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4.  Sir Henry Dale, O.M., 85 
British Medical Journal  1960;1(5188):1803-1804.
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PMCID: PMC1967772
5.  Sir Henry Dale 90 
British Medical Journal  1965;1(5448):1450.
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PMCID: PMC2166673  PMID: 20790547
6.  Histamine and Sir Henry Dale 
British Medical Journal  1965;1(5448):1488-1490.
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PMCID: PMC2166627  PMID: 14288090
9.  Sir Henry Dale 
British Medical Journal  1968;3(5613):261-262.
PMCID: PMC1986261  PMID: 20791530
12.  Sir Henry Dale, O.M 
British Medical Journal  1965;1(5449):1557.
PMCID: PMC2166726
13.  Sir Henry Dale, P.R.S 
British Medical Journal  1940;2(4170):791.
PMCID: PMC2179982  PMID: 20783436
14.  Sir Henry Dale 
British Medical Journal  1955;1(4926):1378-1379.
PMCID: PMC2062160  PMID: 14363904
15.  Sir Henry Dale's Opus 
British Medical Journal  1953;1(4825):1436-1437.
PMCID: PMC2016634  PMID: 13042293
16.  Sir Henry Dale, M. D. (1875-1968). 
PMCID: PMC2312287  PMID: 4901736
17.  Three who made an association: I. Sir William Osler, 1849-1919 II. George Milbry Gould, 1848-1922 III. Margaret Ridley Charlton, 1858-1931 and the founding of the Medical Library Association, Philadelphia, 1898. 
The careers and personalities of the three founders of the Medical Library Association, Sir William Osler, George Milbry Gould, and Margaret Ridley Charlton are outlined, followed by a review of their role in the founding of the association. The career of Sir William Osler is well documented in existing literature, both in medical history and medical librarianship; the biographies of George Milbry Gould and Margaret Ridley Charlton are less known, and this article describes their lives in relation to the founding of the association. The issue of responsibility for the association's founding is explored, and primary recognition is attributed to Margaret Charlton. The author attempts to follow the tradition of Harvey Cushing in his The Life of Sir William Osler in allowing the characters to speak in their own words as much as possible.
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PMCID: PMC226151  PMID: 8883979
18.  Three who made an association: I. Sir William Osler, 1849-1919. II. George Milbry Gould, 1848-1922. III. Margaret Ridley Charlton, 1858-1931 and the founding of the Medical Library Association, Philadelphia, 1898. 
The careers and personalities of the three founders of the Medical Library Association, Sir William Osler, George Milbry Gould, and Margaret Ridley Charlton are outlined, followed by a review of their role in the founding of the association. The career of Sir William Osler is well documented in existing literature, both in medical history and medical librarianship; the biographies of George Milbry Gould and Margaret Ridley Charlton are less known, and this article describes their lives in relation to the founding of the association. The issue of responsibility for the association's founding is explored, and primary recognition is attributed to Margaret Charlton. The author attempts to follow the tradition of Harvey Cushing in his The Life of Sir William Osler in allowing the characters to speak in their own words as much as possible.
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PMCID: PMC226350  PMID: 9578937
19.  The differential transmissibility of Myxoma virus strains of differing virulence grades by the rabbit flea Spilopsyllus cuniculi (Dale). 
The Journal of Hygiene  1975;75(2):237-247.
Laboratory studies showed that few rabbit fleas (Spilopsyllus cuniculi (Dale)) transmitted myxomatosis after removal from wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus (L) that had been infected for fever than 10-12 days, irrespective of the virulence of the myxoma virus strain involved. Rabbits infected with fully virulent (Grade I) strains died within 10-15 days and few fleas from these hosts became infective; averaging all the samples takem. 12% of the fleas were infective. Also, few fleas acquired infectivity on individual rabbits which covered from infection with attenuated strains; the mean was 8% infective. Rabbits which died between 17 and 44 days after infection had higher proportions of infective fleas at all sampling times; the mean was 42% infective. Male and female fleas transmitted virus with equal efficiency. For rabbits infected with any of the attenuated virus strains the mean percentage of infective fleas was inversely related to the survival time of the host. Rabbits infected with moderately attenuated strains (Grades IIIA and IIIB) had, on average, the highest proportion of infective fleas; hence such strains have a selective advantage and have become predominant under natural conditions in Britain. The changes that might occur if there is an increase in host resistance to myxomatosis are discussed.
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PMCID: PMC2130293  PMID: 1058245
20.  Sir William Osler (1849-1919). 
Heart  1997;77(1):10.
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PMCID: PMC484626  PMID: 9038686

Results 1-25 (888500)