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1.  A Refrigerated Web Camera for Photogrammetric Video Measurement inside Biomass Boilers and Combustion Analysis 
Sensors (Basel, Switzerland)  2011;11(2):1246-1260.
This paper describes a prototype instrumentation system for photogrammetric measuring of bed and ash layers, as well as for flying particle detection and pursuit using a single device (CCD) web camera. The system was designed to obtain images of the combustion process in the interior of a domestic boiler. It includes a cooling system, needed because of the high temperatures in the combustion chamber of the boiler. The cooling system was designed using CFD simulations to ensure effectiveness. This method allows more complete and real-time monitoring of the combustion process taking place inside a boiler. The information gained from this system may facilitate the optimisation of boiler processes.
doi:10.3390/s110201246
PMCID: PMC3274055  PMID: 22319349
biomass boiler; web camera; photogrammetric processing; CFD analysis
2.  Chemical and biological characterization of emissions from coal- and oil-fired power plants. 
Emission samples were obtained from two medium-sized power plants, one fired with oil and the other with pulverized coal. Particles obtained by a miniscale plume stack gas sampler (MIPSGAS), simulating the dilution process in the plume, were subjected to detailed physical, chemical and biological characterization. Studies by scanning electron microscopy and by Coulter counter demonstrated that the particles from the oil-fired boiler were considerably larger than the particles from the coal-fired boiler. Chemical analyses revealed more organic substances and more S, Ni, V, in the oil than in the coal particles. The latter contained a larger proportion of Al, Si, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Se, Rb, Y, Zr, Ba and Pb. Biological testing revealed a greater acute and subacute toxicity by the intratracheal route in the hamster, a greater toxicity to alveolar macrophages and a greater lung retention of BaP coated on the particles from oil combustion than on those from coal combustion. In another sampling line, employed simultaneously with the MIPSGAS-particulate sampler, the total emissions were collected, i.e., both particle and gas phase. These samples were used for chemical analyses and Ames mutagenicity test. Analyses of specific PAHs in emissions from both plants demonstrated that concentrations were below the detection limit (less than 4 ng/m3 of benzo(a)pyrene), which is in accord with an efficient combustion of the fuel. The mutagenicity of the samples were below the detection limit of the mutagenicity assay.
Images
PMCID: PMC1569405  PMID: 6825622
3.  Surface topography of composite restorative materials following ultrasonic scaling and its Impact on bacterial plaque accumulation. An in-vitro SEM study 
Background: This is an in vitro study to investigate the effects of ultrasonic scaling on the surface roughness and quantitative bacterial count on four different types of commonly used composite restorative materials for class V cavities.
Materials & Methods: Nanofilled, hybrid, silorane and flowable composites were tested. Forty extracted teeth served as specimen and were divided into 4 groups of 10 specimens, with each group receiving a different treatment and were examined by a Field emission scanning electron microscope. Bacterial suspension was then added to the pellicle-coated specimens, and then bacterial adhesion was analyzed by using image analyzing program.
Results: Flowable and silorane-based composites showed considerably smoother surfaces and lesser bacterial count in comparison to other types, proving that bacterial adhesion is directly proportional to surface roughness.
Conclusion: The use of ultrasonic scalers affects the surfaces of composite restorative materials. Routine periodontal scaling should be carried out very carefully, and polishing of the scaled surfaces may overcome the alterations in roughness, thus preventing secondary caries, surface staining, plaque accumulation and subsequent periodontal inflammation.
How to cite this article: Eid H A, Togoo R A, Saleh A A, Sumanth C R. Surface Topography of Composite Restorative Materials following Ultrasonic Scaling and its Impact on Bacterial Plaque Accumulation. An In-Vitro SEM Study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(3):13-19.
PMCID: PMC3769865  PMID: 24155597
Surface roughness; Composites; Ultrasonic Scaling.
4.  Survey of the use of personal protective equipment and prevalence of work related symptoms among dental staff. 
OBJECTIVES: Dental instruments such as the right angle or straight handpiece, air turbine, and ultrasonic scaler have the ability to produce dental aerosols containing water, saliva, microorganisms, blood, tooth particles, lubricating oil, and restorative materials. The purpose of this study was to find out whether personal protective equipment (mask, glasses) was used by dental personnel, and to investigate possible work related disease in the dental profession. METHODS: Cross sectional data were collected with a self administered questionnaire sent to 69 randomly chosen general dental practices in the West Midlands Region. All members of the dental team completed questionnaires (dentists (n = 122); nurses (n = 115); hygienists (n = 86); and receptionists (n = 74) and answered questions on use of personal protective equipment and the prevalence of upper and lower respiratory tract, eye, and skin symptoms (reported and work related). Reception staff were included as a low exposure, control group. Also, a longitudinal study of dental hygienists was carried out on 31 people who had taken part in a similar study five years earlier. RESULTS: Use of a face mask and glasses differed between clinical groups with hygienists and nurses being the most and least prevalent users respectively. Although several reported symptoms were significantly more prevalent among clinical staff, only one work related symptom (skin rashes or itchy or dry skin) was reported by the clinical staff more than by the non-clinical receptionists. Among female clinical staff, age < 35 years and atopy were the factors that predisposed to work related symptoms. Also, reported symptoms were related to duration of use of instruments that generated aerosols. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows a low level of work related symptoms in dentistry, but highlights a group vulnerable to prolonged exposures to dental aerosols. It also supports the need for enforcement of the use of personal protective equipment among dental nurses.
PMCID: PMC1128662  PMID: 9072020
5.  Comparison of the effect of hand instruments, an ultrasonic scaler, and an erbium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet laser on root surface roughness of teeth with periodontitis: a profilometer study 
Purpose
The present study aimed to measure root surface roughness in teeth with periodontitis by a profilometer following root planning with ultrasonic and hand instruments with and without erbium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Er:YAG) laser irradiation.
Methods
Sixty single-rooted maxillary and mandibular teeth, extracted because of periodontal disease, were collected. The crowns and apices of the roots were cut off using a diamond bur and water coolant. The specimens were mounted in an acrylic resin block such that a plain root surface was accessible. After primary evaluation and setting a baseline, the samples were divided into 4 groups. In group 1, the samples were root planned using a manual curette. The group 2 samples were prepared with an ultrasonic scaler. In group 3, after scaling with hand instrumentation, the roots were treated with a Smart 1240D plus Er:YAG laser and in group 4, the roots were prepared with ultrasonic scaler and subsequently treated with an Er:YAG laser. Root surface roughness was then measured by a profilometer (MahrSurf M300+RD18C system) under controlled laboratory conditions at a temperature of 25℃ and 41% humidity. The data were analyzed statistically using analysis of variance and a t-test (P<0.05).
Results
Significant differences were detected in terms of surface roughness and surface distortion before and after treatment. The average reduction of the surface roughness after treatment in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 was 1.89, 1.88, 1.40, and 1.52, respectively. These findings revealed no significant differences among the four groups.
Conclusions
An Er:YAG laser as an adjunct to traditional scaling and root planning reduces root surface roughness. However, the surface ultrastructure is more irregular than when using conventional methods.
doi:10.5051/jpis.2013.43.2.101
PMCID: PMC3651935  PMID: 23678394
Laser therapy; Periodontitis; Tooth; Ultrasonics
6.  Incidence of cancer among Norwegian boiler welders. 
OBJECTIVES: The cancer incidence among 2957 boiler welders was investigated. The subjects were registered electrical welders from 1942 to 1981. A subcohort of 606 stainless steel welders was studied separately. METHODS: The investigation was a historical prospective cohort study based on a national registry. The loss of follow up was 4.9%. RESULTS: There were 625 deaths (659 expected). There were 269 cancer cases (264 expected). An excess of lung cancer was found; 50 cases v 37.5 expected. There were three cases of pleural mesotheliomas v 1.1 expected. The subcohort of stainless steel welders had six cases of lung cancer v 5.8 expected, and one case of pleural mesothelioma v 0.2 expected. CONCLUSIONS: The welders in the study were assumed to represent a qualified work force. These welders had a small excess risk of lung cancer. The excess risk did not seem to be associated with stainless steel welding. Smoking and asbestos exposure were potential confounders.
PMCID: PMC1128455  PMID: 8664959
7.  Vehicle-Dependent Disposition Kinetics of Fluoranthene in Fisher-344 Rats 
The objective of this study was to evaluate how the vehicles of choice affect the pharmacokinetics of orally administered Fluoranthene [FLA] in rats. Fluoranthene is a member of the family of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon chemicals. Fluoranthene exposure to humans may occur as a result of cigarette smoking, consumption of contaminated food and water, heating woods in stoves and boilers, industrial sources such as coal gasification, carbon and graphite electrode manufacturing. Adult male Fisher-344 rats were given single oral doses of 25 and 50 μg/kg FLA in tricaprylin, peanut oil, cod liver oil, Tween 80/isotonic saline (1:5) and 2% Alkamuls-EL620 through gavage. After administration, the rats were housed individually in metabolic cages and sacrificed at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 hours post FLA exposure. Blood, lung, liver, small intestine, adipose tissue samples, urine, and feces were collected at each time point. Samples were subjected to a liquid-liquid extraction using methanol, chloroform, and water. The extracts were analyzed by a reverse-phase HPLC, equipped with a fluorescence detector. The results revealed a dose-dependent increase in FLA concentrations in plasma and tissues for all the vehicles used. Plasma and tissue FLA concentrations were greater for peanut oil; cod liver oil, and tricaprylin vehicles compared to Alkamuls (p < 0.05), and Tween 80/isotonic saline (1:5). Most of the FLA administered through peanut oil, cod liver oil and tricaprylin was cleared from the body by 8 hours (90%) and 12 hours (80%) post administration for the 25 μg/kg and 50 μg/kg dose groups, respectively. With both doses employed, the metabolism of FLA was highest when cod liver oil was used as a vehicle and lowest in vehicles containing detergent/water [cod liver oil > peanut oil > tricaprylin > alkamuls > Tween 80/isotonic saline (1:5)]. These findings suggest that uptake and elimination of FLA is accelerated when administered through oil-based vehicles. The low uptake of FLA from Alkamuls and Tween 80/isotonic saline may have been a result of the poor solubility of the chemical. In summary, our findings reiterate that absorption characteristics of FLA were governed by the dose as well as the dosing vehicle. The vehicle-dependent bioavailability of FLA suggests a need for the judicious selection of vehicles in evaluating oral toxicity studies for risk assessment purposes.
PMCID: PMC2760079  PMID: 18441404
Fluoranthene; pharmacokinetics; absorption; tricaprylin; peanut oil; cod liver oil; and Alkamuls
8.  Antioxidant airway responses following experimental exposure to wood smoke in man 
Background
Biomass combustion contributes to the production of ambient particulate matter (PM) in rural environments as well as urban settings, but relatively little is known about the health effects of these emissions. The aim of this study was therefore to characterize airway responses in humans exposed to wood smoke PM under controlled conditions. Nineteen healthy volunteers were exposed to both wood smoke, at a particulate matter (PM2.5) concentration of 224 ± 22 μg/m3, and filtered air for three hours with intermittent exercise. The wood smoke was generated employing an experimental set-up with an adjustable wood pellet boiler system under incomplete combustion. Symptoms, lung function, and exhaled NO were measured over exposures, with bronchoscopy performed 24 h post-exposure for characterisation of airway inflammatory and antioxidant responses in airway lavages.
Results
Glutathione (GSH) concentrations were enhanced in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) after wood smoke exposure vs. air (p = 0.025), together with an increase in upper airway symptoms. Neither lung function, exhaled NO nor systemic nor airway inflammatory parameters in BAL and bronchial mucosal biopsies were significantly affected.
Conclusions
Exposure of healthy subjects to wood smoke, derived from an experimental wood pellet boiler operating under incomplete combustion conditions with PM emissions dominated by organic matter, caused an increase in mucosal symptoms and GSH in the alveolar respiratory tract lining fluids but no acute airway inflammatory responses. We contend that this response reflects a mobilisation of GSH to the air-lung interface, consistent with a protective adaptation to the investigated wood smoke exposure.
doi:10.1186/1743-8977-7-21
PMCID: PMC2936868  PMID: 20727160
9.  Vehicle-Dependent Disposition Kinetics of Fluoranthene in Fisher-344 Rats 
The objective of this study was to evaluate how the vehicles of choice affect the pharmacokinetics of orally administered Fluoranthene [FLA] in rats. Fluoranthene is a member of the family of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon chemicals. Fluoranthene exposure to humans may occur as a result of cigarette smoking, consumption of contaminated food and water, heating woods in stoves and boilers, industrial sources such as coal gasification, carbon and graphite electrode manufacturing. Adult male Fisher-344 rats were given single oral doses of 25 and 50 μg/kg FLA in tricaprylin, peanut oil, cod liver oil, tween 80/isotonic saline (1:5) and 2% Alkamuls-EL620 through gavage. After administration, the rats were housed individually in metabolic cages and sacrificed at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 hours post FLA exposure. Blood, lung, liver, small intestine, adipose tissue samples, urine, and feces were collected at each time point. Samples were subjected to a liquid-liquid extraction using methanol, chloroform, and water. The extracts were analyzed by a reverse-phase HPLC, equipped with a fluorescence detector. The results revealed a dose-dependent increase in FLA concentrations in plasma and tissues for all the vehicles used. Plasma and tissue FLA concentrations were greater for peanut oil; cod liver oil, and tricaprylin vehicles compared to Alkamuls (p < 0.05), and tween 80/isotonic saline (1:5). Most of the FLA administered through peanut oil, cod liver oil and tricaprylin was cleared from the body by 8 hours (90%) and 12 hours (80%) post administration for the 25 μg/kg and 50 μg/kg dose groups, respectively. With both doses employed, the metabolism of FLA was highest when cod liver oil was used as a vehicle and lowest in vehicles containing detergent/water [cod liver oil > peanut oil > tricaprylin > alkamuls > tween 80/isotonic saline (1:5)]. These findings suggest that uptake and elimination of FLA is accelerated when administered through oil-based vehicles. The low uptake of FLA from alkamuls and tween 80/isotonic saline may have been a result of the poor solubility of the chemical. In summary, our findings reiterate that absorption characteristics of FLA were governed by the dose as well as the dosing vehicle. The vehicle-dependent bioavailability of FLA suggests a need for the judicious selection of vehicles in evaluating oral toxicity studies for risk assessment purposes.
PMCID: PMC2760079  PMID: 18441404
Fluoranthene; pharmacokinetics; absorption; tricaprylin; peanut oil; cod liver oil; and alkamuls
10.  Grand Rounds: Asbestos-Related Pericarditis in a Boiler Operator 
Context
Occupational and environmental exposures to asbestos remain a public health problem even in developed countries. Because of the long latency in asbestos-related pathology, past asbestos exposure continues to contribute to incident disease. Asbestos most commonly produces pulmonary pathology, with asbestos-related pleural disease as the most common manifestation. Although the pleurae and pericardium share certain histologic characteristics, asbestos-related pericarditis is rarely reported.
Case presentation
We present a 59-year-old man who worked around boilers for almost 30 years and was eventually determined to have calcific, constrictive pericarditis. He initially presented with an infectious exacerbation of chronic bronchitis. Chest radiographs demonstrated pleural and pericardial calcifications. Further evaluation with cardiac catheterization showed a hemodynamic picture consistent with constrictive pericarditis. A high-resolution computerized tomography scan of the chest demonstrated dense calcification in the pericardium, right pleural thickening and nodularity, right pleural plaque without calcification, and density in the right middle lobe. Pulmonary function testing showed mild obstruction and borderline low diffusing capacity.
Discussion
Based on the patient’s occupational history, the presence of pleural pathology consistent with asbestos, previous evidence that asbestos can affect the pericardium, and absence of other likely explanations, we concluded that his pericarditis was asbestos-related.
Relevance to clinical practice
Similar to pleural thickening and plaque formation, asbestos may cause progressive fibrosis of the pericardium.
doi:10.1289/ehp.10354
PMCID: PMC2199309  PMID: 18197304
asbestos; boiler operators; calcific pericarditis; constrictive pericarditis; extrapulmonary
11.  Comparative evaluation of roughness of titanium surfaces treated by different hygiene instruments 
Purpose
The use of appropriate instruments to clean surfaces with minimal change, is critical for the successful maintenance of a dental implant. However, there is no consensus about the type and methodology for such instruments. The aim of this study was to characterize changes in the roughness of titanium surfaces treated by various scaling instruments.
Methods
Thirty-seven identical disks (5 mm in diameter) were investigated in this study. The specimens were divided into eight groups according to the types of instrumentation and the angle of application. Ultrasonic scaling systems were applied on a titanium disk to simulate standard clinical conditions. The equipment included a piezoelectric ultrasonic scaler with a newly developed metallic tip (NS group), a piezoelectric ultrasonic scaler with a conventional tip (CS group), a piezoelectric root planer ultrasonic scaler with a conventional tip (PR group), and a plastic hand curette (PH group). In addition, the sites treated using piezoelectric ultrasonic scaler systems were divided two sub-groups: 15 and 45 degrees. The treated titanium surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the average surface roughness (Ra) and mean roughness profile depth (Rz) were measured with a profilometer.
Results
SEM no significant changes in the titanium surfaces in the NS group, regardless of the angle of application. The PH group also showed no marked changes to the titanium surface, although some smoothening was observed. All CS and PR sites lost their original texture and showed irregular surfaces in SEM analysis. The profilometer analysis demonstrated that the roughness values (Ra and Rz) of the titanium surfaces increased in all, except the PH and NS groups, which showed roughness decreases relative to the untreated control group. The Ra value differed significantly between the NS and PR groups (P<0.05).
Conclusions
The results of this study indicated that changes in or damage to titanium surfaces might be more affected by the hardness of the scaler tip than by the application method. Within the limitations of this study, the newly developed metallic scaler tip might be especially suitable for peri-implant surface decontamination, due to its limited effects on the titanium surface.
doi:10.5051/jpis.2012.42.3.88
PMCID: PMC3395000  PMID: 22803010
Dental implants; Dental instruments; Peri-implantitis; Periodontal debridement
12.  Mutagenicity in emissions from coal- and oil-fired boilers. 
The mutagenicity of emission samples from three oil-fired and four coal-fired boilers have been compared by using the Salmonella/microsome assay. Very little or no mutagenic activity was observed in samples from five of these boilers. The sample from one oil-fired boiler showed mutagenic activity of about 500 revertants/MJ, and the sample from a coal-fired fluidized bed combustor had an activity of 58,000 revertants/MJ measured with strain TA 98 in the absence of metabolic activation. All samples contained substances that were cytotoxic to the test bacteria, thus making it difficult to obtain linear dose-response curves. Mutagenic activity at low levels may remain undetected due to this toxicity of the samples. Samples with mutagenic activity below the detection limit in the Salmonella test have also been tested for forward mutations at the HGPRT locus in V79 hamster cells. Weak mutagenic effects were detected in two of the samples, whereas the sample from one oil-fired boiler remained negative. In this test, as well as in the Salmonella test, a strong cytotoxic effect could be observed with all samples.
PMCID: PMC1569406  PMID: 6825617
13.  Vitamin B12 absorption studies: effect of parenteral non-radioactive vitamin B12 on serum level of 57Co vitamin B12 
Journal of Clinical Pathology  1967;20(5):687-688.
The intestinal absorption of 57Co vitamin B12 has been measured by counting the radioactivity in the serum, and the effect of the parenteral administration of 1 mg. non-radioactive vitamin B12 two hours after the oral dose has been studied. When parenteral vitamin B12 was not given, the mean radioactivity in the serum was lower in both patients with pernicious anaemia and in control subjects, and the results in the patients with pernicious anaemia were more definitive. There was no significant difference between the results obtained with an Ekco scaler and those with an I.D.L. scaler.
This is the simplest and most convenient method of measuring vitamin B12 absorption. It is suggested that the test be standardized by giving 0·5 μg. 57Co vitamin B12 with a maximal histamine stimulation of intrinsic factor secretion, but without a parenteral dose of non-radioactive vitamin B12. The results are expressed most usefully as a percentage of the administered dose per litre of serum or plasma.
PMCID: PMC473551  PMID: 5602975
14.  Variation in periodontal floras. 
Infection and Immunity  1984;46(3):720-726.
Statistical analyses indicated (i) that the floras of individual samples taken from the depth of sulci with nickel-plated Morse 00 scalers were highly reproducible and representative of the flora present at any given time, (ii) that the different compositions of floras of different people with similar clinical signs were statistically highly significant, and (iii) that floras of different affected sites may differ significantly in some (two of three) people at any one time or may differ from week to week in other people (one of three). Thus the flora composition of individual sites appears to be in dynamic flux, probably in response either to environmental changes or to host responses. There was no evidence that double sampling per se (two single passes with 00 scalers) changed the composition of the flora. Repeat samples taken after 1 week were slightly more similar to the initial samples than were samples taken after 3 weeks.
PMCID: PMC261604  PMID: 6500707
15.  The effect of pretreating resorbable blast media titanium discs with an ultrasonic scaler or toothbrush on the bacterial removal efficiency of brushing 
Purpose
This in vitro study was performed to assess the adherence of Porphyromonas gingivalis to a resorbable blast media (RBM) titanium surface pretreated with an ultrasonic scaler or toothbrush and to evaluate the effects of the treatment of the RBM titanium discs on the bacterial removal efficiency of brushing by crystal violet assay and scanning electron microscopy.
Methods
RBM titanium discs were pretreated with one of several ultrasonic scaler tips or cleaned with a toothbrush. Then the titanium discs were incubated with P. gingivalis and the quantity of adherent bacteria was compared. The disc surfaces incubated with bacteria were brushed with a toothbrush with dentifrice. Bacteria remaining on the disc surfaces were quantified.
Results
A change in morphology of the surface of the RBM titanium discs after different treatments was noted. There were no significant differences in the adherence of bacteria on the pretreated discs according to the treatment modality. Pretreatment with various instruments did not produce significant differences in the bacterial removal efficiency of brushing with dentifrice.
Conclusions
Within the limits of this study, various types of mechanical instrumentation were shown to cause mechanical changes on the RBM titanium surface but did not show a significant influence on the adherence of bacteria and removal efficiency of brushing.
doi:10.5051/jpis.2013.43.6.301
PMCID: PMC3891862  PMID: 24455443
Bacteria; Dental scaling; Scanning electron microscopy; Surface properties; Titanium; Toothbrushing
16.  Effects of ultrasonic instrumentation with different scaler-tip angulations on the shear bond strength and bond failure mode of metallic orthodontic brackets 
Korean Journal of Orthodontics  2014;44(1):44-49.
Objective
To evaluate the effects of ultrasonic instrumentation with different scaler-tip angulations on the shear bond strength (SBS) and bond failure mode of metallic orthodontic brackets.
Methods
Adhesive pre-coated metallic brackets were bonded to 72 extracted human premolars embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin. The teeth were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 24 each) to undergo no treatment (control group) or ultrasonic instrumentation with a scaler-tip angulation of 45° (45°-angulation group) or 0° (0°-angulation group). SBS was tested in a universal testing machine, and adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were recorded. The Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U-test were used for statistical analysis.
Results
The control group had a significantly higher mean SBS value than the treated groups, which showed no significant differences in their mean SBS values. The ARI scores were not significantly different among the groups.
Conclusions
Ultrasonic instrumentation around the bracket base reduces the SBS of metallic orthodontic brackets, emphasizing the need for caution during professional oral hygiene procedures in orthodontic patients. The scaler-tip angulation does not influence the SBS reduction and bond failure mode of such brackets.
doi:10.4041/kjod.2014.44.1.44
PMCID: PMC3915176  PMID: 24511515
Bracket; Bonding; Oral hygiene; Ultrasonics
17.  Optimization and Thermoeconomics Research of a Large Reclaimed Water Source Heat Pump System 
The Scientific World Journal  2013;2013:893020.
This work describes a large reclaimed water source heat pump system (RWSHPS) and elaborates on the composition of the system and its design principles. According to the characteristics of the reclaimed water and taking into account the initial investment, the project is divided into two stages: the first stage adopts distributed heat pump heating system and the second adopts the combination of centralized and decentralized systems. We analyze the heating capacity of the RWSHPS, when the phase II project is completed, the system can provide hydronic heating water with the supply and return water temperature of 55°C/15°C and meet the hydronic heating demand of 8 million square meters of residential buildings. We make a thermal economics analysis by using Thermal Economics theory on RWSHPS and gas boiler system, it is known that the RWSHPS has more advantages, compared with the gas boiler heating system; both its thermal efficiency and economic efficiency are relatively high. It provides a reference for future applications of the RWSHPS.
doi:10.1155/2013/893020
PMCID: PMC3780707  PMID: 24089607
18.  Neuropathy in female dental personnel exposed to high frequency vibrations. 
OBJECTIVE--To evaluate early neuropathy in dental personnel exposed to high frequency vibrations. METHODS--30 dentists and 30 dental hygienists who used low and high speed hand pieces and ultrasonic scalers were studied, and 30 dental assistants and 30 medical nurses not exposed to vibration (all women). Vibrotactile sensibility, strength, motor performance, sensorineural symptoms and signs, and vascular symptoms in the hands, as well as mercury concentrations in biological samples and cervicobrachial symptoms, were studied. RESULTS--The two groups exposed to vibration had significant impairments of vibrotactile sensibility, strength, and motor performance, as well as more frequent sensorineural symptoms. In the dentists there were significant associations between the vibrotactile sensibility and strength, motor performance, superficial sensibility, and sensorineural symptoms. There were no associations between these findings and cervicobrachial symptoms, mercury concentrations, or smoking. There was no increase of vascular symptoms of the hands in the groups exposed to vibration. CONCLUSION--Dental hygienists and dentists had a slight neuropathy, which may be associated with their exposure to high frequency vibrations, and which may be detrimental to their work performance. Thus, development of safer equipment is urgent.
PMCID: PMC1128165  PMID: 7757164
19.  Efficacy of various cleansing techniques on dentin wettability and its influence on shear bond strength of a resin luting agent 
PURPOSE
To evaluate the shear bond strength of resin luting agent to dentin surfaces cleansed with different agents like pumice, ultrasonic scaler with chlorhexidine gluconate, EDTA and the influence of these cleansing methods on wetting properties of the dentin by Axisymmetric drop Shape Analysis - Contact Diameter technique (ADSA-CD).
MATERIALS AND METHODS
Forty coronal portions of human third molar were prepared until dentin was exposed. Specimens were divided into two groups: Group A and Group B. Provisional restorations made with autopolymerizing resin were luted to dentin surface with zinc oxide eugenol in Group A and with freegenol cement in Group B. All specimens were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 hrs and provisional cements were mechanically removed with explorer and rinsed with water and cleansed using various methods (Control-air-water spray, Pumice prophylaxis, Ultrasonic scaler with 0.2% Chlorhexidine gluconate, 17% EDTA). Contact angle measurements were performed to assess wettability of various cleansing agents using the ADSA-CD technique. Bond strength of a resin luting agent bonded to the cleansed surface was assessed using Instron testing machine and the mode of failure noted. SEM was done to assess the surface cleanliness. Data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance with Tukey HSD tests (α=.05).
RESULTS
Specimens treated with EDTA showed the highest shear bond strength and the lowest contact angle for both groups. SEM showed that EDTA was the most effective solution to remove the smear layer. Also, mode of failure seen was predominantly cohesive for both EDTA and pumice prophylaxis.
CONCLUSION
EDTA was the most effective dentin cleansing agent among the compared groups.
doi:10.4047/jap.2012.4.3.139
PMCID: PMC3439623  PMID: 22977721
EDTA; Dental bonding; Microscopy; Electron; Scanning; Wettability; Zinc-oxide Eugenol cement; Shear strength
20.  Efficacy of 0.2% tempered chlorhexidine as a pre-procedural mouth rinse: A clinical study 
Objective:
Our objective was to determine the efficacy of pre-procedural rinsing with chlorhexidine in reducing bacterial aerosol contamination during use of ultrasonic scaler and comparing the efficacy of water, non-tempered chlorhexidine and tempered chlorhexidine in reducing bacterial count in aerosols when used as a pre-procedural rinse.
Materials and Methods:
The study was designed to include 30 systemically healthy patients in different age groups. The patients were divided randomly into 3 groups (I, II, III) of 10 patients each to be administered with sterile water, non tempered chlorhexidine and tempered chlorhexidine, respectively, as a pre-procedural rinse. The aerosol produced by the ultrasonic unit was collected at 3° clock, 6° clock and 12° clock positions on blood agar plates within a range of 4 feet in all the three groups. The blood agar plates were incubated for 48 hours and the total number of colony forming units (CFUs) were counted and statistically analyzed.
Results:
The results showed that CFU in group III and group II were significantly reduced when compared to group I with F=1084.92, P<0.001 (ANOVA). Also, CFU in group III was significantly reduced when compared to group II with P<0.001.
Conclusions:
Pre-procedural rinse can significantly reduce the viable microbial content of dental aerosols and tempered chlorhexidine was more effective than non-tempered chlorhexidine.
doi:10.4103/0972-124X.99264
PMCID: PMC3459501  PMID: 23055587
Aerosol production; colony forming unit; pre-procedural rinse; tempered chlorhexidine
21.  Noise levels in a dental teaching institute - A matter of concern! 
Objective: To measure and assess the noise levels produced by various dental equipments in different areas of a dental institution and to recommend improvements if noise levels are not within permissible limits. Material and Methods: Sound levels were measured at three different areas of a dental institution where learning and teaching activities are organized. The sound level was measured using a sound level meter known as ‘decibulolmeter’. In each area the noise level was assessed at two positions-one, at 6 inches from the operators ear and second, at the chairside instrument trolley. Noise levels were also assessed from a central location of the clinic area when multiple equipments were in operation simultaneously. Results: Dental laboratory machine, dental hand-piece, ultrasonic scalers, amalgamators, high speed evacuation, and other items produce noise at different sound levels which is appreciable. The noise levels generated varied between 72.6 dB in pre-clinics and 87.2 dB in prosthesis laboratory. The results are comparable to the results of other studies which are conducted elsewhere. Although the risk to the dentists is lesser, but damage to the hearing is possible over prolonged periods. Conclusion: Higher noise levels are potentially hazardous to the persons working in such environments especially in the laboratory areas where noise levels are exceeding the permissible limits.
Key words:Noise level, equipment, hearing loss, risk, working areas.
doi:10.4317/jced.50725
PMCID: PMC3917637  PMID: 24558544
22.  Health and environmental impacts of increased generation of coal ash and FGD sludges. Report to the Committee on Health and Ecological Effects of Increased Coal Utilization. 
This paper focuses on the incremental impacts of coal ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastes associated with increased coal usage by utilities and industry under the National Energy Plan (NEP). In the paper, 1985 and 2000 are the assessment points using the baseline data taken from the Annual Environmental Analysis Report (AEAR, September 1977). In each EPA region, the potential mix of disposal options has been broadly estimated and impacts assessed therefrom. In addition, future use of advanced combustion techniques has been taken into account. The quantities of coal ash and FGD wastes depend on ash and sulfur content of the coal, emission regulations, the types of ash collection and FGD systems, and operating conditions of the systems and boiler. The disposal of these wastes is (or will be) subject to Federal and State regulations. The one key legal framework concerning environmental impact on land is the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). RCRA and related Federal and State laws provide a sufficient statutory basis for preventing significant adverse health and environmental impacts from coal ash and FGD waste disposal. However, much of the development and implementation of specific regulations lie ahead. FGD wastes and coal ash and FGD wastes are currently disposed of exclusively on land. The most common land disposal methods are inpoundments (ponds) and landfills, although some mine disposal is also practiced. The potential environmental impacts of this disposal are dependent on the characteristics of the disposal site, characteristics of the coal ash and FGD wastes, control method and the degree of control employed. In general, the major potential impacts are ground and surface water contamination and the "degradation" of large quantities of land. However, assuming land is available for disposal of these wastes, control technology exists for environmentally sound disposal. Because of existing increases in coal use, the possibility of significant environmental impacts, both regionally and nationally, exists regardless of whether the NEP scenario develops or not. Existing baseline data indicate that with sound control technology and successful development and implementation of existing regulatory framework, regional scale impacts are likely to be small; however, site-specific impacts could be significant and need to be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Both Federal and privately-funded programs are developing additional data and information on disposal of FGD sludges and coal ash. Continuation of these programs will provide additional vital information in the future. However, further information in several areas if desirable: further data on levels of radionuclides and trace metals in these wastes: studies on biological impacts of trace metals; and completion of current and planned studies on disposal problems associated with advanced combustion techniques like fluid bed combustion.
PMCID: PMC1638118  PMID: 540614
23.  Self-reported neurological symptoms in relation to CO emissions due to problem gas appliance installations in London: a cross-sectional survey 
Environmental Health  2008;7:34.
Background
Previous research by the authors found evidence that up to 10% of particular household categories may be exposed to elevated carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations from poor quality gas appliance installations. The literature suggests certain neurological symptoms are linked to exposure to low levels of CO. This paper addresses the hypothesis that certain self-reported neurological symptoms experienced by a householder are linked to an estimate of their CO exposure.
Methods
Between 27 April and 27 June 2006, 597 homes with a mains supply of natural gas were surveyed, mainly in old, urban areas of London. Qualified gas engineers tested all gas appliances (cooker, boiler, gas fire, and water heater) and reported, according to the Gas Industry Unsafe Situations Procedure, appliances considered At Risk (AR), Immediately Dangerous (ID) or Not to Current Standards (NCS). Five exposure risk categories were defined based on measurement of CO emitted by the appliance, its features and its use, with "high or very high" exposure category where occupants were considered likely to be exposed to levels greater than 26 ppm for one hour. The prevalence of symptoms at each level of exposure was compared with that at lowest level of exposure.
Results
Of the households, 6% were assessed as having a "high or very high" risk of exposure to CO. Of the individuals, 9% reported at least one neurological symptom. There was a statistically significant association between "high or very high" exposure risk to CO and self-reported symptoms compared to "no exposure" likelihood, for households not in receipt of benefit, controlling for "number of residents" and presence of pensioners, OR = 3.23 (95%CI: 1.28, 8.15). Risk ratios across all categories of exposure likelihood indicate a dose-response pattern. Those households in receipt of benefit showed no dose-response pattern.
Conclusion
This study found an association between risk of CO exposure at low concentration, and prevalence of self-reported neurological symptoms in the community for those households not in receipt of benefit. As health status was self-reported, this association requires further investigation.
doi:10.1186/1476-069X-7-34
PMCID: PMC2459147  PMID: 18593476
24.  Urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine as a biomarker of oxidative DNA damage in workers exposed to fine particulates. 
Environmental Health Perspectives  2004;112(6):666-671.
Residual oil fly ash (ROFA) is a chemically complex mixture of compounds, including metals that are potentially carcinogenic because of their ability to cause oxidative injury. In this study, we investigated the association between exposure to particulate matter with an aerodynamic mass median diameter
PMCID: PMC1241959  PMID: 15121508
Environmental Health Perspectives  2003;111(5):676-680.
Particulate air pollution has been associated with adverse respiratory health effects. This study assessed the utility of expired nitric oxide to detect acute airway responses to metal-containing fine particulates. Using a repeated-measures study design, we investigated the association between the fractional concentration of expired nitric oxide (F(E)NO) and exposure to particulate matter with an aerodynamic mass median diameter of less than or equal to 2.5 micro m (PM(2.5)) in boilermakers exposed to residual oil fly ash and metal fumes. Subjects were monitored for 5 days during boiler repair overhauls in 1999 (n = 20) or 2000 (n = 14). The Wilcoxon median baseline F(E)NO was 10.6 ppb [95% confidence interval (CI): 9.1, 12.7] in 1999 and 7.4 ppb (95% CI: 6.7, 8.0) in 2000. The Wilcoxon median PM(2.5) 8-hr time-weighted average was 0.56 mg/m(3) (95% CI: 0.37, 0.93) in 1999 and 0.86 mg/m(3) (95% CI: 0.65, 1.07) in 2000. F(E)NO levels during the work week were significantly lower than baseline F(E)NO in 1999 (p < 0.001). A significant inverse exposure-response relationship between log-transformed F(E)NO and the previous workday's PM(2.5) concentration was found in 1999, after adjusting for smoking status, age, and sampling year. With each 1 mg/m(3) incremental increase in PM(2.5) exposure, log F(E)NO decreased by 0.24 (95% CI: -0.38, -0.10) in 1999. The lack of an exposure-response relationship between PM(2.5) exposure and F(E)NO in 2000 could be attributable to exposure misclassification resulting from the use of respirators. In conclusion, occupational exposure to metal-containing fine particulates was associated with significant decreases in F(E)NO in a survey of workers with limited respirator usage.
PMCID: PMC1241474  PMID: 12727593

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