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1.  Modulation of HCV Replication After Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in HCV/HIV Coinfected Patients 
Science translational medicine  2014;6(246):246ra98.
The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important contributor to morbidity and mortality in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Coinfection results in increased HCV replication and more rapid rates of liver disease progression. The effect of HIV combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on HCV replication has not been studied in depth. To address this issue, we enrolled a small cohort of HCV/HIV coinfected patients into a cART initiation trial, and used dynamic modeling combined with evaluation of immune responses and microarray profiles to determine how effective treatment of HIV affects HCV. Treatment with cART resulted in HCV flare and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) increase (2× or more increase from baseline) in a subset of treated patients. Subjects with evidence of hepatic injury (increased ALT) were more likely to have HCV-specific immune responses directed against HCV epitopes. Over time, HCV viral loads declined. Reproducible and biologically important gene expression changes occurred in patients who underwent successful cART, particularly with respect to downregulation of genes with known antiviral roles. Our findings suggest that the effective suppression of HIV by cART initiates a cascade of early and late events in treated patients with HCV. Early events involving downregulation of interferon-stimulated genes may lead to transiently increased viral replication and hepatic injury. At later time points, HCV viral load declines to levels comparable to those seen in the setting of HCV monoinfection. These findings support early antiretroviral therapy in those with HCV/HIV coinfection.
doi:10.1126/scitranslmed.3008195
PMCID: PMC4326686  PMID: 25101888
2.  Phenotype of asthmatics with increased airway S-nitrosoglutathione reductase activity 
Study question
S-Nitrosoglutathione is an endogenous airway smooth muscle relaxant. Increased airway S-Nitrosoglutathione breakdown occurs in some asthma patients. We asked whether patients with increased airway catabolism of this molecule had clinical features that distinguished them from other asthma patients.
Methods
We measured S-Nitrosoglutathione reductase expression and activity in bronchoscopy samples from 66 subjects in the Severe Asthma Research Program. We also analysed phenotype and genotype data from in the program as a whole.
Results
Airway S-nitrosoglutathione reductase activity was increased in asthma patients (p = 0.032). However, only a subpopulation was affected, and this subpopulation was not defined by a “severe asthma” diagnosis. Subjects with increased activity were younger, had higher Immunoglobulin E and an earlier onset of symptoms. Consistent with a link between S-Nitrosoglutathione biochemistry and atopy, 1) interleukin 13 increased S-Nitrosoglutathione reductase expression, and 2) subjects with an S-Nitrosoglutathione reductase single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) previously associated asthma had higher Immunoglobulin E than those without this SNP. Expression was higher in airway epithelium than in smooth muscle, and was increased in regions of the asthmatic lung with decreased airflow.
Answer to the question
An early-onset, allergic phenotype characterizes the asthma population with increased S-Nitrosoglutathione reductase activity.
doi:10.1183/09031936.00042414
PMCID: PMC4283933  PMID: 25359343
3.  Risk Factors for Montelukast Treatment Failure in Step-Down Therapy for Controlled Asthma 
Background
Leukotriene receptor antagonists including montelukast are an option for step-down therapy for mild asthmatics controlled on low-dose inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). Because some patients fail montelukast step-down therapy, it would be helpful for clinicians to be able to predict the risk of treatment failure.
Objectives
To determine patient characteristics associated with montelukast treatment failure and develop a clinical index to predict the risk of montelukast treatment failure.
Methods
Using the 165 participants in the Leukotriene or Corticosteroid or Corticosteroid-Salmeterol Study (LOCCS) trial who were stepped down from low-dose ICS to montelukast, we determined associations between enrollment variables and treatment failure. We constructed a montelukast failure index to predict the risk of montelukast treatment failure during step-down. To assess its specificity for montelukast, index performance was evaluated in the other LOCCS treatment groups.
Results
Characteristics independently associated with montelukast treatment failure included age of asthma onset <10 years old (OR = 2.39; 95% CI = 1.17–5.02; p = .018), need for steroid burst in the last year (OR = 2.39; 95% CI = 1.13–5.09; p = .022), and pre-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) (OR = 1.44 per 10% lower % predicted; 95% CI = 1.07–1.97; p = .016). A montelukast failure index was generated from these three variables (range: −5 to 7 points). Scores <0 predicted low risk (<0.20) of treatment failure, whereas scores >5 predicted high risk (>0.60) of treatment failure.
Conclusion
Early asthma onset, worse asthma control in the last year, and lower pre-bronchodilator FEV1 are associated with montelukast treatment failure. A montelukast failure index is proposed to quantify the risk of failure prior to treatment initiation.
doi:10.3109/02770903.2011.627488
PMCID: PMC4277696  PMID: 22029858
asthma; leukotrienes; therapy
4.  Asthma Outcomes: Composite Scores of Asthma Control 
Background
Current asthma guidelines recommend assessing the level of a patient’s asthma control. Consequently, there is increasing use of asthma control as an outcome measure in clinical research studies. Several composite assessment instruments have been developed to measure asthma control.
Objective
National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and federal agencies convened an expert group to propose the most appropriate standardized composite score of asthma control instruments to be used in future asthma studies.
Methods
We conducted a comprehensive search of PubMed, using both the National Library of Medicine’s Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) and key terms to identify studies that attempted to develop and/or test composite score instruments for asthma control. We classified instruments as core (required in future studies), supplemental (used according to study aims and standardized), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an NIH-organized workshop convened in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011.
Results
We identified 17 composite score instruments with published validation information; all had comparable content. Eight instruments demonstrated responsiveness over time; 3 demonstrated responsiveness to treatment. A minimal clinically important difference has been established for 3 instruments. The instruments have demographic limitations; some are proprietary, and their use could be limited by cost.
Conclusion
Two asthma composite score instruments are sufficiently validated for use in adult populations, but additional research is necessary to validate their use in nonwhite populations. Gaps also exist in validating instruments for pediatric populations.
doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2011.12.980
PMCID: PMC4269334  PMID: 22386507
Asthma Control Questionnaire; Asthma Control Test; Asthma Therapy Assessment Questionnaire; childhood Asthma Control Test
5.  Bronchial Thermoplasty – Long Term Safety and Effectiveness in Severe Persistent Asthma 
Background
Bronchial thermoplasty (BT) has previously been shown to improve asthma control out to 2 years in patients with severe persistent asthma.
Objective
To assess effectiveness and safety of BT in asthma patients 5 years post therapy.
Methods
BT-treated subjects from the Asthma Intervention Research 2 (AIR2) Trial (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01350414) were evaluated annually for 5 years to assess long-term safety of BT and durability of treatment effect. Outcomes assessed post-BT included severe exacerbations, adverse events, healthcare utilization, spirometry data, and high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scans.
Results
162/190 BT-treated subjects (85.3%) from the AIR2 Trial completed 5 years of follow-up. The proportion of subjects experiencing severe exacerbations and Emergency Room visits, and the rates of events in each of years 1 to 5 remained low and were less than those observed in the 12 months prior to BT treatment (average 5 year reduction in proportions: 44% for exacerbations and 78% for ER visits). Respiratory adverse events and respiratory-related hospitalizations remained unchanged in Years 2 through 5 as compared to the first year after BT. Pre-BD FEV1 values remained stable between years 1 and 5 after BT, despite a 17% reduction in average daily inhaled corticosteroid dose. HRCT scans from baseline to 5 years after BT showed no structural abnormalities that could be attributed to BT.
Conclusions
These data demonstrate the 5-year durability of the benefits of BT with regard to both asthma control (based on maintained reduction in severe exacerbations and ER visits for respiratory symptoms) and safety. BT has become an important addition to our treatment armamentarium and should be considered for patients with severe persistent asthma who remain symptomatic despite taking ICS (inhaled corticosteroids) and LABA (long-acting-β2-agonists).
doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2013.08.009
PMCID: PMC4114404  PMID: 23998657
Bronchial thermoplasty; asthma; Bronchoscopic procedure; Alair System; asthma exacerbation
6.  A Multi-Sensor RSS Spatial Sensing-Based Robust Stochastic Optimization Algorithm for Enhanced Wireless Tethering 
Sensors (Basel, Switzerland)  2014;14(12):23970-24003.
The reliability of wireless communication in a network of mobile wireless robot nodes depends on the received radio signal strength (RSS). When the robot nodes are deployed in hostile environments with ionizing radiations (such as in some scientific facilities), there is a possibility that some electronic components may fail randomly (due to radiation effects), which causes problems in wireless connectivity. The objective of this paper is to maximize robot mission capabilities by maximizing the wireless network capacity and to reduce the risk of communication failure. Thus, in this paper, we consider a multi-node wireless tethering structure called the “server-relay-client” framework that uses (multiple) relay nodes in between a server and a client node. We propose a robust stochastic optimization (RSO) algorithm using a multi-sensor-based RSS sampling method at the relay nodes to efficiently improve and balance the RSS between the source and client nodes to improve the network capacity and to provide redundant networking abilities. We use pre-processing techniques, such as exponential moving averaging and spatial averaging filters on the RSS data for smoothing. We apply a receiver spatial diversity concept and employ a position controller on the relay node using a stochastic gradient ascent method for self-positioning the relay node to achieve the RSS balancing task. The effectiveness of the proposed solution is validated by extensive simulations and field experiments in CERN facilities. For the field trials, we used a youBot mobile robot platform as the relay node, and two stand-alone Raspberry Pi computers as the client and server nodes. The algorithm has been proven to be robust to noise in the radio signals and to work effectively even under non-line-of-sight conditions.
doi:10.3390/s141223970
PMCID: PMC4299096  PMID: 25615734
wireless tethering; relay; wireless nodes; mobile robots; multi-sensor sampling; RSS; receiver spatial sampling
7.  Effect of Vitamin D3 on Asthma Treatment Failures in Adults With Symptomatic Asthma and Lower Vitamin D Levels 
JAMA  2014;311(20):2083-2091.
IMPORTANCE
In asthma and other diseases, vitamin D insufficiency is associated with adverse outcomes. It is not known if supplementing inhaled corticosteroids with oral vitamin D3 improves outcomes in patients with asthma and vitamin D insufficiency.
OBJECTIVE
To evaluate if vitamin D supplementation would improve the clinical efficacy of inhaled corticosteroids in patients with symptomatic asthma and lower vitamin D levels.
DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS
The VIDA (Vitamin D Add-on Therapy Enhances Corticosteroid Responsiveness in Asthma) randomized, double-blind, parallel, placebo-controlled trial studying adult patients with symptomatic asthma and a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of less than 30 ng/mL was conducted across 9 academic US medical centers in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute’s AsthmaNet network, with enrollment starting in April 2011 and follow-up complete by January 2014. After a run-in period that included treatment with an inhaled corticosteroid, 408 patients were randomized.
INTERVENTIONS
Oral vitamin D3 (100 000 IU once, then 4000 IU/d for 28 weeks; n = 201) or placebo (n = 207) was added to inhaled ciclesonide (320 µg/d). If asthma control was achieved after 12 weeks, ciclesonide was tapered to 160 µg/d for 8 weeks, then to 80 µg/d for 8 weeks if asthma control was maintained.
MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES
The primary outcome was time to first asthma treatment failure (a composite outcome of decline in lung function and increases in use of β-agonists, systemic corticosteroids, and health care).
RESULTS
Treatment with vitamin D3 did not alter the rate of first treatment failure during 28 weeks (28%[95% CI, 21%-34%] with vitamin D3 vs 29% [95% CI, 23%–35%] with placebo; adjusted hazard ratio, 0.9 [95% CI, 0.6–1.3]). Of 14 prespecified secondary outcomes, 9 were analyzed, including asthma exacerbation; of those 9, the only statistically significant outcome was a small difference in the overall dose of ciclesonide required to maintain asthma control (111.3 µg/d [95% CI, 102.2–120.4 µg/d] in the vitamin D3 group vs 126.2 µg/d [95% CI, 117.2–135.3 µg/d] in the placebo group; difference of 14.9 µg/d [95% CI, 2.1–27.7 µg/d]).
CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE
Vitamin D3 did not reduce the rate of first treatment failure or exacerbation in adults with persistent asthma and vitamin D insufficiency. These findings do not support a strategy of therapeutic vitamin D3 supplementation in patients with symptomatic asthma.
TRIAL REGISTRATION
clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01248065
doi:10.1001/jama.2014.5052
PMCID: PMC4217655  PMID: 24838406
8.  Predictors of Response to Tiotropium Versus Salmeterol in Adults with Asthma1 
The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology  2013;132(5):10.1016/j.jaci.2013.08.003.
Background
Tiotropium has activity as an asthma controller. However, predictors of a positive response to tiotropium have not been described.
Objective
To describe individual and differential response of patients with asthma to salmeterol and tiotropium, when added to an ICS, as well as predictors of a positive clinical response.
Methods
Data from the double-blind, three-way crossover NHLBI Asthma Clinical Research Network’s TALC trial (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00565266) were analyzed for individual and differential treatment responses to salmeterol and tiotropium, and predictors of a positive response to the endpoints FEV1, morning peak expiratory flow (AM PEF), and asthma control days (ACDs).
Results
While approximately equal numbers of patients showed a differential response to salmeterol and tiotropium in terms of AM PEF (90 and 78, respectively), and ACDs (49 and 53, respectively), more showed a differential response to tiotropium for FEV1 (104) than salmeterol (62). An acute response to a short-acting bronchodilator, especially albuterol, predicted a positive clinical response to tiotropium for FEV1 (OR 4.08 [CI 2.00–8.31], P < 0.001) and AM PEF (OR 2.12 [CI 1.12–4.01], P = 0.021), as did a decreased FEV1/FVC ratio (FEV1 response increased 0.39% of baseline for every 1% decrease in the FEV1/FVC ratio). Higher cholinergic tone was also a predictor, while ethnicity, gender, atopy, IgE Level, sputum eosinophils, FENO, asthma duration, and BMI were not.
Conclusion
While these results need confirmation, predictors of a positive clinical response to tiotropium include a positive response to albuterol and airway obstruction, factors which could help identify appropriate patients for this therapy.
doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2013.08.003
PMCID: PMC3826080  PMID: 24084072
asthma; tiotropium; salmeterol; responder analysis; predictor of response
9.  Randomized Clinical Trial of Lansoprazole for Poorly Controlled Asthma in Children 
Context
Asymptomatic gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is prevalent in children with asthma. It is not known whether treatment of GER with a proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) improves asthma control.
Objective
To determine whether lansoprazole is effective in reducing asthma symptoms in children without overt GER.
Design, Setting, and Patients
A multicenter, randomized, masked, placebo controlled, parallel clinical trial comparing lansoprazole to placebo in children with poor asthma control on inhaled corticosteroid treatment conducted at 18 academic clinical centers. Participants were followed for 24 weeks. A subgroup had an esophageal pH study before randomization.
Intervention
Children received either lansoprazole (15 mg daily < 30 kg; 30 mg ≥ 30 kg) or placebo, 1:1 allocation ratio.
Main outcome
The primary outcome was the change in Asthma Control score (ACQ, range from 0 to 6). Secondary outcomes included lung function measures, asthma-related quality of life and acute episodes of poor asthma control.
Results
306 children were enrolled from April 2011 to August 2010, the median age was 11. The mean change (95% confidence interval (CI)) in the ACQ score was −0.1 (−0.2, 0.1) and −0.2 (−0.4, −0.1) units for the lansoprazole and placebo groups, respectively (P=0.12). There were no detectable treatment differences in secondary outcomes (mean (95% CI) for FEV1(0.00 (−0.08, 0.08)), asthma quality of life (−0.1 (−0.4, 0.1) or episodes of poor asthma control, hazard ratio of 1.18 (95% CI 0.91, 1.53). Among the 115 children with esophageal pH studies, the prevalence of GER was 43%. In the subgroup with a positive pH study, no treatment effect for lansoprazole versus placebo was observed for any asthma outcome. Children treated with lansoprazole reported more upper respiratory infections (63% vs 49%, P=0.02), sore throats (52% vs 39%, P=0.02), and bronchitis (7% vs 2%, P=0.05).
Conclusion
Among children with poorly controlled asthma without symptoms of GER who were using inhaled corticosteroids, the addition of lansoprazole, as compared to placebo, did not improve symptoms nor lung function but was associated with increased adverse events.
doi:10.1001/jama.2011.2035
PMCID: PMC4153372  PMID: 22274684
10.  Bronchial Thermoplasty: A Novel Therapy for Severe Asthma 
Clinics in chest medicine  2013;34(3):437-444.
Synopsis
This article presents an overview of bronchial thermoplasty, a novel treatment for severe asthma. Within, the authors discuss the rationale for bronchial thermoplasty in severe asthma, current clinical evidence for the use of this procedure, clinical recommendations, and future directions.
doi:10.1016/j.ccm.2013.03.003
PMCID: PMC3928678  PMID: 23993815
Bronchial thermoplasty; severe asthma; airway remodeling; airway smooth muscle
11.  Genome-wide association study identifies TH1 pathway genes associated with lung function in asthmatic patients 
Background
Recent meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies in general populations of European descent have identified 28 loci for lung function.
Objective
We sought to identify novel lung function loci specifically for asthma and to confirm lung function loci identified in general populations.
Methods
Genome-wide association studies of lung function (percent predicted FEV1 [ppFEV1], percent predicted forced vital capacity, and FEV1/forced vital capacity ratio) were performed in 4 white populations of European descent (n = 1544), followed by meta-analyses.
Results
Seven of 28 previously identified lung function loci (HHIP, FAM13A, THSD4, GSTCD, NOTCH4-AGER, RARB, and ZNF323) identified in general populations were confirmed at single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) levels (P < .05). Four of 32 loci (IL12A, IL12RB1, STAT4, and IRF2) associated with ppFEV1 (P < 10−4) belong to the TH1 or IL-12 cytokine family pathway. By using a linear additive model, these 4 TH1 pathway SNPs cumulatively explained 2.9% to 7.8% of the variance in ppFEV1 values in 4 populations (P = 3 × 10−11). Genetic scores of these 4 SNPs were associated with ppFEV1 values (P = 2 × 10−7) and the American Thoracic Society severe asthma classification (P = .005) in the Severe Asthma Research Program population. TH2 pathway genes (IL13, TSLP, IL33, and IL1RL1) conferring asthma susceptibility were not associated with lung function.
Conclusion
Genes involved in airway structure/remodeling are associated with lung function in both general populations and asthmatic subjects. TH1 pathway genes involved in anti-virus/bacterial infection and inflammation modify lung function in asthmatic subjects. Genes associated with lung function that might affect asthma severity are distinct from those genes associated with asthma susceptibility.
doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2013.01.051
PMCID: PMC3746327  PMID: 23541324
Lung function; FEV1; asthma; TH1; IL12A; IL12RB1; STAT4; IRF2
12.  Coexisting chronic conditions associated with mortality and morbidity in adult patients with asthma 
Objective
Many asthma patients suffer from chronic conditions other than asthma. We investigated the specific contribution of common comorbidities on mortality and morbidity in adult asthma.
Methods
In an observational study of adults with incident asthma identified between 1999 and 2003 using National Veterans Affairs and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services encounter databases (n=25,975, follow-up 3.0±1.7 years), association between 13 most prevalent comorbidities (hypertension, ischemic heart disease (IHD), osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, mental disorders, substance/drug abuse, enlarged prostate, depression, cancer, alcoholism, HIV, and heart failure) and 4 conditions previously associated with asthma (sleep apnea, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), rhinitis, and sinusitis) and mortality, hospitalizations and asthma exacerbations were assessed using multivariate regression analyses adjusted for other clinically important covariates.
Results
HIV followed by alcoholism and mental disorders among 18–45 years old, and heart failure, diabetes, IHD, and cancer among those ≥65 years old were associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality. Many conditions were associated with increased risk for all-cause hospitalizations, but the increased risk was consistent across all ages for mental disorders. For asthma exacerbations, mental disorder followed by substance abuse and IHD were associated with increased risk among those 18–45 years old, and chronic sinusitis, mental disorder, and IHD among those ≥65 years old. GERD was associated with decreased risk for asthma exacerbation in all ages.
Conclusions
Many comorbidities are associated with poor outcome in adult asthmatics and their effect differs by age. Mental disorders are associated with increased risk of mortality and morbidity across ages.
doi:10.3109/02770903.2013.879881
PMCID: PMC4067514  PMID: 24432868
observational study; Veterans; outcome research; comorbidities; mental disorders
13.  An Association between l-Arginine/Asymmetric Dimethyl Arginine Balance, Obesity, and the Age of Asthma Onset Phenotype 
Rationale: Increasing body mass index (BMI) has been associated with less fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO). This may be explained by an increase in the concentration of asymmetric dimethyl arginine (ADMA) relative to l-arginine, which can lead to greater nitric oxide synthase uncoupling.
Objectives: To compare this mechanism across age of asthma onset groups and determine its association with asthma morbidity and lung function.
Methods: Cross-sectional study of participants from the Severe Asthma Research Program, across early- (<12 yr) and late- (>12 yr) onset asthma phenotypes.
Measurements and Main Results: Subjects with late-onset asthma had a higher median plasma ADMA level (0.48 μM, [interquartile range (IQR), 0.35–0.7] compared with early onset, 0.37 μM [IQR, 0.29–0.59], P = 0.01) and lower median plasma l-arginine (late onset, 52.3 [IQR, 43–61] compared with early onset, 51 μM [IQR 39–66]; P = 0.02). The log of plasma l-arginine/ADMA was inversely correlated with BMI in the late- (r = −0.4, P = 0.0006) in contrast to the early-onset phenotype (r = −0.2, P = 0.07). Although FeNO was inversely associated with BMI in the late-onset phenotype (P = 0.02), the relationship was lost after adjusting for l-arginine/ADMA. Also in this phenotype, a reduced l-arginine/ADMA was associated with less IgE, increased respiratory symptoms, lower lung volumes, and worse asthma quality of life.
Conclusions: In late-onset asthma phenotype, plasma ratios of l-arginine to ADMA may explain the inverse relationship of BMI to FeNO. In addition, these lower l-arginine/ADMA ratios are associated with reduced lung function and increased respiratory symptom frequency, suggesting a role in the pathobiology of the late-onset phenotype.
doi:10.1164/rccm.201207-1270OC
PMCID: PMC3570651  PMID: 23204252
asthma; obesity; age of asthma onset; ADMA; arginine
14.  P2X7-Regulated Protection from Exacerbations and Loss of Control Is Independent of Asthma Maintenance Therapy 
Rationale: The function of the P2X7 nucleotide receptor protects against exacerbation in people with mild-intermittent asthma during viral illnesses, but the impact of disease severity and maintenance therapy has not been studied.
Objectives: To evaluate the association between P2X7, asthma exacerbations, and incomplete symptom control in a more diverse population.
Methods: A matched P2RX7 genetic case-control was performed with samples from Asthma Clinical Research Network trial participants enrolled before July 2006, and P2X7 pore activity was determined in whole blood samples as an ancillary study to two trials completed subsequently.
Measurements and Main Results: A total of 187 exacerbations were studied in 742 subjects, and the change in asthma symptom burden was studied in an additional 110 subjects during a trial of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) dose optimization. African American carriers of the minor G allele of the rs2230911 loss-of-function single nucleotide polymorphism were more likely to have a history of prednisone use in the previous 12 months, with adjustment for ICS and long-acting β2-agonists use (odds ratio, 2.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.2–6.2; P = 0.018). Despite medium-dose ICS, attenuated pore function predicted earlier exacerbations in incompletely controlled patients with moderate asthma (hazard ratio, 3.2; confidence interval, 1.1–9.3; P = 0.033). After establishing control with low-dose ICS in patients with mild asthma, those with attenuated pore function had more asthma symptoms, rescue albuterol use, and FEV1 reversal (P < 0.001, 0.03, and 0.03, respectively) during the ICS adjustment phase.
Conclusions: P2X7 pore function protects against exacerbations of asthma and loss of control, independent of baseline severity and the maintenance therapy.
doi:10.1164/rccm.201204-0750OC
PMCID: PMC3570642  PMID: 23144325
asthma; P2X7; exacerbation; Asthma Clinical Research Network; corticosteroids
15.  Receptor Pre-Clustering and T cell Responses: Insights into Molecular Mechanisms 
T cell activation, initiated by T cell receptor (TCR) mediated recognition of pathogen-derived peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex class I or II molecules (pMHC), shows exquisite specificity and sensitivity, even though the TCR–pMHC binding interaction is of low affinity. Recent experimental work suggests that TCR pre-clustering may be a mechanism via which T cells can achieve such high sensitivity. The unresolved stoichiometry of the TCR makes TCR–pMHC binding and TCR triggering, an open question. We formulate a mathematical model to characterize the pre-clustering of T cell receptors (TCRs) on the surface of T cells, motivated by the experimentally observed distribution of TCR clusters on the surface of naive and memory T cells. We extend a recently introduced stochastic criterion to compute the timescales of T cell responses, assuming that ligand-induced cross-linked TCR is the minimum signaling unit. We derive an approximate formula for the mean time to signal initiation. Our results show that pre-clustering reduces the mean activation time. However, additional mechanisms favoring the existence of clusters are required to explain the difference between naive and memory T cell responses. We discuss the biological implications of our results, and both the compatibility and complementarity of our approach with other existing mathematical models.
doi:10.3389/fimmu.2014.00132
PMCID: PMC4012210  PMID: 24817867
T cell receptor; clustering; stochastic dynamics; signaling; naive T cells; memory T cells
16.  Genome-wide association studies of asthma indicate opposite immunopathogenesis direction from autoimmune diseases 
Background
Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of asthma have consistently implicated the ORM1-like 3 and gasdermin B (ORMDL3-GSDMB), IL33, IL-1 receptor–like 1 and IL-18 receptor 1 (IL1RL1-IL18R1), RAD50-IL13, thymic stromal lymphopoietin and WD repeat domain 36 region (TSLP-WDR36), and HLA-DR/DQ regions.
Objective
A GWAS of asthma was performed in a non-Hispanic white population.
Methods
A GWAS was performed in 813 Severe Asthma Research Program/Collaborative Studies on the Genetics of Asthma/Chicago Asthma Genetics Study cases and 1564 control subjects. The GWAS results were compared with those of the published GWASs of autoimmune diseases.
Result
Multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms in the TNFAIP3 interacting protein 1 (TNIP1) gene, which interacts with TNFAIP3 and inhibits the TNF-α–induced nuclear factor κB inflammation pathway, were associated with asthma: rs1422673 (P = 3.44 × 10−7) and rs10036748 (P = 1.41 × 10−6, r2 = 0.67). rs1422673 was also associated with asthma in the published GABRIEL (P = .018) and EVE (P = 1.31 × 10−5) studies. The minor allele T of rs20541 in IL13 is the risk allele for asthma but the protective allele for psoriasis. The minor allele T of rs2395185 in HLA-DRA is the risk allele for asthma but the protective allele for ulcerative colitis. The minor allele A of rs2872507 in GSDMB is the protective allele for asthma but the risk allele for rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn disease, and ulcerative colitis. The T allele of rs10036748 in the TNIP1 gene is the minor protective allele for asthma but the minor or major risk allele for systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis in non-Hispanic white or Chinese subjects, respectively.
Conclusions
Our study suggests that single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with both asthma and autoimmune diseases might have opposite effects on immunopathogenesis. (J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012;130:861-8.)
doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2012.04.041
PMCID: PMC3579216  PMID: 22694930
Asthma; genetics; genome-wide association study; TNFAIP3 interacting protein 1
17.  A detailed phenotypic analysis of immune cell populations in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of atopic asthmatics after segmental allergen challenge 
Background
Atopic asthma is characterized by intermittent exacerbations triggered by exposure to allergen. Exacerbations are characterized by an acute inflammatory reaction in the airways, with recruitment of both innate and adaptive immune cells. These cell populations as well as soluble factors are critical for initiating and controlling the inflammatory processes in allergic asthma. Detailed data on the numbers and types of cells recruited following allergen challenge is lacking. In this paper we present an extensive phenotypic analysis of the inflammatory cell infiltrate present in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid following bronchoscopically directed allergen challenge in mild atopic asthmatics.
Methods
A re-analysis of pooled data obtained prior to intervention in our randomized, placebo controlled, double blinded study (costimulation inhibition in asthma trial [CIA]) was performed. Twenty-four subjects underwent bronchoscopically directed segmental allergen challenge followed by BAL collection 48 hours later. The BAL fluid was analyzed by multi-color flow cytometry for immune cell populations and multi-plex ELISA for cytokine detection.
Results
Allergen instillation induced pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6) and immune modulating cytokines (IL-2, IFN-γ, and IL-10) along with an increase in lymphocytes and suppressor cells (Tregs and MDSC). Interestingly, membrane expression of CD30 was identified on lymphocytes, especially Tregs, but not eosinophils. Soluble CD30 was also detected in the BAL fluid after allergen challenge in adult atopic asthmatics.
Conclusions
After segmental allergen challenge of adult atopic asthmatics, cell types associated with a pro-inflammatory as well as an anti-inflammatory response are detected within the BAL fluid of the lung.
doi:10.1186/1710-1492-9-37
PMCID: PMC3848528  PMID: 24330650
T lymphocyte; CD30 expression; Segmental allergen challenge; Asthma
18.  Comparison of Physician-, Biomarker-, and Symptom-Based Strategies for Adjustment of Inhaled Corticosteroid Therapy in Adults With Asthma 
Context
No consensus exists for adjusting inhaled corticosteroid therapy in patients with asthma. Approaches include adjustment at outpatient visits guided by physician assessment of asthma control (symptoms, rescue therapy, pulmonary function), based on exhaled nitric oxide, or on a day-to-day basis guided by symptoms.
Objective
To determine if adjustment of inhaled corticosteroid therapy based on exhaled nitric oxide or day-to-day symptoms is superior to guideline-informed, physician assessment–based adjustment in preventing treatment failure in adults with mild to moderate asthma.
Design, Setting, and Participants
A randomized, parallel, 3-group, placebo-controlled, multiply-blinded trial of 342 adults with mild to moderate asthma controlled by low-dose inhaled corticosteroid therapy (n=114 assigned to physician assessment–based adjustment [101 completed], n=115 to biomarker-based [exhaled nitric oxide] adjustment [92 completed], and n=113 to symptom-based adjustment [97 completed]), the Best Adjustment Strategy for Asthma in the Long Term (BASALT) trial was conducted by the Asthma Clinical Research Network at 10 academic medical centers in the United States for 9 months between June 2007 and July 2010.
Interventions
For physician assessment–based adjustment and biomarker-based (exhaled nitric oxide) adjustment, the dose of inhaled corticosteroids was adjusted every 6 weeks; for symptom-based adjustment, inhaled corticosteroids were taken with each albuterol rescue use.
Main Outcome Measure
The primary outcome was time to treatment failure.
Results
There were no significant differences in time to treatment failure. The 9-month Kaplan-Meier failure rates were 22% (97.5% CI, 14%-33%; 24 events) for physician assessment–based adjustment, 20% (97.5% CI, 13%-30%; 21 events) for biomarker-based adjustment, and 15% (97.5% CI, 9%-25%; 16 events) for symptom-based adjustment. The hazard ratio for physician assessment–based adjustment vs biomarker-based adjustment was 1.2 (97.5% CI, 0.6-2.3). The hazard ratio for physician assessment–based adjustment vs symptom-based adjustment was 1.6 (97.5% CI, 0.8-3.3).
Conclusion
Among adults with mild to moderate persistent asthma controlled with low-dose inhaled corticosteroid therapy, the use of either biomarker-based or symptom-based adjustment of inhaled corticosteroids was not superior to physician assessment–based adjustment of inhaled corticosteroids in time to treatment failure.
Trial Registration
clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00495157
doi:10.1001/2012.jama.10893
PMCID: PMC3697088  PMID: 22968888
19.  Genome-wide Ancestry Association Testing Identifies a Common European Variant on 6q14.1 as a Risk Factor for Asthma in African Americans 
Background
Genetic variants that contribute to asthma susceptibility may be present at varying frequencies in different populations, which is an important consideration and advantage for performing genetic association studies in admixed populations.
Objective
To identify asthma-associated loci in African Americans.
Methods
We compared local African and European ancestry estimated from dense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotype data in African American adults with asthma and non-asthmatic controls. Allelic tests of association were performed within the candidate regions identified, correcting for local European admixture.
Results
We identified a significant ancestry association peak on chromosomes 6q. Allelic tests for association within this region identified a SNP (rs1361549) on 6q14.1 that was associated with asthma exclusively in African Americans with local European admixture (OR=2.2). The risk allele is common in Europe (42% in the HapMap CEU) but absent in West Africa (0% in the HapMap YRI), suggesting the allele is present in African Americans due to recent European admixture. We replicated our findings in Puerto Ricans and similarly found that the signal of association is largely specific to individuals who are heterozygous for African and non-African ancestry at 6q14.1. However, we found no evidence for association in European Americans or in Puerto Ricans in the absence of local African ancestry, suggesting that the association with asthma at rs1361549 is due to an environmental or genetic interaction.
Conclusion
We identified a novel asthma-associated locus that is relevant to admixed populations with African ancestry, and highlight the importance of considering local ancestry in genetic association studies of admixed populations.
doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2012.03.045
PMCID: PMC3503456  PMID: 22607992
asthma; population structure; genome-wide association study; admixture mapping; ancestry association testing; admixed populations; African Americans; Puerto Ricans
20.  Elevated urinary leukotriene E4 levels are associated with hospitalization for pain in children with sickle cell disease 
American journal of hematology  2008;83(8):640-643.
Cysteinyl leukotrienes (CsyLTs) are inflammatory mediators produced by white blood cells. Leukotriene LTE4 is the stable metabolite of CsyLTs, which can be measured in urine. We tested two hypotheses among children with sickle cell disease (SCD): (1) baseline urinary LTE4 levels are elevated in children with SCD when compared with controls; and (2) baseline LTE4 levels are associated with an increased incidence rate of hospitalization for SCD-related pain. Baseline LTE4 levels were measured in children with SCD (cases) and children without SCD matched for age and ethnicity (controls). Medical records of cases were reviewed to assess the frequency of hospitalization for pain within 3 years of study entry. LTE4 levels were obtained in 71 cases and 22 controls. LTE4 levels were higher in cases compared with controls (median LTE4: 100 vs. 57 pg/mg creatinine, P < 0.001). After adjustment for age and asthma diagnosis, a greater incidence rate of hospitalization for pain was observed among children with SCD in the highest LTE4 tertile when compared with the lowest (114 vs. 52 episodes per 100 patient-years, P = 0.038). LTE4 levels are elevated in children with SCD when compared with controls. LTE4 levels are associated with an increased rate of hospitalizations for pain.
doi:10.1002/ajh.21199
PMCID: PMC3729258  PMID: 18506703
21.  The Impact of Self-Identified Race on Epidemiologic Studies of Gene Expression 
Genetic epidemiology  2011;35(2):93-101.
Although population differences in gene expression have been established, the impact on differential gene expression studies in large populations is not well understood. We describe the effect of self-reported race on a gene expression study of lung function in asthma. We generated gene expression profiles for 254 young adults (205 non-Hispanic whites and 49 African Americans) with asthma on whom concurrent total RNA derived from peripheral blood CD4+ lymphocytes and lung function measurements were obtained. We identified four principal components that explained 62% of the variance in gene expression. The dominant principal component, which explained 29% of the total variance in gene expression, was strongly associated with self-identified race (P<10−16). The impact of these racial differences was observed when we performed differential gene expression analysis of lung function. Using multivariate linear models, we tested whether gene expression was associated with a quantitative measure of lung function: pre-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). Though unadjusted linear models of FEV1 identified several genes strongly correlated with lung function, these correlations were due to racial differences in the distribution of both FEV1 and gene expression, and were no longer statistically significant following adjustment for self-identified race. These results suggest that self-identified race is a critical confounding covariate in epidemiologic studies of gene expression and that, similar to genetic studies, careful consideration of self-identified race in gene expression profiling studies is needed to avoid spurious association.
doi:10.1002/gepi.20560
PMCID: PMC3718033  PMID: 21254216
ancestry; gene expression; population stratification; self-identified race
22.  Determinants of asthma after severe respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis 
Background
The development of asthma after respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis has been demonstrated in case-control studies, although the determinants of post-RSV asthma remain undefined.
Objectives
We sought to evaluate the potential determinants of physician-diagnosed asthma after severe RSV bronchiolitis during infancy.
Methods
We enrolled 206 children during an initial episode of severe RSV bronchiolitis at 12 months of age or less in a prospective cohort study and followed these children for up to 6 years. In a subset of 81 children, we analyzed CCL5 (RANTES) mRNA expression in upper airway epithelial cells.
Results
Forty-eight percent of children had physician-diagnosed asthma before the seventh birthday. Independent determinants significantly associated with increased risk for physician-diagnosed asthma by the seventh birthday included maternal asthma (odds ratio [OR], 5.2; 95% CI, 1.7-15.9; P = .004), exposure to high levels of dog allergen (OR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.3-7.7; P = .012), aeroallergen sensitivity at age 3 years (OR, 10.7; 95% CI, 2.1-55.0; P = .005), recurrent wheezing during the first 3 years of life (OR, 7.3; 95% CI, 1.2-43.3; P = .028), and CCL5 expression in nasal epithelia during acute RSV infection (OR, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.2-2.4; P < .001). White children (OR, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.04-0.93; P = .041) and children attending day care (OR, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.04-0.84; P = .029) had a decreased risk of physician-diagnosed asthma.
Conclusions
Approximately 50% of children who experience severe RSV bronchiolitis have a subsequent asthma diagnosis. The presence of increased CCL5 levels in nasal epithelia at the time of bronchiolitis or the development of allergic sensitization by age 3 years are associated with increased likelihood of subsequent asthma.
doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2012.02.010
PMCID: PMC3612548  PMID: 22444510
Bronchiolitis; respiratory syncytial virus; asthma; prospective cohort; CCL5
23.  Immune responses to self-antigens in asthma patients: Clinical and immuno-pathological implications 
Human Immunology  2012;73(5):511-516.
Asthma leads to chronic airway inflammation that shares pathological features of chronic rejection after lung transplantation. Due to significant role of autoimmunity in chronic rejection, we hypothesized that immunity to self-antigens may also be present in asthma. The goal was to define immune responses to self-antigens in patients with asthma. Blood and clinical data were collected from 99 asthmatics and 60 controls. Serum was analyzed for antibodies (Abs) to Collagen V (ColV) by ELISA and correlated with disease severity. Asthmatics' sera were tested in human protein array to determine immune responses to other self-antigens. Asthmatics had higher concentration of Abs to ColV (predominantly IgG isotype) compared to control (p < 0.01). These Abs correlated with severe asthma (p<0.01) and corticosteroid use (p=0.032). Additionally, Abs to novel self-antigens epidermal group factor receptor (EGFr), activin A type 1 receptor, and alpha-catenin (α-catenin) were detected in asthmatics. We conclude that Abs to self-antigens (ColV, EGFr, Activin A type 1 receptor, and α-catenin) are present in asthmatics sera correlating with clinical disease. Epithelial damage from airway inflammation during asthma may result in exposure of cryptic self-antigens or their determinants resulting in immune response to self-antigens and these may contribute to pathogenesis of asthma.
doi:10.1016/j.humimm.2012.02.010
PMCID: PMC3338898  PMID: 22386692
Asthma; Autoimmunity; Collagen V; epidermal growth factor receptor; Activin A type 1 receptor; alpha catenin
24.  Sleep Quality and Asthma Control and Quality of Life in Non-Severe and Severe Asthma 
Sleep & breathing = Schlaf & Atmung  2011;16(4):1129-1137.
Purpose
The effect of sleep quality on asthma control independent from common comorbidities like gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is unknown. This study examined the association between sleep quality and asthma control and quality of life after accounting for OSA and GERD in non-severe (NSA) and severe (SA) asthma.
Methods
Cross-sectional data from 60 normal controls, 143 with NSA, and 79 with SA participating in the Severe Asthma Research Program was examined. Those who reported using positive airway pressure therapy or were at high risk for OSA were excluded.
Results
Both SA and NSA had poorer sleep quality than controls, with SA reporting the worst sleep quality. All asthmatics with GERD and 92% of those without GERD had poor sleep quality (p =.02). The majority (88%–100%) of NSA and SA participants who did not report nighttime asthma disturbances still reported having poor sleep quality. In both NSA and SA, poor sleep quality was associated with worse asthma control and quality of life after controlling for GERD and other covariates.
Conclusions
These results suggest that poor sleep quality is associated with poor asthma control and quality of life among asthmatics and cannot be explained by comorbid GERD and nighttime asthma disturbances.
doi:10.1007/s11325-011-0616-8
PMCID: PMC3617495  PMID: 22102290
Asthma control; Gastroesphogeal reflux disease; Sleep
25.  Severe Asthma 
The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP) has characterized over the past 10 years 1,644 patients with asthma, including 583 individuals with severe asthma. SARP collaboration has led to a rapid recruitment of subjects and efficient sharing of samples among participating sites to conduct independent mechanistic investigations of severe asthma. Enrolled SARP subjects underwent detailed clinical, physiologic, genomic, and radiological evaluations. In addition, SARP investigators developed safe procedures for bronchoscopy in participants with asthma, including those with severe disease. SARP studies revealed that severe asthma is a heterogeneous disease with varying molecular, biochemical, and cellular inflammatory features and unique structure–function abnormalities. Priorities for future studies include recruitment of a larger number of subjects with severe asthma, including children, to allow further characterization of anatomic, physiologic, biochemical, and genetic factors related to severe disease in a longitudinal assessment to identify factors that modulate the natural history of severe asthma and provide mechanistic rationale for management strategies.
doi:10.1164/rccm.201107-1317PP
PMCID: PMC3297096  PMID: 22095547
asthma; remodeling; inflammation; bronchoscopy; imaging

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