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1.  Critical care procedure logging using handheld computers 
Critical Care  2004;8(5):R336-R342.
Introduction
We conducted this study to evaluate the feasibility of implementing an internet-linked handheld computer procedure logging system in a critical care training program.
Methods
Subspecialty trainees in the Interdepartmental Division of Critical Care at the University of Toronto received and were trained in the use of Palm handheld computers loaded with a customized program for logging critical care procedures. The procedures were entered into the handheld device using checkboxes and drop-down lists, and data were uploaded to a central database via the internet. To evaluate the feasibility of this system, we tracked the utilization of this data collection system. Benefits and disadvantages were assessed through surveys.
Results
All 11 trainees successfully uploaded data to the central database, but only six (55%) continued to upload data on a regular basis. The most common reason cited for not using the system pertained to initial technical problems with data uploading. From 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003, a total of 914 procedures were logged. Significant variability was noted in the number of procedures logged by individual trainees (range 13–242). The database generated by regular users provided potentially useful information to the training program director regarding the scope and location of procedural training among the different rotations and hospitals.
Conclusion
A handheld computer procedure logging system can be effectively used in a critical care training program. However, user acceptance was not uniform, and continued training and support are required to increase user acceptance. Such a procedure database may provide valuable information that may be used to optimize trainees' educational experience and to document clinical training experience for licensing and accreditation.
doi:10.1186/cc2921
PMCID: PMC1065023  PMID: 15469577
critical care; handheld computers; internet; procedure logging; training program
2.  Handheld computers in critical care 
Critical Care  2001;5(4):227-231.
Background
Computing technology has the potential to improve health care management but is often underutilized. Handheld computers are versatile and relatively inexpensive, bringing the benefits of computers to the bedside. We evaluated the role of this technology for managing patient data and accessing medical reference information, in an academic intensive-care unit (ICU).
Methods
Palm III series handheld devices were given to the ICU team, each installed with medical reference information, schedules, and contact numbers. Users underwent a 1-hour training session introducing the hardware and software. Various patient data management applications were assessed during the study period. Qualitative assessment of the benefits, drawbacks, and suggestions was performed by an independent company, using focus groups. An objective comparison between a paper and electronic handheld textbook was achieved using clinical scenario tests.
Results
During the 6-month study period, the 20 physicians and 6 paramedical staff who used the handheld devices found them convenient and functional but suggested more comprehensive training and improved search facilities. Comparison of the handheld computer with the conventional paper text revealed equivalence. Access to computerized patient information improved communication, particularly with regard to long-stay patients, but changes to the software and the process were suggested.
Conclusions
The introduction of this technology was well received despite differences in users' familiarity with the devices. Handheld computers have potential in the ICU, but systems need to be developed specifically for the critical-care environment.
PMCID: PMC37409  PMID: 11511337
computer communication networks; medical informatics; medical technology; microcomputers; point-of-care technology
3.  Many family physicians will not manually update PDA software: an observational study 
Informatics in primary care  2009;17(4):225-230.
Background
In a prospective study to explore connections between clinical information delivery and information retrieval, 41 Canadian family physicians searched an Electronic Knowledge Resource as needed for practice. Research software, called the Information Assessment Method prompted family physicians to report on the situational relevance, perceived cognitive impact, and application of their retrieved information hits. Both the Information Assessment Method and the Electronic Knowledge Resource needed periodic updating to properly address our research questions.
Objective
To determine the frequency of software updates when manual or semi-automatic approaches are used by family physicians.
Methods
Each family physician received a handheld computer (PDA) that ran the Windows Mobile 6 operating system. For technical reasons, the Information Assessment Method and the Electronic Knowledge Resource were accessed offline on PDA. To update the Electronic Knowledge Resource and the Information Assessment Method, family physicians were asked to synchronize their PDA to their PC. Updating the Information Assessment Method was a manual process, whereas updating the Electronic Knowledge Resource was semi-automatic.
Results
We found: (1) about 25% of family physicians never or rarely updated PDA software on their own (2) a large number of software updates were never installed, and (3) the semi-automatic method was associated with a small increase in the proportion of installed software updates (58.9% versus 48.6% for the manual method).
Conclusions
When a wireless Internet connection is not used to update PDA software, sociotechnical issues complicate mobile data collection and data transfer.
PMCID: PMC2878612  PMID: 20359400 CAMSID: cams799
Computers handheld; software; family practice
4.  Use of a Handheld Computer Application for Voluntary Medication Event Reporting by Inpatient Nurses and Physicians 
OBJECTIVE
To determine the feasibility of capturing self-reported medication events using a handheld computer-based Medication Event Reporting Tool (MERT).
DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS
Handheld computers operating the MERT software application were deployed among volunteer physician (n = 185) and nurse (n = 119) participants on the medical wards of four university-affiliated teaching hospitals. Participants were encouraged to complete confidential reports on the handheld computers for medication events observed during the study period.
MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS
Demographic variables including age, gender, education level, and clinical experience were recorded for all participants. Each MERT report included details on the provider, location, timing and type of medication event recorded. Over the course of 2,311 days of clinician participation, 76 events were reported; the median time for report completion was 231 seconds. The average event reporting rate for all participants was 0.033 reports per clinician shift. Nurses had a significantly higher reporting rate compared to physicians (0.045 vs 0.026 reports/shift, p = .02). Subgroup analysis revealed that attending physicians reported events more frequently than resident physicians (0.042 vs 0.021 reports/shift, p = .03), and at a rate similar to that of nurses (p = .80). Only 5% of MERT medication events were reported to require increased monitoring or treatment.
CONCLUSIONS
A handheld-based event reporting tool is a feasible method to record medication events in inpatient hospital care units. Handheld reporting tools may hold promise to augment existing hospital reporting systems.
doi:10.1007/s11606-007-0404-0
PMCID: PMC2359505  PMID: 18373139
incident reporting; medication errors; computers; handheld
5.  User satisfaction and frustration with a handheld, pen-based guideline implementation system for asthma. 
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate clinicians' satisfaction and frustrations with the use of a handheld computer system that implements a guideline for management of childhood asthma exacerbations. SETTING: Nine primary-care pediatric practices. DESIGN: Survey component of a randomized, prospective before-after trial. INTERVENTION: Newton MessagePad outfitted with custom software (called "AsthMonitor") that assists in documentation of clinical findings and provides guideline-based recommendations. RESULTS: Overall, 3 users gave strongly positive global ratings while 6 users were neutral. The majority used the documentation functions concurrently with care. Except for recommendations to administer oxygen (which were unsupported by evidence), users found the recommendations appropriate and appreciated the reminders. Seven of 9 participants believed it took more time to document with AsthMonitor. CONCLUSIONS: Handheld computers are acceptable to some office-based practitioners to provide guideline-based advice within the context of the clinical encounter.
PMCID: PMC2232865  PMID: 10566499
6.  Handheld Optical Coherence Tomography Scanner for Primary Care Diagnostics 
The goal of this study is to develop an advanced point-of-care diagnostic instrument for use in a primary care office using handheld optical coherence tomography (OCT). This system has the potential to enable earlier detection of diseases and accurate image-based diagnostics. Our system was designed to be compact, portable, user-friendly, and fast, making it well suited for the primary care office setting. The unique feature of our system is a versatile handheld OCT imaging scanner which consists of a pair of computer-controlled galvanometer-mounted mirrors, interchangeable lens mounts, and miniaturized video camera. This handheld scanner has the capability to guide the physician in real time for finding suspicious regions to be imaged by OCT. In order to evaluate the performance and use of the handheld OCT scanner, the anterior chamber of a rat eye and in vivo human retina, cornea, skin, and tympanic membrane were imaged. Based on this feasibility study, we believe that this new type of handheld OCT device and system has the potential to be an efficient point-of-care imaging tool in primary care medicine.
doi:10.1109/TBME.2010.2096816
PMCID: PMC3214662  PMID: 21134801
Handheld imaging scanner; optical coherence tomography (OCT); primary care medicine
7.  Remote analysis of physiological data from neurosurgical ICU patients. 
Recent technical advances in Internet-based client/server applications and new multimedia communications protocols are enabling the development of cost-effective, platform-independent solutions to the problem of remote access to continuously acquired physiological data. The UCLA Neurosurgery Intensive Care Unit (ICU) has developed a distributed computer system that provides access over the World Wide Web (WWW) to current and previously acquired physiological data, such as intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, and heart rate from critical care patients. Physicians and clinical researchers can access these data through personal computers from their offices, from their homes, or even while on the road. The system creates and continuously updates a database of all monitored parameters in data formats that can readily be used for further clinical studies. This paper describes an extension to this system that allows for remote interaction with and analysis of the data via the WWW. Physicians can now pose a limited, predefined set of clinically relevant questions to the system without having to be at the patient's bedside.
PMCID: PMC116316  PMID: 8880679
8.  Introducing handheld computing into a residency program: preliminary results from qualitative and quantitative inquiry. 
Although published reports describe specific handheld computer applications in medical training, we know very little yet about how, and how well, handheld computing fits into the spectrum of information resources available for patient care and physician training. This paper reports preliminary quantitative and qualitative results from an evaluation study designed to track changes in computer usage patterns and computer-related attitudes before and after introduction of handheld computing. Pre-implementation differences between residents and faculty s usage patterns are interpreted in terms of a "work role" construct. We hypothesize that over time residents and faculty will adopt, adapt, or abandon handheld computing according to how, and how well, this technology supports their successful completion of work role-related tasks. This hypothesis will be tested in the second phase of this pre- and post-implementation study.
PMCID: PMC2243603  PMID: 11825224
9.  Development and Testing of a Scale to Assess Physician Attitudes about Handheld Computers with Decision Support 
Objective
The authors developed and evaluated a rating scale, the Attitudes toward Handheld Decision Support Software Scale (H-DSS), to assess physician attitudes about handheld decision support systems.
Design
The authors conducted a prospective assessment of psychometric characteristics of the H-DSS including reliability, validity, and responsiveness. Participants were 82 Internal Medicine residents. A higher score on each of the 14 five-point Likert scale items reflected a more positive attitude about handheld DSS. The H-DSS score is the mean across the fourteen items. Attitudes toward the use of the handheld DSS were assessed prior to and six months after receiving the handheld device.
Statistics
Cronbach's Alpha was used to assess internal consistency reliability. Pearson correlations were used to estimate and detect significant associations between scale scores and other measures (validity). Paired sample t-tests were used to test for changes in the mean attitude scale score (responsiveness) and for differences between groups.
Results
Internal consistency reliability for the scale was α = 0.73. In testing validity, moderate correlations were noted between the attitude scale scores and self-reported Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) usage in the hospital (correlation coefficient = 0.55) and clinic (0.48), p < 0.05 for both. The scale was responsive, in that it detected the expected increase in scores between the two administrations (3.99 (s.d. = 0.35) vs. 4.08, (s.d. = 0.34), p < 0.005).
Conclusion
The authors' evaluation showed that the H-DSS scale was reliable, valid, and responsive. The scale can be used to guide future handheld DSS development and implementation.
doi:10.1197/jamia.M2096
PMCID: PMC1561800  PMID: 16799120
10.  Handheld Computing in Medicine 
Handheld computers have become a valuable and popular tool in various fields of medicine. A systematic review of articles was undertaken to summarize the current literature regarding the use of handheld devices in medicine. A variety of articles were identified, and relevant information for various medical fields was summarized. The literature search covered general information about handheld devices, the use of these devices to access medical literature, electronic pharmacopoeias, patient tracking, medical education, research, business management, e-prescribing, patient confidentiality, and costs as well as specialty-specific uses for personal digital assistants (PDAs).
The authors concluded that only a small number of articles provide evidence-based information about the use of PDAs in medicine. The majority of articles provide descriptive information, which is nevertheless of value. This article aims to increase the awareness among physicians about the potential roles for handheld computers in medicine and to encourage the further evaluation of their use.
doi:10.1197/jamia.M1180
PMCID: PMC150367  PMID: 12595403
11.  Handheld Computer-based Decision Support Reduces Patient Length of Stay and Antibiotic Prescribing in Critical Care 
Objective: This study assessed the effect of a handheld computer-based decision support system (DSS) on antibiotic use and patient outcomes in a critical care unit.
Design: A DSS containing four types of evidence (patient microbiology reports, local antibiotic guidelines, unit-specific antibiotic susceptibility data for common bacterial pathogens, and a clinical pulmonary infection score calculator) was developed and implemented on a handheld computer for use in the intensive care unit at a tertiary referral hospital. System impact was assessed in a prospective “before/after” cohort trial lasting 12 months. Outcome measures were defined daily doses (DDDs) of antibiotics per 1,000 patient-days, patient length of stay, and mortality.
Results: The number of admissions, APACHE (Acute Physiology, Age, and Chronic Health Evaluation) II and SAPS (Simplified Acute Physiology Score) II for patients in preintervention, and intervention (DSS use) periods were statistically comparable. The mean patient length of stay and the use of antibiotics in the unit during six months of the DSS use decreased from 7.15 to 6.22 bed-days (p = 0.02) and from 1,767 DDD to 1,458 DDD per 1,000 patient-days (p = 0.04), respectively, with no change in mortality. The DSS was accessed 674 times during 168 days of the trial. Microbiology reports and antibiotic guidelines were the two most commonly used (53% and 22.5%, respectively) types of evidence. The greatest reduction was observed in the use of β-lactamase–resistant penicillins and vancomycin.
Conclusion: Handheld computer-based decision support contributed to a significant reduction in patient length of stay and antibiotic prescribing in a critical care unit.
doi:10.1197/jamia.M1798
PMCID: PMC1174884  PMID: 15802478
12.  Clinician Use of a Palmtop Drug Reference Guide 
Objective: Problems involving drug knowledge are one of the most common causes of serious medication errors. Although the information that clinicians need is often available somewhere, retrieving it expeditiously has been problematic. At the same time, clinicians are faced with an ever-expanding pharmacology knowledge base. Recently, point-of-care technology has become more widely available and more practical with the advent of handheld, or palmtop, computing. Therefore, the authors evaluated the clinical contribution of a drug database developed for the handheld computer. ePocrates Rx (formerly known as qRx; ePocrates, San Carlos, California) is a comprehensive drug information guide that is downloadable free from the Internet and designed for the Palm OS platform align="right".
Design: A seven-day online survey of 3,000 randomly selected ePocrates Rx users was conducted during March 2000.
Measurements: User technology experience, product evaluation and usage patterns, and the effects of the drug reference database on information-seeking behavior, practice efficiency, decision making, and patient care.
Results: The survey response rate was 32 percent (n=946). Physicians reported that ePocrates Rx saves time during information retrieval, is easily incorporated into their usual workflow, and improves drug-related decision making. They also felt that it reduced the rate of preventable adverse drug events.
Conclusions: Self-reported perceptions by responding clinicians endorse improved access to drug information and improved practice efficiency associated with the use of handheld devices. The clinical and practical value of using these devices in clinical settings will clearly grow further as wireless communication becomes more ubiquitous and as more applications become available.
doi:10.1197/jamia.M1001
PMCID: PMC344582  PMID: 11971883
13.  Handheld Technology to Improve Patient Care 
Objective: Despite an increasing movement toward shared decision making and the incorporation of patients' preferences into health care decision making, little research has been done on the development and evaluation of support systems that help clinicians elicit and integrate patients' preferences into patient care. This study evaluates nurses' use of choice, a handheld-computer–based support system for preference-based care planning, which assists nurses in eliciting patients' preferences for functional performance at the bedside. Specifically, it evaluates the effects of system use on nurses' care priorities, preference achievement, and patients' satisfaction.
Design: Three-group sequential design with one intervention and two control groups (N=155). In the intervention group, nurses elicited patients' preferences for functional performance with the handheld-computer–based choice application as part of their regular admission interview; preference information was added to patients' charts and used in subsequent care planning.
Results: Nurses' use of choice made nursing care more consistent with patient preferences (F=11.4; P<0.001) and improved patients' preference achievement (F=4.9; P<0.05). Furthermore, higher consistency between patients' preferences and nurses' care priorities was associated with higher preference achievement (r=0.49; P<0.001).
Conclusion: In this study, the use of a handheld-computer–based support system for preference-based care planning improved patient-centered care and patient outcomes. The technique has potential to be included in clinical practice as part of nurses' routine care planning.
doi:10.1197/jamia.M0891
PMCID: PMC344576  PMID: 11861634
14.  Using Wireless Handheld Computers to Seek Information at the Point of Care: An Evaluation by Clinicians 
Objective
To evaluate: (1) the effectiveness of wireless handheld computers for online information retrieval in clinical settings; (2) the role of MEDLINE® in answering clinical questions raised at the point of care.
Design
A prospective single-cohort study: accompanying medical teams on teaching rounds, five internal medicine residents used and evaluated MD on Tap, an application for handheld computers, to seek answers in real time to clinical questions arising at the point of care.
Measurements
All transactions were stored by an intermediate server. Evaluators recorded clinical scenarios and questions, identified MEDLINE citations that answered the questions, and submitted daily and summative reports of their experience. A senior medical librarian corroborated the relevance of the selected citation to each scenario and question.
Results
Evaluators answered 68% of 363 background and foreground clinical questions during rounding sessions using a variety of MD on Tap features in an average session length of less than four minutes. The evaluator, the number and quality of query terms, the total number of citations found for a query, and the use of auto-spellcheck significantly contributed to the probability of query success.
Conclusion
Handheld computers with Internet access are useful tools for healthcare providers to access MEDLINE in real time. MEDLINE citations can answer specific clinical questions when several medical terms are used to form a query. The MD on Tap application is an effective interface to MEDLINE in clinical settings, allowing clinicians to quickly find relevant citations.
doi:10.1197/jamia.M2424
PMCID: PMC2213482  PMID: 17712085
15.  Barriers to Acceptance of Personal Digital Assistants for HIV/AIDS Data Collection in Angola 
Purpose
Handheld computers have potential to improve HIV/AIDS programs in healthcare settings in low-resource countries, by improving the speed and accuracy of collecting data. However, the acceptability of the technology (i.e., user attitude and reaction) is critical for its successful implementation. Acceptability is particularly critical for HIV/AIDS behavioral data, as it depends on respondents giving accurate information about a highly sensitive topic – sexual behavior.
Methods
To explore the acceptability of handheld computers for HIV/AIDS data collection and to identify potential barriers to acceptance, five focus groups of 8–10 participants each were conducted in Luanda, Angola. Facilitators presented Palm Tungsten E handhelds to the focus groups, probed participants’ perceptions of the handheld computer, and asked how they felt about disclosing intimate sexual behavior to an interviewer using a handheld computer. Discussions were conducted in Portuguese, the official language of Angola, and audio-taped. They were then transcribed and translated into English for analysis.
Results
In total, 49 people participated in the focus groups. PDAs were understood through the lens of social and cultural beliefs. Themes that emerged were suspicion of outsiders, concern with longevity, views on progress and development, and concern about social status.
Conclusions
The findings from this study suggest that personal and cultural beliefs influence participant acceptance of PDAs in Angola. While PDAs provide great advantages in terms of speed and efficiency of data collection, these barriers, if left unaddressed, may lead to biased reporting of HIV/AIDS risk data. An understanding of the barriers and why they are relevant in Angola may help researchers and practitioners to reduce the impact of these barriers on HIV/AIDS data collection.
doi:10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2011.04.004
PMCID: PMC3152252  PMID: 21622022
Computers; Handheld; Data Collection; HIV; Sexual Behavior; Africa South of the Sahara
16.  Evidence of Effectiveness of Health Care Professionals Using Handheld Computers: A Scoping Review of Systematic Reviews 
Background
Handheld computers and mobile devices provide instant access to vast amounts and types of useful information for health care professionals. Their reduced size and increased processing speed has led to rapid adoption in health care. Thus, it is important to identify whether handheld computers are actually effective in clinical practice.
Objective
A scoping review of systematic reviews was designed to provide a quick overview of the documented evidence of effectiveness for health care professionals using handheld computers in their clinical work.
Methods
A detailed search, sensitive for systematic reviews was applied for Cochrane, Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), Global Health, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases. All outcomes that demonstrated effectiveness in clinical practice were included. Classroom learning and patient use of handheld computers were excluded. Quality was assessed using the Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) tool. A previously published conceptual framework was used as the basis for dual data extraction. Reported outcomes were summarized according to the primary function of the handheld computer.
Results
Five systematic reviews met the inclusion and quality criteria. Together, they reviewed 138 unique primary studies. Most reviewed descriptive intervention studies, where physicians, pharmacists, or medical students used personal digital assistants. Effectiveness was demonstrated across four distinct functions of handheld computers: patient documentation, patient care, information seeking, and professional work patterns. Within each of these functions, a range of positive outcomes were reported using both objective and self-report measures. The use of handheld computers improved patient documentation through more complete recording, fewer documentation errors, and increased efficiency. Handheld computers provided easy access to clinical decision support systems and patient management systems, which improved decision making for patient care. Handheld computers saved time and gave earlier access to new information. There were also reports that handheld computers enhanced work patterns and efficiency.
Conclusions
This scoping review summarizes the secondary evidence for effectiveness of handheld computers and mhealth. It provides a snapshot of effective use by health care professionals across four key functions. We identified evidence to suggest that handheld computers provide easy and timely access to information and enable accurate and complete documentation. Further, they can give health care professionals instant access to evidence-based decision support and patient management systems to improve clinical decision making. Finally, there is evidence that handheld computers allow health professionals to be more efficient in their work practices. It is anticipated that this evidence will guide clinicians and managers in implementing handheld computers in clinical practice and in designing future research.
doi:10.2196/jmir.2530
PMCID: PMC3841346  PMID: 24165786
handheld computers; mobile devices; mhealth; PDA; information seeking behavior; evidence-based practice; delivery of health care; clinical practice; health technology adoption; diffusion of innovation; systematic review; evidence synthesis; documentation
17.  Design and evaluation of a wireless electronic health records system for field care in mass casualty settings 
Background
There is growing interest in the use of technology to enhance the tracking and quality of clinical information available for patients in disaster settings. This paper describes the design and evaluation of the Wireless Internet Information System for Medical Response in Disasters (WIISARD).
Materials and methods
WIISARD combined advanced networking technology with electronic triage tags that reported victims' position and recorded medical information, with wireless pulse-oximeters that monitored patient vital signs, and a wireless electronic medical record (EMR) for disaster care. The EMR system included WiFi handheld devices with barcode scanners (used by front-line responders) and computer tablets with role-tailored software (used by managers of the triage, treatment, transport and medical communications teams). An additional software system provided situational awareness for the incident commander. The WIISARD system was evaluated in a large-scale simulation exercise designed for training first responders. A randomized trial was overlaid on this exercise with 100 simulated victims, 50 in a control pathway (paper-based), and 50 in completely electronic WIISARD pathway. All patients in the electronic pathway were cared for within the WIISARD system without paper-based workarounds.
Results
WIISARD reduced the rate of the missing and/or duplicated patient identifiers (0% vs 47%, p<0.001). The total time of the field was nearly identical (38:20 vs 38:23, IQR 26:53–1:05:32 vs 18:55–57:22).
Conclusion
Overall, the results of WIISARD show that wireless EMR systems for care of the victims of disasters would be complex to develop but potentially feasible to build and deploy, and likely to improve the quality of information available for the delivery of care during disasters.
doi:10.1136/amiajnl-2011-000229
PMCID: PMC3198000  PMID: 21709162
Electronic Health records; disasters; wireless; mobile computing
18.  MED31/437: A Web-based Diabetes Management System: DiabNet 
Introduction
A web-based system (DiabNet) was developed to provide instant access to the Electronic Diabetes Records (EDR) for end-users, and real-time information for healthcare professionals to facilitate their decision-making. It integrates portable glucometer, handheld computer, mobile phone and Internet access as a combined telecommunication and mobile computing solution for diabetes management. Methods:
Active Server Pages (ASP) embedded with advanced ActiveX controls and VBScript were developed to allow remote data upload, retrieval and interpretation. Some advisory and Internet-based learning features, together with a video teleconferencing component make DiabNet web site an informative platform for Web-consultation.
Results
The evaluation of the system is being implemented among several UK Internet diabetes discussion groups and the Diabetes Day Centre at the Guy's & St. Thomas' Hospital. Many positive feedback are received from the web site demonstrating DiabNet is an advanced web-based diabetes management system which can help patients to keep closer control of self-monitoring blood glucose remotely, and is an integrated diabetes information resource that offers telemedicine knowledge in diabetes management.
Discussion
In summary, DiabNet introduces an innovative online diabetes management concept, such as online appointment and consultation, to enable users to access diabetes management information without time and location limitation and security concerns.
doi:10.2196/jmir.1.suppl1.e68
PMCID: PMC1761784
Web-based; ActiveX ; Diabetes Management; Decision-Making; Mobile Computing
19.  The Impact of Mobile Handheld Technology on Hospital Physicians' Work Practices and Patient Care: A Systematic Review 
The substantial growth in mobile handheld technologies has heralded the opportunity to provide physicians with access to information, resources, and people at the right time and place. But is this technology delivering the benefits to workflow and patient care promised by increased mobility? The authors conducted a systematic review to examine evidence regarding the impact of mobile handheld technology on hospital physicians' work practices and patient care, focusing on quantification of the espoused virtues of mobile technologies. The authors identified thirteen studies that demonstrated the ability of personal digital assistants (PDAs) to positively impact on areas of rapid response, error prevention, and data management and accessibility. The use of PDAs demonstrates the greatest benefits in contexts where time is a critical factor and a rapid response crucial. However, the extent to which these devices improved outcomes and workflow efficiencies because of their mobility was largely absent from the literature. The paucity of evidence calls for much needed future research that asks explicit questions about the impact the mobility of devices has on work practices and outcomes.
doi:10.1197/jamia.M3215
PMCID: PMC3002124  PMID: 19717793
20.  Medical emergency team response for the non-hospitalized patient☆ 
Resuscitation  2012;84(3):276-279.
Objectives
Rapid response systems (RRS) evolved to care for deteriorating hospitalized patients outside of the ICU. However, emergent critical care needs occur suddenly and unexpectedly throughout the hospital campus, including areas with non-hospitalized persons. The efficacy of RRS in this population has not yet been described or tested. We hypothesize that non-hospitalized patients accrue minimal benefit from ICU physician participation in the RRS.
Design
A retrospective review of all RRS events in non-hospitalized patients for a 28 month period was performed in a large, urban university medical center. Location, patient type and age, activation trigger, interventions performed, duration of event and disposition were recorded. Admission diagnosis and length of stay were also recorded for patients admitted to the hospital.
Setting
Academic medical center.
Patients
Non-hospitalized persons requiring evaluation by the medical emergency team.
Interventions
None.
Measurements and main results
There were a total of 1778 RRS activations during the study period. 232 (13%) of activations were for non-hospitalized patients. The patient cohort consisted of outpatients, visitors, and staff. Triggers for RRS activation were neurologic change (42%), cardiac (27%), respiratory (16%), and staff concerns (16%). The mean duration of the response was 38 min. The most common interventions performed included administration of oxygen (46%), intravenous fluids (13%) and dextrose (6%). 82% of patients were taken to the emergency department and 32% of the ED cohort were admitted to the hospital.
Conclusions
Perceived emergencies in non-hospitalized patients occur commonly but require minimal emergent intervention. Restriction of critical care physician involvement to inpatient deteriorations should be considered when designing a RRS. Future studies are needed to evaluate the utility of nonphysician provider led rapid response teams with protocol-driven interventions for similar populations.
doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2012.06.022
PMCID: PMC3744334  PMID: 22776516
Rapid response; Medical emergency team; Non-hospitalized
21.  Patient Perceptions of Physician Use of Handheld Computers 
Background
Handheld computers have advantages for physicians, including portability and integration into office workflow. However, negative patient perceptions of physician use of handheld computers in the examining room might limit integration.
Objective
To survey patients’ perceptions of handheld use, and compare those with their providers’ perceptions.
Methods
A survey of patient attitudes toward handhelds was conducted among patients at a low-income university clinic. Internal Medicine residents providing care were also surveyed.
Results
Patients (N=93) were mostly female (79%) and ethnic minorities (67%) with average age of 39. Only 10% of patients did not like the idea of a handheld computer in the exam room. Other negative attitudes were also seen in a minority of patients. Some physicians (23%) reported reservations about using the handheld with patients.
Conclusions
Negative attitudes were rare among patients, but some providers were concerned about using the handheld in the exam room.
PMCID: PMC1480272  PMID: 14728182
handheld computers; patients; evaluation; outcomes; doctor-patient communication
22.  Enhancing Community-Based Disaster Preparedness with Information Technology: Community Disaster Information System 
Disasters  2008;32(1):149-165.
A critical component of community-based disaster preparedness (CBDP) is a local resource database of suppliers providing physical, information and human resources for use in disaster response. Maintenance of such a database can become a collaborative responsibility among community-based non-governmental organizations (NGOs), public, and private organizations in the community. In addition to mobilizing resources, this process raises awareness within the community and aids in assessing local knowledge and resources. This paper presents the results of a pilot study in implementing a community-based resource database through collaboration with local American Red Cross chapters and public and private community organizations. The design of the resource database is described. The resource database is accessible both using the Internet and offline using laptops and handheld PDAs to support disaster response. The study concludes that CBDP is strengthened through a combination of appropriate information technology and collaborative relationships between NGOs and community-based organizations.
doi:10.1111/j.1467-7717.2007.01032.x
PMCID: PMC2239245  PMID: 18217923
CBDP; NGOs; emergency preparedness; information technology
23.  Assessing physician attitudes regarding use of an outpatient EMR: a longitudinal, multi-practice study. 
A pre- and post-implementation assessment of physician attitudes was undertaken as part of the evaluation of the pilot implementations of an outpatient EMR in 6 practices of a large academic health system. Our results show that these physicians are ready adopters of computer technology when it demonstrates value-added for the effort required to use it. These physicians utilize email, the Internet, remote access to computer systems, and personal productivity software because they serve a valuable purpose in their academic and clinical work and in their personal lives. Much more critical to the acceptance of an EMR by physicians is its ability to facilitate efficient clinical workflows without negative effects on the valued relationships physicians have with their patients--those that are based on rapport, quality of care, and privacy.
PMCID: PMC2243374  PMID: 11825179
24.  Inviting Patients to Read Their Doctors’ Notes: A Quasi-experimental Study and a Look Ahead 
Annals of internal medicine  2012;157(7):461-470.
Background
Little information exists about what primary care physicians (PCPs) and patients experience if patients are invited to read their doctors’ office notes.
Objective
To evaluate the effect on doctors and patients of facilitating patient access to visit notes over secure Internet portals.
Design
Quasi-experimental trial of PCPs and patient volunteers in a year-long program that provided patients with electronic links to their doctors’ notes.
Setting
Primary care practices at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) in Massachusetts, Geisinger Health System (GHS) in Pennsylvania, and Harborview Medical Center (HMC) in Washington.
Participants
105 PCPs and 13 564 of their patients who had at least 1 completed note available during the intervention period.
Measurements
Portal use and electronic messaging by patients and surveys focusing on participants’ perceptions of behaviors, benefits, and negative consequences.
Results
11 797 of 13 564 patients with visit notes available opened at least 1 note (84% at BIDMC, 92% at GHS, and 47% at HMC). Of 5391 patients who opened at least 1 note and completed a postintervention survey, 77% to 87% across the 3 sites reported that open notes helped them feel more in control of their care; 60% to 78% of those taking medications reported increased medication adherence; 26% to 36% had privacy concerns; 1% to 8% reported that the notes caused confusion, worry, or offense; and 20% to 42% reported sharing notes with others. The volume of electronic messages from patients did not change. After the intervention, few doctors reported longer visits (0% to 5%) or more time addressing patients’ questions outside of visits (0% to 8%), with practice size having little effect; 3% to 36% of doctors reported changing documentation content; and 0% to 21% reported taking more time writing notes. Looking ahead, 59% to 62% of patients believed that they should be able to add comments to a doctor’s note. One out of 3 patients believed that they should be able to approve the notes’ contents, but 85% to 96% of doctors did not agree. At the end of the experimental period, 99% of patients wanted open notes to continue and no doctor elected to stop.
Limitations
Only 3 geographic areas were represented, and most participants were experienced in using portals. Doctors volunteering to participate and patients using portals and completing surveys may tend to offer favorable feedback, and the response rate of the patient surveys (41%) may further limit generalizability.
Conclusion
Patients accessed visit notes frequently, a large majority reported clinically relevant benefits and minimal concerns, and virtually all patients wanted the practice to continue. With doctors experiencing no more than a modest effect on their work lives, open notes seem worthy of widespread adoption.
Primary Funding Source
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Drane Family Fund, the Richard and Florence Koplow Charitable Foundation, and the National Cancer Institute.
doi:10.7326/0003-4819-157-7-201210020-00002
PMCID: PMC3908866  PMID: 23027317
25.  Open source handheld-based EMR for paramedics working in rural areas. 
We describe a handheld-based electronic medical record (EMR) for use in certain rural settings. The system is based on the Linux operating system and allows access to large mobile databases. The open source system is designed for paramedical health workers serving remote areas in rural India. A PDA loaded with the handheld-based EMR provides workers who have little access to medical doctors with different kinds of decision support and alerts. It addresses two important problems in developing countries: prenatal care and child health. This paper describes the technical challenges and innovation needed in the design, development, adaptation and implementation of the handheld EMR in a real setting in India
PMCID: PMC2244537  PMID: 12463777

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