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1.  Development of Stable Phosphohistidine Analogues 
Journal of the American Chemical Society  2010;132(41):14327-14329.
Protein phosphorylation is one of the most common and extensively studied posttranslational modifications (PTMs). Compared to the O-phosphorylation of Ser, Thr, and Tyr residues, our understanding of histidine phosphorylation is relatively limited, particularly in higher eukaryotes, due to technical difficulties stemming from the intrinsic instability and isomerism of phosphohistidine (pHis). We report the design and synthesis of stable and nonisomerizable pHis analogues. These pHis analogues were successfully utilized in solid-phase peptide synthesis and semi-synthesis of histone H4. Significantly, the first antibody that specifically recognizes pHis was obtained using the synthetic peptide as the immunogen.
doi:10.1021/ja104393t
PMCID: PMC3189792  PMID: 20879710
2.  Respiratory syncytial virus and TNFalpha induction of chemokine gene expression involves differential activation of Rel A and NF-kappaB1 
Background
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection of airway epithelial cells stimulates the expression and secretion of a variety of cytokines including the chemotactic cytokines interleukin-8 (IL-8), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and RANTES (regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted). Chemokines are important chemoattractants for the recruitment of distinct sets of leukocytes to airway sites of inflammation.
Results
We have shown previously that chemokine expression is regulated in airway epithelial cells (A549) in a stimulus-specific manner in part through the redox-responsive transcription factors AP-1 and NF-κB. In this study, we examined the NF-κB-mediated effects of RSV and the proinflammatory cytokine TNFα on the induction of IL-8, MCP-1 and RANTES chemokine gene expression in A549 epithelial cells. The results demonstrate that RSV induces chemokine expression with distinct kinetics that is associated with a specific pattern of NF-κB binding activity. This distinction was further demonstrated by the differential effects of the NF-κB inhibitors dexamethasone (DEX) and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). NAC preferentially inhibited RSV induced chemokine expression, whereas DEX preferentially inhibited TNFα induced chemokine expression. DNA binding studies using NF-κB subunit specific binding ELISA demonstrated that RSV and TNFα induced different NF-κB binding complexes containing Rel A (p65) and NF-κB1 (p50). Both TNFα and RSV strongly induced Rel A the activation subunit of NF-κB, whereas only TNFα was able to substantially induce the p50 subunit. Consistent with the expression studies, RSV but not TNFα induction of Rel A and p50 were markedly inhibited by NAC, providing a mechanism by which TNFα and RSV can differentially activate chemokine gene expression via NF-κB.
Conclusions
These data suggest that RSV induction of chemokine gene expression, in contrast to TNFα, involves redox-sensitive NF-κB complexes containing predominantly Rel A.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-2-5
PMCID: PMC102322  PMID: 11922866

Results 1-2 (2)