PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-25 (190921)

Clipboard (0)
None

Related Articles

1.  Diagnostic Accuracy of Ultrasound in Determining the Cause of Bilious Vomiting in Neonates 
Iranian Journal of Radiology  2012;9(4):190-194.
Background
Plain radiography and contrast radiologic studies are traditionally the main options in evaluating neonates presenting with bilious vomiting. While ultrasonography (US) is more available, its diagnostic accuracy is in question.
Objectives
The purpose of this study is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of US in evaluating these patients with bilious vomiting.
Patients and Methods
All neonates with bilious vomiting or bilious nasogastric tube drainage presented to a children’s hospital in a 1.5-year period were included. US were performed in all patients. The results were compared with clinical and radiological data and the final diagnosis. We used chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests for analysis.
Results
The cause of bilious vomiting for 18 of the 23 included patients was surgical. All patients labeled as surgical candidates by US ended in surgery [positive predictive value (PPV) = 100%], while only 50% of the patients with inconclusive US were operated [negative predictive value (NPV) = 50%, Confidence Interval (CI) 95%: 29%-71%]. The sensitivity and specificity of US in diagnosing intestinal atresia (n = 9) was 89% [CI 95%: (68% - 100%)] and 100%. In cases with malrotation (n = 4) and midgut volvulus (n = 2), sonographic diagnosis was in concordance with final surgical diagnosis.
Conclusion
This study suggested that in cases in which US makes a certain diagnosis, its accuracy eliminates the need for further diagnostic tests, but if it is inconclusive, further radiological contrast studies should be tried to make the final diagnosis.
doi:10.5812/iranjradiol.8465
PMCID: PMC3569550  PMID: 23407700
Ultrasonography; Vomiting; Infant, Newborn; Bilious
2.  Intestinal malrotation and midgut volvulus 
Radiology Case Reports  2016;11(3):271-274.
A four-day-old boy presented with persistent bilious vomiting, bloody stained stool, and mild abdominal distension. Transabdominal ultrasound demonstrated a round soft-tissue mass-like structure in the right upper quadrant. With color Doppler ultrasound, the whirlpool sign was observed. Abdominal radiograph showed nonspecific findings. Upper gastrointestinal series revealed upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction at the level of distal duodenum. The diagnosis of intestinal malrotation with midgut volvulus was established and the treated surgically. Intestinal malrotation is congenital abnormal positioning of the bowel loops within the peritoneal cavity resulting in abnormal shortening of mesenteric root that is predisposed to midgut volvulus. Neonates and infants with persistent bilious vomiting should undergo diagnostic workup and preferably ultrasound as the first step. With classic sonographic appearance of whirlpool sign, even further imaging investigations is often not needed, and the surgeon should be alerted to plan surgery.
doi:10.1016/j.radcr.2016.05.012
PMCID: PMC4996931  PMID: 27594965
Intestinal malrotation; Midgut volvulus; Upper gastrointestinal obstruction
3.  Pediatric Gastric Volvulus: Diagnostic and Clinical Approach 
Gastric volvulus is a significant, rare cause of non-bilious vomiting and consists of a pathological rotation of the stomach of more than 180° around the axis without obstruction of the gastrointestinal tract. A definitive diagnosis is made with upper radiological gastrointestinal studies. Treatment may be conservative or surgical with anterior and fundal gastropexy in patients with ingravescent symptoms. We describe the case of a 16-month-old female admitted to our hospital for recurrent and postprandial vomiting episodes which had started at 11 months of age. A history of gastroesophageal reflux was present until 1 year of age, in association with recurrent respiratory infections. The basic metabolic panel was normal. Barium study showed stomach rotation along a horizontal plane stomach. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed no mucosal alterations. The diagnosis was chronic organoaxial gastric volvulus. In our patient, the surgical procedure of gastropexy, both anterior and fundal, without fundoplication was performed. She showed good improvement after surgery, with resolution of symptoms and weight gain.
doi:10.1159/000348758
PMCID: PMC3617890  PMID: 23626505
Postprandial vomiting; Chronic gastric volvulus; Anterior; fundal gastropexy
4.  Acute gastric volvulus: A vicious twist of tummy-case report 
Highlights
•Acute gastric volvulus is an uncommon surgical emergency requiring timely action.•High index of clinical suspicion needed for diagnosis.•Early intervention can save lives and lessen the associated high mortality.•Primary gastric volvulus may be associated with general laxity of ligaments.•Primary gastric volvulus may be linked to fibrosis in active pulmonary tuberculosis.
Introduction
Gastric volvulus is an uncommon disorder and can present either in the acute or chronic setting with variable symptoms. A robust blood supply of the stomach from different sources does not allow ischemia to develop early. When it occurs in the acute scenario, patients present with severe epigastric pain and retching without vomiting. Together with inability to pass nasogastric tube, they constitute Borchardt’s triad.
Presentation of case
We report a case which presented in the emergency department with severe abdominal pain, abdominal distension and vomiting and a previous history of pulmonary tuberculosis. An incidental finding of uterovaginal prolapse was present. A diagnosis of acute gastric volvulus with peritonitis was made and total gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y esophagojejunostomy for gangrenous and perforated stomach was performed.
Discussion
Primary gastric volvulus occurs in the absence of any defect in the diaphragm or adjacent organ pathology and may be caused by weakening of gastric supports. We wish to highlight if there is a possible association of primary gastric volvulus with uterovaginal prolapse reflecting a general laxity of body ligaments or with fibrosis of the lung secondary to pulmonary tuberculosis resulting into the twisting of the stomach.
Conclusion
Acute gastric volvulus is a surgical emergency requiring early diagnosis and aggressive management, as a delay results into complications like gangrene and perforation which substantially increase the morbidity and mortality in these patients.
doi:10.1016/j.ijscr.2016.12.005
PMCID: PMC5167236  PMID: 27988456
Primary gastric volvulus; Organoaxial; Gastric gangrene; Borchardt’s triad; Acute gastric volvulus; Total gastrectomy
5.  Laparoscopic management of midgut malrotation and tuberculous peritonitis in an adolescent boy 
BMJ Case Reports  2014;2014:bcr2013200714.
An unusual case of miliary plastic peritonitis associated with midgut malrotation in an adolescent in whom various diagnostic investigations, medical management and staged initial laparoscopic diagnostic followed by therapeutic procedure was curative have been presented. Tuberculous miliary plastic peritonitis causes dense adhesions between bowel loops and prevents midgut volvulus in a pre-existing malrotation. Diagnosis can be a challenge and threshold for diagnostic laparoscopy should be low. Interval correction of malrotation by laparoscopy after complete resolution of tuberculosis is easy, safe and effective, and cosmetically more pleasing. Midgut malrotation is a congenital anomaly referring to either lack of or incomplete rotation of fetal axis around the axis of superior mesenteric artery during fetal development. Most patients present with bilious vomiting in the first month of life because of duodenal obstruction or a volvulus. This is an unusual case of midgut malrotation in association with tuberculous peritonitis in an adolescent boy.
doi:10.1136/bcr-2013-200714
PMCID: PMC4078532  PMID: 24969067
6.  Gastric remnant twist in the immediate post-operative period following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy 
Twist of stomach remnant post sleeve gastrectomy is a rare entity and difficult to diagnose pre-operatively. We are reporting a case of gastric volvulus post laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, which was managed conservatively. A 38-year-old lady with a body mass index of 54 underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. Sleeve gastrectomy was performed over a 32 French bougie using Endo-GIA tri-stapler. On post-operative day 1, patient had nausea and non-bilious vomiting. An upper gastrointestinal gastrografin study on post-operative days 1 and 2 revealed collection of contrast in the fundic area of stomach with poor flow distally, and she vomited gastrograffin immediately post procedure. With the suspicion of a stricture in the mid stomach as the cause, the patient was taken back for a exploratory laparoscopy and intra-operative endoscopy. We found a twist in the gastric tube which was too tight for the endoscope to pass through. This was managed conservatively with a long stent to keep the gastric tube straight and patent. The stent was discontinued in 7 d and the patient did well. In laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy the stomach is converted into a tube and is devoid of its supports. If the staples fired are not aligned appropriately, it can predispose this stomach tube to undergo torsion along its long axis. Such a twist can be avoided by properly aligning the staples and by placing tacking sutures to the omentum and new stomach tube. This twist is a functional obstruction rather than a stricture; thus, it can be managed by endoscopy and stent placement.
doi:10.4240/wjgs.v7.i11.345
PMCID: PMC4663389  PMID: 26649158
Gastric remnant; Stent; Sleeve gastrectomy; Volvulus; Obesity
7.  Acute gastric volvulus: an uncommon complication of a hiatus hernia 
BMJ Case Reports  2011;2011:bcr0920114753.
An 80-year-old male patient with a history of a hiatus hernia presented with acute abdominal pain and vomiting. CT of his abdomen revealed extraluminal free gas consistent with a perforation. He had a large hiatus hernia. The subdiaphragmatic portion of the stomach was distended and adopted a more transverse lie. The radiological findings were in keeping with acute gastric volvulus with secondary ischaemic complications. Acute gastric volvulus is an abnormal rotation of the stomach resulting in complete obstruction. It is a surgical emergency and does not always present in its classical form. Clinicians should be mindful of this diagnosis in patients presenting with an acute surgical abdomen, especially if the presentation is non-specific, as delays in diagnosis are associated with significant morbidity and mortality.
doi:10.1136/bcr.09.2011.4753
PMCID: PMC3207776  PMID: 22675018
8.  Neonatal obstructed Treitz’s hernia with abdominal cocoon simulating volvulus neonatorum 
BMJ Case Reports  2013;2013:bcr2013009950.
A case of congenital obstructed Treitz's hernia presenting with bilious vomiting in a newborn baby girl has been presented. Internal herniation of contents within a peritoneal sac of the right paramesocolic hernia formed abdominal cocoon which simulated volvulus neonatorum. Plain radiographs and contrast studies were helpful in defining the nature and extent of the lesion. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy, reduction of small bowel contents from the hernial sac forming an abdominal cocoon, Ladd's procedure to correct associated midgut malrotation with incidental appendicectomy uneventfully and recovered well.
doi:10.1136/bcr-2013-009950
PMCID: PMC3736278  PMID: 23832996
9.  Gastric volvulus and associated gastro-oesophageal reflux. 
Archives of Disease in Childhood  1995;73(5):462-464.
Between 1984 and 1994, 10 neurologically normal children between 2 and 24 months were diagnosed as having gastric volvulus with associated gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR). The common features at presentation were episodic colicky abdominal pain, non-bilious vomiting, upper abdominal distension, haematemesis, and failure to thrive. Anterior gastropexy and conservative management of GOR was curative.
Images
PMCID: PMC1511387  PMID: 8554369
10.  Congenital Hemidiaphragmatic Agenesis Presenting as Reversible Mesenteroaxial Gastric Volvulus and Diaphragmatic Hernia: A Case Report 
Journal of Korean Medical Science  2009;24(3):517-519.
A 70-yr-old woman complained of left sided chest pain and non-bilious vomiting for four days after taking a gastric bloating agent for an upper gastrointestinal study. The chest radiography revealed gastric air-fluid levels and bowel loops in the left thoracic cavity. An emergency thoracotomy was performed. The abdominal organs (stomach, spleen, splenic flexure of the colon) were in the left thorax and the entire left hemidiaphragm was absent. There were no diaphragmatic remnants visible for reconstruction of the left diaphragm. We provided warm saline irrigation and performed a left lower lobe adhesiotomy. Thirteen days after surgery, the chest radiography showed improvement in the herniation but mild haziness remained at the left lower lung field. Here we present the oldest case of congenital diaphragmatic agenesis presenting with transient gastric volvulus and diaphragmatic hernia.
doi:10.3346/jkms.2009.24.3.517
PMCID: PMC2698203  PMID: 19543520
Congenital Hemidiaphragmatic Agenesis; Mesenteroaxial Gastric Volvulus; Hernia, Diaphragmatic; Spontaneous Resolution
11.  Intestinal malrotation with suspected cow’s milk allergy: a case report 
BMC Research Notes  2012;5:481.
Background
Intestinal malrotation is an incomplete rotation of the intestine. Failure to rotate leads to abnormalities in intestinal positioning and attachment that leave obstructing bands across the duodenum and a narrow pedicle for the midgut loop, thus making it susceptible to volvulus. One of the important differential diagnoses for malrotation is an allergy to cow’s milk. Several studies have described infants with surgical gastrointestinal diseases and cow’s milk allergy. However, to our knowledge, no study has reported infants with intestinal malrotation who have been symptomatic before surgery was performed and have been examined by allergen-specific lymphocyte stimulation test and food challenge tests with long-term follow-up.
Case presentation
The patient was a Japanese male born at 39 weeks of gestation. He was breast-fed and received commercial cow’s milk supplementation starting the day of birth and was admitted to our hospital at 6 days of age due to bilious vomiting. Plain abdominal radiography showed a paucity of gas in the distal bowel. Because we demonstrated malpositioning of the intestine by barium enema, we repositioned the bowel in a normal position by laparotomy. The patient was re-started on only breast milk 2 days post surgery because we suspected the presence of a cow’s milk allergy, and the results of an allergen-specific lymphocyte stimulation test showed a marked increase in lymphocyte response to kappa-casein. At 5 months of age, the patient was subjected to a cow’s milk challenge test. After the patient began feeding on cow’s milk, he had no symptoms and his laboratory investigations showed no abnormality. In addition, because the patient showed good weight gain and no symptoms with increased cow’s milk intake after discharge, we concluded that the present case was not the result of a cow’s milk allergy. At 1 year, the patient showed favorable growth and development, and serum allergy investigations revealed no reaction to cow’s milk.
Conclusion
When physicians encounter infants with surgical gastrointestinal disease, including intestinal malrotation, they should consider cow’s milk allergy as a differential diagnosis or complication and should utilize food challenge tests for a definitive diagnosis.
doi:10.1186/1756-0500-5-481
PMCID: PMC3490812  PMID: 22943656
Allergen-specific lymphocyte stimulation test; Cow’s milk allergy; Food challenge test; Infant; Intestinal malrotation
12.  A personalized care plan in chronic care: implementation and evaluation 
Purpose
Implementation and evaluation of a personalized care plan for approximately 350 people with (an increased risk of) cardiovascular disease in ten general practices in the Netherlands.
Context
The ‘Healthy Vessels’ (‘Vitale Vaten’) care standard of 2009 describes the optimum care for people with (an increased risk of) cardiovascular disease and is based on the Chronic Care Model. New: working with a personalized care plan, with detailed attention for the promotion of self-management and shared decision-making (SDM). This requires patients to adopt a more active attitude, with a more coaching role from care providers. Vilans has developed the personalized care plan for cardiovascular disease (the booklet ‘Zorgplan Vitale Vaten’) and the personalized care plan for diabetes and for COPD in 2011. In 2011 Vilans also started with the development of a general care plan for patients with multi morbidity diseases.
Data sources
Patients: quantitative survey with a written questionnaire sent to approximately 75 patients. Baseline and end points for 40 patients, plus in-depth interviews with eight patients.
Care providers
Quantitative survey with a written questionnaire sent to 45 care providers. Baseline and end points for 22 care providers, plus in-depth interviews with 10 care providers.
Case description
The personalized care plan is produced by a shared decision-making process and consists of:
A prioritised list of the patient’s SMART objectives
A personalized plan for achieving those objectives
Agreements concerning what the patient will do himself/herself and the support or advice needed
Agreements concerning contact to review the progress (how and when)
The patient or the care provider notes the plan in the patient’s booklet (the ‘Zorgplan Vitale Vaten’=‘Healthy Vessels Care Plan’). This booklet also contains information about the risk factors for cardiovascular disease, the importance of the patient adopting an active role, measurement values, medication and the patient’s care providers.
Advisers from Vilans, the knowledge centre for long-term care in the Netherlands, provide participating organisations guidance for the implementation of the personalized care plan with: work conferences, supporting products and monthly support phone-calls or e-mails.
The project consists of the following phases:
Jan 2010 to Jun 2010: development of materials
Jun 2010 to Oct 2011: implementation and evaluation in ten general practices
Nov 2011 to Feb 2012: project completion and reporting
The results will be available in February 2012
The study questions in this project are:
What effects does the personalized care plan have on the level of self-management of the patients?
What effects does the personalized care plan have on professionals in a multidisciplinary team?
Do the effects also apply to ethnic minority patients and patients with a low socio-economic status?
(Preliminary) conclusions:
Self-management/Shared Decision Making is difficult to implement. Regular feedback and joint learning are needed.
It is helpful when agreements between the patient and the care provider are made concrete: writing things down makes a difference.
Variable response from patients: ranging from ‘good to know you have something to fall back on’ to ‘the idea of writing down personal objectives makes me feel a bit nervous’.
The personalized care plan does not seem suitable for all, in particular not for the elderly, for those of low socio-economic status, and for ethnic minorities.
Discussion
Health care professionals are used to take care of patients with chronic diseases. They are very willing to help and give patients some advice about how they can prevent a chronic disease or have a good life with a chronic disease. During the conferences and phone calls we have with them, we see that the focus is more on caring instead of sharing and self-management. It frustrates professionals when patients do not behave the way they tell them to. They do not know how to handle or turn the conversation into self-management and rather fall back in their roll of caring. It seems necessary to get feedback on a regular basis so they can explore new ways of self-management support together in a multidisciplinary way.
Self-management support is more successful when professionals are working together, looking for ways to take into account the perspective and expectations of the patient as well as those of the professional. The personalized care plan can help patients and professionals exploring their new roles.
There are some relevant questions concerning personalized care plans in practice which we cannot yet answer. We would like to discuss these essential questions with the participants of INIC12. For example:
How important is it for patients to have a personalized care plan? Does it support them in making decisions concerning their health in daily life? In what way can a digital care plan provide help?
Do professionals improve their caring and communication with patients with chronic diseases when they use a personalized care plan?
Is it more successful when one professional is the central care provider for a patient?
What are good ways for integrating personalized care plans in usual care? Does it take more time in comparison to regular care?
How to create possibilities for professionals so they can regard the personalized care plan as an important topic in chronic care? We see it is difficult for a small group of patients. How to implement the personalized care plan for all the patients with a chronic disease?
What do the answers to these questions mean and does individual care planning change the health care process in such a way that self-management can flourish?
PMCID: PMC3617761
personalized care plan; self-management; vascular risk; multidisciplinary team; chronic care
13.  Successful Interruption of Transmission of Onchocerca volvulus in the Escuintla-Guatemala Focus, Guatemala 
Background
Elimination of onchocerciasis (river blindness) through mass administration of ivermectin in the six countries in Latin America where it is endemic is considered feasible due to the relatively small size and geographic isolation of endemic foci. We evaluated whether transmission of onchocerciasis has been interrupted in the endemic focus of Escuintla-Guatemala in Guatemala, based on World Health Organization criteria for the certification of elimination of onchocerciasis.
Methodology/Principal Findings
We conducted evaluations of ocular morbidity and past exposure to Onchocerca volvulus in the human population, while potential vectors (Simulium ochraceum) were captured and tested for O. volvulus DNA; all of the evaluations were carried out in potentially endemic communities (PEC; those with a history of actual or suspected transmission or those currently under semiannual mass treatment with ivermectin) within the focus. The prevalence of microfilariae in the anterior segment of the eye in 329 individuals (≥7 years old, resident in the PEC for at least 5 years) was 0% (one-sided 95% confidence interval [CI] 0–0.9%). The prevalence of antibodies to a recombinant O. volvulus antigen (Ov-16) in 6,432 school children (aged 6 to 12 years old) was 0% (one-sided 95% IC 0–0.05%). Out of a total of 14,099 S. ochraceum tested for O. volvulus DNA, none was positive (95% CI 0–0.01%). The seasonal transmission potential was, therefore, 0 infective stage larvae per person per season.
Conclusions/Significance
Based on these evaluations, transmission of onchocerciasis in the Escuintla-Guatemala focus has been successfully interrupted. Although this is the second onchocerciasis focus in Latin America to have demonstrated interruption of transmission, it is the first focus with a well-documented history of intense transmission to have eliminated O. volvulus.
Author Summary
Brought to the Americas from Africa by the slave trade, onchocerciasis is present in six countries in Latin America. The disease is caused by a round worm and is transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected black fly. Once in a human, the adult worms produce larvae that circulate through the body, causing itching or even blindness. Ivermectin, a drug that kills the larvae, is delivered by public health authorities in countries where the disease is present. If the larvae are killed, then the disease cannot be transmitted to more people. People living in the Escuintla-Guatemala focus, a region in Guatemala where the disease was common, have been taking ivermectin for many years. The Ministry of Health of Guatemala believes that onchocerciasis is no longer being transmitted in the area. To prove that there is no more transmission of the disease, the authors examined the eyes of residents of the area to see if they could find any evidence of the worms. They also conducted analyses of blood in school children to see if they had ever been exposed to the worm, and they caught thousands of black flies and tested them to see if they were infected. These evaluations found no evidence of transmission of the disease in the Escuintla-Guatemala focus. As a result, local public health authorities can stop giving ivermectin and invest their human resources in other important diseases.
doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0000404
PMCID: PMC2656640  PMID: 19333366
14.  Intestinal ascariasis at pediatric emergency room in a developed country 
World Journal of Gastroenterology : WJG  2014;20(38):14058-14062.
Ascaris lumbricoides infection is rare among children in developed countries. Although large numbers of adult Ascaris in the small intestine can cause various abdominal symptoms, this infection remains asymptomatic until the number of worms in the intestine considerably increases in most cases. Ascaris causing bilious vomiting suggesting ileus is rare, especially in developed countries. A 6-year-old boy who lived in Japan, presented with abdominal colic, bilious vomiting at the pediatric emergency room. He appeared pale, and had no abdominal distention, tenderness, palpable abdominal mass, or findings of dehydration. He experienced bilious vomiting again during a physical examination. Laboratory tests showed mild elevation of white blood cells and C-reactive protein levels. Antigens of adenovirus, rotavirus, and norovirus were not detected from his stool, and stool culture showed normal flora. Ultrasonography showed multiple, round-shaped structures within the small intestine, and a tubular structure in a longitudinal scan of the small intestine. Capsule endoscopy showed a moving worm of Ascaris in the jejunum. Intestinal ascariasis should be considered as a cause of bilious vomiting in children, even at the emergency room in industrial countries. Ultrasound examination and capsule endoscopy are useful for diagnosis of pediatric intestinal ascariasis.
doi:10.3748/wjg.v20.i38.14058
PMCID: PMC4194592  PMID: 25320546
Ascaris lumbricoides; Paralytic ileus; Capsule endoscopy; Ultrasound; Bilious vomiting
15.  Nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy 
BMJ Clinical Evidence  2009;2009:1405.
Introduction
More than half of pregnant women suffer from nausea and vomiting, which typically begins by the 4th week and disappears by the 16th week of pregnancy. The cause of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy is unknown, but may be due to the rise in human chorionic gonadotrophin concentration. In 1 in 200 women, the condition progresses to hyperemesis gravidarum, which is characterised by prolonged and severe nausea and vomiting, dehydration, and weight loss.
Methods and outcomes
We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatment for nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy? What are the effects of treatments for hyperemesis gravidarum? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2008 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).
Results
We found 30 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions.
Conclusions
In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupressure; acupuncture; antihistamines; corticosteroids; corticotrophins; diazepam; dietary interventions other than ginger; domperidone; ginger; metoclopramide; ondansetron; phenothiazines; and pyridoxine (vitamin B6).
Key Points
More than half of pregnant women suffer from nausea and vomiting, which typically begins by the 4th week and disappears by the 16th week of pregnancy. The cause of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy is unknown, but may be due to the rise in human chorionic gonadotrophin concentration.In 1 in 200 women, the condition progresses to hyperemesis gravidarum, which is characterised by prolonged and severe nausea and vomiting, dehydration, and weight loss.
Ginger may reduce nausea and vomiting in pregnancy compared with placebo, although studies have given inconclusive results. Pyridoxine may be as effective as ginger in reducing nausea, although studies have given inconsistent results about reduction of vomiting.We don't know whether dietary interventions other than ginger are beneficial.
P6 acupressure may reduce nausea and vomiting compared with sham acupressure, but wristbands can be difficult to use. We don't know whether acupressure is more effective than pyridoxine at reducing nausea or vomiting.
We don't know whether acupuncture is more effective than sham acupuncture at reducing nausea and vomiting.
Antihistamines may reduce nausea and vomiting compared with placebo. The antihistamine dimenhydrinate may be as effective as ginger at improving nausea at 7 days, although it seems more effective at reducing vomiting episodes in the first 2 days.
We don't know whether phenothiazines, metoclopramide, or domperidone reduce nausea or vomiting.
Acupressure may be more effective at reducing vomiting episodes in women with hyperemesis gravidarum compared with placebo or control (intravenous fluid therapy).
We don't know whether acupuncture, intramuscular corticotrophin, corticosteroids, diazepam, ginger, metoclopramide, ondansetron, or other dietary interventions are effective in treating hyperemesis gravidarum.
Corticosteroids may be more effective than metoclopramide at reducing vomiting episodes and reducing readmission to the intensive care unit in women with hyperemesis gravidarum.
PMCID: PMC2907767  PMID: 21726485
16.  Aripiprazole in the Maintenance Treatment of Bipolar Disorder: A Critical Review of the Evidence and Its Dissemination into the Scientific Literature 
PLoS Medicine  2011;8(5):e1000434.
A systematic search of the literature reveals limited evidence to support use of aripiprazole, a second-generation antipsychotic medication, in maintenance therapy of bipolar disorder, despite widespread use.
Background
Aripiprazole, a second-generation antipsychotic medication, has been increasingly used in the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder and received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for this indication in 2005. Given its widespread use, we sought to critically review the evidence supporting the use of aripiprazole in the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder and examine how that evidence has been disseminated in the scientific literature.
Methods and Findings
We systematically searched multiple databases to identify double-blind, randomized controlled trials of aripiprazole for the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder while excluding other types of studies, such as open-label, acute, and adjunctive studies. We then used a citation search to identify articles that cited these trials and rated the quality of their citations. Our evidence search protocol identified only two publications, both describing the results of a single trial conducted by Keck et al., which met criteria for inclusion in this review. We describe four issues that limit the interpretation of that trial as supporting the use of aripiprazole for bipolar maintenance: (1) insufficient duration to demonstrate maintenance efficacy; (2) limited generalizability due to its enriched sample; (3) possible conflation of iatrogenic adverse effects of abrupt medication discontinuation with beneficial effects of treatment; and (4) a low overall completion rate. Our citation search protocol yielded 80 publications that cited the Keck et al. trial in discussing the use of aripiprazole for bipolar maintenance. Of these, only 24 (30%) mentioned adverse events reported and four (5%) mentioned study limitations.
Conclusions
A single trial by Keck et al. represents the entirety of the literature on the use of aripiprazole for the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder. Although careful review identifies four critical limitations to the trial's interpretation and overall utility, the trial has been uncritically cited in the subsequent scientific literature.
Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary
Editors' Summary
Background
Bipolar disorder (manic depression) is a serious, long-term mental illness that affects about 1% of adults at some time during their life. It usually develops in late adolescence or early adulthood and affects men and women from all backgrounds. People with bipolar disorder experience wild mood swings that interfere with daily life and damage relationships. During “manic” episodes, which can last several months if untreated, they may feel euphoric (“high”), energetic, or irritable. They may be full of ambitious plans, feel creative, and spend money recklessly. They can also have psychotic symptoms—they may see or hear things that are not there. During depressive episodes, affected individuals may feel helpless, worthless, and suicidal. Treatments for bipolar disorder include drugs to stabilize mood swings (for example, lithium and anticonvulsant medications), antidepressants to treat depressive episodes, and antipsychotic drugs to treat manic episodes. Psychotherapy can also help and patients can be taught to recognize the signs of approaching manic or depressive episodes and the triggers for these episodes.
Why Was This Study Done?
Treatment of bipolar disorder is divided into three phases: acute treatment lasting about 2 months to achieve remission, continuance treatment lasting from months 2 through 6 to prevent relapse, and long-term maintenance treatment to prevent recurrence. Second-generation (atypical) antipsychotics are widely used for acute treatment of manic episodes but are also used for maintenance treatment. For example, the atypical antipsychotic aripiprazole, which gained US approval for this indication in 2005, is now a popular choice among clinicians for treating bipolar disorder. But how much evidence is there to support aripiprazole's use in the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder? Here, the researchers systematically search the published literature for double-blind randomized controlled trials of aripiprazole for this indication, critically analyze the quality of these trials, and undertake a citation search to investigate how the results of these trials have been disseminated in the scientific literature. In double-blind randomized controlled trials, patients are randomly assigned to receive a test drug or a control (generally, placebo), and the effects of these drugs compared; patients in the trial, and physicians administering treatments, would not know who is receiving the test drug or control until the trial is completed.
What Did the Researchers Do and Find?
The researchers' search for reports of double-blind randomized controlled trials of aripiprazole for the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder using predefined criteria identified only two publications, both describing a single trial—the Keck trial. Critical review of this trial identified four issues that limit its interpretation for supporting aripiprazole as a maintenance therapy: the trial was too short to demonstrate maintenance efficacy; all the trial participants had responded well to aripiprazole as an acute treatment so the generalizability of the trial's results was limited; the trial design meant that some of the apparent beneficial treatment results could have reflected the adverse effects of abrupt medication discontinuation in the control group; and the trial had a low completion rate. The researchers' citation search identified 80 publications that cited the Keck trial in discussions of the use of aripiprazole for maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder. Only a quarter of these papers presented any numerical data from the trial, only a third mentioned any of the reported adverse events, and only four papers mentioned the trial's limitations.
What Do These Findings Mean?
This evaluation of the evidence base supporting the use of aripiprazole for the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder shows that the justification for this practice relies on the results of one published trial. Moreover, the methodology and reporting of this trial mean that its results cannot easily be generalized to inform the treatment of most patients with bipolar disorder. Worryingly, the researchers' citation search indicates that the Keck trial has been cited uncritically in the ensuing scientific literature. Although the unique features of bipolar disorder make it hard to undertake controlled studies of treatment options, the researchers express concern that “the publication and apparently uncritical acceptance of this trial may be diverting patients away from more effective treatments”.
Additional Information
Please access these websites via the online version of this summary at http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1000434.
The US National Institute of Mental Health has detailed information on bipolar disorder, including an Easy to Read booklet (in English and Spanish)
The UK National Health Service Choices website provides information on all aspects of bipolar disorder
The UK charity Mind has information on bipolar disorder and provides links to other useful organizations
MedlinePlus has links to further information on bipolar disorder (in English and Spanish)
doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1000434
PMCID: PMC3086871  PMID: 21559324
17.  Nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy 
BMJ Clinical Evidence  2014;2014:1405.
Introduction
More than half of pregnant women suffer from nausea and vomiting, which typically begins by the fourth week and disappears by the 16th week of pregnancy. The cause of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy is unknown, but may be due to the rise in human chorionic gonadotrophin concentration. In 1 in 200 women, the condition progresses to hyperemesis gravidarum, which is characterised by prolonged and severe nausea and vomiting, dehydration, and weight loss.
Methods and outcomes
We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatment for nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy? What are the effects of treatments for hyperemesis gravidarum? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).
Results
We found 32 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions.
Conclusions
In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupressure; acupuncture; corticosteroids; ginger; metoclopramide; ondansetron; prochlorperazine; promethazine; and pyridoxine (vitamin B6).
Key Points
More than half of pregnant women suffer from nausea and vomiting, which typically begins by the fourth week and disappears by the 16th week of pregnancy. The cause of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy is unknown, but may be due to the rise in human chorionic gonadotrophin concentration.In 1 in 200 women, the condition progresses to hyperemesis gravidarum, which is characterised by prolonged and severe nausea and vomiting, dehydration, and weight loss.
In general, the trials we found were small and of limited quality. There is a need for other large high-quality trials in this condition with consistent outcomes.
For nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy: Ginger may reduce nausea and vomiting in pregnancy compared with placebo, although studies used different preparations of ginger and reported varying outcome measures. Pyridoxine may be more effective than placebo at reducing nausea but we don't know about vomiting, and evidence was weak. Pyridoxine may be as effective as ginger in reducing nausea and vomiting, although evidence was limited. Acupressure may be more effective than sham acupressure at reducing nausea and vomiting. However, evidence was weak, and interventions and outcomes varied between trials.We don't know whether acupressure is more effective than pyridoxine at reducing nausea or vomiting as we found insufficient evidence.We don't know whether acupuncture is more effective than sham acupuncture at reducing nausea and vomiting.We don't know whether prochlorperazine, promethazine, or metoclopramide reduce nausea or vomiting compared with placebo.
In hyperemesis gravidarum: We don't know whether acupressure, acupuncture, corticosteroids, ginger, metoclopramide, or ondansetron are effective in treating hyperemesis gravidarum.Hydrocortisone may be more effective than metoclopramide at reducing vomiting episodes and reducing readmission to the intensive care unit in women with hyperemesis gravidarum.
PMCID: PMC3959188  PMID: 24646807
18.  Do Tonkean macaques (Macaca tonkeana) perceive what conspecifics do and do not see? 
PeerJ  2016;4:e1693.
The understanding of the visual perception of others, also named visual perspective taking, is a component of Theory of Mind. Although strong evidence of visual perspective taking has been reported in great apes, the issue is more open to discussion in monkeys. We investigated whether Tonkean macaques (Macaca tonkeana) know what conspecifics do and do not see, using a food competition paradigm originally developed in great apes. We tested individuals in pairs, after establishing the dominance relationship within each pair. Twenty-one pairs were tested in four different conditions. In one condition, the subordinate had the choice between two pieces of food, one that was visible only to it and another that was also visible to the dominant. It was predicted that if the subordinate understands that the dominant cannot see both pieces of food because one is hidden from its view, the subordinate should preferentially go for the food visible only to itself. In the three other conditions, we varied the temporal and visual access to food for both individuals, to control for alternative explanations based on dominance. We recorded the first movement direction chosen by subjects, i.e. towards a) visible food b) hidden food or c) elsewhere; and the outcome of the test, i.e. the quantity of food obtained. Results showed that subordinates moved preferentially for the hidden food when released simultaneously with the dominant and also with a head start on the dominant. By contrast, dominants’ choices of the two pieces of food were random. We also describe and discuss some of the strategies used by subordinates in these tests. According to the whole of our results, Tonkean macaques seem capable of visual perspective taking despite the fact that a low-level explanation as behavior reading has not been totally excluded.
doi:10.7717/peerj.1693
PMCID: PMC4768696  PMID: 26925323
Perspective taking; Theory of mind; Competition; Social cognition; Monkey
19.  Oral Ondansetron Administration in Emergency Departments to Children with Gastroenteritis: An Economic Analysis 
PLoS Medicine  2010;7(10):e1000350.
Stephen Freedman and colleagues performed a cost analysis of the routine administration of ondansetron in both the United States and Canada and show that its routine administration to eligible children in such settings could provide substantial benefit.
Background
The use of antiemetics for children with vomiting is one of the most controversial decisions in the treatment of gastroenteritis in developed countries. Ondansetron, a selective serotonin receptor antagonist, has been found to be effective in improving the success of oral rehydration therapy. However, North American and European clinical practice guidelines continue to recommend against its use, stating that evidence of cost savings would be required to support ondansetron administration. Thus, an economic analysis of the emergency department administration of ondansetron was conducted. The primary objective was to conduct a cost analysis of the routine administration of ondansetron in both the United States and Canada.
Methods and Findings
A cost analysis evaluated oral ondansetron administration to children presenting to emergency departments with vomiting and dehydration secondary to gastroenteritis from a societal and health care payer's perspective in both the US and Canada. A decision tree was developed that incorporated the frequency of vomiting, intravenous insertion, hospitalization, and emergency department revisits. Estimates of the monetary costs associated with ondansetron use, intravenous rehydration, and hospitalization were derived from administrative databases or emergency department use. The economic burden in children administered ondansetron plus oral rehydration therapy was compared to those not administered ondansetron employing deterministic and probabilistic simulations. We estimated the costs or savings to society and health care payers associated with the routine administration of ondansetron. Sensitivity analyses considered variations in costs, treatment effects, and exchange rates. In the US the administration of ondansetron to eligible children would prevent approximately 29,246 intravenous insertions and 7,220 hospitalizations annually. At the current average wholesale price, its routine administration to eligible children would annually save society US$65.6 million (US$49.1–US$81.1) and health care payers US$61.1 million (US$46.2–US$76.3). In Canada the administration of ondansetron to eligible children would prevent 4,065 intravenous insertions and 1,003 hospitalizations annually. Its routine administration would annually save society CDN$1.72 million (CDN$1.15–CDN$1.89) and the health care system CDN$1.18 million (CDN$0.88–CDN$1.41).
Conclusions
In countries where intravenous rehydration is often employed, the emergency department administration of oral ondansetron to children with dehydration and vomiting secondary to gastroenteritis results in significant monetary savings compared to a no-ondansetron policy.
Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary
Editors' Summary
Background
Although many episodes of gastroenteritis in children are mild and can be managed with oral fluids, including oral rehydration therapy (ORT), some cases are severe enough to require hospital admission for intravenous fluids. Administration of an antiemetic (a drug that reduces nausea and sickness) can be clinically effective, especially ondansetron, (a drug that belongs to a class of drugs known as selective serotonin receptor antagonists), which is safer than other antiemetics, such as promethazine and prochlorperazine, and in which there is good evidence to support its effectiveness in improving the success of ORT in children with gastroenteritis. Furthermore, studies have shown that administration of ondansetron decreases the risk of further vomiting, and hence the need for intravenous rehydration, and immediate hospital admission. However, despite the proven clinical benefits of ondansetron, clinical practice guidelines continue to recommend against the use of antiemetics in gastroenteritis because the evidence of cost savings is not yet clear. Last year, the UK's National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence recommended that such a cost analysis should be a key research priority in pediatric gastroenteritis.
Why Was This Study Done?
This study—which is an economic analysis—was conducted in response to the various calls for the need to demonstrate the cost effectiveness of ondansetron in the management of pediatric gastroenteritis.
What Did the Researchers Do and Find?
The researchers analysed the costs of the administration of oral ondansetron in both the US and Canada, if routinely given to children with gastroenteritis-induced vomiting and dehydration in the emergency department setting. In addition, the researchers calculated the incremental cost of ondansetron per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained from a health care perspective, compared to a regimen without ondansetron administration. The authors conducted a particular type of statistical analysis, known as decision tree analysis, to compare the two treatment options—administering ondansetron and not administering ondansetron in addition to ORT, with the clinical outcomes (further vomiting, intravenous rehydration, and hospitalization) determined on the basis of the documented efficacy of ondansetron. In addition, the researchers conducted their analyses from both the societal perspective (which included all costs, both direct—the resources required to produce a service; and indirect—productivity costs) and the health care payer's perspective. The US and Canada use similar medical resources, management programs, and treatment guidelines, but as prices differ dramatically (for example, the cost of hospitalization in the US is 8-fold higher than that in Canada), the researchers conducted a separate analysis for each country.
On the basis of data from the US, the researchers found that the administration of ondansetron to eligible children would prevent approximately 29,246 intravenous insertions and 7,220 hospitalizations every year with an annual saving of US$65.6 million to society and US$61.1 million to payers of health care costs if this drug was given routinely. When using Canadian data, the researchers found that the administration of ondansetron to eligible children would prevent 4,065 intravenous insertions and 1,003 hospitalizations every year, with an annual saving of CDN$1.72 million to society and CDN$1.18 million to payers of health care costs if this drug was given routinely.
What Do These Findings Mean?
The results of this study show that the emergency department administration of oral ondansetron to children with dehydration and vomiting secondary to gastroenteritis results in significant monetary savings from both societal and health care perspectives compared to a policy that does not include ondansetron administration. Furthermore, the societal savings are probably an underestimate because in their model, the researchers assumed that only 10% of children with gastroenteritis presenting to an emergency department would meet eligibility criteria (in reality, this proportion would likely be higher). In addition, the researchers did not include estimates for ondansetron administration in the clinic or private office setting, as although such use is common, no estimates of eligibility and efficacy were available.
Therefore, in addition to being clinically beneficial, the administration of oral ondansetron to children with dehydration and vomiting secondary to gastroenteritis is also economically advantageous.
Additional Information
Please access these Web sites via the online version of this summary at http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1000350.
Patient UK and the US National Institutes of Health provide information for patients on ondansetron
Patient UK provides information on gastroenteritis in children
BBC Health also provides general information on gastroenteritis
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention contains a report on managing acute gastroenteritis among children
doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1000350
PMCID: PMC2953527  PMID: 20967234
20.  The Co-evolution of Concepts and Motivation 
Does the human mind contain evolved concepts? Many psychologists have doubted this or have investigated only a narrow set (e.g., object, number, cause). Does the human mind contain evolved motivational systems? Many more assent to this claim, holding that there are evolved motivational systems for, among other tasks, social affiliation, aggressive competition, and finding food. An emerging research program, however, reveals that these are not separate questions. Any evolved motivational system needs a wealth of conceptual structure that tethers the motivations to real world entities. For instance, what use is a fear of predators without knowing what predators are and how to respond to them effectively? As we illustrate with case studies of cooperation and conflict, there is no motivation without representation: To generate adaptive behavior, motivational systems must be interwoven with the concepts required to support them, and cannot be understood without explicit reference to those concepts.
doi:10.1177/0963721414521631
PMCID: PMC4159186  PMID: 25221389
evolutionary psychology; concepts; motivation; free rider; formidability
21.  Pediatric gastric volvulus--experience with 7 cases. 
Gastric volvulus, organoaxial or mesenterioaxial, is a rare condition in infancy and childhood. We experienced 7 cases of pediatric gastric volvulus, consisting of 3 cases of secondary gastric volvulus due to left diaphragmatic eventration or paraesophageal hernia and 4 cases of idiopathic gastric volvulus. Of 7 cases, five were organoaxial in type and two were mesenterioaxial. The main symptoms of secondary gastric volvulus were vomiting and respiratory difficulty whereas those of idiopathic gastric volvulus were abdominal distension and weight loss with or without failure to thrive. It may be suspected on plain abdominal radiographs and usually confirmed by upper gastrointestinal series. Upper gastrointestinal series in organaxial volvulus demonstrated characteristic findings such as reversal of the greater and lesser curvatures and two air-fluid levels. In mesenterioaxial volvulus, the stomach was rotated into inverted position with pyloroantral obstruction showing a beak appearance. The three patients with secondary volvulus underwent repair of associated defect with or without gastropexy and the 3 patients with idiopathic volvulus underwent anterior gastropexy or gastrostomy. In those with idiopathic gastric volvulus, there was no obvious cause such as laxity of the perigastric ligaments. The operative results were satisfactory except for the three patients with idiopathic gastric volvulus whose abdomen remained distended regardless of weight gain.
PMCID: PMC3053782  PMID: 1285925
22.  Gastric volvulus 
Emergency Medicine Journal : EMJ  2007;24(6):446-447.
Gastric volvulus is a rare disease with an unknown incidence. Unless it stays in the back of the diagnostician's mind, diagnosis of gastric volvulus, which can have significant morbidity and mortality associated with it, can be easily missed. Unstable vital signs and distressed appearance are not always present, as in textbook cases. The presence of a hiatal hernia with persistent vomiting despite initial antiemetic treatment should trigger one to think of gastric volvulus, despite the patient appearing very stable. With the advent of CT and laparoscopic surgery, the gold standards for diagnosing and treating this disease are ever evolving.
doi:10.1136/emj.2006.041947
PMCID: PMC2658296  PMID: 17513555
23.  A Rare but Serious Complication of Ladd's Procedure: Recurrent Midgut Volvulus 
Case Reports in Gastroenterology  2007;1(1):130-134.
An eighteen-month-old boy who had undergone a Ladd's procedure for malrotation in the newborn period presented with acute onset of nausea, vomiting, rectal bleeding, and confusion. Laparotomy revealed midgut volvulus, mesenteric lymphadenopathy and massive chylous ascites. Recurrent midgut volvulus following Ladd's procedure is extremely rare but should be borne in mind in cases of persistent or recurrent gastrointestinal symptoms. Timely surgery is necessary to avoid intestinal gangrene and decrease morbidity and mortality related to consequences of midgut volvulus.
doi:10.1159/000110601
PMCID: PMC3073800  PMID: 21487558
Intestinal malrotation; Midgut volvulus, recurrent
24.  Nausea and vomiting in people with cancer and other chronic diseases 
BMJ Clinical Evidence  2009;2009:2406.
Introduction
Nausea and vomiting occur in 40%–70% of people with cancer, and are also common in other chronic conditions such as hepatitis C and inflammatory bowel disease. Nausea and vomiting become more common as disease progresses.
Methods and outcomes
We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for nausea and vomiting occurring as a result of either the disease or its treatment in adults with cancer? What are the effects of treatments for nausea and vomiting occurring as a result of either the disease or its treatment in adults with chronic diseases other than cancer? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2008 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).
Results
We found nine systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions.
Conclusions
In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: 5HT3 antagonists, antihistamines, antimuscarinics, atypical antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, butyrophenones, cannabinoids, corticosteroids, haloperidol, metoclopramide, NK1 antagonists, phenothiazines, prokinetics, 5HT3 antagonists plus corticosteroids, and venting gastrostomy.
Key Points
Nausea and vomiting occur in 40%–70% of people with cancer, and are also common in other chronic conditions such as hepatitis C and inflammatory bowel disease. Nausea and vomiting become more common as disease progresses.
Nausea and vomiting may occur as a result of the disease or its treatment.
The evidence base for treatment-related causes of nausea and vomiting (chemotherapy and radiotherapy) is much greater and more robust than for disease-related causes.
Metoclopramide is likely to be effective for reducing episodes of vomiting in people having chemotherapy. Dexamethasone, in combination with other antiemetics, reduces acute and delayed emesis compared with placebo in people receiving emetogenic chemotherapy, and it may be more effective than metoclopramide in this population. 5HT3 antagonists also reduce acute vomiting in people having chemotherapy compared with metoclopramide-based regimens, and this benefit is enhanced by the addition of dexamethasone.There is consensus that haloperidol, phenothiazines, and venting gastrostomy are effective for controlling nausea and vomiting in people with cancer.
Cannabinoids are effective for nausea and vomiting in people receiving chemotherapy, but may be associated with a high and often unacceptable burden of adverse effects.
We don't know whether antihistamines, antimuscarinics, antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, or NK1 antagonists are effective in people with cancer-related nausea and vomiting.
We don't know whether 5HT3 antagonists alone reduce nausea and vomiting in people having radiotherapy. However, adding dexamethasone to 5HT3 antagonists seems more effective than 5HT3 antagonists alone.
Despite the lack of robust RCT evidence, there is a consensus based on clinical experience that antihistamines have a place in the management of nausea and vomiting, especially that related to motion sickness, mechanical bowel obstruction, and raised intracranial pressure. We don't know whether any other interventions are effective for controlling nausea and vomiting in people with chronic conditions other than cancer.
PMCID: PMC2907825  PMID: 19445763
25.  Atypical presentation of perforated peptic ulcer disease in a 12-year-old boy 
BMJ Case Reports  2014;2014:bcr2014204716.
A 12-year-old boy was referred to the surgical unit with 4 h history of severe lower abdominal pain and bilious vomiting. No other symptoms were reported and there was no significant medical or family history. Examination revealed tenderness in the lower abdomen, in particular the left iliac fossa. His white cell count was elevated at 19.6×109/L, with a predominant neutrophilia of 15.8×109/L and a C reactive protein of <0.3 mg/L. An abdominal X-ray revealed intraperitoneal gas and a chest X-ray identified free air under both hemidiaphragms. Subsequent diagnostic laparoscopy identified a perforated duodenal ulcer that was repaired by means of an omental patch. The case illustrates that although uncommon, alternate diagnoses must be borne in mind in children presenting with lower abdominal pain and diagnostic laparoscopy is a useful tool in children with visceral perforation as it avoids treatment delays and exposure to excess radiation.
doi:10.1136/bcr-2014-204716
PMCID: PMC4078441  PMID: 24973349

Results 1-25 (190921)