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1.  Postpartum spontaneous dissection of the first obtuse marginal branch of the left circumflex coronary artery causing acute coronary syndrome: a case report and literature review 
Introduction
Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare but important cause of acute coronary syndrome. It can cause unstable angina, acute myocardial infarction, and sudden death. The condition commonly affects young females with about one-third of the cases occurring during pregnancy and the peripartum period. The diagnosis may occasionally be overlooked as the patients are often young and have no risk factors for coronary artery disease.
Case presentation
Here we report the case of a 29-year-old African American woman who presented with acute coronary syndrome due to spontaneous dissection of the first obtuse marginal branch of the left circumflex coronary artery at three weeks post-partum and recovered requiring only medical management, possibly by longitudinal distribution of the intramural hematoma leading to good distal flow.
Conclusions
Spontaneous coronary artery dissection should be suspected in all young multiparous females presenting with chest pain in the peripartum period even in the absence of risk factors. Urgent diagnosis by angiography is required. It is recommended that treatment should be tailored to meet individual circumstances. Patients who present with single-vessel disease and hemodynamic stability, and who receive medical treatment with anticoagulation, nitrates and a beta-blocker, should experience good results.
doi:10.1186/1752-1947-7-82
PMCID: PMC3608039  PMID: 23510019
2.  Recurrent post-partum coronary artery dissection 
Coronary artery dissection is a rare but well-described cause for myocardial infarction during the post-partum period. Dissection of multiple coronary arteries is even less frequent. Here we present a case of recurrent post-partum coronary artery dissections. This unusual presentation poses unique problems for management. A 35 year-old female, gravida 3 para 2, presented with myocardial infarction 9 weeks and 3 days post-partum. Cardiac catheterization demonstrated left anterior descending (LAD) dissection but an otherwise normal coronary anatomy. The lesion was treated with four everolimus eluting stents. Initially the patient made an unremarkable recovery until ventricular fibrillation arrest occurred on the following day. Unsynchronized cardioversion restored a normal sinus rhythm and repeat catheterization revealed new right coronary artery (RCA) dissection. A wire was passed distally, but it was unclear whether this was through the true or false lumen and no stents could be placed. However, improvement of distal RCA perfusion was noted on angiogram. Despite failure of interventional therapy the patient was therefore treated conservatively. Early operation after myocardial infarction has a significantly elevated risk of mortality and the initial dissection had occurred within 24 hours. This strategy proved successful as follow-up transthoracic echocardiography after four months demonstrated a preserved left ventricular ejection fraction of 55-60% without regional wall motion abnormalities. The patient remained asymptomatic from a cardiac point of view.
doi:10.1186/1749-8090-5-78
PMCID: PMC2958892  PMID: 20932332
3.  Spontaneous coronary artery dissection causing acute myocardial infarction in a 62-year-old postmenopausal woman without co-morbidities: a case report 
Introduction
Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is an important yet rare cause of acute coronary syndrome. The available literature shows a higher risk factor for women, notably during pregnancy and puerperium. The incidence in postmenopausal women is exceedingly rare, and is more commonly seen in association with concurrent predisposing factors.
We illustrate an extremely rare case of a 62-year-old post-menopausal woman presenting with an acute myocardial infarction secondary to spontaneous dissection of the left anterior descending artery. Subsequent investigations did not reveal the presence of any co-morbidities.
To the best of our knowledge, our patient is one of the oldest documented cases of spontaneous coronary artery dissection on record, and is notable for having no known underlying risk factors for development of spontaneous coronary artery dissection.
Given the paucity of literature on spontaneous coronary artery dissection, particularly in postmenopausal women, we believe this case will provide further insight into the clinical presentation and management of this rare entity.
Case presentation
A 62-year-old previously healthy postmenopausal Hispanic woman presented with chest pain and was found to have an ST elevation myocardial infarction. Cardiac catheterization revealed a dissection in her left anterior descending artery. Revascularization was deferred; our patient received appropriate medical management and remained asymptomatic. A full panel of tests was done to exclude underlying connective tissue disorders and vasculitis. On subsequent follow-up, our patient continued to do well and all work-up was reported as negative.
Conclusion
We describe the varied presentation and subsequent management of a case of spontaneous coronary artery dissection and highlight the importance of considering spontaneous coronary artery dissection as a differential diagnosis even in older, postmenopausal women.
The consequences of a delay in diagnosis and appropriate management are associated with a high mortality and morbidity; hence we believe that reporting all cases of spontaneous coronary artery dissection, particularly in postmenopausal women, will add invaluable information to the limited literature on this rare condition.
doi:10.1186/1752-1947-6-430
PMCID: PMC3539931  PMID: 23272729
4.  An unusual case of spontaneous multi vessel coronary artery dissection in an elderly patient: a case report 
Cases Journal  2009;2:6645.
Introduction
Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is an uncommon cause of acute coronary syndrome and sudden cardiac death. We report an unusual case of multi vessel spontaneous coronary artery dissection in an elderly woman with successful medical management.
Case presentation
A 65 year-old woman with hypertension and Parkinson's disease presented with sudden onset severe chest pain. Electrocardiogram showed ischemic ST-segment elevation in inferior and lateral leads. Urgent cardiac catheterization revealed focal dissections in four small caliber coronary arteries in right and left coronary systems including right posterior decending, posterolateral, obtuse marginal and septal arteries. Angiography demonstrated no significant atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. The patient was medically managed with Eptifibatide, Aspirin, Clopidogrel and β blocker since dissected vessels were not technically suitable for percutaneous coronary intervention. Antiparkinson medications were held as a potential cause of dissection. She responded well to medical management.
Conclusion
Coronary dissection should be considered in all patients with an acute coronary syndrome. Medical management is an effective therapeutic option for the patient with small vessel dissections.
doi:10.4076/1757-1626-2-6645
PMCID: PMC2827076  PMID: 20184681
5.  Spontaneous Multiarterial Dissection Immediately after Childbirth 
Texas Heart Institute Journal  2012;39(5):683-686.
Spontaneous coronary artery dissection and vertebral artery dissection are rare, life-threatening conditions. The pathophysiology of spontaneous coronary artery dissection during the peripartum period is poorly understood. We present a case of spontaneous multivessel dissection in a 32-year-old postpartum woman who presented with neck and chest pain. The patient's coronary and vertebral artery dissections were diagnosed with use of multiple imaging methods, and dissection of the internal mammary artery was discovered during surgery. The patient underwent successful coronary artery bypass grafting and remained asymptomatic 2 years later. To our knowledge, this is the first report of simultaneous coronary, vertebral, and internal mammary artery dissection in a postpartum woman. Early recognition and treatment is crucial, given the high mortality rate associated with spontaneous dissection.
PMCID: PMC3461663  PMID: 23109768
Acute coronary syndrome/etiology; coronary artery bypass; postpartum period; pregnancy complications, cardiovascular/diagnosis; rupture, spontaneous/diagnosis/etiology/surgery; treatment outcome; vertebral artery dissection/epidemiology/surgery/ultrasonography
6.  Spontaneous Right Coronary Artery Dissection 
Texas Heart Institute Journal  2012;39(1):95-98.
Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rather rare cause of myocardial infarction, chest pain, and sudden death. Since the condition was first described in 1931, fewer than 200 cases have been reported in the medical literature. There are currently no known direct causes of this condition, although some correlations have been noted. Many patients are women in the peripartum period or of childbearing age, with few or no risk factors for coronary artery disease. Other associations include contraceptive use and connective-tissue disorders, Ehlers-Danlos and Marfan syndromes, and polyarteritis nodosa. Most of the reported dissections have occurred in the left anterior descending coronary artery. Herein, we report the case of a 36-year-old woman who presented at our institution with an acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction secondary to a spontaneous dissection of the right coronary artery. Thrombectomy and stenting resolved the occlusion of the artery, and the patient was discharged from the hospital on medical therapy. We discuss the pathophysiology, presentation, and treatment of this rare and often fatal condition.
PMCID: PMC3298930  PMID: 22412239
Coronary vessels/pathology; dissection; female; rupture, spontaneous/complications/physiopathology
7.  Spontaneous Post-Partum Cervical Carotid Artery Dissection in a Patient with Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome 
Interventional Neuroradiology  2011;17(4):486-489.
Summary
Post-partum cervicocephalic artery dissection (pp-CAD) is a rare and poorly understood condition. To our knowledge, only 21 cases have been reported. Reversible cerebral segmental vasoconstriction (RCSV) was first described by Call and Fleming in 1988, and its association with pp-CAD has only been reported in three cases. However, in those cases it is unclear whether the pp-CAD may have been caused by straining during labor and therefore merely coincidental to the intracranial arteriopathy. We describe a 41-year-old right-handed African-American woman who developed the syndrome of pp-CAD (headaches, trace subarachnoid hemorrhage and diffuse cerebral arteriopathy on angiogram) two weeks after delivery. In this unique case, the patient had fortuitously undergone an MR study twice over a four day period which included the carotid bifurcations. During that time the patient was an inpatient, on bed rest and subject to continuous cardiac monitoring. The interval studies documented a true spontaneous right internal carotid artery dissection occurring without obvious cause. The patient had noted moderate right neck pain developing between the two MR studies but experienced no neurological deficits. Subsequent conventional angiography confirmed the presence of postpartum cerebral arteriopathy and the cervical dissection. The patient was managed conservatively with antiplatelet medication and had an otherwise uneventful course. We hypothesize whether transient arterial wall abnormalities, postpartum hormonal changes or subtle connective tissue aberrations play a similar role in the pathogenesis of these two associated conditions.
PMCID: PMC3296511  PMID: 22192555
internal carotid artery dissection, reversible cerebral segmental vasoconstriction, Call-Fleming syndrome, post-partum spontaneous cervicocephalic dissection
8.  Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection following Topical Hormone Replacement Therapy 
Case Reports in Cardiology  2012;2012:524508.
Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare condition, usually presenting as an acute coronary syndrome, and is often seen in states associated with high systemic estrogen levels such as pregnancy or oral contraceptive use. While topical hormonal replacement therapy may result in increased estrogen levels similar to those documented with oral contraceptive use, there are no reported cases of spontaneous coronary dissection with topical hormonal replacement therapy. We describe a 53-year-old female who developed two spontaneous coronary dissections while on topical hormonal replacement therapy. The patient had no other risk factors for coronary dissection. After withdrawal from topical hormonal therapy, our patient has done well and has not had recurrent coronary artery dissections over a one-year follow-up period. The potential contributory role of topical hormonal therapy as a cause of spontaneous coronary dissection should be recognized.
doi:10.1155/2012/524508
PMCID: PMC4008130  PMID: 24826258
9.  Surgical Management of Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection 
Texas Heart Institute Journal  2008;35(4):402-405.
Spontaneous coronary artery dissection, which causes acute coronary syndrome and can result in sudden death, is rare; but its true incidence is underestimated, since most patients die suddenly, without diagnosis. The aim of this study was to show the importance of prompt diagnosis and treatment.
In reviewing the records of 5,000 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography between January 2001 and August 2006, we found 6 cases of spontaneous coronary artery dissection (an incidence rate of 0.12%). Five patients presented with left main coronary artery dissection and 1 patient, with right coronary artery dissection.
Angioplasty with stenting failed in the patient with right coronary artery dissection. Coronary artery bypass surgery was performed in all patients. The patient with right coronary artery dissection died of sepsis on the 30th postoperative day. The other 5 patients (83.3%) are still free of symptoms, and they had negative results on stress tests at the 6- and 12-month follow-up visits after coronary artery bypass surgery.
The clinical presentation of spontaneous left main coronary artery dissection was similar to that of atherosclerotic disease. However, early diagnosis of spontaneous coronary artery dissection by means of coronary angiography is of paramount importance, because urgent coronary artery bypass grafting can be lifesaving.
PMCID: PMC2607103  PMID: 19156232
Aneurysm, dissecting/diagnosis/therapy; death, sudden, cardiac/etiology; myocardial ischemia/etiology; pregnancy complications, cardiovascular; puerperal disorders; rupture, spontaneous
10.  Spontaneous Dissection of Right Coronary Artery Manifested with Acute Myocardial Infarction 
Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare cause of acute ischemic coronary events and sudden cardiac death. It usually occurs in young women without traditional risk factors for coronary artery disease during pregnancy or postpartum period. However, it has also been reported in patients with atherosclerotic coronary disease. We present a case of spontaneous right coronary artery dissection in a 48-year male with recent myocardial infarction and previous percutaneous coronary intervention.
doi:10.2174/1874192401004010178
PMCID: PMC2995159  PMID: 21127744
Coronary artery dissection; atherosclerosis.
11.  Spontaneous coronary artery dissection: a neglected cause of acute myocardial ischaemia and sudden death. 
Heart  1996;75(5):451-454.
Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare cause of acute myocardial ischaemia. Eight consecutive fatal cases which occurred in women aged 34-54 years (mean 43) are described. The dissection involved the left anterior descending coronary artery in four, the left main trunk in two, the right coronary artery in one, and both left anterior descending and circumflex arteries in one. The clinical presentation was sudden death in six cases, and acute myocardial infarction in two. Diagnosis was made at necropsy in every case but one, in which coronary dissection was diagnosed during life by selective coronary angiography. The only ascertained risk factor was hypertension in one patient; none of the women was in the puerperium, and Marfan syndrome was excluded in all. Histology showed a haematoma between the coronary tunica media and adventitia, that flattened and occluded the lumen; a coronary intimal tear was detected in only two cases. Unusual histological findings were cystic medial necrosis in one case, eosinophilic inflammatory infiltrates in four, and angiomatosis of the tunica adventitia in one. Patients dying of spontaneous coronary dissection are usually middle aged women, with no coronary atherosclerosis and apparently no risk factors. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is unpredictable, and sudden death is the usual mode of clinical presentation. Prompt diagnosis and life saving treatment is far from being achieved.
Images
PMCID: PMC484340  PMID: 8665336
12.  Spontaneous coronary artery dissection: a report of three cases and review of the literature. 
Postgraduate Medical Journal  1993;69(818):940-945.
We describe the clinical course of three patients who developed spontaneous coronary artery dissection. All patients were young women, one 9 weeks pregnant. All presented with chest pain; one died suddenly proving refractory to resuscitation, another developed unstable angina culminating in myocardial infarction, cardiogenic shock and death, and the third patient underwent coronary artery bypass grafting following diagnosis of a spontaneous coronary dissection of the left anterior descending artery at angiography. Pathological findings in the two fatal cases are reported. This condition, although rare, is a prominent cause of ischaemic coronary events in young women, when it is frequently associated with pregnancy or the puerperium. Most patients die suddenly, but a clinical spectrum is seen including stable and unstable angina, myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock. The left anterior descending artery is most frequently affected. The classical histological finding is that of a large haematoma occupying the outer third of the media resulting in complete compression of the true lumen. The cause of spontaneous dissection remains unclear but theories of aetiology include a medial eosinophilic angiitis, pregnancy-induced degeneration of collagen in conjunction with the stresses of parturition, and rupture of the vasal vasorum. The diagnosis must be considered when a patient presents with a suggestive clinical profile. Urgent angiography should be undertaken to establish the diagnosis and consideration given to the need for coronary artery bypass grafting, which has been successfully employed in a number of patients. The uneventful long-term survival of cases treated conservatively has been reported.
Images
PMCID: PMC2400005  PMID: 8121872
13.  A case of postpartum spontaneous coronary artery dissection 
Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is rare and usually affects younger women in the peripartum period. Here, we report an interesting case of a 34-year-old woman with spontaneous coronary artery dissection that occurred 1 month after childbirth. Emergency coronary angiography showed stenosis of the left anterior descending artery, but immediately afterwards, a new occlusion of the right coronary artery occurred. Intravascular ultrasound was used to image both right and left coronary arteries. The new occlusion of the right coronary artery was probably iatrogenic, but the left coronary artery occlusion was spontaneous. The patient underwent percutaneous coronary intervention in the right coronary artery because of her unstable hemodynamic condition. Revascularization of the left coronary artery was performed by bypass grafting. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 30. As the optimal treatment for spontaneous coronary artery dissection has not yet been established, treatments should be based on the patient’s clinical presentation.
doi:10.1007/s11748-013-0274-9
PMCID: PMC4254160  PMID: 23775233
Coronary artery dissection; Myocardial infarction; Coronary artery bypass grafting; Percutaneous coronary intervention
14.  An unusual case of chronic coronary artery dissection: Did cisplatin play a role? 
The Canadian Journal of Cardiology  2008;24(10):795-797.
Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is an unusual cause of acute myocardial ischemia. The natural history of spontaneous coronary artery dissection that persists on angiography after the acute event has not been well characterized. A case of a 36-year-old man who presented with monomorphic ventricular tachycardia 12 years following a myocardial infarction that occurred during his last course of bleomycin-etoposidecisplatin therapy for testicular cancer is reported. On further investigation, coronary angiography revealed a long chronic dissection of the right coronary artery. The patient was successfully treated with medical management and insertion of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. The case also highlights the increased cardiovascular morbidity in testicular cancer survivors and evokes the possibility of mechanisms of myocardial ischemia other than atherosclerotic disease in these young patients.
PMCID: PMC2643162  PMID: 18841261
Cisplatin; Coronary artery dissection; Myocardial infarction; Ventricular tachycardia
15.  Successful Aorta-osteal Stenting after Iatrogenic Acute Type-A Aortic Dissection during Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention 
Balkan Medical Journal  2014;31(4):352-355.
Background:
Iatrogenic acute dissection of the ascending aorta following coronary angiography and percutaneous intervention is rare. This complication, if not managed urgently, can have critical results.
Case Report:
We present the case of a 70 year-old woman who was treated by primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of the right coronary artery (RCA) for acute inferior myocardial infarction; however, the procedure was complicated by anterograde dissection of the RCA with a simultaneous retrograde propagation to the proximal part of the ascending aorta. Successful stenting of the entry point was able to heal the RCA and restrict the retrograde propagation to the ascending aorta. The aortic dissection was monitored by means of computerised tomography and the dissection repaired itself spontaneously within a day.
Conclusion:
Treatment of the aorta coronary dissection (ACD) by urgent osteal stenting is a less invasive treatment compared with surgical treatment in appropriate cases. We demonstrated that immediate osteal stenting should be performed in ACD.
doi:10.5152/balkanmedj.2014.14039
PMCID: PMC4318409  PMID: 25667792
Acute myocardial infarction; aorto-coronary dissection; percutaneous coronary intervention
16.  Intravascular Ultrasound to Guide Percutaneous Coronary Interventions 
Executive Summary
Objective
The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of using intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) as an adjunctive imaging tool to coronary angiography for guiding percutaneous coronary interventions.
Background
Intravascular Ultrasound
Intravascular ultrasound is a procedure that uses high frequency sound waves to acquire 3-dimensional images from the lumen of a blood vessel. The equipment for performing IVUS consists of a percutaneous transducer catheter and a console for reconstructing images. IVUS has been used to study the structure of the arterial wall and nature of atherosclerotic plaques, and obtain measurements of the vessel lumen. Its role in guiding stent placement is also being investigated. IVUS is presently not an insured health service in Ontario.
Clinical Need
Coronary artery disease accounts for approximately 55% of cardiovascular deaths, the leading cause of death in Canada. In Ontario, the annual mortality rate due to ischemic heart disease was 141.8 per 100,000 population between 1995 and 1997. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), a less invasive approach to treating coronary artery disease, is used more frequently than coronary bypass surgery in Ontario. The number of percutaneous coronary intervention procedures funded by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-term Care is expected to increase from approximately 17, 780 in 2004/2005 to 22,355 in 2006/2007 (an increase of 26%), with about 95% requiring the placement of one or more stents. Restenosis following percutaneous coronary interventions involving bare metal stents occurs in 15% to 30% of the cases, mainly because of smooth muscle proliferation and migration, and production of extracellular matrix. In-stent restenosis has been linked to suboptimal stent expansion and inadequate lesion coverage, while stent thrombosis has been attributed to incomplete stent-to-vessel wall apposition. Since coronary angiography (the imaging tool used to guide stent placement) has been shown to be inaccurate in assessing optimal stent placement, and IVUS can provide better views of the vessel lumen, the clinical utility of IVUS as an imaging tool adjunctive to coronary angiography in coronary intervention procedures has been explored in clinical studies.
Method
A systematic review was conducted to answer the following questions:
What are the procedure-related complications associated with IVUS?
Does IVUS used in conjunction with angiography to guide percutaneous interventions improve patient outcomes compared to angiographic guidance without IVUS?
Who would benefit most in terms of clinical outcomes from the use of IVUS adjunctive to coronary angiography in guiding PCIs?
What is the effectiveness of IVUS guidance in the context of drug-eluting stents?
What is the cost-effectiveness ratio and budget impact of adjunctive IVUS in PCIs in Ontario?
A systematic search of databases OVID MEDLINE, EMBASE, MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, The Cochrane Library, and the International Agency for Health Technology Assessment (INAHTA) database for the period beginning in May 2001 until the day of the search, November 4, 2005 yielded 2 systematic reviews, 1 meta-analysis, 6 randomized controlled trials, and 2 non-randomized studies on left main coronary arteries. The quality of the studies ranged from moderate to high. These reports were combined with reports from a previous systematic review for analysis. In addition to qualitative synthesis, pooled analyses of data from randomized controlled studies using a random effect model in the Cochrane Review Manager 4.2 software were conducted when possible.
Findings of Literature Review & Analysis
Safety
Intravascular ultrasound appears to be a safe tool when used in coronary interventions. Periprocedural complications associated with the use of IVUS in coronary interventions ranged from 0.5% in the largest study to 4%. Coronary rupture was reported in 1 study (1/54). Other complications included prolonged spasms of the artery after stenting, dissection, and femoral aneurysm.
Effectiveness
Based on pooled analyses of data from randomized controlled studies, the use of intravascular ultrasound adjunctive to coronary intervention in percutaneous coronary interventions using bare metal stents yielded the following findings:
For lesions predominantly at low risk of restenosis:
There were no significant differences in preintervention angiographic minimal lumen diameter between the IVUS-guided and angiography-guided groups.
IVUS guidance resulted in a significantly larger mean postintervention angiographic minimal lumen diameter (weighted mean difference of 0.11 mm, P = .0003) compared to angiographic guidance alone.
The benefit in angiographic minimal lumen diameter from IVUS guidance was not maintained at 6-month follow-up, when no significant difference in angiographic minimal lumen diameter could be detected between the two arms (weighted mean difference 0.08, P = .13).
There were no statistically significant differences in angiographic binary restenosis rates between IVUS-guidance and no IVUS guidance (Odds ratio [OR] 0.87 in favour of IVUS, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] [0.64–1.18], P = 0.37).
IVUS guidance resulted in a reduction in the odds of target lesion revascularization (repeat percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary bypass graft) compared to angiographic guidance alone. The reduction was statistically significant at a follow-up period of 6 months to 1 year, and at a follow-up period of 18 month to 2 years (OR 0.52 in favour of IVUS, 95% CI [0.33–0.81], P = .004).
Total revascularization rate (either target lesion or target vessel revascularization) was significantly lower for IVUS-guided patients at 18 months to 2.5 years after intervention (OR 0.43 in favour of IVUS, 95% CI [0.29–0.63], p < .0001).
There were no statistically significant differences in the odds of death (OR 1.36 in favour of no IVUS, P =0.65) or myocardial infarction (OR 0.95 in favour of IVUS, P = 0.93) between IVUS-guidance and angiographic guidance alone at up to 2.5 years of follow-up
The odds of having a major cardiac event (defined as death, myocardial infarction, and target lesion or target vessel revascularization) were significantly lower for patients with IVUS guidance compared to angiographic guidance alone during follow-up periods of up to 2.5 years (OR 0.53, 95% CI [0.36–0.78], P = 0.001). Since there were no significant reductions in the odds of death or myocardial infarction, the reduction in the odds of combined events reflected mainly the reduction in revascularization rates.
For lesions at High Risk of Restenosis:
There is evidence from one small, randomized controlled trial (n=150) that IVUS-guided percutaneous coronary intervention in long de novo lesions (>20 mm) of native coronary arteries resulted in statistically significant larger minimal lumen Diameter, and statistically significant lower 6-month angiographic binary restenosis rate. Target vessel revascularization rate and the rate of combined events were also significantly reduced at 12 months.
A small subgroup analysis of a randomized controlled trial reported no benefit in clinical or angiographic outcomes for IVUS-guided percutaneous coronary interventions in patients with diabetes compared to those guided by angiography. However, due to the nature and size of the analysis, no firm conclusions could be reached.
Based on 2 small, prospective, non-randomized controlled studies, IVUS guidance in percutaneous coronary interventions of left main coronary lesions using bare metal stents or drug-eluting stents did not result in any benefits in angiographic or clinical outcomes. These findings need to be confirmed.
Interventions Using Drug-Eluting Stents
There is presently no evidence on whether the addition of IVUS guidance during the implantation of drug-eluting stents would reduce incomplete stent apposition, or improve the angiographic or clinical outcomes of patients.
Ontario-Based Economic Analysis
Cost-effectiveness analysis showed that PCIs using IVUS guidance would likely be less costly and more effective than PCIs without IVUS guidance. The upfront cost of adjunctive use of IVUS in PCIs ranged from $1.56 million at 6% uptake to $13.04 million at 50% uptake. Taking into consideration cost avoidance from reduction in revascularization associated with the use of IVUS, a net saving of $0.63 million to $5.2 million is expected. However, since it is uncertain whether the reduction in revascularization rate resulting from the use of IVUS can be generalized to clinical settings in Ontario, further analysis on the budget impact and cost-effectiveness need to be conducted once Ontario-specific revascularization rates are verified.
Factors to be Considered in the Ontario Context
Applicability of Findings to Ontario
The interim analysis of an Ontario field evaluation that compared drug-eluting stents to bare metal stents showed that the revascularization rates in low-risk patients with bare metal stents were much lower in Ontario compared to rates reported in randomized controlled trials (7.2% vs >17 %). Even though IVUS is presently not routinely used in the stenting of low-risk patients in Ontario, the revascularization rates in these patients in Ontario were shown to be lower than those reported for the IVUS groups reported in published studies. Based on this information and previous findings from the Ontario field evaluation on stenting, it is uncertain whether the reduction in revascularization rates from IVUS guidance can be generalized to Ontario. In light of the above findings, it is advisable to validate the reported benefits of IVUS guidance in percutaneous coronary interventions involving bare metal stents in the Ontario context.
Licensing Status
As of January 16, 2006, Health Canada has licensed 10 intravascular ultrasound imaging systems/catheters for transluminal intervention procedures, most as class 4 medical devices.
Current Funding
IVUS is presently not an insured procedure under the Ontario Health Insurance Plan and there are no professional fees for this procedure. All costs related to the use of IVUS are covered within hospitals’ global budgets. A single use IVUS catheter costs approximately $900CDN and the procedure adds approximately 20 minutes to 30 minutes to a percutaneous coronary intervention procedure.
Diffusion
According to an expert consultant, current use of IVUS in coronary interventions in Ontario is probably limited to high-risk cases such as interventions in long lesions, small vessels, and bifurcated lesions for which images from coronary angiography are indeterminate. It was estimated that IVUS is being used in about 6% of all percutaneous coronary interventions at a large Ontario cardiac centre.
Expert Opinion
IVUS greatly enhances the cardiac interventionists’ ability to visualize and assess high-risk lesions such as long lesions, narrow lesions, and bifurcated lesions that may have indeterminate angiographic images. Information from IVUS in these cases facilitates the choice of the most appropriate approach for the intervention.
Conclusion
The use of adjunctive IVUS in PCIs using bare metal stents in lesions predominantly at low risk for restenosis had no significant impact on survival, myocardial infarction, or angiographic restenosis rates up to 2.5 years after intervention.
The use of IVUS adjunctive to coronary angiography in percutaneous coronary interventions using bare metal stents in lesions predominantly at low risk for restenosis significantly reduced the target lesion and target vessel revascularization at a follow-up period of 18 months to 2.5 years.
One small study suggests that adjunctive IVUS in PCIs using bare metal stents in long lesions (>20 mm) significantly improved the 6-month angiographic restenosis rate and one-year target lesion revascularization rate. These results need to be confirmed with large randomized controlled trials.
Based on information from the Ontario field evaluation on stenting, it is uncertain whether the reduction in revascularization rate resulting from the use of IVUS in the placement of bare metal stents can be generalized to clinical settings in Ontario.
There is presently insufficient evidence available to determine the impact of adjunctive IVUS in percutaneous interventions in high-risk lesions (other than long lesions) or in PCIs using drug-eluting stents.
PMCID: PMC3379536  PMID: 23074482
17.  Postpartal Dissection of All Coronary Arteries in an In Vitro-Fertilized Postmenopausal Woman 
Texas Heart Institute Journal  2009;36(2):168-170.
Myocardial infarction complicates approximately 1 in 10,000 pregnancies. Although coronary artery dissection is the leading cause of pregnancy-related myocardial infarction during the postpartum period, the pathogenesis of coronary dissection during this period remains uncertain.
Herein, we report the case of a 52-year-old black postmenopausal woman with no apparent cardiovascular risk factors who gave birth to twins after in vitro fertilization. Ten days after delivery, she presented with an acute coronary syndrome. Coronary angiography revealed dissection of all 3 coronary arteries. Despite aggressive medical management, the patient experienced recurrent myocardial ischemia. Repeat coronary angiography revealed progression of the dissection process, which required urgent coronary artery bypass surgery. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. To our knowledge, this report is the 1st description of pregnancy-associated coronary artery dissections in a postmenopausal woman, and the 1st such event in a pregnancy that resulted from in vitro fertilization.
PMCID: PMC2676589  PMID: 19436817
Chest pain/etiology; fertilization in vitro; myocardial infarction/complications; maternal age; postpartum period; pregnancy, high-risk; pregnancy complications, cardiovascular/diagnosis/etiology/radiography/therapy; postmenopause; puerperal disorders/complications/etiology/surgery; risk factors; rupture, spontaneous
18.  Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection during Cabergoline Therapy 
Texas Heart Institute Journal  2012;39(1):92-94.
Although spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare cause of acute coronary syndrome, it should be considered during the evaluation of patients who have chest pain. Coronary vasospasm can lead to spontaneous dissection. The dopamine agonist cabergoline is known to cause digital vasospasm. Herein, we report a case of spontaneous right coronary artery dissection in a 43-year-old woman who was taking cabergoline as therapy for prolactinoma. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an apparent relationship between cabergoline therapy and spontaneous coronary artery dissection. The possible association of cabergoline with coronary artery spasm and dissection should be considered in patients who present with chest pain while taking this medication.
PMCID: PMC3298899  PMID: 22412238
Acute coronary syndrome/diagnosis/etiology/therapy; cabergoline/adverse effects; coronary vasospasm/chemically induced; dopamine agonists/adverse effects; rupture, spontaneous/diagnosis/etiology; substance-related disorders/complications
19.  Effect of HIV infection on pregnancy-related mortality in sub-Saharan Africa: secondary analyses of pooled community-based data from the network for Analysing Longitudinal Population-based HIV/AIDS data on Africa (ALPHA) 
Lancet  2013;381(9879):1763-1771.
Summary
Background
Model-based estimates of the global proportions of maternal deaths that are in HIV-infected women range from 7% to 21%, and the effects of HIV on the risk of maternal death is highly uncertain. We used longitudinal data from the Analysing Longitudinal Population-based HIV/AIDS data on Africa (ALPHA) network to estimate the excess mortality associated with HIV during pregnancy and the post-partum period in sub-Saharan Africa.
Methods
The ALPHA network pooled data gathered between June, 1989 and April, 2012 in six community-based studies in eastern and southern Africa with HIV serological surveillance and verbal-autopsy reporting. Deaths occurring during pregnancy and up to 42 days post partum were defined as pregnancy related. Pregnant or post-partum person-years were calculated for HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women, and HIV-infected to HIV-uninfected mortality rate ratios and HIV-attributable rates were compared between pregnant or post-partum women and women who were not pregnant or post partum.
Findings
138 074 women aged 15–49 years contributed 636 213 person-years of observation. 49 568 women had 86 963 pregnancies. 6760 of these women died, 235 of them during pregnancy or the post-partum period. Mean prevalence of HIV infection across all person-years in the pooled data was 17·2% (95% CI 17·0–17·3), but 60 of 118 (50·8%) of the women of known HIV status who died during pregnancy or post partum were HIV infected. The mortality rate ratio of HIV-infected to HIV-uninfected women was 20·5 (18·9–22·4) in women who were not pregnant or post partum and 8·2 (5·7–11·8) in pregnant or post-partum women. Excess mortality attributable to HIV was 51·8 (47·8–53·8) per 1000 person-years in women who were not pregnant or post partum and 11·8 (8·4–15·3) per 1000 person-years in pregnant or post-partum women.
Interpretation
HIV-infected pregnant or post-partum women had around eight times higher mortality than did their HIV-uninfected counterparts. On the basis of this estimate, we predict that roughly 24% of deaths in pregnant or post-partum women are attributable to HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, suggesting that safe motherhood programmes should pay special attention to the needs of HIV-infected pregnant or post-partum women.
Funding
Wellcome Trust, Health Metrics Network (WHO).
doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(13)60803-X
PMCID: PMC4325135  PMID: 23683643
20.  Pseudo (Platelet-type) von Willebrand disease in pregnancy: a case report 
Background
Pseudo (platelet-type)-von Willebrand disease is a rare autosomal dominant bleeding disorder caused by an abnormal function of the glycoprotein lb protein; the receptor for von Willebrand factor. This leads to an increased removal of VWF multimers from the circulation as well as platelets and this results in a bleeding diathesis. Worldwide, less than 50 patients are reported with platelet type von Willebrand disease (PT-VWD).
Case presentation
We describe the management of platelet type von Willebrand disease in pregnancy of a 26 year old Caucasian primigravida. The initial diagnosis was made earlier following a significant haemorrhage post tonsillectomy several years prior to pregnancy. The patient was managed under a multidisciplinary team which included obstetricians, haematologists, anaesthetists and neonatologists. Care plans were made for the ante- natal, intra-partum and post-partum periods in partnership with the patient. The patient’s platelet count levels dropped significantly during the antenatal period. This necessitated the active exclusion of other causes of thrombocytopenia in pregnancy. A vaginal delivery was desired and plans were made for induction of labour at 38 weeks of gestation with platelet cover in view of the progressive fall of the platelet count. The patient however went into spontaneous labour on the day of induction. She was transfused two units of platelets before delivery. She had an unassisted vaginal delivery of a healthy baby. The successful antenatal counselling has encouraged the diagnosis of the same condition in her mother and sister. We found this to be a particularly interesting case as well as challenging to manage due to its rarity. Psuedo von Willebrand disease in pregnancy can be confused with a number of other differential diagnoses, such as gestational thrombocutopenia, idiopathatic thrombocytopenia, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and pre-eclampsia; all need consideration during investigations even in a case such as this where the diagnosis of platelet type von Willebrand disease was known before pregnancy.
Conclusion
Management of pseudo von Willebrand disease in pregnancy involves the co-operation of multidisciplinary teams, regular monitoring of platelet levels and factor VIII and replacement as appropriate. This case report highlights this rare condition and the need to exclude all the other differential diagnoses of thrombocytopenia in pregnant women with thrombocytopenia.
doi:10.1186/1471-2393-13-16
PMCID: PMC3558368  PMID: 23327637
Von Willebrand; Platelet type; Thrombocytopenia; Pregnancy
21.  Myometrial cavernous hemangioma with pulmonary thromboembolism in a post-partum woman: a case report and review of the literature 
Introduction
Cavernous hemangiomas of the uterus are rare benign vascular lesions. Nine cases of diffuse cavernous hemangioma of the gravid uterus have been reported, most of which diffusely involved the myometrium. These vascular malformations are clinically significant, and may cause pronounced bleeding resulting in maternal or fetal demise. Thrombosis of cavernous hemangiomas of the uterus has been previously reported. We here report the first case in which a thrombosed cavernous hemangioma of the myometrium resulted in a fatal pulmonary embolism in a post-partum woman.
Case presentation
A 25-year-old obese African-American woman who had one pregnancy and was delivered of twins by cesarean section was admitted 1 week after the successful delivery. The 12-day clinical course included ventilator-dependent respiratory failure, systemic hypertension, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the sputum, leukocytosis and asystole. A transabdominal ultrasound examination showed heterogeneous thickened and irregular products in the endometrial canal. The laboratory values were relevant for an increased prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, ferritin and a decrease in hemoglobin. The clinical cause of death was cited as acute respiratory distress syndrome. At autopsy, a 400g spongy, hemorrhagic uterus with multiple cystic spaces measuring approximately 0.5 × 0.4cm filled with thrombi within the myometrium was identified. Immunohistological examination with a CD31 stain for vascular endothelium associated antigen confirmed several endothelium-lined vessels, some of which contained thrombi. These histological features were consistent with cavernous hemangioma of the myometrium. A histological examination of the lungs revealed multiple fresh thromboemboli in small- and medium-sized pulmonary arteries in the right upper and lower lobes without organization, but with adjacent areas of fresh hemorrhagic infarction.
Conclusion
This case underscores the importance of a high index of suspicion in a pregnant or post-partum woman presenting with respiratory symptoms. Thrombosis of the cavernous hemangiomas of the gravid or post-partum uterus is a rare entity. This case is of interest because it indicates that this condition can be fatally complicated by embolization of the thrombi in the cavernous myometrial hemangiomas. Although delivery by conservative methods, as well as cesarean section, is possible without resorting to hysterectomy, occasionally, the consequences could be fatal as in this case.
doi:10.1186/1752-1947-6-397
PMCID: PMC3543180  PMID: 23176111
Hemangioma; Cavernous; Myometrium; Thrombosis; Pulmonary emboli
22.  An 18-year-old man with fenestrated vertebral arteries, recurrent stroke and successful angiographic coiling 
Journal of the neurological sciences  2007;260(1-2):279-282.
Fenestration of vertebral arteries has been reported in association with thromboembolic brain infarctions. However, few cases have been reported in which recurrent infarction occurred in spite of adequate anticoagulation. We report a young man with fenestrated vertebral arteries and stroke who failed to respond to standard anticoagulation therapy but did well with angiographic coil obliteration of an abnormal vertebral segment. An 18-year-old left-handed man presented with acute onset of dizziness and headache. No trauma or other stroke risk factors were identified. Left cerebellar infarction was seen on CT, but the cause could not be identified by brain and neck MRI, MRA, or CTA. Bilateral fenestrated vertebral arteries were identified with conventional angiography. Although the patient recovered fully and was treated with anticoagulation, he suffered a recurrent stroke 1 month later involving the right cerebellum while he was on a therapeutic dose of warfarin. Repeat arteriography showed a spontaneous dissection within one of the fenestrated vertebral segments. Since receiving angiographic coil obliteration of the pathologic segment, he has been free of all symptoms. We conclude that the patient sustained recurrent thromboembolic events in his posterior circulation due to spontaneous dissection within a fenestrated vertebral artery segment. Conventional angiography and emergent interventional embolization were essential to his diagnostic evaluation and therapeutic intervention.
doi:10.1016/j.jns.2007.04.032
PMCID: PMC2925646  PMID: 17568613
Cerebellar infarction; Thromboembolic stroke; Posterior circulation; Fenestrated vertebral artery; Interventional radiology
23.  Spontaneous cervicocephalic arterial dissection with headache and neck pain as the only symptom 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2012;13(3):247-253.
Background and objective
Cervicocephalic arterial dissection can cause both ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke. However, spontaneous cervicocephalic arterial dissection presenting only with headache and neck pain has rarely been reported. The clinical features of patients with spontaneous cervicocephalic arterial dissection presenting only with headache and neck pain were investigated.
Methods
The subjects were seven patients with spontaneous cervicocephalic arterial dissection with headache and neck pain alone who were admitted to our hospital during the past 3 years. The clinical features of these patients were investigated. The diagnosis of arterial dissection was based on the criteria of the Strategies Against Stroke Study for Young Adults in Japan.
Results
The age of the patients (3 males, 4 females) ranged from 35 to 79 (mean, 51.0 ± 16.2) years. Six patients had vertebral artery dissection, one had internal carotid artery dissection, and one had an association of vertebral and internal carotid artery dissection. With the exception of one patient, the headache and neck pain were unilateral. All patients with vertebral artery dissection complained of posterior cervical or occipital pain. In the cases of internal carotid artery dissection, one patient complained of temporal pain, and one patient with co-existing vertebral artery dissection complained of posterior cervical pain. The mode of onset was acute in five patients, thunderclap in one, and gradual and progressive in one. The pain was severe in all cases. Five patients complained of continuous pain, while two had intermittent pain. The quality of the pain was described as throbbing by five patients and constrictive by two. The headache and neck pain persisted for 1 week or longer in six of the seven patients.
Conclusion
Cervicocephalic arterial dissection should be suspected when patients complain of intense unilateral posterior cervical and occipital pain or temporal pain.
doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0420-2
PMCID: PMC3311823  PMID: 22350749
Spontaneous cervicocephalic arterial dissection; Headache; Neck pain
24.  Spontaneous cervicocephalic arterial dissection with headache and neck pain as the only symptom 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2012;13(3):247-253.
Background and objective
Cervicocephalic arterial dissection can cause both ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke. However, spontaneous cervicocephalic arterial dissection presenting only with headache and neck pain has rarely been reported. The clinical features of patients with spontaneous cervicocephalic arterial dissection presenting only with headache and neck pain were investigated.
Methods
The subjects were seven patients with spontaneous cervicocephalic arterial dissection with headache and neck pain alone who were admitted to our hospital during the past 3 years. The clinical features of these patients were investigated. The diagnosis of arterial dissection was based on the criteria of the Strategies Against Stroke Study for Young Adults in Japan.
Results
The age of the patients (3 males, 4 females) ranged from 35 to 79 (mean, 51.0 ± 16.2) years. Six patients had vertebral artery dissection, one had internal carotid artery dissection, and one had an association of vertebral and internal carotid artery dissection. With the exception of one patient, the headache and neck pain were unilateral. All patients with vertebral artery dissection complained of posterior cervical or occipital pain. In the cases of internal carotid artery dissection, one patient complained of temporal pain, and one patient with co-existing vertebral artery dissection complained of posterior cervical pain. The mode of onset was acute in five patients, thunderclap in one, and gradual and progressive in one. The pain was severe in all cases. Five patients complained of continuous pain, while two had intermittent pain. The quality of the pain was described as throbbing by five patients and constrictive by two. The headache and neck pain persisted for 1 week or longer in six of the seven patients.
Conclusion
Cervicocephalic arterial dissection should be suspected when patients complain of intense unilateral posterior cervical and occipital pain or temporal pain.
doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0420-2
PMCID: PMC3311823  PMID: 22350749
Spontaneous cervicocephalic arterial dissection; Headache; Neck pain
25.  Management of Posterior Fossa Dissecting Aneurysms 
Interventional Neuroradiology  2009;14(Suppl 2):65-74.
Summary
Treatment and prognosis of 14 patients of posterior fossa arterial dissections (AD) and dissecting aneurysms (DA) in one institution was reviewed. Internal trapping of aneurysm was performed for six patients presenting with SAH (three Vertebral, one posterior cerebral, one posterior inferior cerebellar, one anterior inferior cerebellar DA). The patency of the parent arteries was preserved in four DA patients with SAH (two Vertebral, two Basilar DA), 1 incidental vertebral DA, and one DA patient with brainstem infarction using stents and coils (four patients) or coils only (two patient). Proximal occlusion of parent artery was performed in a vertebral DA with SAH. One patient with a superior cerebellar DA presented with a midbrain infarct developed SAH with spontaneous occlusion of the aneurysm two weeks later. Of the 14 cases, ten were angiographically stable or cured during a follow up period of four to 70 months. one spontaneously resolved and two recurred. There was one death.
PMCID: PMC3328073  PMID: 20557803
dissecting aneurysms, posterior fossa dissections, endovascular techniques, subarachnoid haemorrhage, infarct

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