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1.  Caregivers of Older Adults with Cancer 
Seminars in oncology nursing  2012;28(4):221-225.
Objective
To review key aspects of family caregiving as it applies to older adults with cancer, discuss the implications of caregiving on the physical and emotional health of caregivers, and discuss future research needs to optimize the care of older adults with cancer and their caregivers.
Data Sources
Literature Review
Conclusions
The number of older adults with cancer is on the rise and these older adults have significant caregiving needs. There is a physical, emotional, and financial toll associated with caregiving.
Implications for Nursing Practice
As the US population ages, it will be even more important that we identify vulnerable older adults, understand their caregiving needs, and mobilize healthcare and community resources to support and assist their caregivers.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2012.09.004
PMCID: PMC4096853  PMID: 23107179
Geriatric Oncology; Family Caregiver; Caregiver Strain; Older Adult with Cancer
2.  Targeting communication interventions to decrease oncology family caregiver burden 
Seminars in oncology nursing  2012;28(4):262-270.
Objectives
The goal of this paper was to articulate and describe family communication patterns that give shape to four types of family caregivers: Manager, Carrier, Partner, and Loner.
Data Sources
Case studies of oncology family caregivers and hospice patients were selected from data collected as part of a larger, randomized controlled trial aimed at assessing family participation in interdisciplinary team meetings.
Conclusion
Each caregiver type demonstrates essential communication traits with nurses and team members; an ability to recognize these caregiver types will facilitate targeted interventions to decrease family oncology caregiver burden.
Implications for Nursing Practice
By becoming familiar with caregiver types, oncology nurses will be better able to address family oncology caregiver burden and the conflicts arising from family communication challenges. With an understanding of family communication patterns and its impact on caregiver burden, nurses can aid patient, family, and team to best optimize all quality of life domains for patient as well as the lead family caregiver.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2012.09.009
PMCID: PMC3489276  PMID: 23107184
3.  Nursing Role Implications for Family Caregiving 
Seminars in oncology nursing  2012;28(4):279-282.
Objective
To describe the clinical, education and research roles of professional nurses caring for family caregivers.
Data Scores
Review of literature and websites on the professional nursing role and family caregivers.
Conclusion
The growing number of family caregivers of cancer patients need education and support. The professional oncology nurse is best suited to assess, teach and support these family caregivers, as well as contribute to the evidence-base of these areas of practice.
Implications for Nursing Practice
Professional nurses caring for oncology patients need to expand their role to include additional support and education of family caregivers.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2012.09.011
PMCID: PMC3651689  PMID: 23107186
Professional nursing; nursing role; family caregiving
4.  Deriving Meaning and Faith in Caregiving 
Seminars in oncology nursing  2012;28(4):256-261.
Objectives
To review assessment of spiritual needs of family caregivers and four core interventions by nurses in addressing spirituality: presence, deep listening, bearing witness and compassion in action.
Data Sources
Literature review.
Conclusion
Spirituality is increasingly recognized as a key domain of quality of life and essential to quality cancer care. In addition to the needs of patients, family caregivers also experience enormous spiritual needs throughout cancer diagnosis and treatment. Nurses can provide valuable spiritual assessment of family caregivers and support them as they seek support services to address spiritual needs.
Implications for Nursing Practice
Family caregiving can be a time of growth and meaning when support is provided by nurses and their colleagues.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2012.09.008
PMCID: PMC3666172  PMID: 23107183
Spiritual care; spirituality; family caregiver
5.  Distance Caregiving a Parent with Cancer 
Seminars in oncology nursing  2012;28(4):271-278.
Objective
To discuss the new phenomenon of distance caregiving, with an emphasis on the experience of adult children providing distance caregiving to a parent with cancer.
Data Sources
Literature Review
Conclusions
Although the research is limited, it forms the foundation for beginning to describe the phenomenon and the associated psychosocial burdens that distance caregivers are struggling with.
Implications for Nursing Practice
With the growing population of distance caregivers, it is important for nurses to address these burdens. Interventions for clinical practice are recommended.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2012.09.010
PMCID: PMC3674787  PMID: 23107185
Distance; caregiving; cancer; technology
6.  Enhancing the Social Well-Being of Family Caregivers 
Seminars in oncology nursing  2012;28(4):246-255.
Objectives
To provide an overview of key issues and resources useful for oncology professionals to support the social-well being of patients and their families. A caregiver narrative highlights examples of the importance of addressing the social impact of illness.
Data Sources
Review of the literature and websites related to social well-being of oncology patients and families.
Conclusions
Culture influences social well-being and impacts caregiving across the life span. Coping with cancer creates a myriad of social implications with potentially significant impacts upon communication; sexuality, intimacy and sexual expression; education, finances, work, and leisure.
Implications for Nursing Practice
Nurses spend the greatest amount of time with patients and their families and therefore have an especially important role in identifying and addressing social needs. An interdisciplinary approach to care that includes the assessment of those at high risk and family meetings increases opportunities to address the complex multidimensional social concerns associated with oncology care.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2012.09.007
PMCID: PMC3729043  PMID: 23107182
Social Well-Being; Family Caregiving; Roles; Culture; Family Meetings; Financial Resources; Bereavement Support
7.  Physical Well-Being of Oncology Caregivers: An Important Quality of Life Domain 
Seminars in oncology nursing  2012;28(4):226-235.
OBJECTIVES
To provide an overview of research and practice related to the physical well-being of oncology caregivers.
DATA SOURCES
Literature retrieved through the PUBMED and CINAHL databases.
CONCLUSION
Caregivers play an important role in supporting people with cancer at every stage of the illness trajectory. Because caregiving is inherently stressful, caregivers should be routinely included in the assessment and treatment of patients with cancer.
IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE
Oncology nurses are uniquely positioned to play a vital role in recognizing caregiver strain and intervening to break the cycle of unremitting physical and psychosocial burden.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2012.09.005
PMCID: PMC3731161  PMID: 23107180
Caregiver burden; physical well-being; adverse physical outcomes
8.  Natural Products for Cancer Prevention 
Seminars in oncology nursing  2012;28(1):29-44.
OBJECTIVES
To review the clinical trial literature on the use and effects of natural products for cancer prevention.
DATA SOURCES
Clinical trials published in PubMed.
CONCLUSION
There is a growing body of literature on the use of natural products for cancer prevention. To date, few trials have demonstrated conclusive benefit. Current guidelines recommend against the use of natural products for cancer prevention.
IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE
Clinicians should ask patients about their use of natural products and motivations for use. If patients are using natural products specifically for cancer prevention, they should be counseled on the current guidelines, as well as their options for other cancer prevention strategies.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2011.11.004
PMCID: PMC3749070  PMID: 22281308
cancer; cancer prevention; multivitamins; vitamins; botanicals; medicinal mushrooms; probiotics; natural products; clinical trials; review
9.  INTERVENTIONS TO PROMOTE ADHERENCE WITH ORAL AGENTS 
Seminars in oncology nursing  2011;27(2):133-141.
Objectives
The advent of oral therapies has dramatically changed the landscape of cancer therapy. Yet the degree to which patients actually take the prescribed agents as ordered remains unknown. This article outlines the challenges that oral chemotherapy agents present to both patients and providers and suggests interventions for promoting adherence.
Data Sources
Published articles and web resources.
Conclusion
Barriers and facilitators to medication adherence are reviewed and interventions to promote medication adherence are presented. Strategies that include patient education and symptom management can promote adherence.
Implications for Nursing Practice
Maximizing adherence to oral chemotherapy agents can have many positive outcomes, but most important is improvement in overall survival and life expectancy. Other outcomes include improved safety and quality of life. Patients risk improper dosing and an increase in disease recurrence when there is nonadherence with medications. Correct dosing, education, and symptom management are all critical to ensuring adherence. Nursing interventions that incorporate education, early symptom identification, and reminder prompts can improve outcomes.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2011.02.005
PMCID: PMC3653175  PMID: 21514482
Cancer; oral chemotherapy; adherence; symptom management; interventions
10.  BIOMARKERS: SYMPTOMS, SURVIVORSHIP, AND QUALITY OF LIFE 
Seminars in Oncology Nursing  2012;28(2):129-138.
Objectives
To review the evidence on a number of biomarkers that show potential clinical utility in the prediction of and treatment responsiveness for the four most common symptoms associated with cancer and its treatment (i.e., pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression).
Data Sources
Review and synthesis of review articles and data-based publications.
Conclusions
A growing body of evidence suggests that sensitive and specific biomarkers will be available to assist clinicians with the assessment and management of symptoms.
Implications for Practice
Nurses will play a critical role in educating patients about their risk for specific symptoms based on an evaluation of specific biomarkers. Nurses will be involved in using biomarker data to titrate medications based on patient’s responses to symptom management interventions.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2012.03.008
PMCID: PMC3340583  PMID: 22542321
biomarkers; genomics; pain; fatigue; depression; sleep disturbance; symptoms; quality of life
11.  Technologies to Support End of Life Care 
Seminars in oncology nursing  2011;27(3):211-217.
Objectives
To describe the current level of utilization of informatics systems in hospice and palliative care and to discuss two projects that highlight the role of informatics applications for hospice informal caregivers.
Data sources
Published articles, web resources, clinical practice and ongoing research initiatives.
Conclusion
There are currently few informatics interventions designed specifically for palliative and hospice care. Challenges such as interoperability, user acceptance, privacy, the digital divide and allocation of resources all affect the diffusion of informatics tools in hospice.
Implications for nursing practice
Caregiver support through use of IT is feasible and may enhance hospice care.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2011.04.006
PMCID: PMC3143374  PMID: 21783012
informatics; hospice; palliative care; information technology; Internet
12.  Patient-reported Symptoms and Quality of Life Integrated into Clinical Cancer Care 
Seminars in oncology nursing  2011;27(3):203-210.
Objectives
To provide an overview of research and practice related to patient-reported symptom and quality of life assessment integrated into clinical care.
Data sources
Literature retrieved through the PUBMED and CINAHL databases.
Conclusion
Assessing and incorporating patient preferences, engaging the patient in self-report and extending the interaction to the place and time favored by the patient are necessary to bring meaning to the term, patient-centered. There is beginning evidence that these approaches can make a difference, improving care quality.
Implications for nursing practice
Oncology nurses no longer need to be constrained by paper symptom checklists. Patient-reported symptom and quality of life information can be electronically collected and simultaneously made available for home and clinical use through the utilization of Web-based programs.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2011.04.005
PMCID: PMC3143403  PMID: 21783011
cancer symptoms; quality of life; patient centered care; clinical informatics; patient reported outcomes
13.  A Deliberate and Rigorous Approach to Development of Patient-centered Technologies 
Seminars in oncology nursing  2011;27(3):183-191.
Objectives
Many technologies intended for patient use are never developed or evaluated with principles of user-centered design. In this review, we explore different approaches to assessing usability and acceptability, drawn from selected exemplar studies in the health sciences literature.
Data sources
Peer-reviewed research manuscripts were selected from Medline and other data sources accessible through pubmed.gov. We also present a framework for developing patient-centered technologies that we recently employed.
Conclusions
While there are studies utilizing principles of user-centered design, many more do not report formative usability testing results and may only report post-hoc satisfaction surveys. Consequently, adoption by user groups may be limited.
Implications for Nursing Practice
We encourage nurses in practice to look for and examine usability testing results prior to considering implementation of any patient-centered technology.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2011.04.003
PMCID: PMC3189856  PMID: 21783009
Usability; Acceptability; Patient-centered; Informatics
14.  Psychological Health in Cancer Survivors 
Seminars in Oncology Nursing  2008;24(3):193-201.
Objectives
The prevalence of both negative (distress) and positive responses (growth, well-being) to the cancer experience is examined and difficulties in establishing the prevalence of these responses discussed. A conceptual framework for understanding factors associated with psychological health in cancer survivors is presented. Finally, strategies for promoting psychological health in cancer survivors are examined.
Data Sources
Review of the literature.
Conclusions
Psychological health in cancer survivors is defined by the presence or absence of distress as well as the presence or absence of positive well-being and psychological growth. Furthermore, psychological health in cancer survivors is determined by the balance between two classes of factors: the stress and burden posed by the cancer experience and the resources available for coping with this stress and burden.
Implications for nursing practice
In general, promotion of psychological health is based upon the prevention or treatment of distress as well as the encouragement of growth and well-being. Periodic screening for psychological distress across the cancer trajectory is critical to appropriate management of distress.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2008.05.007
PMCID: PMC3321244  PMID: 18687265
15.  Essential Genetic and Genomic Nursing Competencies for the Oncology Nurse 
Seminars in oncology nursing  2011;27(1):64-71.
Objectives
To review the opportunities and possibilities for advancing oncology nursing competencies in genetic/genomics through the illustration of case scenarios in clinical care.
Data Sources
Literature; research reports.
Conclusions
Oncology nurses have the potential to influence whether or not cutting edge research discoveries are utilized at the bedside. Clinical integration of genetic/genomic information has the potential to optimize health outcomes and lengthen patient lives.
Implications for Nursing Practice
Oncology nurses need to include genetics/genomics in their practice in order to impact quality patient care today and for the future.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2010.11.008
PMCID: PMC3059123  PMID: 21255714
Competency; Genetics; Genomics; Oncology Nursing Education
16.  Clinical Trials – The Art of Enrollment 
Seminars in Oncology Nursing  2008;24(4):262-269.
Objectives
Enrollment barriers and multidisciplinary approaches to increase cancer trials participation are presented. Recruitment barriers, research in Maryland, and a Best Practice for cancer trials are discussed.
Data Sources
Journal and research articles, web sites.
Conclusion
Clinical trials have produced prevention and care advances for cancer and other diseases. Trial enrollment is lower for minorities and underserved communities. A comprehensive program for addressing enrollment barriers should incorporate research on barriers, multidisciplinary teams, and education and trial infrastructure in community settings.
Implications for Nursing Practice
Health disparities training, including culturally appropriate enrollment approaches for education and retention of underserved communities, should incorporate community stakeholders and nurse/physician researchers.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2008.08.006
PMCID: PMC3262589  PMID: 19000600
clinical trials enrollment; barriers; accrual; minority and underserved
17.  Developing Successful Models of Cancer Palliative Care Services 
Seminars in oncology nursing  2010;26(4):266-284.
Objectives
This article describes successful institutionally-based programs for providing high quality palliative care to people with cancer and their family members. Challenges and opportunities for program development are also described.
Data Sources
Published literature from 2000 to present describing concurrent oncology palliative care clinical trials, standards and guidelines were reviewed.
Conclusion
Clinical trials have demonstrated feasibility and positive outcomes and formed the basis for consensus guidelines that support concurrent oncology palliative care models.
Implications for nursing practice
Oncology nurses should advocate for all patients with advanced cancer and their families to have access to concurrent oncology palliative oncology care from the time of diagnosis with a life-limiting cancer.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2010.08.006
PMCID: PMC2976669  PMID: 20971407
Cancer palliative care models; review; palliative care standards
18.  Psychological Consequences of Hematopoieitc Stem Cell Transplant 
Seminars in oncology nursing  2009;25(2):139-150.
Objectives
To address the psychological impact of the transplant on quality of life including physical, psychological, social and spiritual for the patient and caregiver and to discuss the nurse’s emotional labor of caring and compassion fatigue for such an intense vulnerable population.
Data Sources
Psychological transplant studies, peer review journals, and textbooks.
Conclusions
The psychological impact after an experience of a transplant can leave an indelible impression on the patient, caregiver and nurse.
Implications for Nursing Practice
Suggestions are made for assessment and management of various potential psychological issues for the three mentioned populations. With these issues being better understood, nurses can actively lessen psychological morbidity.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2009.03.008
PMCID: PMC3105969  PMID: 19411017
Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); Psychological; Quality of Life (QOL); Caregiver; Compassion Fatigue
19.  Technology and Quality of Life Outcomes 
Seminars in oncology nursing  2010;26(1):47-58.
Objectives
To discuss recent technological advances in quality of life data collection and guidance for use in research and clinical practice. The use of telephone-, computer-, and web/Internet based technologies to collect quality of life data, reliability and validity issues, and cost will be discussed along with the potential pitfalls associated with these technologies.
Data Sources
Health care literature and web resources.
Conclusion
Technology has provided researchers and clinicians with an opportunity to collect QOL data from patients that were previously not accessible. Most technologies offer a variety of options, such as language choice, formatting options for the delivery of questions, and data management services. Choosing the appropriate technology for use in research and/or clinical practice primarily depends on the purpose for QOL data collection.
Implications for Nursing Practice
Technology is changing the way nurses assess quality of life in patients with cancer and provide care. As stakeholders in the health care delivery system and patient advocates, nurses must be intimately involved in the evaluation and use of new technologies that impact quality of life and/or the delivery of care.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2009.11.007
PMCID: PMC2853361  PMID: 20152578
20.  Social and Ethical Implications of Genomics, Race, Ethnicity and Health Inequities 
Seminars in oncology nursing  2008;24(4):254-261.
Objectives
To review ethical, ethnic/ancestral, and societal issues of genetic and genomic information and technologies in the context of racial and ethnic health disparities.
Data sources
Research and journal articles, government reports, web sites.
Conclusion
As knowledge of human genetic variation and its link to diseases continues to grow, some see race and ethnicity well poised to serve as genetic surrogates in predicting disease etiology and treatment response. However, stereotyping and bias, in clinical interactions can be barriers to effective treatment for racial and ethnic minority patients.
Implications for nursing practice
The nursing profession has a key role in assuring that genomic healthcare does not enhance racial and ethnic health inequities. This will require utilization of new genomic knowledge and caring for each patient as an individual in a culturally and clinically appropriate manner.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2008.08.005
PMCID: PMC2892396  PMID: 19000599
human genetics; clinical decision-making; race; health disparities; nursing
21.  Non-Myeloablative Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation 
Seminars in oncology nursing  2009;25(2):120-128.
Objective
To review the literature related to nonmyeloablative stem cell transplantation, and the unique characteristics and patient population to which it applies.
Data Sources
Research studies, research and clinical reviews, clinical experience
Conclusion
Nonmyeloablative stem cell transplantation has demonstrated effective and safe application in a heterogeneous population not otherwise eligible for an allogeneic transplantation. Although many principles are based on those of conventional myeloablative transplantation, the engraftment kinetics, patient selection and regimen related complications are distinct.
Implications for Nursing Practice
Nurses must be knowledgeable about nonmyeloablative stem cell transplantation including the provision of individualized care for a heterogeneous population. This can include non-traditional transplant indications, elderly cancer patients and those with comorbidities.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2009.03.006
PMCID: PMC2728008  PMID: 19411015
Regimen Intensity; Transplant Engraftment; Chimerism; Comorbidities; Elderly
22.  Nutrition and the Cancer Survivor: Evidence to Guide Oncology Nursing Practice 
Seminars in oncology nursing  2008;24(3):171-179.
Objectives
To conduct a systematic review of scientific reports related to diet and cancer survivorship that have been published since the 2006 American Cancer Society’s Guide for Informed Choices on Nutrition and Physical Activity During and After Cancer Treatment and to integrate these findings into a consistent message that can be delivered by nurses in hopes of improving the health and well-being of cancer survivors.
Data Sources
Journal articles.
Conclusion
Cancer survivors represent a growing population at high risk for recurrence and other co-morbidities. Evidence continues to accumulate regarding the importance of weight management, and a healthful diet (plant-based, low saturated fat) in improving the overall health and promoting disease-free and overall survival in this population
Implications for Nursing Practice
Cancer survivors are eager for nutrition information and nurses are well-positioned to guide them regarding the importance of weight management and healthy food choices.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2008.05.005
PMCID: PMC2629487  PMID: 18687263
23.  Smoking Cessation and Lung Cancer: Oncology Nurses Can Make a Difference 
Seminars in oncology nursing  2008;24(1):16-26.
OBJECTIVES
Provide an overview of the impact of smoking after a diagnosis of lung cancer, discuss the relationship between smoking cessation and improved outcomes during the lung cancer trajectory, present information about tobacco dependence evidence-based treatments, reimbursement for these treatments, and tobacco-related resources available for patients and health care professionals, and emphasize the important role of nurses.
DATA SOURCES
Published articles, reports, websites, and research studies.
CONCLUSION
Tobacco use is associated with 30% of cancer deaths. Prevention of tobacco use and cessation are primary ways to prevent lung cancer. However, even after a diagnosis of lung cancer, smoking cessation is important in improving survival and quality of life. Although effective tobacco dependence treatments are available to help smokers quit smoking, persistent efforts over repeated contacts may be necessary to achieve long-term cessation.
IMPLICATION FOR NURSING PRACTICE
Oncology nursing action is essential in the identification of and intervention with patients who struggle with tobacco dependence after diagnosis.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2007.11.008
PMCID: PMC2249620  PMID: 18222148
smoking cessation interventions; tobacco dependence treatment and lung cancer
24.  Methodological Issues in Exercise Intervention Research in Oncology 
Seminars in oncology nursing  2007;23(4):297-304.
Objectives
To review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that offered exercise interventions for adults diagnosed and treated for cancer related to design, sample, type of intervention and outcomes.
Data sources
Several electronic data-bases were searched and recent review papers were scanned to identify relevant publications.
Conclusion
Exercise adoption seems clearly feasible for early-stage cancer patients, particularly breast cancer patients. Data support positive effects for physical functioning, quality of life (QOL), and psychological well-being. Effects for patients with later-stage disease and other cancers are less clear. The impact of exercise adoption on biomarkers of disease status, immune functioning and hormone levels should also be examined.
Implications for nursing practice
There are many opportunities for nurses to promote exercise in clinical care and in a research context.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2007.08.006
PMCID: PMC2180155  PMID: 18022057
25.  Lung Cancer Screening: Promise and Pitfalls 
Seminars in oncology nursing  2008;24(1):9-15.
OBJECTIVES
To provide an overview of the status of lung cancer screening.
DATA SOURCES
Published articles, book chapters, websites, and research studies on lung cancer screening.
CONCLUSION
Screening with chest x-ray and sputum cytology has not been shown to be effective in reducing lung cancer mortality. Although screening with helical CT is currently under investigation in randomized clinical trials, observational studies have not shown evidence that it can detect lung cancer that is curable.
IMPLICATION FOR NURSING PRACTICE
As healthcare educators and caregivers, nurses should be informed of the status and current controversies associated with lung cancer screening.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2007.11.007
PMCID: PMC2266834  PMID: 18222147
lung cancer screening; helical CT; low-dose CT; spiral CT; cancer screening clinical trials

Résultats 1-25 (26)