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1.  Hereditary Causes of Kidney Stones and Chronic Kidney Disease 
Pediatric nephrology (Berlin, Germany)  2013;28(10):1923-1942.
Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC) and primary hyperoxaluria (PH) are rare but important causes of severe kidney stone disease and/or chronic kidney disease in children. Recurrent kidney stone disease and nephrocalcinosis, particularly in pre-pubertal children, should alert the physician to the possibility of an inborn error of metabolism as the underlying cause. Unfortunately, the lack of recognition and knowledge of the five disorders has frequently resulted in an unacceptable delay in diagnosis and treatment, sometimes with grave consequences. A high index of suspicion coupled with early diagnosis may reduce or even prevent the serious long-term complications of these diseases. In this paper, we review the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and outcome of patients with APRT deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, FHHNC and PH with emphasis on childhood manifestations.
doi:10.1007/s00467-012-2329-z
PMCID: PMC4138059  PMID: 23334384
Nephrolithiasis; nephrocalcinosis; kidney failure; crystalline nephropathy; hereditary disorders; adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency; 2,8-dihydroxyadeninuria; cystinuria; Dent disease; familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis; primary hyperoxaluria
2.  Coexistence of ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis and anti-phospholipase A2 receptor antibody-positive membranous nephropathy 
Clinical Kidney Journal  2012;5(2):162-165.
Antibodies to myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 (PR3) have been demonstrated to mediate anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated disease. For membranous nephropathy, antibodies to the podocyte-expressed phospholipase A2 receptor (anti-PLA2R) are highly associated with disease activity and have been reported in at least 70% of patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy (IMN). We present a case of a 56-year-old male with a 1 year history of hypertension, leg edema, and proteinuria, who presented with advanced renal failure and was found to have both ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis (GN) and IMN on kidney biopsy. Consistent with the idea that this is due to the chance occurrence of two independent diseases, we found both anti-MPO and anti-PLA2R antibodies in the patient's sera. Treatment with methylprednisolone, plasmapheresis, and cyclophosphamide resulted in improvement in kidney function and proteinuria, together with the simultaneous decrease in both autoantibodies. This is the first demonstration of two pathogenic antibodies giving rise to ANCA-associated GN and IMN in the same patient. It confirms the importance of classifying disease based upon the underlying mechanism, in addition to renal histopathology, to both optimize therapy and predict prognosis.
doi:10.1093/ckj/sfr149
PMCID: PMC3341840  PMID: 22833809
ANCA vasculitis; antiphospholipase; membranous nephropathy
3.  Advances in the management of gout: Critical appraisal of febuxostat in the control of hyperuricemia 
Gout recently passed rheumatoid arthritis to become the most common inflammatory arthritis in the United States (US). However, epidemiologic studies indicate that the quality of gout management is suboptimal owing to both patient and physician issues. Only three options for urate-lowering therapy are currently available in the US: allopurinol, probenecid, and recently, febuxostat. Probenecid is generally safe except for the occurrence of urolithiasis, but is only effective for the subset of patients with better kidney function. Allopurinol use is limited due to its side effects, potential toxicity of uncertain magnitude in patients with renal disease, and failure to achieve targeted serum urate levels. In part this failure may be due to the necessity for it to be titrated for optimal therapeutic effect. Febuxostat is a new medication that may offer several advantages and can be given as an alternative to allopurinol. We review the basic biology and clinical performance of febuxostat, and consider the potential utility of this agent in comparison to the older, better-established gout therapeutics.
PMCID: PMC3108781  PMID: 21694922
allopurinol; gout suppressants; nephrolithiasis; uric acid; urolithiasis

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