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1.  Ease of Using a Dedicated Percutaneous Closure Device after Inadvertent Cannulation of the Subclavian Artery: Case Report 
Case Reports in Medicine  2009;2009:728629.
Inadvertent puncture of the subclavian artery is a relatively frequent and potentially disastrous complication of attempted central venous access. Due to its noncompressible location, accidental subclavian arterial cannulation may result in hemorrhage as the sheath is removed. We report a new case of successful percutaneous closure of the subclavian artery which had been inadvertently cannulated, using a closure device based on a collagen plug (Angio-Seal, St. Jude Medical). This was performed in a patient who had received maximal antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapies because of prior coronary stenting in the context of cardiogenic shock. There was no prior angiographic assessment, as arterial puncture was presumed to have been distal to the right common artery and vertebral arteries. No complications were observed in this high-risk patient, suggesting that this technique could be used once the procedure has been evaluated prospectively.
doi:10.1155/2009/728629
PMCID: PMC2729251  PMID: 19718242
2.  Effects of active tobacco smoking on the prevalence of asthma-like symptoms in adolescents 
The prevalence of asthma in adolescents markedly varies between different localities as found by the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) and this may be due to environmental factors. Although tobacco smoke exposure is related to an increase in the prevalence of asthma, there is lack of information on that respect in children from developing countries, where active tobacco smoking usually starts early in adolescence. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of tobacco smoking on the prevalence of asthma symptoms in a random sample of 4738 adolescents aged 13.4 ± 1.05 years who responded the ISAAC video questionnaires plus questions on tobacco smoking. The prevalence of tobacco smoking in the last 12 months was 16.2%, with significant female predominance. The persistent smokers had a significantly higher prevalence of asthma-like symptoms ever and in the last 12 months (wheezing, wheezing with exercise, nocturnal wheezing, severe wheezing, and dry nocturnal cough) than ex-smokers and nonsmokers. More than 27% of asthma symptoms in our adolescents are attributable to active tobacco consumption (population attributable risk). This study strongly suggests that potent and more effective campaigns against tobacco smoking should be implemented in developing countries, where active tobacco smoking is dramatically increasing in children.
PMCID: PMC2692110  PMID: 18044067
asthma; prevalence; ISAAC; tobacco; video questionnaires

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