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author:("tansy, E M")
1.  White coats and no trousers: narrating the experiences of women technicians in medical laboratories, 1930–90 
Laboratory technicians are a vital part of any working lab. Not only is their knowledge and expertise important for the success of research, but they also often maintain the lab's intellectual and social life. Despite the importance of their work, they are rarely acknowledged in publications, and leave only a few traces within the historical record—the voices of women laboratory technicians are even harder to uncover. This paper attempts to correct this imbalance by presenting the narratives of women who worked as laboratory technicians at places such as the National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR), the Wellcome Research Laboratories, and established hospital and university labs in Cambridge, Oxford and London. The data were collected though narrative interviews. Specifically, the paper looks at the roles of these women within the lab, their experiences of the social and gender dynamics of the lab, and the development of expertise in regard to the work they carried out and the extent to which they received credit for their contributions to science.
doi:10.1098/rsnr.2014.0058
PMCID: PMC4321123  PMID: 26489181
oral history; women; technicians; laboratory; production of knowledge
2.  Thomas Graham Brown (1882–1965): Behind the Scenes at the Cardiff Institute of Physiology 
Thomas Graham Brown undertook seminal experiments on the neural control of locomotion between 1910 and 1915. Although elected to the Royal Society in 1927, his locomotion research was largely ignored until the 1960s when it was championed and extended by the distinguished neuroscientist, Anders Lundberg. Puzzlingly, Graham Brown's published research stopped in the 1920s and he became renowned as a mountaineer. In this article, we review his life and multifaceted career, including his active neurological service in WWI. We outline events behind the scenes during his tenure at Cardiff's Institute of Physiology in Wales, UK, including an interview with his technician, Terrence J. Surman, who worked in this institute for over half a century.
doi:10.1080/0964704X.2010.510991
PMCID: PMC3259622
physiology; spinal cord; locomotion; motoneurones; interneurones; neural control; mountaineering; sailing; medical school politics
3.  What's in a name? Henry Dale and adrenaline, 1906. 
Medical History  1995;39(4):459-476.
PMCID: PMC1037030  PMID: 8558993
4.  Working with C. S. Sherrington, 1918–24 
doi:10.1098/rsnr.2007.0037
PMCID: PMC2628577  PMID: 18548907
5.  Working with Cambridge physiologists 
doi:10.1098/rsnr.2007.0036
PMCID: PMC2628578  PMID: 18548908
13.  Book Review 
Medical History  2007;51(3):425-427.
PMCID: PMC1894862
14.  Keeping the culture alive: the laboratory technician in mid-twentieth-century British medical research 
This paper reports results from a detailed study of the careers of laboratory technicians in British medical research. Technicians and their contributions are very frequently missing from accounts of modern medicine, and this project is an attempt to correct that absence. The present paper focuses almost entirely on the Medical Research Council's National Institute for Medical Research in North London, from the first proposal of such a body in 1913 until the mid 1960s. The principal sources of information have been technical staff themselves, largely as recorded in an extensive series of oral history interviews. These have covered a wide range of issues and provide valuable perspectives about technicians' backgrounds and working lives.
doi:10.1098/rsnr.2007.0035
PMCID: PMC2628576  PMID: 18548906
medical laboratory technicians; medical laboratories; medical history
15.  KEEPING THE CULTURE ALIVE 
This paper reports results from a detailed study of the careers of laboratory technicians in British medical research. Technicians and their contributions are very frequently missing from accounts of modern medicine, and this project is an attempt to correct that absence. The present paper focuses almost entirely on the Medical Research Council’s National Institute for Medical Research in North London, from the first proposal of such a body in 1913 until the mid 1960s. The principal sources of information have been technical staff themselves, largely as recorded in an extensive series of oral history interviews. These have covered a wide range of issues and provide valuable perspectives about technicians’ backgrounds and working lives.
PMCID: PMC2628576  PMID: 18548906
medical laboratory technicians; medical laboratories; medical history
18.  The psychopharmacologists II 
Medical History  2000;44(2):294-295.
PMCID: PMC1044277

Résultats 1-25 (34)