PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-8 (8)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
author:("Chen, danhong")
1.  Ultrasensitive Quantum Dot Fluorescence quenching Assay for Selective Detection of Mercury Ions in Drinking Water 
Scientific Reports  2014;4:5624.
Mercury is one of the most acutely toxic substances at trace level to human health and living thing. Developing a rapid, cheap and water soluble metal sensor for detecting mercury ions at ppb level remains a challenge. Herein, a metal sensor consisting of MPA coated Mn doped ZnSe/ZnS colloidal nanoparticles was utilized to ultrasensitively and selectively detect Hg2+ ions with a low detection limit (0.1 nM) over a dynamic range from 0 to 20 nM. According to strong interaction between thiol(s) and mercury ions, mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) was used as a highly unique acceptor for mercury ions in the as-obtained ultrasensitive sensor. In the presence of mercury ions, colloidal nanoparticles rapidly agglomerated due to changes of surface chemical properties, which results in severe quenching of fluorescent intensity. Meanwhile, we find that the original ligands are separated from the surface of colloidal nanoparticles involving strongly chelation between mercury ion and thiol(s) proved by controlled IR analysis. The result shows that the QD-based metal ions sensor possesses satisfactory precision, high sensitivity and selectivity, and could be applied for the quantification analysis of real samples.
doi:10.1038/srep05624
PMCID: PMC4087922  PMID: 25005836
2.  Green preparation of reduced graphene oxide for sensing and energy storage applications 
Scientific Reports  2014;4:4684.
Preparation of graphene from chemical reduction of graphene oxide (GO) is recognized as one of the most promising methods for large-scale and low-cost production of graphene-based materials. This study reports a new, green, and efficient reducing agent (caffeic acid/CA) for GO reduction. The CA-reduced GO (CA-rGO) shows a high C/O ratio (7.15) that is among the best rGOs prepared with green reducing reagents. Electronic gas sensors and supercapacitors have been fabricated with the CA-rGO and show good performance, which demonstrates the potential of CA-rGO for sensing and energy storage applications.
doi:10.1038/srep04684
PMCID: PMC3986759  PMID: 24732631
3.  CNT@TiO2 nanohybrids for high-performance anode of lithium-ion batteries 
Nanoscale Research Letters  2013;8(1):499.
This work describes a potential anode material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), namely, anatase TiO2 nanoparticle-decorated carbon nanotubes (CNTs@TiO2). The electrochemical properties of CNTs@TiO2 were thoroughly investigated using various electrochemical techniques, including cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, galvanostatic cycling, and rate experiments. It was revealed that compared with pure TiO2 nanoparticles and CNTs alone, the CNT@TiO2 nanohybrids offered superior rate capability and achieved better cycling performance when used as anodes of LIBs. The CNT@TiO2 nanohybrids exhibited a cycling stability with high reversible capacity of about 190 mAh g-1 after 120 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g-1 and an excellent rate capability (up to 100 mAh g-1 at a current density of 1,000 mA g-1).
doi:10.1186/1556-276X-8-499
PMCID: PMC3874633  PMID: 24267743
TiO2; Carbon nanotubes; Nanohybrids; Anode; Lithium ion batteries
4.  Direct Growth of Vertically-oriented Graphene for Field-Effect Transistor Biosensor 
Scientific Reports  2013;3:1696.
A sensitive and selective field-effect transistor (FET) biosensor is demonstrated using vertically-oriented graphene (VG) sheets labeled with gold nanoparticle (NP)-antibody conjugates. VG sheets are directly grown on the sensor electrode using a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method and function as the sensing channel. The protein detection is accomplished through measuring changes in the electrical signal from the FET sensor upon the antibody-antigen binding. The novel biosensor with unique graphene morphology shows high sensitivity (down to ~2 ng/ml or 13 pM) and selectivity towards specific proteins. The PECVD growth of VG presents a one-step and reliable approach to prepare graphene-based electronic biosensors.
doi:10.1038/srep01696
PMCID: PMC3631944  PMID: 23603871
5.  Growth of carbon nanowalls at atmospheric pressure for one-step gas sensor fabrication 
Nanoscale Research Letters  2011;6(1):202.
Carbon nanowalls (CNWs), two-dimensional "graphitic" platelets that are typically oriented vertically on a substrate, can exhibit similar properties as graphene. Growth of CNWs reported to date was exclusively carried out at a low pressure. Here, we report on the synthesis of CNWs at atmosphere pressure using "direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition" by taking advantage of the high electric field generated in a pin-plate dc glow discharge. CNWs were grown on silicon, stainless steel, and copper substrates without deliberate introduction of catalysts. The as-grown CNW material was mainly mono- and few-layer graphene having patches of O-containing functional groups. However, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies confirmed that most of the oxygen groups could be removed by thermal annealing. A gas-sensing device based on such CNWs was fabricated on metal electrodes through direct growth. The sensor responded to relatively low concentrations of NO2 (g) and NH3 (g), thus suggesting high-quality CNWs that are useful for room temperature gas sensors.
PACS: Graphene (81.05.ue), Chemical vapor deposition (81.15.Gh), Gas sensors (07.07.Df), Atmospheric pressure (92.60.hv)
doi:10.1186/1556-276X-6-202
PMCID: PMC3211258  PMID: 21711721
6.  Enhancing Solar Cell Efficiencies through 1-D Nanostructures 
Nanoscale Research Letters  2008;4(1):1-10.
The current global energy problem can be attributed to insufficient fossil fuel supplies and excessive greenhouse gas emissions resulting from increasing fossil fuel consumption. The huge demand for clean energy potentially can be met by solar-to-electricity conversions. The large-scale use of solar energy is not occurring due to the high cost and inadequate efficiencies of existing solar cells. Nanostructured materials have offered new opportunities to design more efficient solar cells, particularly one-dimensional (1-D) nanomaterials for enhancing solar cell efficiencies. These 1-D nanostructures, including nanotubes, nanowires, and nanorods, offer significant opportunities to improve efficiencies of solar cells by facilitating photon absorption, electron transport, and electron collection; however, tremendous challenges must be conquered before the large-scale commercialization of such cells. This review specifically focuses on the use of 1-D nanostructures for enhancing solar cell efficiencies. Other nanostructured solar cells or solar cells based on bulk materials are not covered in this review. Major topics addressed include dye-sensitized solar cells, quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells, and p-n junction solar cells.
doi:10.1007/s11671-008-9200-y
PMCID: PMC2893966
Solar cells; Nanowires; Nanotubes; Nanorods; Quantum dots; Hybrid nanostructures
7.  Enhancing Solar Cell Efficiencies through 1-D Nanostructures 
Nanoscale Research Letters  2008;4(1):1-10.
The current global energy problem can be attributed to insufficient fossil fuel supplies and excessive greenhouse gas emissions resulting from increasing fossil fuel consumption. The huge demand for clean energy potentially can be met by solar-to-electricity conversions. The large-scale use of solar energy is not occurring due to the high cost and inadequate efficiencies of existing solar cells. Nanostructured materials have offered new opportunities to design more efficient solar cells, particularly one-dimensional (1-D) nanomaterials for enhancing solar cell efficiencies. These 1-D nanostructures, including nanotubes, nanowires, and nanorods, offer significant opportunities to improve efficiencies of solar cells by facilitating photon absorption, electron transport, and electron collection; however, tremendous challenges must be conquered before the large-scale commercialization of such cells. This review specifically focuses on the use of 1-D nanostructures for enhancing solar cell efficiencies. Other nanostructured solar cells or solar cells based on bulk materials are not covered in this review. Major topics addressed include dye-sensitized solar cells, quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells, and p-n junction solar cells.
doi:10.1007/s11671-008-9200-y
PMCID: PMC2893966
Solar cells; Nanowires; Nanotubes; Nanorods; Quantum dots; Hybrid nanostructures
8.  Velocity vector imaging in assessing myocardial systolic function of hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy 
The Canadian Journal of Cardiology  2007;23(12):957-961.
BACKGROUND:
To date, most studies about strain and strain rate (SR) are based on Doppler tissue imaging (DTI), which is dependent on the angle between ultrasonic scan line and tissue. Velocity vector imaging (VVI) is a new echocardiographic method based on two-dimensional gray scale imaging, which is angle-independent and can provide more information about cardiac function than DTI.
OBJECTIVES:
To assess regional myocardial SR in hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) but normal global ejection fraction (GEF) and fractional shortening (FS) using VVI.
METHODS:
Using VVI, two-dimensional images were performed in 20 hypertensive patients with LVH and 20 normal control subjects. The segmental systolic peak SR (SRs) in the short-axis view and the apical SRs in the long-axis view were analyzed by offline software.
RESULTS:
The segmental SRs in the long-axis and short-axis views were significantly lower in the LVH group than in the corresponding segments of the control group. There was no significant difference between the circumferential SRs of different segments in the short-axis view in the LVH and control groups. The circumferential SRs decreased significantly from the endocardium to the middle layer of the myocardium in the short-axis view in the LVH group and in the control group.
CONCLUSIONS:
Hypertensive patients with LVH may have regional LV systolic function impairment despite having normal GEF and FS. The GEF and FS were not the decisive factors of myocardial systolic function in the present study. There was an obvious systolic gradient from the endocardium to the middle layer of myocardium in circumferential SRs in the short-axis view. VVI can be used to accurately recognize and quantify abnormalities of regional myocardial deformation.
PMCID: PMC2651418  PMID: 17932571
Left ventricular hypertrophy; Systolic peak strain rate; Velocity vector imaging

Results 1-8 (8)