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author:("Ayazi, parvin")
1.  Serum interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in febrile seizures: is there a link? 
Korean Journal of Pediatrics  2014;57(10):440-444.
Purpose
Febrile seizures are induced by fever and are the most common type of seizures in children. Although numerous studies have been performed on febrile seizures, their pathophysiology remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that cytokines may play a role in the pathogenesis of febrile seizures. The present study was conducted to identify potential links between serum interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and febrile seizures.
Methods
Ninety-two patients with simple or complex febrile seizures (46 patients per seizure type), and 46 controls with comparable age, sex, and severity of temperature were enrolled.
Results
The median concentrations of serum IL-1β in the simple, complex febrile seizure, and control groups were 0.05, 0.1, and 0.67 pg/mL, respectively (P=0.001). Moreover, the median concentrations of TNF-α in the simple, complex febrile seizure, and control groups were 2.5, 1, and 61.5 pg/mL, respectively (P=0.001). Furthermore, there were significant differences between the case groups in serum IL-1β and TNF-α levels (P<0.05).
Conclusion
Unlike previous studies, our study does not support the hypothesis that increased IL-1β and TNF-α production is involved in the pathogenesis of febrile seizures.
doi:10.3345/kjp.2014.57.10.440
PMCID: PMC4219946  PMID: 25379044
Interleukin-1beta; Tumor necrosis factor-alpha; Febrile seizures
2.  Melatonin’s Effect in Febrile Seizures and Epilepsy 
Objective
Recognition of risk factors for febrile seizures (FS) and epilepsy is essential.
Studies regarding the role of melatonin in these convulsive disorders are limited.
This study determines the relationship between serum melatonin levels and FS and epilepsy in children.
Materials & Methods
A population of 111 children with simple FS, complex FS, and epilepsy (37 children per group, respectively) were included as case groups. In addition, 37 febrile children without seizures comprised the control group. Serum melatonin levels were measured and compared between all groups.
Results
The serum melatonin levels in the simple, complex FSs, and epilepsy groups were 2, 2.4, and 2 pg/ml, respectively. The serum melatonin level in the control group was 2.1pg/ml.
Moreover, there were no significant differences observed while comparing the case groups.
Conclusion
The present study reveals that there is no association between serum melatonin level and simple or complex FS and epilepsy. It appears that melatonin plays no significant role in these convulsive disorders.
PMCID: PMC4135277  PMID: 25143770
Melatonin; Simple febrile seizures; Complex febrile seizures; Epilepsy
3.  Are Clinical, Laboratory, and Imaging Markers Suitable Predictors of Vesicoureteral Reflux in Children With Their First Febrile Urinary Tract Infection? 
Korean Journal of Urology  2014;55(8):536-541.
Purpose
This study was conducted to determine the predictive value of clinical, laboratory, and imaging variables for the diagnosis of vesicoureteral reflux in children with their first febrile urinary tract infection.
Materials and Methods
One hundred fifty-three children with their first febrile urinary tract infection were divided into two groups according to the results of voiding cystourethrography: 60 children with vesicoureteral reflux and 93 children without. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value, likelihood ratio (positive and negative), and accuracy of the clinical, laboratory, and imaging variables for the diagnosis of vesicoureteral reflux were determined.
Results
Of the 153 children with febrile urinary tract infection, 60 patients (39.2%) had vesicoureteral reflux. There were significant differences between the two groups regarding fever>38℃, suprapubic pain, C-reactive protein quantitative level, number of red blood cells in the urine, and results of renal ultrasound and dimercaptosuccinic acid renal scanning (p<0.05). There were significant positive correlations between fever>38.2℃ and dimercaptosuccinic acid renal scanning and vesicoureteral reflux. Also, there were significant positive correlations between the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, positive urinary nitrite test, hyaline cast, and renal ultrasound and high-grade vesicoureteral reflux.
Conclusions
This study revealed fever>38.2℃ and dimercaptosuccinic acid renal scanning as the best predictive markers for vesicoureteral reflux in children with their first febrile urinary tract infection. In addition, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, positive urinary nitrite test, hyaline cast, and renal ultrasound are the best predictive markers for high-grade vesicoureteral reflux.
doi:10.4111/kju.2014.55.8.536
PMCID: PMC4131083  PMID: 25132949
99mTc-Dimercaptosuccinic acid scan; Sedimentation rate; Urinary tract infections; Vesicoureteral reflux
4.  Diagnostic Accuracy of the Quantitative C-Reactive Protein, Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate and White Blood Cell Count in Urinary Tract Infections among Infants and Children 
Objectives:
The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the quantitative C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and white blood cell (WBC) count in urinary tract infections (UTI) among hospitalised infants and children in Qazvin, Iran.
Methods:
This cross-sectional study was conducted on 127 hospitalised children ranging in age from 2 months to 12 years old 31.79 months (SD 30.73) who were suspected of having a UTI and who did not receive antibiotics prior to being seen at a Qazvin teaching children’s hospital between 2005 and 2006. A urine analysis (U/A) and urine culture (U/C) were performed. The blood was taken for CRP, ESR and WBC analyses. U/C has been considered the gold standard test for a UTI and dimercaptosuccinic acid renal scintigraphy (DMSA) as the gold standard for an upper UTI (pyelonephritis). These tests were used to determine the diagnostic accuracy, which is represented as the percent of correct results.
Results:
Within the study population, 72 patients (56.7%) were younger than two years old 9.86 months (SD 4.56) and 55 (43.3%) were older than two years old 63.58 months (SD 30.96). One hundred and two patients (80.3%) were female. There were 100 cases that had a positive U/C. Of the patients with a positive U/C, 81 had pyuria (WBC more than 5/hpf), 71 had a peripheral WBC count of more than 10 000 /mL, 95 had a CRP of more than 10 mg/L and 82 had an ESR > 10 mm/h. The sensitivity and specificity as well as the positive and negative predictive values and the accuracy of CRP when using U/C as the gold standard were, respectively, 96%, 11.1%, 80.2%, 50%, and 78%; when using ESR as the gold standard were, respectively, 55%, 40%, 77.6%, 17.2%, and 52%; and when using WBC counts as the gold standard were, respectively, 69%, 52%, 86.6%, 35.6%, and 65%. The accuracy of CRP, ESR and WBC counts when considering the DMSA as the gold standard were 58.3%, 62.8%, and 64.5%, respectively.
Conclusion:
Although acute phase reactants can help in the diagnosis of a UTI, they are not pathognomonic. CRP, ESR and WBC were neither completely sensitive nor specific for detecting a UTI and its localisation site in Iranian children. Therefore, in a country where advanced clinical diagnostic tests are available, the advanced test should be used in conjunction with CRP, ESR and WBC analyses. Finally, a combination of laboratory tests along with history and exact clinical examination are needed for the diagnosis of a UTI and its localisation site.
PMCID: PMC3957355  PMID: 24643248
children; DMSA renal scintigraphy; erythrocyte sedimentation rate; Urinary tract infection; quantitative C-reactive protein
5.  Serum levels of interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 as diagnostic markers of acute pyelonephritis in children 
Korean Journal of Pediatrics  2013;56(5):218-223.
Purpose
Early diagnosis and treatment of acute pyelonephritis in children is of special importance in order to prevent serious complications. This study was conducted to determine the diagnostic value of serum interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 in children with acute pyelonephritis.
Methods
Eighty-seven patients between 1 month to 12 years old with urinary tract infection (UTI) were divided into 2 groups based on the result of 99m-technetium dimercapto-succinic acid renal scan: acute pyelonephritis (n=37) and lower UTI (n=50) groups. White blood cell (WBC) count, neutrophil (Neutl) count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration, platelet count, and serum IL-6 and IL-8 concentrations of both groups were measured and compared.
Results
There was a significant difference between two groups regarding WBC count, Neutl count, ESR, and CRP concentration (P<0.05). In addition, the difference between the two groups regarding serum IL-6 and IL-8 concentrations was not significant (IL-6, 60 and 35.4 pg/mL and IL-8, 404 and 617 pg/mL, respectively). The sensitivity and specificity of serum IL-6 and IL-8 for diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis were 73%, 42% and 78%, 32%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive values of serum IL-6 and IL-8 were less than those of acute phase serum reactants such as CRP.
Conclusion
This study showed that there was no significant difference between acute pyelonephritis and lower UTI groups regarding serum IL-6 and IL-8 levels. Therefore, despite confirming results of previous studies, it seems that IL-6 and IL-8 are not suitable markers for differentiating between acute pyelonephritis and lower UTI.
doi:10.3345/kjp.2013.56.5.218
PMCID: PMC3668203  PMID: 23741236
Interleukin-6; Interleukin-8; Acute pyelonephritis
6.  Can Urinary Nitrite Results Be Used to Conduct Antimicrobial Option for Urinary Tract Infection in Children? 
Iranian Journal of Pediatrics  2012;22(2):237-240.
Objective
This study was performed to determine the relationship between urinary nitrite results and bacterial resistance to antimicrobial drugs in urinary tract infection of children.
Methods
In a cross-section study 119 children younger than 12 years with urinary tract infection were evaluated in Qazvin children's hospital. Patients were divided into negative and positive nitrite groups depending on urinary nitrite test result. Rates of antibiotic resistance in the two groups were compared.
Findings
Sixty seven patients were in the negative nitrite group and 52 in the positive nitrite group. Resistance rates to ceftriaxone, trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole, ampicillin, gentamicin, amikacin, nalidixic acid, cephalothin and nitrofurantoin in the nitrite negative group were 7.5%, 31.3%, 50.7%, 11.9%, 9%, 3%, 14.9% and 11.9%, respectively. These values in the nitrite positive group were 21.2%, 28.8%, 63.5%, 7.7%, 5.8%, 1.9%, 9.6%, and 3.8%, respectively (P>0.05).
Conclusion
This study showed that there is no correlation between urinary nitrite results and bacterial resistance to antimicrobial drugs. Therefore, it seems that physicians should not adjust antibiotic therapy for UTI based on nitrite results.
PMCID: PMC3446071  PMID: 23056892
Urinary tract infections; Nitrite; Anti-bacterial agents; Drug resistance
7.  Serum Immunoglobulin Levels in Splenectomized and Non- Splenectomized Patients with Major Beta-Thalassemia 
Iranian Journal of Pediatrics  2011;21(1):95-98.
Objective
Thalassemia is a common disease in many countries, in which several complications such as infections can occur. Although aberration in the function of the immune system could be a reason for such complication, a little is known about the status of humoral immune system in major beta thalassemia. In this study we measured serum immunoglobulins level in a group of patients with major beta thalassemia.
Methods
Ninety nine patients with major beta thalassemia were enrolled in this study divided into two groups of splenctomized and not splenctomized patients. Serum IgG, IgM and IgA levels of these patients were measured and analyzed.
Findings
Serum mean levels of IgG and IgM in patients of all ages in both groups were normal. The mean serum IgA level in the group of not splenectomized patients aged less than five years as well as in the splenectomized patients aged more than twenty years was increased. However, it was normal in other age groups.
Conclusion
Although this study could not show any defect in the humoral immune system, evaluation of immunoglobulins could be useful to understand the relmarkable high rate of infection in the patients with major beta thalassemia.
PMCID: PMC3446106  PMID: 23056771
Humoral Immune System; Immunoglobulins; Major Beta-Thalassemia; Splenectomy
8.  Comparison of 16S rDNA-PCR Amplification and Culture of Cerebrospinal Fluid for Diagnosis of Bacterial Meningitis 
Iranian Journal of Pediatrics  2010;20(4):471-475.
Objective
Early and accurate diagnosis of bacterial meningitis is of critical concern. Optimum and rapid laboratory facilities are not routinely available for detecting the etiologic agents of meningitis. The objective of this study was to compare polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay with culture for detection of bacteria in central nervous system (CNS) samples from patients suspected to have meningitis.
Methods
One-hundred cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were obtained and divided into two parts. One part of samples was used for standard bacterial culture and gram staining. The remaining was used for DNA extraction. PCR assay was performed with universal primers for 16S rDNA gene of bacteria. Performance characteristics of the test were determined.
Findings
The PCR method was able to detect bacteria in all 36 culture-positive and in 38 of 64 culture-negative cases showing sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 40.6% respectively. Positive predictive value was 48.6% and negative predictive value 100%, however, Kappa coefficient showed the correlation of the 2 methods to be at 0.33.
Conclusion
There are advantages and disadvantages in performance characteristics of the conventional CSF culture and universal CSF 16S rDNA PCR. Therefore, it is recommended to use both methods in clinical practice, particularly in suspicious contaminated samples, with presumable presence of fastidious or slow growing bacteria because of antibiotic consumption.
PMCID: PMC3446091  PMID: 23056748
Meningitis; Bacterial; rDNA; PCR; Central nervous system; Infection
9.  Zinc and Copper Status in Children with Beta-Thalassemia Major  
Iranian Journal of Pediatrics  2010;20(3):297-302.
Objective
There are some reports in which a condition of zinc deficiency and its associated outcomes with a change in concentration of serum copper among the thalassemic patients has been highlighted. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the serum zinc and copper levels in children with beta-thalassemia major.
Methods
In this cross sectional study all children under 12 years affected by beta thalassemia major (40 patients) were evaluated for serum zinc and copper levels in Qazvin thalassemia center (Qazvin, Iran) in 2007. Serum measurements for zinc and copper were performed by atomic absorption spectrophotometer.
Findings
The mean concentrations of serum zinc and copper levels were 67.35±20.38 and 152.42±24.17 µg/dl respectively. Twenty-six (65%) of thalassemic patients had zinc concentration under 70 µg/dl (hypozincemia). None of the thalassemic children had copper deficiency. No significant correlation between serum zinc level with age, weight, height, body mass index, duration of blood transfusion, desferrioxamine dose and ferritin level was observed in thalassemic patients (P=0.3).
Conclusion
This study revealed that hypozincemia is common in thalassemic patients, but in contrast, there is no copper deficiency. Further evaluation in this regard is recommended.
PMCID: PMC3446035  PMID: 23056720
Beta-thalassemia; Zinc; Copper; Children
10.  Risk Factors of the First Febrile Seizures in Iranian Children 
Objective. Febrile seizures are the most common type of convulsion in children. The identification of influencing factors on incidence of the first febrile seizures is of prime priority. The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors of the first febrile seizures in Iranian children. Methods. In this case-control study 80 children aged 9 month to 5 years with their first febrile seizures were compared with 80 children with fever without seizure based on different risk factors in 2007. Results. There was significant difference between two groups regarding the gender, family history of febrile seizures, breast-feeding duration, and the body temperature (P < .05). Conclusion. Our study showed that factors including the gender, family history of febrile seizures, breast-feeding duration, and the body temperature are among the risk factors in occurrence of the first febrile seizure. Preventive measures to remove such risk factors could lead to lower the incidence of febrile seizures.
doi:10.1155/2010/862897
PMCID: PMC2905933  PMID: 20652051

Results 1-10 (10)