PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-3 (3)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Authors
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Porous titanium particles for acetabular reconstruction in total hip replacement show extensive bony armoring after 15 weeks 
Acta Orthopaedica  2014;85(6):600-608.
Background and purpose
— The bone impaction grafting technique restores bone defects in total hip replacement. Porous titanium particles (TiPs) are deformable, like bone particles, and offer better primary stability. We addressed the following questions in this animal study: are impacted TiPs osteoconductive under loaded conditions; do released micro-particles accelerate wear; and are systemic titanium blood levels elevated after implantation of TiPs?
Animals and methods —
An AAOS type-III defect was created in the right acetabulum of 10 goats weighing 63 (SD 6) kg, and reconstructed with calcium phosphate-coated TiPs and a cemented polyethylene cup. A stem with a cobalt chrome head was cemented in the femur. The goats were killed after 15 weeks. Blood samples were taken pre- and postoperatively.
Results —
The TiP-graft layer measured 5.6 (SD 0.8) mm with a mean bone ingrowth distance of 2.8 (SD 0.8) mm. Cement penetrated 0.9 (0.3–1.9) mm into the TiPs. 1 reconstruction showed minimal cement penetration (0.3 mm) and failed at the cement-TiP interface. There were no signs of accelerated wear, metallic particle debris, or osteolysis. Median systemic titanium concentrations increased on a log-linear scale from 0.5 (0.3–1.1) parts per billion (ppb) to 0.9 (0.5–2.8) ppb (p = 0.01).
Interpretation —
Adequate cement pressurization is advocated for impaction grafting with TiPs. After implantation, calcium phosphate-coated TiPs were osteoconductive under loaded conditions and caused an increase in systemic titanium concentrations. However, absolute levels remained low. There were no signs of accelerated wear. A clinical pilot study should be performed to prove that application in humans is safe in the long term.
doi:10.3109/17453674.2014.960660
PMCID: PMC4259031  PMID: 25238431
2.  Frictional and bone ingrowth properties of engineered surface topographies produced by electron beam technology 
Background
Electron beam melting (E-beam) is a new technology to produce 3-dimensional surface topographies for cementless orthopedic implants.
Methods
The friction coefficients of two newly developed E-beam produced surface topographies were in vitro compared with sandblasted E-beam and titanium plasma sprayed controls. Bone ingrowth (direct bone–implant contact) was determined by implanting the samples in the femoral condyles of 6 goats for a period of 6 weeks.
Results
Friction coefficients of the new structures were comparable to the titanium plasma sprayed control. The direct bone–implant contact was 23.9 and 24.5% for the new surface structures. Bone–implant contact of the sandblasted and titanium plasma sprayed control was 18.2 and 25.5%, respectively.
Conclusions
The frictional and bone ingrowth properties of the E-beam produced surface structures are similar to the plasma-sprayed control. However, since the maximal bone ingrowth had not been reached for the E-beam structures during the relatively short-term period, longer-term follow-up studies are needed to assess whether the E-beam structures lead to a better long-term performance than surfaces currently in use, such as titanium plasma spray coating.
doi:10.1007/s00402-010-1218-9
PMCID: PMC3078515  PMID: 21161665
Electron beam melting; Bone ingrowth; Friction; Surface characteristics; Prosthesis
3.  In Vitro Testing of Femoral Impaction Grafting With Porous Titanium Particles: A Pilot Study 
The disadvantages of allografts to restore femoral bone defects during revision hip surgery have led to the search for alternative materials. We investigated the feasibility of using porous titanium particles and posed the following questions: (1) Is it possible to create a high-quality femoral graft of porous titanium particles in terms of graft thickness, cement thickness, and cement penetration? (2) Does this titanium particle graft layer provide initial stability when a femoral cemented stem is implanted in it? (3) What sizes of particles are released from the porous titanium particles during impaction and subsequent cyclic loading of the reconstruction? We simulated cemented revision reconstructions with titanium particles in seven composite femurs loaded for 300,000 cycles and measured stem subsidence. Particle release from the titanium particle grafts was analyzed during impaction and loading. Impacted titanium particles formed a highly interlocked graft layer. We observed limited cement penetration into the titanium particle graft. A total mean subsidence of 1.04 mm was observed after 300,000 cycles. Most particles released during impaction were in the phagocytable range (< 10 μm). There was no detectable particle release during loading. Based on the data, we believe titanium particles are a promising alternative for allografts. However, animal testing is warranted to investigate the biologic effect of small-particle release.
doi:10.1007/s11999-008-0688-3
PMCID: PMC2674165  PMID: 19139968

Results 1-3 (3)