PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-25 (1390097)

Clipboard (0)
None

Related Articles

1.  Fibromyalgia: Presentation and management with a focus on pharmacological treatment 
Fibromyalgia is a condition with widespread muscle pain. Prevalence studies showed that 2% to 7% of the population have fibromyalgia, which affects approximately one million Canadians. Fibromyalgia is most common in women, but it also involves men and children. As with most chronic illnesses, the causes of fibromyalgia are unknown. However, recent research supports underlying abnormalities in the central nervous system, which supports fibromyalgia as a chronic disease state and valid clinical entity. Pain is the primary symptom, often accompanied by overwhelming fatigue, sleep dysfunction and cognitive impairment. In 1990, the American College of Rheumatology developed diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis of fibromyalgia. Lifestyle changes, including pacing of activities and aerobic exercise, are very important in managing fibromyalgia symptoms. Emotional and behavioural therapy can also be helpful. Controlled trials of antidepressants, gabapentinoids, tramadol, zopiclone and sodium oxybate have shown effectiveness in fibromyalgia patients. Pregabalin and duloxetine were recently approved in the United States. Effective management of fibromyalgia is complex and requires a multidisciplinary treatment approach. Response and tolerance of different therapeutic interventions vary from patient to patient. Recent advances in the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia offer hope for new and improved therapies in the management of this disabling condition.
PMCID: PMC2799316  PMID: 19225604
Fatigue; Fibromyalgia; Pain; Treatment
2.  Effectiveness of the psychological and pharmacological treatment of catastrophization in patients with fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial 
Trials  2009;10:24.
Background
Fibromyalgia is a prevalent and disabling disorder characterized by widespread pain and other symptoms such as insomnia, fatigue or depression. Catastrophization is considered a key clinical symptom in fibromyalgia; however, there are no studies on the pharmacological or psychological treatment of catastrophizing. The general aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of cognitive-behaviour therapy and recommended pharmacological treatment for fibromyalgia (pregabalin, with duloxetine added where there is a comorbid depression), compared with usual treatment at primary care level.
Method/design
Design: A multi-centre, randomized controlled trial involving three groups: the control group, consisting of usual treatment at primary care level, and two intervention groups, one consisting of cognitive-behaviour therapy, and the other consisting of the recommended pharmacological treatment for fibromyalgia.
Setting: 29 primary care health centres in the city of Zaragoza, Spain.
Sample: 180 patients, aged 18–65 years, able to understand and read Spanish, who fulfil criteria for primary fibromyalgia, with no previous psychological treatment, and no pharmacological treatment or their acceptance to discontinue it two weeks before the onset of the study.
Intervention: Psychological treatment is based on the manualized protocol developed by Prof. Escobar et al, from the University of New Jersey, for the treatment of somatoform disorders, which has been adapted by our group for the treatment of fibromyalgia. It includes 10 weekly sessions of cognitive-behaviour therapy. Pharmacological therapy consists of the recommended pharmacological treatment for fibromyalgia: pregabalin (300–600 mg/day), with duloxetine (60–120 mg/day) added where there is a comorbid depression).
Measurements: The following socio-demographic data will be collected: sex, age, marital status, education, occupation and social class. The diagnosis of psychiatric disorders will be made with the Structured Polyvalent Psychiatric Interview. Other instruments to be administered are the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, the Hamilton tests for Anxiety and for Depression, the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), the EuroQuol-5 domains (EQ-5D), and the use of health and social services (CSRI). Assessments will be carried out at baseline, 1, 3, and 6 months.
Main variable: Pain catastrophizing.
Analysis: The analysis will be per intent to treat. We will use the general linear models of the SPSS version 15 statistical package, to analyse the effect of the treatment on the result variable (pain catastrophizing).
Discussion
It is necessary to assess the effectiveness of pharmacological and psychological treatments for pain catastrophizing in fibromyalgia. This randomized clinical trial will determine whether both treatments are effective for this important prognostic variable in patients with fibromyalgia.
Trial registration
Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN10804772
doi:10.1186/1745-6215-10-24
PMCID: PMC2689860  PMID: 19389246
3.  A novel comparative effectiveness study of Tai Chi versus aerobic exercise for fibromyalgia: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial 
Trials  2015;16:34.
Background
Fibromyalgia is a chronic musculoskeletal pain syndrome that causes substantial physical and psychological impairment and costs the US healthcare system over $25 billion annually. Current pharmacological therapies may cause serious adverse effects, are expensive, and fail to effectively improve pain and function. Finding new and effective non-pharmacological treatments for fibromyalgia patients is urgently needed. We are currently conducting the first comparative effectiveness randomized trial of Tai Chi versus aerobic exercise (a recommended component of the current standard of care) in a large fibromyalgia population. This article describes the design and conduct of this trial.
Methods/design
A single-center, 52-week, randomized controlled trial of Tai Chi versus aerobic exercise is being conducted at an urban tertiary medical center in Boston, Massachusetts. We plan to recruit 216 patients with fibromyalgia. The study population consists of adults ≥21 years of age with fibromyalgia who meet American College of Rheumatology 1990 and 2010 diagnostic criteria. Participants are randomized to one of four Tai Chi intervention groups: 12 or 24 weeks of supervised Tai Chi held once or twice per week, or a supervised aerobic exercise control held twice per week for 24 weeks. The primary outcome is the change in Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire total score from baseline to 24 weeks. Secondary outcomes include measures of widespread pain, symptom severity, functional performance, balance, muscle strength and power, psychological functioning, sleep quality, self-efficacy, durability effects, and health-related quality of life at 12, 24, and 52 week follow-up.
Discussion
This study is the first comparative effectiveness randomized trial of Tai Chi versus aerobic exercise in a large fibromyalgia population with long-term follow up. We present here a robust and well-designed trial to determine the optimal frequency and duration of a supervised Tai Chi intervention with regard to short- and long-term effectiveness. The trial also explores multiple outcomes to elucidate the potential mechanisms of Tai Chi and aerobic exercise and the generalizability of these interventions across instructors. Results of this study are expected to have important public health implications for patients with a major disabling disease that incurs substantial health burdens and economic costs.
Trial registration
ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01420640, registered 18 August 2011.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13063-015-0548-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/s13063-015-0548-x
PMCID: PMC4323027  PMID: 25633475
Tai Chi; Aerobic exercise; Fibromyalgia; Randomized controlled trial; Comparative effectiveness research
4.  Fibromyalgia: From treatment to rehabilitation 
Fibromyalgia is a clinical syndrome of chronic widespread pain and reduced pain thresholds to palpation. The pathophysiology remains unknown, but there is increasing evidence that peripheral and central sensitization cause an amplification of sensory impulses that may alter pain perception in fibromyalgia patients. Interventions to treat fibromyalgia should aim at different targets simultaneously in order to reduce peripheral and central sensitization. There are both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic approaches with evidence for effectiveness in the treatment of fibromyalgia and its associated symptoms. Evidence from randomized trials and meta-analyses shows that partial and short-term improvements in fibromyalgia symptoms can be achieved with low doses of antidepressants and with physical activity such as aerobic and strengthening exercises. A multidimensional approach which emphasizes education and integration of exercise and cognitive behavior therapy improves quality of life and reduces pain, fatigue and depressive symptoms when measured on a short term basis. More recently, trials have shown the neuromodulators gabapentin and pregabalin to be effective in reducing pain and improving quality of sleep in fibromyalgia. In addition, small trials of noninvasive brain stimulation have also shown benefits in reducing pain in fibromyalgia. It is essential to keep in mind that some important clinical conditions can mimic and overlap with fibromyalgia and should always be ruled out by a complete history, physical examination and appropriate laboratory testing.
doi:10.1016/j.eujps.2009.08.011
PMCID: PMC2907544  PMID: 20657807
Fibromyalgia syndrome; Chronic Pain; Disability; Treatment; Rehabilitation
5.  The PedsQL™ as a patient-reported outcome in children and adolescents with fibromyalgia: an analysis of OMERACT domains 
Background
Fibromyalgia is a chronic health condition characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain, multiple tender points on physical examination, generalized muscular aching, stiffness, fatigue, nonrestorative sleep pattern, cognitive dysfunction, and mood disturbance. Recently, the Outcome Measures in Rheumatoid Arthritis Clinical Trials (OMERACT) Fibromyalgia Syndrome Workshop ranked and prioritized the domains that should be consistently measured in fibromyalgia clinical trials, specifically, pain, generic health-related quality of life, fatigue, sleep quality, and physical function. The focus of these deliberations was exclusively on adult patients, and to our knowledge, these domains have not been previously tested within a multidimensional framework in children and adolescents with fibromyalgia.
Methods
An analysis to determine the feasibility, reliability, and validity of the PedsQL™ 4.0 (Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™) Generic Core Scales, PedsQL™ Multidimensional Fatigue Scale, and PedsQL™ Rheumatology Module Pain and Hurt Scale as patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures for pediatric patients with fibromyalgia. The PedsQL™ Scales were completed by 59 families in a pediatric rheumatology clinic in a large children's hospital.
Results
The PedsQL™ evidenced minimal missing responses (0.53% patient self-report, 0.70% parent proxy-report), achieved excellent reliability for the Generic Core Scales Total Scale Score (α = 0.88 patient self-report, 0.87 parent proxy-report), the Multidimensional Fatigue Scale Total Scale Score (α = 0.94 patient self-report, 0.94 parent proxy-report), and acceptable reliability for the 4-item Rheumatology Module Pain and Hurt Scale (α = 0.68 patient self-report, 0.75 parent proxy-report). The PedsQL™ Generic Core Scales and Multidimensional Fatigue Scale significantly distinguished between pediatric patients with fibromyalgia and healthy children. Pediatric patients with fibromyalgia self-reported severely impaired physical and psychosocial functioning, significantly lower on most dimensions when compared to pediatric cancer patients receiving cancer treatment, and significantly lower on all dimensions than pediatric patients with other rheumatologic diseases. Patients with fibromyalgia self-reported significantly greater pain and fatigue than pediatric patients with other rheumatologic conditions, and generally more fatigue than pediatric patients receiving treatment for cancer.
Conclusion
The results demonstrate the excellent measurement properties of the PedsQL™ Scales in fibromyalgia. These PedsQL™ Scales measure constructs consistent with the recommended OMERACT Fibromyalgia Syndrome Workshop domains. The findings highlight the severely impaired HRQOL of pediatric patients with fibromyalgia. Regular monitoring of pediatric patients with fibromyalgia will help identify children and adolescents at risk for severely impaired HRQOL. These PedsQL™ Scales are appropriate outcome measures for clinical trials and health services research for pediatric patients with fibromyalgia.
doi:10.1186/1477-7525-5-9
PMCID: PMC1802070  PMID: 17295915
6.  Fibromyalgia: A Primer for the Anesthesia Community 
Purpose of the Review
The present review is intended to give an overview of fibromyalgia for the anesthesiologist. While the basics of the treatment of fibromyalgia are included, the intent is to provide context to discuss the potential implications in perioperative management.
Recent Findings
One of the most important changes in the last year is the new criteria established by the American College of Rheumatology for the diagnosis of fibromyalgia. Instead of a combination of self-report and a tender point examination, there is a new self-report questionnaire that is now used diagnose fibromyalgia. This tool incorporates aspects of widespread body pain and some of the known comorbid symptoms. A score of 0-31 is given, which allows for the disease to be viewed as a continuum of sensitivity and symptomatology, instead of as a binary diagnosis. This continuum has been termed “fibromyalgia-ness.” This article also reviews the advances in understanding of the pathophysiology and emerging therapies. Little is known about the impact of fibromyalgia in the perioperative period.
Summary
The impact of fibromyalgia on anesthesia care is not known. Years of quality research have clearly demonstrated multiple pathophysiologic changes that could impact anesthesia care and future study is needed.
doi:10.1097/ACO.0b013e32834a1091
PMCID: PMC3422621  PMID: 21799404
fibromyalgia; treatment; anesthesiology; postoperative pain; chronic post-surgical pain
7.  The quality of websites addressing fibromyalgia: an assessment of quality and readability using standardised tools 
BMJ Open  2011;1(1):e000152.
Background
Patients living with fibromyalgia strongly prefer to access health information on the web. However, the majority of subjects in previous studies strongly expressed their concerns about the quality of online information resources.
Objectives
The purpose of this study was to evaluate existing online fibromyalgia information resources for content, quality and readability by using standardised quality and readability tools.
Methods
The first 25 websites were identified using Google and the search keyword ‘fibromyalgia’. Pairs of raters independently evaluated website quality using two structured tools (DISCERN and a quality checklist). Readability was assessed using the Flesch Reading Ease score maps.
Results
Ranking of the websites' quality varied by the tool used, although there was general agreement about the top three websites (Fibromyalgia Information, Fibromyalgia Information Foundation and National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases). Content analysis indicated that 72% of websites provided information on treatment options, 68% on symptoms, 60% on diagnosis and 40% on coping and resources. DISCERN ratings classified 32% websites as ‘very good’, 32% as ‘good and 36% as ‘marginal’. The mean overall DISCERN score was 36.88 (good). Only 16% of websites met the recommended literacy level grade of 6–8 (range 7–15).
Conclusion
Higher quality websites tended to be less readable. Online fibromyalgia information resources do not provide comprehensive information about fibromyalgia, and have low quality and poor readability. While information is very important for those living with fibromyalgia, current resources are unlikely to provide necessary or accurate information, and may not be usable for most people.
Article summary
Article focus
The purpose of the study was to gain a better understanding of the online information resources available for people with fibromyalgia and to evaluate those resources for content, quality and readability.
To determine the content, website quality and readability of the most readily retrieved information available on the web when searching for fibromyalgia information.
Key messages
Most existing websites do not provide comprehensive information on fibromyalgia.
Websites are highly variable in terms of quality.
Higher quality websites do not present information in language/reading levels appropriate for the general population.
Strengths and limitations of this study
This study examines the quality of online fibromyalgia resources.
Standardised quality and readability tools were used to assess quality and readability.
There is no gold standard for comparison or ways to evaluate the quality of websites.
The quality issue was discussed using critical appraisal tools designed for the lay public.
The readability score may vary for some websites as it may be related to the use of technical terms such as fibromyalgia.
doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2011-000152
PMCID: PMC3191440  PMID: 22021777
8.  Acute pancreatitis and fibromyalgia: Cytokine link 
Context:
Fibromyalgia is a widespread musculoskeletal pain disorder found in 2% of the general population and with a preponderance of 85% in females, and has both genetic and environmental contribution. Acute pancreatitis is a severe condition and in most cases gallstones disease represents approximately half of the cases of acute pancreatitis, and 20-25% are related to alcohol abuse. Small numbers of cases are caused by a variety of other reasons but a few cases have no obvious cause, referred to as ‘idiopathic’. Here we present a case where fibromyalgia might be linked to acute pancreatitis. We believe this has not been reported in this context in literature.
Case Report:
Fibromyalgia is a widespread musculoskeletal pain disorder found in 2% of the general population and with a preponderance of 85% in females, and has both genetic and environmental contribution. Patient had a cholecystectomy eight years previously. Patient feels tired almost all the time due to her fibromyalgia and requires family support for daily routine. Patient's blood results showed alanine transaminase 527 IU/L, alkaline phosphatase 604 IU/L, bilirubin 34 μmol/L, amylase 2257 IU/L, C-reactive protein 19 mg/L, Gamma-Glutamyl transpeptidase 851 IU/L, renal function and electrolytes were within normal limits. The patient was admitted to the high dependency unit with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis.
Conclusion:
There is a known increase in levels of cytokines in patients with fibromyalgia. Part of the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis is related to raised cytokines and immune deregulations. We hypothesize that elevated levels of cytokines in fibromyalgia has led to acute pancreatitis in our patient. Further epidemiological research on the incidence of pancreatitis in cytokine mediated conditions such as fibromyalgia is required.
doi:10.4297/najms.2011.3205
PMCID: PMC3336914  PMID: 22540093
Fibromyalgia; acute pancreatitis; immunodysregulation; cytokines
9.  Beyond pain in fibromyalgia: insights into the symptom of fatigue 
Fatigue is a disabling, multifaceted symptom that is highly prevalent and stubbornly persistent. Although fatigue is a frequent complaint among patients with fibromyalgia, it has not received the same attention as pain. Reasons for this include lack of standardized nomenclature to communicate about fatigue, lack of evidence-based guidelines for fatigue assessment, and a deficiency in effective treatment strategies. Fatigue does not occur in isolation; rather, it is present concurrently in varying severity with other fibromyalgia symptoms such as chronic widespread pain, unrefreshing sleep, anxiety, depression, cognitive difficulties, and so on. Survey-based and preliminary mechanistic studies indicate that multiple symptoms feed into fatigue and it may be associated with a variety of physiological mechanisms. Therefore, fatigue assessment in clinical and research settings must consider this multi-dimensionality. While no clinical trial to date has specifically targeted fatigue, randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses indicate that treatment modalities studied in the context of other fibromyalgia symptoms could also improve fatigue. The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Fibromyalgia Working Group and the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) have been instrumental in propelling the study of fatigue in fibromyalgia to the forefront. The ongoing efforts by PROMIS to develop a brief fibromyalgia-specific fatigue measure for use in clinical and research settings will help define fatigue, allow for better assessment, and advance our understanding of fatigue.
doi:10.1186/ar4395
PMCID: PMC3978642  PMID: 24289848
10.  Interpreting Effect Sizes and Clinical Relevance of Pharmacological Interventions for Fibromyalgia 
Pain and Therapy  2013;2(1):65-71.
Duloxetine, milnacipran, and pregabalin are approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the management of fibromyalgia. A number of meta-analyses, pooled analyses, and systematic reviews have been published in recent years involving the efficacy of these three medications for pain in fibromyalgia. Despite being based on the same clinical data, some analyses found these treatments to have a clinically relevant effect on pain, while others concluded that the advantages were small or of questionable clinical relevance. This commentary discussed possible reasons behind these differing conclusions and explored ways of evaluating the clinical relevance of pharmacological treatments for fibromyalgia. In particular, we considered: (1) the importance of judicious and careful interpretation of average treatment effect size and the recognition that average treatment effect sizes do not always tell the whole story; (2) the utility of individual patient response data to assess clinical relevance; and (3) the importance of considering pain reduction within the context of other benefits due to the presence of associated symptoms in patients with fibromyalgia.
doi:10.1007/s40122-013-0011-1
PMCID: PMC4107878  PMID: 25135038
Clinical relevance; Duloxetine; Effect size; Fibromyalgia; Milnacipran; Pain; Patient response; Patient-reported outcomes; Pregabalin
11.  General symptom reporting in female fibromyalgia patients and referents: a population-based case-referent study 
BMC Public Health  2009;9:402.
Background
Fibromyalgia is characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain and palpation tenderness. In addition to these classic symptoms, fibromyalgia patients tend to report a number of other complaints. What these other complaints are and how often they are reported as compared with related referents from the general population is not very well known. We therefore hypothesized that subjects with fibromyalgia report more of a wide range of symptoms as compared with referents of the same sex and age from the general population.
Methods
138 women with diagnosed fibromyalgia in primary health care and 401 referents from the general population matched to the cases by sex, age and residential area responded to a postal questionnaire where information on marital status, education, occupational status, income level, immigrant status, smoking habits physical activity, height and weight history and the prevalence of 42 defined symptoms was sought.
Results
The cases had lower educational and income levels, were more often unemployed, on sick leave or on disability pension and were more often first generation immigrants than the referents. They were also heavier, shorter and more often had a history of excessive food intake and excessive weight loss. When these differences were taken into account, cases reported not only significantly more presumed fibromyalgia symptoms but also significantly more of general symptoms than the referents. The distribution of symptoms was similar in subjects with fibromyalgia and referents, indicating a generally higher symptom reporting level among the former.
Conclusion
Subjects with fibromyalgia had a high prevalence of reported general symptoms than referents. Some of these differences may be a consequence of the disorder while others may reflect etiological processes.
doi:10.1186/1471-2458-9-402
PMCID: PMC2776598  PMID: 19878599
12.  Effects of a one week multidisciplinary inpatient self-management programme for patients with fibromyalgia: a randomised controlled trial 
Background
Self-management programmes (SMP) are recommended for patients with fibromyalgia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate effects of a one week multidisciplinary inpatient self-management programme on psychological distress, skills as a consumer of health services, self-efficacy, and functional and symptomatic consequences of fibromyalgia (FM).
Methods
A randomised controlled two-armed, assessor-blinded trial with three-week follow-up to evaluate SMP. Primary outcomes were the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-20) and the Effective Musculoskeletal Consumer Scale (EC-17), while secondary outcomes included the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and Self-efficacy scales for pain, function and symptoms (ASES).
Results
150 patients with FM were randomised to one week one SMP (n = 75) or to a waiting list control group (n = 75). Of these, 58 participants in the treatment group and 60 in the control group completed the study. At three weeks’ follow up there was a significant difference in EC-17 (0-100) in favour of the treatment group (mean difference 4.26, 95 CI 0.8 to 7.7, p = 0.02). There were no differences between the groups for any of the other outcomes.
Conclusion
This study shows that in patients with FM the SMP had no effect on psychological distress, functional and symptomatic consequences and self-efficacy, except for a small short-term effect on skills and behaviour that are important for managing and participating in health care (EC-17). Clinical Trials.gov Id: NCT01035125.
Trial registration
Clinical Trials.gov Id: NCT01035125
doi:10.1186/1471-2474-13-189
PMCID: PMC3551734  PMID: 23013162
Self-management programme; RCT; Fibromyalgia
13.  Management of Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Review of Evidence 
Pain and Therapy  2013;2(2):87-104.
Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a common chronic musculoskeletal pain disorder of unknown etiology and characterized by generalized body pain, hyperalgesia, and other functional and emotional comorbidities. Despite extensive research, no treatment modality is effective for all FMS patients. In this paper, we briefly review the history of FMS and diagnostic criteria, and potential pathophysiological mechanisms including central pain modulation, neurotransmitters, sympatho-adrenal and hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal systems and peripheral muscle issues. The primary focus of the paper is to review treatment options for managing fibromyalgia symptoms. We will discuss FDA-approved medications and other pharmacologic agents, and non-pharmacologic treatments that have shown promising effects.
doi:10.1007/s40122-013-0016-9
PMCID: PMC4107911  PMID: 25135147
Classification criteria; Duloxetine; Fibromyalgia; Milnacipran; Non-pharmacologic treatment; Pain; Pharmacologic treatment; Pregabalin
14.  Fibromyalgia and the therapeutic relationship: Where uncertainty meets attitude 
BACKGROUND:
Fibromyalgia remains underdiagnosed and suboptimally treated even though it affects an estimated 3.3% of Canadians. The present study examines knowledge and attitudinal challenges affecting optimal care.
METHODS:
A mixed-methods approach was employed. Discussion groups, semistructured interviews and a quantitative online survey (five-point scale) were conducted (June 2007 to January 2008). Participants included 189 general practitioners (GPs) and 139 specialists (anesthesiologists, neurologists, physiatrists, psychiatrists and rheumatologists) distributed across Canada. Participants included 18 patients to enrich the scope of the findings.
RESULTS:
GPs reported insufficient knowledge and skill in diagnosing fibromyalgia, with not all believing it to be a diagnosable condition (mean 3.74/5). Twenty-three per cent of GPs and 12% of specialists characterized fibromyalgia patients as malingerers. They further reported a lack of knowledge and skill in treating fibromyalgia (mean 2.73/5), including the pain, sleep disorders and mood disorders related to the condition (mean 3.32/5). Specialists shared these challenges, although to a lesser degree – “We are not trained to treat distress and suffering” (Specialist). Attitudinal issues centred around frustration (mean 3.91/5) and negative profiling of fibromyalgia patients (mean 3.06/5 and 1.99/5).
CONCLUSIONS:
Findings revealed the presence of GP attitudinal and confidence challenges in caring for fibromyalgia patients. As care of fibromyalgia patients moves to general practices, these fundamental competencies must be addressed to assure that all patients receive the quality of care necessary to manage their disease and to empower physicians to be more professionally effective. As stated by one patient, “Why are we being penalized for having this disability?”
PMCID: PMC3008664  PMID: 21165373
Doctor-patient relationship; Fibromyalgia; Mixed-method research; Pain; Patient profiling; Qualitative research
15.  Real-world comparison of health care utilization between duloxetine and pregabalin initiators with fibromyalgia 
Journal of Pain Research  2014;7:37-46.
Objectives
To compare health care utilization of duloxetine initiators and pregabalin initiators among fibromyalgia patients in a real-world setting.
Methods
A retrospective cohort study was conducted based on a US national commercial health claims database (2006–2009). Fibromyalgia patients who initiated duloxetine or pregabalin in 2008, aged 18–64 years, and who maintained continuous health insurance coverage 1 year before and 1 year after initiation were assigned to duloxetine or pregabalin cohorts on the basis of their initiated agent. Patients who had pill coverage of the agents over the course of 90 days preceding the initiation were excluded. The two comparative cohorts were constructed using propensity score greedy match methods. Descriptive analysis and paired t-test were performed to compare health care utilization rates in the postinitiation year and the changes of these rates from the preinitiation year to the postinitiation year.
Results
Both matched cohorts (n=1,265 pairs) had a similar mean initiation age (49–50 years), percentage of women (87%–88%), and prevalence of baseline comorbid conditions (neuropathic pain other than diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain, low back pain, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, headache or migraine, and osteoarthritis). In the preinitiation year, both cohorts had similar inpatient, outpatient, and medication utilization rates (inpatient, 15.7%–16.1%; outpatient, 100.0%; medication, 97.9%–98.7%). The utilization rates diverged in the postinitiation year, with the pregabalin cohort using more fibromyalgia-related inpatient care (3.2% versus 2.2%; P<0.05), any inpatient care (19.3% versus 16.8%; P<0.05), and fibromyalgia-related outpatient care (62.1% versus 51.8%; P<0.05). From the preinitiation period to the postinitiation period, the duloxetine cohort experienced decreases in certain utilization rates, whereas the pregabalin cohort had increases (percentage of patients with a fibromyalgia-related admission, −1.2% versus 0.4% [P<0.01]; number of fibromyalgia-related outpatient claims, −1.7 versus 4.7 [P<0.01]).
Conclusion
Fibromyalgia patients initiating pregabalin tended to consume more fibromyalgia-related inpatient and outpatient care in the first postinitiation year, whereas fibromyalgia patients initiating duloxetine tended to have lower utilization rates of fibromyalgia-related inpatient care in the postinitiation year than in the preinitiation year.
doi:10.2147/JPR.S51636
PMCID: PMC3891762  PMID: 24470771
fibromyalgia; health care utilization; propensity score methods; duloxetine; pregabalin
16.  Objective evidence that small-fiber polyneuropathy underlies some illnesses currently labeled as fibromyalgia 
Pain  2013;154(11):10.1016/j.pain.2013.06.001.
Fibromyalgia is a common, disabling, syndrome that includes chronic widespread pain plus other diverse symptoms. No specific objective abnormalities have been identified, precluding definitive testing, disease-modifying treatments, and identification of causes. In contrast, small-fiber polyneuropathy (SFPN), despite causing similar symptoms, is definitionally a disease caused by dysfunction and degeneration of peripheral small-fiber neurons. SFPN has established etiologies, some diagnosable and definitively treatable, e.g., diabetes. To evaluate the hypothesis that some patients labeled with “fibromyalgia” have unrecognized SFPN causing their illness symptoms, we analyzed SFPN-associated symptoms, signs, and pathological and physiological markers in 27 fibromyalgia patients and 30 matched normal controls. Fibromyalgia subjects had to satisfy American College of Rheumatology criteria plus present documented evidence of a physician’s actual fibromyalgia diagnosis. Study instruments comprised the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI), the Utah Early Neuropathy Scale (UENS), distal-leg neurodiagnostic skin biopsies, plus autonomic-function testing (AFT). 41% of skin biopsies from fibromyalgia subjects vs. 3% of biopsies from control subjects were diagnostic for SFPN, and MNSI and UENS scores were higher among fibromyalgia than control subjects (all P ≤ 0.001). Abnormal AFTs were equally prevalent suggesting that fibromyalgia-associated SFPN is primarily somatic. Blood tests from all 13 fibromyalgia subjects with SFPN-diagnostic skin biopsies provided insights into etiologies. All glucose tolerance tests were normal, but eight subjects had dysimmune markers, 2 had hepatitis C serologies, and one family had apparent genetic causality. These findings suggest that some patients with chronic pain labeled as “fibromyalgia” have unrecognized small-fiber polyneuropathy, a distinct disease that can be objectively tested for and sometimes definitively treated.
doi:10.1016/j.pain.2013.06.001
PMCID: PMC3845002  PMID: 23748113
chronic pain; human-subject research; peripheral neuropathy; peripheral nerve; skin biopsy; autonomic function testing
17.  Antidepressants in the treatment of fibromyalgia 
Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic disease of widespread and debilitating pain whose cause is unknown and whose risk factors are poorly understood. It is often comorbid with rheumatoid and other pain disorders as well as psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression. Although they are not officially approved for this indication, antiepileptics and antidepressants are often used to treat fibromyalgia. The tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), particularly amitriptyline, are among the most common treatment strategies. Because of the poor tolerability of the tricyclics, the newer antidepressants have been widely tested in fibromyalgia. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and the reversible monoamine oxidase inhibitors do not seem to be particularly helpful. The serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), duloxetine and milnacipran, on the other hand, have been shown in placebo-controlled trials to offer significant relief to patients suffering from fibromyalgia. Although no direct comparative studies have been performed, these compounds appear to be as effective as the TCAs but much better tolerated. The effectiveness of the SNRIs as well as other dual acting antidepressants, such as mirtazapine, but not the SSRIs, implies that a dysfunction of both serotonin and norepinephrine neurotransmission probably exists in fibromyalgia. The effectiveness of antidepressants appears to be independent of their effect on comorbid depression.
PMCID: PMC2671948  PMID: 19412502
fibromyalgia syndrome; FMS; pain; depression; antidepressants; norephinephrine; serotonin
18.  A randomized, double-blind, multicenter, placebo-controlled phase III trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pregabalin in Japanese patients with fibromyalgia 
Arthritis Research & Therapy  2012;14(5):R217.
Introduction
Fibromyalgia is a chronic disorder characterized by widespread pain and tenderness. Prior trials have demonstrated the efficacy of pregabalin for the relief of fibromyalgia symptoms, and it is approved for the treatment of fibromyalgia in the United States. However, prior to this study, there has not been a large-scale efficacy trial in patients with fibromyalgia in Japan.
Methods
This randomized, double-blind, multicenter, placebo-controlled trial was conducted at 44 centers in Japan to assess the efficacy and safety of pregabalin for the symptomatic relief of pain in fibromyalgia patients. Patients aged ≥18 years who had met the criteria for fibromyalgia were randomized to receive either pregabalin, starting at 150 mg/day and increasing to a maintenance dose of 300 or 450 mg/day, or placebo, for 15 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was mean pain score at final assessment. Secondary endpoints included Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC) together with measures of sleep, physical functioning and quality of life.
Results
A total of 498 patients (89% female) were randomized to receive either pregabalin (n = 250) or placebo (n = 248). Pregabalin significantly reduced mean pain score at final assessment (difference in mean change from baseline, compared with placebo -0.44; P = 0.0046) and at every week during the study (P <0.025). Key secondary endpoints were also significantly improved with pregabalin treatment compared with placebo, including PGIC (percentage reporting symptoms "very much improved" or "much improved", 38.6% vs 26.7% with placebo; P = 0.0078); pain visual analog scale (difference in mean change from baseline, compared with placebo -6.19; P = 0.0013); Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire total score (-3.33; P = 0.0144); and quality of sleep score (-0.73; P <0.0001). Treatment was generally well tolerated, with somnolence and dizziness the most frequently reported adverse events.
Conclusions
This trial demonstrated that pregabalin, at doses of up to 450 mg/day, was effective for the symptomatic relief of pain in Japanese patients with fibromyalgia. Pregabalin also improved measures of sleep and functioning and was well tolerated. These data indicate that pregabalin is an effective treatment option for the relief of pain and sleep problems in Japanese patients with fibromyalgia.
Trial Registration
ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00830167
doi:10.1186/ar4056
PMCID: PMC3580529  PMID: 23062189
19.  Disability and quality of life in patients with fibromyalgia 
Background
Patients with fibromyalgia often feel disabled in the performance of daily activities. Psychological factors seem to play a pronounced disabling role in fibromyalgia.
The objectives of the study are: Firstly, to investigate contributing factors for disability in fibromyalgia. Secondly, to study psychological distress in patients with fibromyalgia as compared to other nonspecific pain syndromes. And finally, to explore the impact of fibromyalgia on a patient's quality of life.
Methods
In this cross sectional study, explaining factors for disability were studied based on a regression analysis with gender, mental health, physical and social functioning as independent variables. For the assessment of disability in fibromyalgia the FIQ was used. The levels of psychological distress in patients with fibromyalgia, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) and chronic low back pain (CLBP) were compared based on scores on the Symptom Checklist (SCL90). Quality of life of patients with fibromyalgia was compared with scores (SF36) of both patients with fibromyalgia and other health conditions as derived from the literature.
Results
Disability in fibromyalgia seemed best explained by a patients mental health condition (β = -0.360 p = 0.02). The level of psychological distress was higher in patients with fibromyalgia as compared to patients with CRPS or CLBP (p < 0.01). The impact of fibromyalgia on quality of life appeared to be high as compared to the impact of other health conditions.
Conclusion
Patients with fibromyalgia report a considerable impact on their quality of life and their perceived disability level seems influenced by their mental health condition. In comparison with patients with other pain conditions psychological distress is higher.
doi:10.1186/1477-7525-6-8
PMCID: PMC2265693  PMID: 18211701
20.  Improving the primary care physicians’ decision making for fibromyalgia in clinical practice: development and validation of the Fibromyalgia Detection (FibroDetect®) screening tool 
Background
Fibromyalgia diagnosis is a challenging and long process, especially among primary care physicians (PCPs), because of symptom heterogeneity, co-morbidities and clinical overlap with other disorders. The purpose was to develop and validate a screening tool in French (FR), German (DE) and English (UK) to help PCPs identify patients with fibromyalgia.
Methods
The FibroDetect questionnaire was simultaneously developed in FR, DE and UK based on information obtained from a literature review, focus groups conducted with clinicians, and face-to-face interviews with fibromyalgia patients (FR, DE and UK, n = 23). The resulting tool was comprehension-tested in patients with diagnosed or suspected fibromyalgia (n = 3 and n = 2 in each country, respectively). Acceptability and applicability were assessed and the tool modified accordingly, then assessed in clinical practice. A scoring method was created using an iterative process based on statistical and clinical considerations with American College of Rheumatology + (ACR+) patients and ACR– patients (n = 276), and validated with fibromyalgia and non-fibromyalgia patients (n = 312).
Results
The FibroDetect included 14 questions assessing patients’ pain and fatigue, personal history and attitudes, symptoms and impact on lives. Six questions were retained in the final scoring, demonstrating satisfactory discriminative power between ACR + and ACR- patients with area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve of 0.74. The predictive accuracy of the tool increased to 0.86 for fibromyalgia and non-fibromyalgia patient detection, with a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 67% for a cut-off of 6 on the score.
Conclusions
The FibroDetect is a self-administered tool that can be used as a screening classification surrogate to the ACR criteria in primary care settings to help PCPs detect potential fibromyalgia patients among a population complaining of chronic widespread pain.
doi:10.1186/s12955-014-0128-x
PMCID: PMC4221679  PMID: 25341959
Fibromyalgia; Primary health care; Screening tool; Early diagnosis; Decision making; FibroDetect
21.  Structural alterations in brainstem of fibromyalgia syndrome patients correlate with sensitivity to mechanical pressure☆ 
NeuroImage : Clinical  2013;3:163-170.
Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic pain disorder characterised by widespread pain and tenderness in muscles and deep tissues. Current theories regarding the pathophysiological origins of fibromyalgia syndrome point towards central sensitisation and a decreased capacity of descending nociceptive controls. Morphological alterations to subcortical brain regions may contribute to such pathophysiological mechanisms, and to pain and other symptoms seen in fibromyalgia. Therefore, we evaluated geometric differences in subcortical structures in fibromyalgia patients relative to healthy people using a novel method of shape analysis. Sixteen female fibromyalgia patients and 15 age and sex matched, healthy control subjects underwent high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance image scanning. Data was analysed using shape analysis of 15 subcortical regions and standard voxel-based morphometry analysis.
Fibromyalgia syndrome patients, relative to healthy control participants, exhibited alterations to the shape of the left lateral aspect of the lower brainstem (medulla). The mean total volume of the brainstem was also found to be significantly reduced in the patient group compared to healthy control subjects, and this brainstem volume reduction in patient group significantly correlated with clinical manual tender point scale scores. Voxel-based morphometry analysis revealed that patients also demonstrated decreased local grey matter volumes in the brainstem (pons) and left precuneus, and increased grey matter volumes in bilateral primary somatosensory cortices.
Results suggest that the volume reduction and associated geometric shape alterations seen in the brainstem of the patient group may contribute to sensitivity to pressure pain in fibromyalgia syndrome. This finding may be due to structure-related deficiencies in regions subserving descending nociceptive control.
Highlights
•Fibromyalgia syndrome patients exhibited shape alterations in the brainstem.•The mean brainstem volume was also significantly reduced in FMS patients.•This volume reduction correlated with clinical manual tender point scores.•Structural alterations in the brainstem may contribute to clinical symptoms of FMS.
doi:10.1016/j.nicl.2013.07.011
PMCID: PMC3791285  PMID: 24179860
22.  Efficacy of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Coupled with a Multidisciplinary Rehabilitation Program for the Treatment of Fibromyalgia 
Pain control in fibromyalgia patients is limited no matter the therapeutic regimens used. Recent data have shown that daily sessions of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the primary motor cortex (M1) in patients with fibromyalgia (FM) are associated with reduction of pain perception.
Objective:
We aimed to test whether active tDCS, as compared with sham tDCS, combined with multidisciplinary rehabilitation is associated with significant clinical gains in fibromyalgia.
Design:
This was a randomized, double-blinded controlled trial.
Subjects:
23 patients were randomized to receive weekly sessions of multidisciplinary rehabilitation approach combined with sham or anodal tDCS of M1. Patients were evaluated for pain with VAS and for quality of life with SF-36, fibromyalgia pain questionnaire and health assessment questionnaire by a blinded rater before and after the 4 month period of rehabilitation.
Results:
Patients tolerated tDCS treatment well, without adverse effects. Patients who received active treatment had a significantly greater reduction of SF-36 pain domain scores (F(2,21)=6.57; p=0.006) and a tendency of higher improvement in Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) scores after (p=0.056) as compared with sham tDCS/standard treatment, but no differences were observed in the other domains.
Conclusions:
Although active tDCS was associated with superior results in one domain (SF-36 pain domain), the lack of significance in the other domains does not fully support this strategy (weekly tDCS) combined with a multidisciplinary approach.
doi:10.2174/1874312901105010045
PMCID: PMC3204430  PMID: 22046206
Electrical stimulation; cerebral cortex; fibromyalgia; pain; quality of life; rehabilitation.
23.  A patient survey of the impact of fibromyalgia and the journey to diagnosis 
Background
Fibromyalgia is a painful, debilitating illness with a prevalence of 0.5-5.0% that affects women more than men. It has been shown that the diagnosis of fibromyalgia is associated with improved patient satisfaction and reduced healthcare utilization. This survey examined the patient journey to having their condition diagnosed and studied the impact of the condition on their life.
Methods
A questionnaire survey of 800 patients with fibromyalgia and 1622 physicians in 6 European countries, Mexico and South Korea. Patients were recruited via their physician.
Results
Over half the patients (61%) were aged 36-59 years, 84% were women, and the mean time since experiencing fibromyalgia symptoms was 6.5 years. Patients had experienced multiple fibromyalgia symptoms (mean of 7.3 out of 14), with pain, fatigue, sleeping problems and concentration difficulties being the most commonly reported. Most patients rated their chronic widespread pain as moderate or severe and fibromyalgia symptoms were on average "fairly" to "very" disruptive, and had a "moderate" to "strong" impact on patients' lives. 22% were unable to work and 25% were not able to work all the time because of their fibromyalgia. Patients waited on average almost a year after experiencing symptoms before presenting to a physician, and it took an average of 2.3 years and presenting to 3.7 different physicians before receiving a diagnosis of fibromyalgia. Patients rated receiving a diagnosis as somewhat difficult on average and had difficulties communicating their symptoms to the physician. Over one third (35%) felt their chronic widespread pain was not well managed by their current treatment.
Conclusions
This survey provides further evidence that fibromyalgia is characterized by multiple symptoms and has a notable impact on quality of life and function. The diagnosis of fibromyalgia is delayed. Patients wait a significant period of time before presenting to a physician, adding to the prolonged time to diagnosis. Patients typically present with a multitude of symptoms, all resulting in a delay in diagnosis and eventual management. Helping clinicians to diagnose and manage patients with fibromyalgia should benefit both patients and funders of healthcare.
doi:10.1186/1472-6963-10-102
PMCID: PMC2874550  PMID: 20420681
24.  Role and rationale for the use of milnacipran in the management of fibromyalgia 
Fibromyalgia (FM) is a complex syndrome characterized by chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain which is often accompanied by multiple other symptoms, including fatigue, sleep disturbances, decreased physical functioning, and dyscognition. Due to these multiple symptoms, as well as high rates of comorbidity with other related disorders, patients with FM often report a reduced quality of life. Although the pathophysiology of FM is not completely understood, patients with FM experience pain differently from the general population, most likely due to dysfunctional pain processing in the central nervous system leading to both hyperalgesia and allodynia. In many patients with FM, this aberrant pain processing, or central sensitization, appears to involve decreased pain inhibition within the spinal tract, which is mediated by descending pathways that utilize serotonin, norepinephrine, and other neurotransmitters. The reduced serotonin and norepinephrine levels observed in patients with FM suggest that medications which increase the levels of these neurotransmitters, such as serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), may have clinically beneficial effects in FM and other chronic pain conditions. Milnacipran is an SNRI that has been approved for the management of FM. In clinical trials, treatment with milnacipran for up to 1 year has been found to improve the pain and other symptoms of FM. Because FM is characterized by multiple symptoms that all contribute to the decreased quality of life and ability to function, the milnacipran pivotal trials implemented responder analyses. These utilized a single composite endpoint to identify the proportion of patients who reported simultaneous and clinically significant improvements in pain, global disease status, and physical function. Other domains assessed during the milnacipran trials include fatigue, multidimensional functioning, mood, sleep quality, and patient-reported dyscognition. This review article provides information intended to help clinicians make informed decisions about the use of milnacipran in the clinical management of patients with FM. It draws primarily on results from 2 of the pivotal clinical trials that formed the basis of approval of milnacipran in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration.
PMCID: PMC2877602  PMID: 20520784
fibromyalgia; milnacipran; pain; serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors; SNRI
25.  Personality and Fibromyalgia Syndrome 
Objectives:
We aimed to review how personality characteristics contribute to the onset, maintenance or modulation of fibromyalgia.
Method:
The databases Medline and PsychINFO were examined from 1967 to 2012 to identify studies that investigated associations between fibromyalgia and personality. Search terms included fibromyalgia and personality, trait psychology, characteristics and individual differences.
Results:
Numerous studies indicate that patients with fibromyalgia experience psychological distress. Various instruments have been used to evaluate distress and related psychological domains, such as anxiety or depression, in fibromyalgia. In many cases, these same instruments have been used to study personality characteristics in fibromyalgia with a subsequent blurring of cause and effect between personality and psychological distress. In addition, the symptoms of fibromyalgia may change pre-illness personality characteristics themselves. These issues make it difficult to identify specific personality characteristics that might influence the fibromyalgia process. Despite this inherent problem with the methodologies used in the studies that make up this literature review, or perhaps because of it, we found no defined personality profile specific to fibromyalgia. However, many patients with fibromyalgia do show personality characteristics that facilitate psychological responses to stressful situations, such as catastrophising or poor coping techniques, and these in turn associate with mechanisms contributing to fibromyalgia.
Conclusion:
No specific fibromyalgia personality is defined but it is proposed that personality is an important filter that modulates a person’s response to psychological stressors. Certain personalities may facilitate translation of these stressors to physiological responses driving the fibromyalgia mechanism.
doi:10.2174/1874312901206010273
PMCID: PMC3447191  PMID: 23002409
Fibromyalgia; personality; stress; psychology; instruments.

Results 1-25 (1390097)