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1.  Traumatic Osteochondral Injury of the Femoral Head Treated by Mosaicplasty: A Report of Two Cases 
HSS Journal  2010;6(2):228-234.
The increased risk of symptomatic progression towards osteoarthritis after chondral damage has led to the development of multiple treatment options for cartilage repair. These procedures have evolved from arthroscopic lavage and debridement, to marrow stimulation techniques, and more recently, to osteochondral autograft and allograft transplants, and autogenous chondrocyte implantation. The success of mosaicplasty procedures in the knee has led to its application to other surfaces, including the talus, tibial plateau, patella, and humeral capitellum. In this report, we present two cases of a chondral defect to the femoral head after a traumatic hip dislocation, treated with an osteochondral autograft (OATS) from the ipsilateral knee, and the inferior femoral head, respectively, combined with a surgical dislocation of the hip. At greater than 1 year and greater than 5 years of follow-up, MRI studies have demonstrated good autograft incorporation with maintenance of articular surface conformity, and both patients clinically continue to have no pain and full active range of motion of their respective hips. In our opinion, treatment of osteochondral defects in the femoral head surface using a surgical dislocation combined with an OATS procedure is a promising approach, as full exposure of the femoral head can be obtained while preserving its vasculature, thus enabling adequate restoration of the articular cartilage surface.
PMCID: PMC2926357  PMID: 21886541
hip dislocation; osteochondral autograft transplant; femoral head; osteochondral defect; osteochondral injury; mosaicplasty
2.  Hip Arthroscopy Update 
HSS Journal  2005;1(1):40-48.
The management of hip injuries in the athlete has evolved significantly in the past few years with theadvancement of arthroscopic techniques. The application of minimally invasive surgical techniques has facilitated relatively rapid returns to sporting activity in recreational and elite athletes alike. Recent advancements in both hip arthroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging have elucidated several sources of intraarticular pathology that result in chronic and disabling hip symptoms. Many of these conditions were previously unrecognized and thus, left untreated. Current indications for hip arthroscopy include management of labral tears, osteoplasty for femoroacetabular impingement, thermal capsulorrhaphy and capsular plication for subtle rotational instability and capsular laxity, lateral impact injury and chondral lesions, osteochondritis dissecans, ligamentum teres injuries, internal and external snapping hip, removal of loose bodies, synovial biopsy, subtotal synovectomy, synovial chondromatosis, infection, and certain cases of mild to moderate osteoarthritis with associated mechanical symptoms. In addition, patients with long-standing, unresolved hip joint pain and positive physical findings may benefit from arthroscopic evaluation. Patients with reproducible symptoms and physical findings that reveal limited functioning, and who have failed an adequate trial of conservative treatment will have the greatest likelihood of success after surgical intervention. Strict attention to thorough diagnostic examination, detailed imaging, and adherence to safe and reproducible surgical techniques, as described in this review, are essential for the success of this procedure.
PMCID: PMC2504137  PMID: 18751808

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