PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-6 (6)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
author:("blanket, P")
1.  Detailed analysis of the cell infiltrate and the expression of mediators of synovial inflammation and joint destruction in the synovium of patients with psoriatic arthritis: implications for treatment 
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases  2006;65(12):1551-1557.
Background
The synovial tissue is a primary target of many inflammatory arthropathies, including psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Identification of proinflammatory molecules in the synovium may help to identify potentially therapeutic targets.
Objective
To investigate extensively the features of cell infiltration and expression of mediators of inflammation and joint destruction in the synovium of patients with PsA compared with patients with rheumatoid arthritis matched for disease duration and use of drugs.
Methods
Multiple synovial tissue biopsy specimens were obtained by arthroscopy from an inflamed joint in 19 patients with PsA (eight oligoarthritis, 11 polyarthritis) and 24 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Biopsy specimens were analysed by immunohistochemistry to detect T cells, plasma cells, fibroblast‐like synoviocytes, macrophages, proinflammatory cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitor metalloproteinase‐1, adhesion molecules and vascular markers. Stained sections were evaluated by digital image analysis.
Results
The synovial infiltrate of patients with PsA and rheumatoid arthritis was comparable with regard to numbers of fibroblast‐like synoviocytes and macrophages. T cell numbers were considerably lower in the synovium of patients with PsA. The number of plasma cells also tended to be lower in PsA. The expression of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin (IL) 1β, IL6 and IL18 was as high in PsA as in rheumatoid arthritis. The expression of matrix metalloproteinases, adhesion molecules and vascular markers was comparable for PsA and rheumatoid arthritis.
Conclusion
These data show increased proinflammatory cytokine expression in PsA synovium, comparable to results obtained for rheumatoid arthritis, and support the notion that, in addition to TNFα blockade, there may be a rationale for treatments directed at IL1β, IL6 and IL18.
doi:10.1136/ard.2005.050963
PMCID: PMC1798447  PMID: 16728461
2.  Chemokine and chemokine receptor expression in paired peripheral blood mononuclear cells and synovial tissue of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and reactive arthritis 
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases  2005;65(3):294-300.
Background
Chemokine receptors and chemokines have a crucial role in leucocyte recruitment into inflamed tissue.
Objective
To examine the expression of an extensive number of chemokines and receptors in a unique bank of paired samples of synovial tissue (ST) and peripheral blood (PB) from patients with different forms of arthritis to assist in identifying suitable targets for therapeutic intervention.
Methods
Synovial biopsy specimens were obtained from 23 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 16 with osteoarthritis, and 8 with reactive arthritis. ST chemokine (CCL2/MCP‐1, CCL5/RANTES, CCL7/MCP‐3, CCL8/MCP‐2, CCL14/HCC‐1, CCL15/HCC‐2, CCL16/HCC‐4), chemokine receptor (CCR1, CCR2b, CCR5, CXCR4), and CD13 expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry and two colour immunofluorescence. Chemokine receptor expression (CCR1, CCR3, CCR5, CCR6, CCR7) on PB cells was studied by flow cytometry. Non‐parametric tests were used for statistical analysis.
Results
Abundant expression of CCR1, CXCR4, and CCR5 was found in all forms of arthritis, with a specific increase of CCL5 and CCL15 in RA. CCL7, CCL8, CCL14, CCL15, and CCL16 were detected for the first time in ST. The results for PB analysis were comparable among different arthritides. Interestingly, compared with healthy controls, significantly lower expression of CCR1 (p<0.005) and CCR5 (p<0.05) by PB monocytes in the patient groups was seen.
Discussion
A variety of chemokines and receptors might have an important role in several inflammatory joint disorders. Although other receptors are involved as well, migration of CCR1+ and CCR5+ cells towards the synovial compartment may play a part in the effector phase of various forms of arthritis.
doi:10.1136/ard.2005.037176
PMCID: PMC1798063  PMID: 16107514
arthritis; chemokines; pathogenesis; synovial tissue; chemokine receptors
3.  Expression of interferon ß in synovial tissue from patients with rheumatoid arthritis: comparison with patients with osteoarthritis and reactive arthritis 
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases  2005;64(12):1780-1782.
Objective: To determine the expression of IFNß in the synovial tissue of patients with RA, osteoarthritis, and reactive arthritis.
Methods: Synovial biopsy specimens were obtained by arthroscopy from patients with RA and disease controls for immunohistological analysis using a monoclonal antibody specific for IFNß. Bound antibody was detected by an immunoperoxidase method. Stained sections were evaluated by computer assisted image analysis. Double stainings were performed with antibodies to detect CD55 positive fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS), CD68 positive macrophages, and CD83 positive dendritic cells (DCs) coexpressing IFNß.
Results: IFNß protein was abundantly expressed in the synovium of patients with RA. Digital image analysis showed a significant increase in the mean integrated optical density for IFNß expression in RA synovial tissue compared with disease controls. Specific up regulation of IFNß expression was also seen when the results were controlled for cell numbers. Phenotypic analysis showed that FLS, especially, but also macrophages and DCs may express IFNß in RA synovial tissue.
Conclusions: The increased expression of IFNß in RA synovium suggests activation of an immunomodulatory mechanism that could inhibit synovial inflammation.
doi:10.1136/ard.2005.040477
PMCID: PMC1755294  PMID: 15878901

Results 1-6 (6)