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1.  18F-Fluorothymidine-Pet Imaging of Glioblastoma Multiforme: Effects of Radiation Therapy on Radiotracer Uptake and Molecular Biomarker Patterns 
The Scientific World Journal  2013;2013:796029.
Introduction. PET imaging is a useful clinical tool for studying tumor progression and treatment effects. Conventional 18F-FDG-PET imaging is of limited usefulness for imaging Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) due to high levels of glucose uptake by normal brain and the resultant signal-to-noise intensity. 18F-Fluorothymidine (FLT) in contrast has shown promise for imaging GBM, as thymidine is taken up preferentially by proliferating cells. These studies were undertaken to investigate the effectiveness of 18F-FLT-PET in a GBM mouse model, especially after radiation therapy (RT), and its correlation with useful biomarkers, including proliferation and DNA damage. Methods. Nude/athymic mice with human GBM orthografts were assessed by microPET imaging with 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT. Patterns of tumor PET imaging were then compared to immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence for markers of proliferation (Ki-67), DNA damage and repair (γH2AX), hypoxia (HIF-1α), and angiogenesis (VEGF). Results. We confirmed that 18F-FLT-PET uptake is limited in healthy mice but enhanced in the intracranial tumors. Our data further demonstrate that 18F-FLT-PET imaging usefully reflects the inhibition of tumor by RT and correlates with changes in biomarker expression. Conclusions. 18F-FLT-PET imaging is a promising tumor imaging modality for GBM, including assessing RT effects and biologically relevant biomarkers.
doi:10.1155/2013/796029
PMCID: PMC3649687  PMID: 23690748
2.  An Integrated Method for Reproducible and Accurate Image-Guided Stereotactic Cranial Irradiation of Brain Tumors Using the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform1 
Translational Oncology  2012;5(4):230-237.
Preclinical studies of cranial radiation therapy (RT) using animal brain tumor models have been hampered by technical limitations in the delivery of clinically relevant RT. We established a bioimageable mouse model of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and an image-guided radiation delivery system that facilitated precise tumor localization and treatment and which closely resembled clinical RT. Our novel radiation system makes use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and bioluminescent imaging (BLI) to define tumor volumes, computed tomographic (CT) imaging for accurate treatment planning, a novel mouse immobilization system, and precise treatments delivered with the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform. We demonstrated that, in vivo, BLI correlated well with MRI for defining tumor volumes. Our novel restraint system enhanced setup reproducibility and precision, was atraumatic, and minimized artifacts on CT imaging used for treatment planning. We confirmed precise radiation delivery through immunofluorescent analysis of the phosphorylation of histone H2AX in irradiated brains and brain tumors. Assays with an intravenous near-infrared fluorescent probe confirmed that radiation of orthografts increased disruption of the tumor blood-brain barrier (BBB). This integrated model system, which facilitated delivery of precise, reproducible, stereotactic cranial RT in mice and confirmed RT's resultant histologic and BBB changes, may aid future brain tumor research.
PMCID: PMC3431032  PMID: 22937174
3.  Detoxification of Multiple Heavy Metals by a Half-Molecule ABC Transporter, HMT-1, and Coelomocytes of Caenorhabditis elegans 
PLoS ONE  2010;5(3):e9564.
Background
Developing methods for protecting organisms in metal-polluted environments is contingent upon our understanding of cellular detoxification mechanisms. In this regard, half-molecule ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters of the HMT-1 subfamily are required for cadmium (Cd) detoxification. HMTs have conserved structural architecture that distinguishes them from other ABC transporters and allows the identification of homologs in genomes of different species including humans. We recently discovered that HMT-1 from the simple, unicellular organism, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, SpHMT1, acts independently of phytochelatin synthase (PCS) and detoxifies Cd, but not other heavy metals. Whether HMTs from multicellular organisms confer tolerance only to Cd or also to other heavy metals is not known.
Methodology/Principal Findings
Using molecular genetics approaches and functional in vivo assays we showed that HMT-1 from a multicellular organism, Caenorhabditis elegans, functions distinctly from its S. pombe counterpart in that in addition to Cd it confers tolerance to arsenic (As) and copper (Cu) while acting independently of pcs-1. Further investigation of hmt-1 and pcs-1 revealed that these genes are expressed in different cell types, supporting the notion that hmt-1 and pcs-1 operate in distinct detoxification pathways. Interestingly, pcs-1 and hmt-1 are co-expressed in highly endocytic C. elegans cells with unknown function, the coelomocytes. By analyzing heavy metal and oxidative stress sensitivities of the coelomocyte-deficient C. elegans strain we discovered that coelomocytes are essential mainly for detoxification of heavy metals, but not of oxidative stress, a by-product of heavy metal toxicity.
Conclusions/Significance
We established that HMT-1 from the multicellular organism confers tolerance to multiple heavy metals and is expressed in liver-like cells, the coelomocytes, as well as head neurons and intestinal cells, which are cell types that are affected by heavy metal poisoning in humans. We also showed that coelomocytes are involved in detoxification of heavy metals. Therefore, the HMT-1-dependent detoxification pathway and coelomocytes of C. elegans emerge as novel models for studies of heavy metal-promoted diseases.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0009564
PMCID: PMC2832763  PMID: 20221439

Results 1-3 (3)