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1.  A portable mnemonic to facilitate checking for cognitive errors 
BMC Research Notes  2016;9:445.
Background
Although a clinician may have the intention of carrying out strategies to reduce cognitive errors, this intention may not be realized especially under heavy workload situations or following a period of interruptions. Implementing strategies to reduce cognitive errors in clinical setting may be facilitated by a portable mnemonic in the form of a checklist.
Methods
A 2-stage approach using both qualitative and quantitative methods was used in the development and evaluation of a mnemonic checklist. In the development stage, a focus-driven literature search and a face-to-face discussion with a content expert in cognitive errors were carried out. Categories of cognitive errors addressed and represented in the checklist were identified. In the judgment stage, the face and content validity of the categories of cognitive errors represented in the checklist were determined. This was accomplished through coding responses of a panel of experts in cognitive errors.
Results
From the development stage, a preliminary version of the checklist in the form of four questions represented by four specific letters was developed. The letter ‘T’ in the TWED checklist stands for ‘Threat’ (i.e., ‘is there any life or limb threat that I need to rule out in this patient?’), ‘W’ for ‘Wrong/What else’ (i.e., ‘What if I am wrong? What else could it be?’), ‘E’ for ‘evidences’ (i.e., ‘Do I have sufficient evidences to support or exclude this diagnosis?’), and ‘D’ for ‘dispositional factors’ (i.e., ‘is there any dispositional factor that influence my decision’). In the judgment stage, the content validity of most categories of cognitive errors addressed in the checklist was rated highly in terms of their relevance and representativeness (with modified kappa values ranging from 0.65 to 1.0). Based on the coding of responses from seven experts, this checklist was shown to be sufficiently comprehensive to activate the implementation intention of checking cognitive errors.
Conclusion
The TWED checklist is a portable mnemonic checklist that can be used to activate implementation intentions for checking cognitive errors in clinical settings. While its mnemonic structure eases recall, its brevity makes it portable for quick application in every clinical case until it becomes habitual in daily clinical practice.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13104-016-2249-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/s13104-016-2249-2
PMCID: PMC5027116  PMID: 27639851
2.  Toward competency-based curriculum: Application of workplace-based assessment tools in the National Saudi Arabian Anesthesia Training Program 
Saudi Journal of Anaesthesia  2016;10(4):417-422.
Background:
The anesthesia training program of the Saudi Commission for health specialties has introduced a developed competency-based anesthesia residency program starting from 2015 with the utilization of the workplace-based assessment (WBA) tools, namely mini-clinical exercises (mini-CEX), direct observation of procedural skills (DOPS), and case-based discussion (CBD).
Objectives:
This work aimed to describe the process of development of anesthesia-specific list of mini-CEX, DOPS, and CBD tools within the Saudi Arabian Anesthesia Training Programs.
Materials and Methods:
To introduce the main concepts of formative WBA tools and to develop anesthesia-specific applications for each of the selected WBA tools, four 1-day workshops were held at the level of major training committees at eastern (Dammam), western (Jeddah), and central (Riyadh) regions in the Kingdom were conducted. Sixty-seven faculties participated in these workshops.
Results:
After conduction of the four workshops, the anesthesia-specific applications setting of mini-CEX, DOPS, and CBD tools among the 5-year levels were fully described. The level of the appropriate consultation skills was divided according to the case complexity adopted from the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical classification for adult and obstetric and pediatric patient as well as the type of the targeted anesthetic procedure.
Conclusion:
WBA anesthesia-specific lists of mini-CEX, DOPS, and CBD forms were easily incorporated first into guidelines to help the first stage of implementation of formative assessment in the Saudi Arabian Anesthesia Residency Program, and this can be helpful to replicate such program within other various training programs in Saudi Arabia and abroad.
doi:10.4103/1658-354X.179097
PMCID: PMC5044726  PMID: 27833485
Anesthesia applications; competency; curriculum; program; residency; Saudi Arabian; workplace-based assessment
3.  The Future of e-Learning in Medical Education: Current Trend and Future Opportunity 
A wide range of e-learning modalities are widely integrated in medical education. However, some of the key questions related to the role of e-learning remain unanswered, such as (1) what is an effective approach to integrating technology into pre-clinical vs. clinical training?; (2) what evidence exists regarding the type and format of e-learning technology suitable for medical specialties and clinical settings?; (3) which design features are known to be effective in designing on-line patient simulation cases, tutorials, or clinical exams?; and (4) what guidelines exist for determining an appropriate blend of instructional strategies, including on-line learning, face-to-face instruction, and performance-based skill practices? Based on the existing literature and a variety of e-learning examples of synchronous learning tools and simulation technology, this paper addresses the following three questions: (1) what is the current trend of e-learning in medical education?; (2) what do we know about the effective use of e-learning?; and (3) what is the role of e-learning in facilitating newly emerging competency-based training? As e-learning continues to be widely integrated in training future physicians, it is critical that our efforts in conducting evaluative studies should target specific e-learning features that can best mediate intended learning goals and objectives. Without an evolving knowledge base on how best to design e-learning applications, the gap between what we know about technology use and how we deploy e-learning in training settings will continue to widen.
doi:10.3352/jeehp.2006.3.3
PMCID: PMC2631188  PMID: 19223995
Education, Medical; Computer-Assisted Instruction; Learning
4.  25th Annual Computational Neuroscience Meeting: CNS-2016 
Sharpee, Tatyana O. | Destexhe, Alain | Kawato, Mitsuo | Sekulić, Vladislav | Skinner, Frances K. | Wójcik, Daniel K. | Chintaluri, Chaitanya | Cserpán, Dorottya | Somogyvári, Zoltán | Kim, Jae Kyoung | Kilpatrick, Zachary P. | Bennett, Matthew R. | Josić, Kresimir | Elices, Irene | Arroyo, David | Levi, Rafael | Rodriguez, Francisco B. | Varona, Pablo | Hwang, Eunjin | Kim, Bowon | Han, Hio-Been | Kim, Tae | McKenna, James T. | Brown, Ritchie E. | McCarley, Robert W. | Choi, Jee Hyun | Rankin, James | Popp, Pamela Osborn | Rinzel, John | Tabas, Alejandro | Rupp, André | Balaguer-Ballester, Emili | Maturana, Matias I. | Grayden, David B. | Cloherty, Shaun L. | Kameneva, Tatiana | Ibbotson, Michael R. | Meffin, Hamish | Koren, Veronika | Lochmann, Timm | Dragoi, Valentin | Obermayer, Klaus | Psarrou, Maria | Schilstra, Maria | Davey, Neil | Torben-Nielsen, Benjamin | Steuber, Volker | Ju, Huiwen | Yu, Jiao | Hines, Michael L. | Chen, Liang | Yu, Yuguo | Kim, Jimin | Leahy, Will | Shlizerman, Eli | Birgiolas, Justas | Gerkin, Richard C. | Crook, Sharon M. | Viriyopase, Atthaphon | Memmesheimer, Raoul-Martin | Gielen, Stan | Dabaghian, Yuri | DeVito, Justin | Perotti, Luca | Kim, Anmo J. | Fenk, Lisa M. | Cheng, Cheng | Maimon, Gaby | Zhao, Chang | Widmer, Yves | Sprecher, Simon | Senn, Walter | Halnes, Geir | Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo | Keller, Daniel | Pettersen, Klas H. | Andreassen, Ole A. | Einevoll, Gaute T. | Yamada, Yasunori | Steyn-Ross, Moira L. | Alistair Steyn-Ross, D. | Mejias, Jorge F. | Murray, John D. | Kennedy, Henry | Wang, Xiao-Jing | Kruscha, Alexandra | Grewe, Jan | Benda, Jan | Lindner, Benjamin | Badel, Laurent | Ohta, Kazumi | Tsuchimoto, Yoshiko | Kazama, Hokto | Kahng, B. | Tam, Nicoladie D. | Pollonini, Luca | Zouridakis, George | Soh, Jaehyun | Kim, DaeEun | Yoo, Minsu | Palmer, S. E. | Culmone, Viviana | Bojak, Ingo | Ferrario, Andrea | Merrison-Hort, Robert | Borisyuk, Roman | Kim, Chang Sub | Tezuka, Taro | Joo, Pangyu | Rho, Young-Ah | Burton, Shawn D. | Bard Ermentrout, G. | Jeong, Jaeseung | Urban, Nathaniel N. | Marsalek, Petr | Kim, Hoon-Hee | Moon, Seok-hyun | Lee, Do-won | Lee, Sung-beom | Lee, Ji-yong | Molkov, Yaroslav I. | Hamade, Khaldoun | Teka, Wondimu | Barnett, William H. | Kim, Taegyo | Markin, Sergey | Rybak, Ilya A. | Forro, Csaba | Dermutz, Harald | Demkó, László | Vörös, János | Babichev, Andrey | Huang, Haiping | Verduzco-Flores, Sergio | Dos Santos, Filipa | Andras, Peter | Metzner, Christoph | Schweikard, Achim | Zurowski, Bartosz | Roach, James P. | Sander, Leonard M. | Zochowski, Michal R. | Skilling, Quinton M. | Ognjanovski, Nicolette | Aton, Sara J. | Zochowski, Michal | Wang, Sheng-Jun | Ouyang, Guang | Guang, Jing | Zhang, Mingsha | Michael Wong, K. Y. | Zhou, Changsong | Robinson, Peter A. | Sanz-Leon, Paula | Drysdale, Peter M. | Fung, Felix | Abeysuriya, Romesh G. | Rennie, Chris J. | Zhao, Xuelong | Choe, Yoonsuck | Yang, Huei-Fang | Mi, Yuanyuan | Lin, Xiaohan | Wu, Si | Liedtke, Joscha | Schottdorf, Manuel | Wolf, Fred | Yamamura, Yoriko | Wickens, Jeffery R. | Rumbell, Timothy | Ramsey, Julia | Reyes, Amy | Draguljić, Danel | Hof, Patrick R. | Luebke, Jennifer | Weaver, Christina M. | He, Hu | Yang, Xu | Ma, Hailin | Xu, Zhiheng | Wang, Yuzhe | Baek, Kwangyeol | Morris, Laurel S. | Kundu, Prantik | Voon, Valerie | Agnes, Everton J. | Vogels, Tim P. | Podlaski, William F. | Giese, Martin | Kuravi, Pradeep | Vogels, Rufin | Seeholzer, Alexander | Podlaski, William | Ranjan, Rajnish | Vogels, Tim | Torres, Joaquin J. | Baroni, Fabiano | Latorre, Roberto | Gips, Bart | Lowet, Eric | Roberts, Mark J. | de Weerd, Peter | Jensen, Ole | van der Eerden, Jan | Goodarzinick, Abdorreza | Niry, Mohammad D. | Valizadeh, Alireza | Pariz, Aref | Parsi, Shervin S. | Warburton, Julia M. | Marucci, Lucia | Tamagnini, Francesco | Brown, Jon | Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira | Kleberg, Florence I. | Triesch, Jochen | Moezzi, Bahar | Iannella, Nicolangelo | Schaworonkow, Natalie | Plogmacher, Lukas | Goldsworthy, Mitchell R. | Hordacre, Brenton | McDonnell, Mark D. | Ridding, Michael C. | Zapotocky, Martin | Smit, Daniel | Fouquet, Coralie | Trembleau, Alain | Dasgupta, Sakyasingha | Nishikawa, Isao | Aihara, Kazuyuki | Toyoizumi, Taro | Robb, Daniel T. | Mellen, Nick | Toporikova, Natalia | Tang, Rongxiang | Tang, Yi-Yuan | Liang, Guangsheng | Kiser, Seth A. | Howard, James H. | Goncharenko, Julia | Voronenko, Sergej O. | Ahamed, Tosif | Stephens, Greg | Yger, Pierre | Lefebvre, Baptiste | Spampinato, Giulia Lia Beatrice | Esposito, Elric | et Olivier Marre, Marcel Stimberg | Choi, Hansol | Song, Min-Ho | Chung, SueYeon | Lee, Dan D. | Sompolinsky, Haim | Phillips, Ryan S. | Smith, Jeffrey | Chatzikalymniou, Alexandra Pierri | Ferguson, Katie | Alex Cayco Gajic, N. | Clopath, Claudia | Angus Silver, R. | Gleeson, Padraig | Marin, Boris | Sadeh, Sadra | Quintana, Adrian | Cantarelli, Matteo | Dura-Bernal, Salvador | Lytton, William W. | Davison, Andrew | Li, Luozheng | Zhang, Wenhao | Wang, Dahui | Song, Youngjo | Park, Sol | Choi, Ilhwan | Shin, Hee-sup | Choi, Hannah | Pasupathy, Anitha | Shea-Brown, Eric | Huh, Dongsung | Sejnowski, Terrence J. | Vogt, Simon M. | Kumar, Arvind | Schmidt, Robert | Van Wert, Stephen | Schiff, Steven J. | Veale, Richard | Scheutz, Matthias | Lee, Sang Wan | Gallinaro, Júlia | Rotter, Stefan | Rubchinsky, Leonid L. | Cheung, Chung Ching | Ratnadurai-Giridharan, Shivakeshavan | Shomali, Safura Rashid | Ahmadabadi, Majid Nili | Shimazaki, Hideaki | Nader Rasuli, S. | Zhao, Xiaochen | Rasch, Malte J. | Wilting, Jens | Priesemann, Viola | Levina, Anna | Rudelt, Lucas | Lizier, Joseph T. | Spinney, Richard E. | Rubinov, Mikail | Wibral, Michael | Bak, Ji Hyun | Pillow, Jonathan | Zaho, Yuan | Park, Il Memming | Kang, Jiyoung | Park, Hae-Jeong | Jang, Jaeson | Paik, Se-Bum | Choi, Woochul | Lee, Changju | Song, Min | Lee, Hyeonsu | Park, Youngjin | Yilmaz, Ergin | Baysal, Veli | Ozer, Mahmut | Saska, Daniel | Nowotny, Thomas | Chan, Ho Ka | Diamond, Alan | Herrmann, Christoph S. | Murray, Micah M. | Ionta, Silvio | Hutt, Axel | Lefebvre, Jérémie | Weidel, Philipp | Duarte, Renato | Morrison, Abigail | Lee, Jung H. | Iyer, Ramakrishnan | Mihalas, Stefan | Koch, Christof | Petrovici, Mihai A. | Leng, Luziwei | Breitwieser, Oliver | Stöckel, David | Bytschok, Ilja | Martel, Roman | Bill, Johannes | Schemmel, Johannes | Meier, Karlheinz | Esler, Timothy B. | Burkitt, Anthony N. | Kerr, Robert R. | Tahayori, Bahman | Nolte, Max | Reimann, Michael W. | Muller, Eilif | Markram, Henry | Parziale, Antonio | Senatore, Rosa | Marcelli, Angelo | Skiker, K. | Maouene, M. | Neymotin, Samuel A. | Seidenstein, Alexandra | Lakatos, Peter | Sanger, Terence D. | Menzies, Rosemary J. | McLauchlan, Campbell | van Albada, Sacha J. | Kedziora, David J. | Neymotin, Samuel | Kerr, Cliff C. | Suter, Benjamin A. | Shepherd, Gordon M. G. | Ryu, Juhyoung | Lee, Sang-Hun | Lee, Joonwon | Lee, Hyang Jung | Lim, Daeseob | Wang, Jisung | Lee, Heonsoo | Jung, Nam | Anh Quang, Le | Maeng, Seung Eun | Lee, Tae Ho | Lee, Jae Woo | Park, Chang-hyun | Ahn, Sora | Moon, Jangsup | Choi, Yun Seo | Kim, Juhee | Jun, Sang Beom | Lee, Seungjun | Lee, Hyang Woon | Jo, Sumin | Jun, Eunji | Yu, Suin | Goetze, Felix | Lai, Pik-Yin | Kim, Seonghyun | Kwag, Jeehyun | Jang, Hyun Jae | Filipović, Marko | Reig, Ramon | Aertsen, Ad | Silberberg, Gilad | Bachmann, Claudia | Buttler, Simone | Jacobs, Heidi | Dillen, Kim | Fink, Gereon R. | Kukolja, Juraj | Kepple, Daniel | Giaffar, Hamza | Rinberg, Dima | Shea, Steven | Koulakov, Alex | Bahuguna, Jyotika | Tetzlaff, Tom | Kotaleski, Jeanette Hellgren | Kunze, Tim | Peterson, Andre | Knösche, Thomas | Kim, Minjung | Kim, Hojeong | Park, Ji Sung | Yeon, Ji Won | Kim, Sung-Phil | Kang, Jae-Hwan | Lee, Chungho | Spiegler, Andreas | Petkoski, Spase | Palva, Matias J. | Jirsa, Viktor K. | Saggio, Maria L. | Siep, Silvan F. | Stacey, William C. | Bernar, Christophe | Choung, Oh-hyeon | Jeong, Yong | Lee, Yong-il | Kim, Su Hyun | Jeong, Mir | Lee, Jeungmin | Kwon, Jaehyung | Kralik, Jerald D. | Jahng, Jaehwan | Hwang, Dong-Uk | Kwon, Jae-Hyung | Park, Sang-Min | Kim, Seongkyun | Kim, Hyoungkyu | Kim, Pyeong Soo | Yoon, Sangsup | Lim, Sewoong | Park, Choongseok | Miller, Thomas | Clements, Katie | Ahn, Sungwoo | Ji, Eoon Hye | Issa, Fadi A. | Baek, JeongHun | Oba, Shigeyuki | Yoshimoto, Junichiro | Doya, Kenji | Ishii, Shin | Mosqueiro, Thiago S. | Strube-Bloss, Martin F. | Smith, Brian | Huerta, Ramon | Hadrava, Michal | Hlinka, Jaroslav | Bos, Hannah | Helias, Moritz | Welzig, Charles M. | Harper, Zachary J. | Kim, Won Sup | Shin, In-Seob | Baek, Hyeon-Man | Han, Seung Kee | Richter, René | Vitay, Julien | Beuth, Frederick | Hamker, Fred H. | Toppin, Kelly | Guo, Yixin | Graham, Bruce P. | Kale, Penelope J. | Gollo, Leonardo L. | Stern, Merav | Abbott, L. F. | Fedorov, Leonid A. | Giese, Martin A. | Ardestani, Mohammad Hovaidi | Faraji, Mohammad Javad | Preuschoff, Kerstin | Gerstner, Wulfram | van Gendt, Margriet J. | Briaire, Jeroen J. | Kalkman, Randy K. | Frijns, Johan H. M. | Lee, Won Hee | Frangou, Sophia | Fulcher, Ben D. | Tran, Patricia H. P. | Fornito, Alex | Gliske, Stephen V. | Lim, Eugene | Holman, Katherine A. | Fink, Christian G. | Kim, Jinseop S. | Mu, Shang | Briggman, Kevin L. | Sebastian Seung, H. | Wegener, Detlef | Bohnenkamp, Lisa | Ernst, Udo A. | Devor, Anna | Dale, Anders M. | Lines, Glenn T. | Edwards, Andy | Tveito, Aslak | Hagen, Espen | Senk, Johanna | Diesmann, Markus | Schmidt, Maximilian | Bakker, Rembrandt | Shen, Kelly | Bezgin, Gleb | Hilgetag, Claus-Christian | van Albada, Sacha Jennifer | Sun, Haoqi | Sourina, Olga | Huang, Guang-Bin | Klanner, Felix | Denk, Cornelia | Glomb, Katharina | Ponce-Alvarez, Adrián | Gilson, Matthieu | Ritter, Petra | Deco, Gustavo | Witek, Maria A. G. | Clarke, Eric F. | Hansen, Mads | Wallentin, Mikkel | Kringelbach, Morten L. | Vuust, Peter | Klingbeil, Guido | De Schutter, Erik | Chen, Weiliang | Zang, Yunliang | Hong, Sungho | Takashima, Akira | Zamora, Criseida | Gallimore, Andrew R. | Goldschmidt, Dennis | Manoonpong, Poramate | Karoly, Philippa J. | Freestone, Dean R. | Soundry, Daniel | Kuhlmann, Levin | Paninski, Liam | Cook, Mark | Lee, Jaejin | Fishman, Yonatan I. | Cohen, Yale E. | Roberts, James A. | Cocchi, Luca | Sweeney, Yann | Lee, Soohyun | Jung, Woo-Sung | Kim, Youngsoo | Jung, Younginha | Song, Yoon-Kyu | Chavane, Frédéric | Soman, Karthik | Muralidharan, Vignesh | Srinivasa Chakravarthy, V. | Shivkumar, Sabyasachi | Mandali, Alekhya | Pragathi Priyadharsini, B. | Mehta, Hima | Davey, Catherine E. | Brinkman, Braden A. W. | Kekona, Tyler | Rieke, Fred | Buice, Michael | De Pittà, Maurizio | Berry, Hugues | Brunel, Nicolas | Breakspear, Michael | Marsat, Gary | Drew, Jordan | Chapman, Phillip D. | Daly, Kevin C. | Bradle, Samual P. | Seo, Sat Byul | Su, Jianzhong | Kavalali, Ege T. | Blackwell, Justin | Shiau, LieJune | Buhry, Laure | Basnayake, Kanishka | Lee, Sue-Hyun | Levy, Brandon A. | Baker, Chris I. | Leleu, Timothée | Philips, Ryan T. | Chhabria, Karishma
BMC Neuroscience  2016;17(Suppl 1):54.
Table of contents
A1 Functional advantages of cell-type heterogeneity in neural circuits
Tatyana O. Sharpee
A2 Mesoscopic modeling of propagating waves in visual cortex
Alain Destexhe
A3 Dynamics and biomarkers of mental disorders
Mitsuo Kawato
F1 Precise recruitment of spiking output at theta frequencies requires dendritic h-channels in multi-compartment models of oriens-lacunosum/moleculare hippocampal interneurons
Vladislav Sekulić, Frances K. Skinner
F2 Kernel methods in reconstruction of current sources from extracellular potentials for single cells and the whole brains
Daniel K. Wójcik, Chaitanya Chintaluri, Dorottya Cserpán, Zoltán Somogyvári
F3 The synchronized periods depend on intracellular transcriptional repression mechanisms in circadian clocks.
Jae Kyoung Kim, Zachary P. Kilpatrick, Matthew R. Bennett, Kresimir Josić
O1 Assessing irregularity and coordination of spiking-bursting rhythms in central pattern generators
Irene Elices, David Arroyo, Rafael Levi, Francisco B. Rodriguez, Pablo Varona
O2 Regulation of top-down processing by cortically-projecting parvalbumin positive neurons in basal forebrain
Eunjin Hwang, Bowon Kim, Hio-Been Han, Tae Kim, James T. McKenna, Ritchie E. Brown, Robert W. McCarley, Jee Hyun Choi
O3 Modeling auditory stream segregation, build-up and bistability
James Rankin, Pamela Osborn Popp, John Rinzel
O4 Strong competition between tonotopic neural ensembles explains pitch-related dynamics of auditory cortex evoked fields
Alejandro Tabas, André Rupp, Emili Balaguer-Ballester
O5 A simple model of retinal response to multi-electrode stimulation
Matias I. Maturana, David B. Grayden, Shaun L. Cloherty, Tatiana Kameneva, Michael R. Ibbotson, Hamish Meffin
O6 Noise correlations in V4 area correlate with behavioral performance in visual discrimination task
Veronika Koren, Timm Lochmann, Valentin Dragoi, Klaus Obermayer
O7 Input-location dependent gain modulation in cerebellar nucleus neurons
Maria Psarrou, Maria Schilstra, Neil Davey, Benjamin Torben-Nielsen, Volker Steuber
O8 Analytic solution of cable energy function for cortical axons and dendrites
Huiwen Ju, Jiao Yu, Michael L. Hines, Liang Chen, Yuguo Yu
O9 C. elegans interactome: interactive visualization of Caenorhabditis elegans worm neuronal network
Jimin Kim, Will Leahy, Eli Shlizerman
O10 Is the model any good? Objective criteria for computational neuroscience model selection
Justas Birgiolas, Richard C. Gerkin, Sharon M. Crook
O11 Cooperation and competition of gamma oscillation mechanisms
Atthaphon Viriyopase, Raoul-Martin Memmesheimer, Stan Gielen
O12 A discrete structure of the brain waves
Yuri Dabaghian, Justin DeVito, Luca Perotti
O13 Direction-specific silencing of the Drosophila gaze stabilization system
Anmo J. Kim, Lisa M. Fenk, Cheng Lyu, Gaby Maimon
O14 What does the fruit fly think about values? A model of olfactory associative learning
Chang Zhao, Yves Widmer, Simon Sprecher,Walter Senn
O15 Effects of ionic diffusion on power spectra of local field potentials (LFP)
Geir Halnes, Tuomo Mäki-Marttunen, Daniel Keller, Klas H. Pettersen,Ole A. Andreassen, Gaute T. Einevoll
O16 Large-scale cortical models towards understanding relationship between brain structure abnormalities and cognitive deficits
Yasunori Yamada
O17 Spatial coarse-graining the brain: origin of minicolumns
Moira L. Steyn-Ross, D. Alistair Steyn-Ross
O18 Modeling large-scale cortical networks with laminar structure
Jorge F. Mejias, John D. Murray, Henry Kennedy, Xiao-Jing Wang
O19 Information filtering by partial synchronous spikes in a neural population
Alexandra Kruscha, Jan Grewe, Jan Benda, Benjamin Lindner
O20 Decoding context-dependent olfactory valence in Drosophila
Laurent Badel, Kazumi Ohta, Yoshiko Tsuchimoto, Hokto Kazama
P1 Neural network as a scale-free network: the role of a hub
B. Kahng
P2 Hemodynamic responses to emotions and decisions using near-infrared spectroscopy optical imaging
Nicoladie D. Tam
P3 Phase space analysis of hemodynamic responses to intentional movement directions using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) optical imaging technique
Nicoladie D.Tam, Luca Pollonini, George Zouridakis
P4 Modeling jamming avoidance of weakly electric fish
Jaehyun Soh, DaeEun Kim
P5 Synergy and redundancy of retinal ganglion cells in prediction
Minsu Yoo, S. E. Palmer
P6 A neural field model with a third dimension representing cortical depth
Viviana Culmone, Ingo Bojak
P7 Network analysis of a probabilistic connectivity model of the Xenopus tadpole spinal cord
Andrea Ferrario, Robert Merrison-Hort, Roman Borisyuk
P8 The recognition dynamics in the brain
Chang Sub Kim
P9 Multivariate spike train analysis using a positive definite kernel
Taro Tezuka
P10 Synchronization of burst periods may govern slow brain dynamics during general anesthesia
Pangyu Joo
P11 The ionic basis of heterogeneity affects stochastic synchrony
Young-Ah Rho, Shawn D. Burton, G. Bard Ermentrout, Jaeseung Jeong, Nathaniel N. Urban
P12 Circular statistics of noise in spike trains with a periodic component
Petr Marsalek
P14 Representations of directions in EEG-BCI using Gaussian readouts
Hoon-Hee Kim, Seok-hyun Moon, Do-won Lee, Sung-beom Lee, Ji-yong Lee, Jaeseung Jeong
P15 Action selection and reinforcement learning in basal ganglia during reaching movements
Yaroslav I. Molkov, Khaldoun Hamade, Wondimu Teka, William H. Barnett, Taegyo Kim, Sergey Markin, Ilya A. Rybak
P17 Axon guidance: modeling axonal growth in T-Junction assay
Csaba Forro, Harald Dermutz, László Demkó, János Vörös
P19 Transient cell assembly networks encode persistent spatial memories
Yuri Dabaghian, Andrey Babichev
P20 Theory of population coupling and applications to describe high order correlations in large populations of interacting neurons
Haiping Huang
P21 Design of biologically-realistic simulations for motor control
Sergio Verduzco-Flores
P22 Towards understanding the functional impact of the behavioural variability of neurons
Filipa Dos Santos, Peter Andras
P23 Different oscillatory dynamics underlying gamma entrainment deficits in schizophrenia
Christoph Metzner, Achim Schweikard, Bartosz Zurowski
P24 Memory recall and spike frequency adaptation
James P. Roach, Leonard M. Sander, Michal R. Zochowski
P25 Stability of neural networks and memory consolidation preferentially occur near criticality
Quinton M. Skilling, Nicolette Ognjanovski, Sara J. Aton, Michal Zochowski
P26 Stochastic Oscillation in Self-Organized Critical States of Small Systems: Sensitive Resting State in Neural Systems
Sheng-Jun Wang, Guang Ouyang, Jing Guang, Mingsha Zhang, K. Y. Michael Wong, Changsong Zhou
P27 Neurofield: a C++ library for fast simulation of 2D neural field models
Peter A. Robinson, Paula Sanz-Leon, Peter M. Drysdale, Felix Fung, Romesh G. Abeysuriya, Chris J. Rennie, Xuelong Zhao
P28 Action-based grounding: Beyond encoding/decoding in neural code
Yoonsuck Choe, Huei-Fang Yang
P29 Neural computation in a dynamical system with multiple time scales
Yuanyuan Mi, Xiaohan Lin, Si Wu
P30 Maximum entropy models for 3D layouts of orientation selectivity
Joscha Liedtke, Manuel Schottdorf, Fred Wolf
P31 A behavioral assay for probing computations underlying curiosity in rodents
Yoriko Yamamura, Jeffery R. Wickens
P32 Using statistical sampling to balance error function contributions to optimization of conductance-based models
Timothy Rumbell, Julia Ramsey, Amy Reyes, Danel Draguljić, Patrick R. Hof, Jennifer Luebke, Christina M. Weaver
P33 Exploration and implementation of a self-growing and self-organizing neuron network building algorithm
Hu He, Xu Yang, Hailin Ma, Zhiheng Xu, Yuzhe Wang
P34 Disrupted resting state brain network in obese subjects: a data-driven graph theory analysis
Kwangyeol Baek, Laurel S. Morris, Prantik Kundu, Valerie Voon
P35 Dynamics of cooperative excitatory and inhibitory plasticity
Everton J. Agnes, Tim P. Vogels
P36 Frequency-dependent oscillatory signal gating in feed-forward networks of integrate-and-fire neurons
William F. Podlaski, Tim P. Vogels
P37 Phenomenological neural model for adaptation of neurons in area IT
Martin Giese, Pradeep Kuravi, Rufin Vogels
P38 ICGenealogy: towards a common topology of neuronal ion channel function and genealogy in model and experiment
Alexander Seeholzer, William Podlaski, Rajnish Ranjan, Tim Vogels
P39 Temporal input discrimination from the interaction between dynamic synapses and neural subthreshold oscillations
Joaquin J. Torres, Fabiano Baroni, Roberto Latorre, Pablo Varona
P40 Different roles for transient and sustained activity during active visual processing
Bart Gips, Eric Lowet, Mark J. Roberts, Peter de Weerd, Ole Jensen, Jan van der Eerden
P41 Scale-free functional networks of 2D Ising model are highly robust against structural defects: neuroscience implications
Abdorreza Goodarzinick, Mohammad D. Niry, Alireza Valizadeh
P42 High frequency neuron can facilitate propagation of signal in neural networks
Aref Pariz, Shervin S. Parsi, Alireza Valizadeh
P43 Investigating the effect of Alzheimer’s disease related amyloidopathy on gamma oscillations in the CA1 region of the hippocampus
Julia M. Warburton, Lucia Marucci, Francesco Tamagnini, Jon Brown, Krasimira Tsaneva-Atanasova
P44 Long-tailed distributions of inhibitory and excitatory weights in a balanced network with eSTDP and iSTDP
Florence I. Kleberg, Jochen Triesch
P45 Simulation of EMG recording from hand muscle due to TMS of motor cortex
Bahar Moezzi, Nicolangelo Iannella, Natalie Schaworonkow, Lukas Plogmacher, Mitchell R. Goldsworthy, Brenton Hordacre, Mark D. McDonnell, Michael C. Ridding, Jochen Triesch
P46 Structure and dynamics of axon network formed in primary cell culture
Martin Zapotocky, Daniel Smit, Coralie Fouquet, Alain Trembleau
P47 Efficient signal processing and sampling in random networks that generate variability
Sakyasingha Dasgupta, Isao Nishikawa, Kazuyuki Aihara, Taro Toyoizumi
P48 Modeling the effect of riluzole on bursting in respiratory neural networks
Daniel T. Robb, Nick Mellen, Natalia Toporikova
P49 Mapping relaxation training using effective connectivity analysis
Rongxiang Tang, Yi-Yuan Tang
P50 Modeling neuron oscillation of implicit sequence learning
Guangsheng Liang, Seth A. Kiser, James H. Howard, Jr., Yi-Yuan Tang
P51 The role of cerebellar short-term synaptic plasticity in the pathology and medication of downbeat nystagmus
Julia Goncharenko, Neil Davey, Maria Schilstra, Volker Steuber
P52 Nonlinear response of noisy neurons
Sergej O. Voronenko, Benjamin Lindner
P53 Behavioral embedding suggests multiple chaotic dimensions underlie C. elegans locomotion
Tosif Ahamed, Greg Stephens
P54 Fast and scalable spike sorting for large and dense multi-electrodes recordings
Pierre Yger, Baptiste Lefebvre, Giulia Lia Beatrice Spampinato, Elric Esposito, Marcel Stimberg et Olivier Marre
P55 Sufficient sampling rates for fast hand motion tracking
Hansol Choi, Min-Ho Song
P56 Linear readout of object manifolds
SueYeon Chung, Dan D. Lee, Haim Sompolinsky
P57 Differentiating models of intrinsic bursting and rhythm generation of the respiratory pre-Bötzinger complex using phase response curves
Ryan S. Phillips, Jeffrey Smith
P58 The effect of inhibitory cell network interactions during theta rhythms on extracellular field potentials in CA1 hippocampus
Alexandra Pierri Chatzikalymniou, Katie Ferguson, Frances K. Skinner
P59 Expansion recoding through sparse sampling in the cerebellar input layer speeds learning
N. Alex Cayco Gajic, Claudia Clopath, R. Angus Silver
P60 A set of curated cortical models at multiple scales on Open Source Brain
Padraig Gleeson, Boris Marin, Sadra Sadeh, Adrian Quintana, Matteo Cantarelli, Salvador Dura-Bernal, William W. Lytton, Andrew Davison, R. Angus Silver
P61 A synaptic story of dynamical information encoding in neural adaptation
Luozheng Li, Wenhao Zhang, Yuanyuan Mi, Dahui Wang, Si Wu
P62 Physical modeling of rule-observant rodent behavior
Youngjo Song, Sol Park, Ilhwan Choi, Jaeseung Jeong, Hee-sup Shin
P64 Predictive coding in area V4 and prefrontal cortex explains dynamic discrimination of partially occluded shapes
Hannah Choi, Anitha Pasupathy, Eric Shea-Brown
P65 Stability of FORCE learning on spiking and rate-based networks
Dongsung Huh, Terrence J. Sejnowski
P66 Stabilising STDP in striatal neurons for reliable fast state recognition in noisy environments
Simon M. Vogt, Arvind Kumar, Robert Schmidt
P67 Electrodiffusion in one- and two-compartment neuron models for characterizing cellular effects of electrical stimulation
Stephen Van Wert, Steven J. Schiff
P68 STDP improves speech recognition capabilities in spiking recurrent circuits parameterized via differential evolution Markov Chain Monte Carlo
Richard Veale, Matthias Scheutz
P69 Bidirectional transformation between dominant cortical neural activities and phase difference distributions
Sang Wan Lee
P70 Maturation of sensory networks through homeostatic structural plasticity
Júlia Gallinaro, Stefan Rotter
P71 Corticothalamic dynamics: structure, number of solutions and stability of steady-state solutions in the space of synaptic couplings
Paula Sanz-Leon, Peter A. Robinson
P72 Optogenetic versus electrical stimulation of the parkinsonian basal ganglia. Computational study
Leonid L. Rubchinsky, Chung Ching Cheung, Shivakeshavan Ratnadurai-Giridharan
P73 Exact spike-timing distribution reveals higher-order interactions of neurons
Safura Rashid Shomali, Majid Nili Ahmadabadi, Hideaki Shimazaki, S. Nader Rasuli
P74 Neural mechanism of visual perceptual learning using a multi-layered neural network
Xiaochen Zhao, Malte J. Rasch
P75 Inferring collective spiking dynamics from mostly unobserved systems
Jens Wilting, Viola Priesemann
P76 How to infer distributions in the brain from subsampled observations
Anna Levina, Viola Priesemann
P77 Influences of embedding and estimation strategies on the inferred memory of single spiking neurons
Lucas Rudelt, Joseph T. Lizier, Viola Priesemann
P78 A nearest-neighbours based estimator for transfer entropy between spike trains
Joseph T. Lizier, Richard E. Spinney, Mikail Rubinov, Michael Wibral, Viola Priesemann
P79 Active learning of psychometric functions with multinomial logistic models
Ji Hyun Bak, Jonathan Pillow
P81 Inferring low-dimensional network dynamics with variational latent Gaussian process
Yuan Zaho, Il Memming Park
P82 Computational investigation of energy landscapes in the resting state subcortical brain network
Jiyoung Kang, Hae-Jeong Park
P83 Local repulsive interaction between retinal ganglion cells can generate a consistent spatial periodicity of orientation map
Jaeson Jang, Se-Bum Paik
P84 Phase duration of bistable perception reveals intrinsic time scale of perceptual decision under noisy condition
Woochul Choi, Se-Bum Paik
P85 Feedforward convergence between retina and primary visual cortex can determine the structure of orientation map
Changju Lee, Jaeson Jang, Se-Bum Paik
P86 Computational method classifying neural network activity patterns for imaging data
Min Song, Hyeonsu Lee, Se-Bum Paik
P87 Symmetry of spike-timing-dependent-plasticity kernels regulates volatility of memory
Youngjin Park, Woochul Choi, Se-Bum Paik
P88 Effects of time-periodic coupling strength on the first-spike latency dynamics of a scale-free network of stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neurons
Ergin Yilmaz, Veli Baysal, Mahmut Ozer
P89 Spectral properties of spiking responses in V1 and V4 change within the trial and are highly relevant for behavioral performance
Veronika Koren, Klaus Obermayer
P90 Methods for building accurate models of individual neurons
Daniel Saska, Thomas Nowotny
P91 A full size mathematical model of the early olfactory system of honeybees
Ho Ka Chan, Alan Diamond, Thomas Nowotny
P92 Stimulation-induced tuning of ongoing oscillations in spiking neural networks
Christoph S. Herrmann, Micah M. Murray, Silvio Ionta, Axel Hutt, Jérémie Lefebvre
P93 Decision-specific sequences of neural activity in balanced random networks driven by structured sensory input
Philipp Weidel, Renato Duarte, Abigail Morrison
P94 Modulation of tuning induced by abrupt reduction of SST cell activity
Jung H. Lee, Ramakrishnan Iyer, Stefan Mihalas
P95 The functional role of VIP cell activation during locomotion
Jung H. Lee, Ramakrishnan Iyer, Christof Koch, Stefan Mihalas
P96 Stochastic inference with spiking neural networks
Mihai A. Petrovici, Luziwei Leng, Oliver Breitwieser, David Stöckel, Ilja Bytschok, Roman Martel, Johannes Bill, Johannes Schemmel, Karlheinz Meier
P97 Modeling orientation-selective electrical stimulation with retinal prostheses
Timothy B. Esler, Anthony N. Burkitt, David B. Grayden, Robert R. Kerr, Bahman Tahayori, Hamish Meffin
P98 Ion channel noise can explain firing correlation in auditory nerves
Bahar Moezzi, Nicolangelo Iannella, Mark D. McDonnell
P99 Limits of temporal encoding of thalamocortical inputs in a neocortical microcircuit
Max Nolte, Michael W. Reimann, Eilif Muller, Henry Markram
P100 On the representation of arm reaching movements: a computational model
Antonio Parziale, Rosa Senatore, Angelo Marcelli
P101 A computational model for investigating the role of cerebellum in acquisition and retention of motor behavior
Rosa Senatore, Antonio Parziale, Angelo Marcelli
P102 The emergence of semantic categories from a large-scale brain network of semantic knowledge
K. Skiker, M. Maouene
P103 Multiscale modeling of M1 multitarget pharmacotherapy for dystonia
Samuel A. Neymotin, Salvador Dura-Bernal, Alexandra Seidenstein, Peter Lakatos, Terence D. Sanger, William W. Lytton
P104 Effect of network size on computational capacity
Salvador Dura-Bernal, Rosemary J. Menzies, Campbell McLauchlan, Sacha J. van Albada, David J. Kedziora, Samuel Neymotin, William W. Lytton, Cliff C. Kerr
P105 NetPyNE: a Python package for NEURON to facilitate development and parallel simulation of biological neuronal networks
Salvador Dura-Bernal, Benjamin A. Suter, Samuel A. Neymotin, Cliff C. Kerr, Adrian Quintana, Padraig Gleeson, Gordon M. G. Shepherd, William W. Lytton
P107 Inter-areal and inter-regional inhomogeneity in co-axial anisotropy of Cortical Point Spread in human visual areas
Juhyoung Ryu, Sang-Hun Lee
P108 Two bayesian quanta of uncertainty explain the temporal dynamics of cortical activity in the non-sensory areas during bistable perception
Joonwon Lee, Sang-Hun Lee
P109 Optimal and suboptimal integration of sensory and value information in perceptual decision making
Hyang Jung Lee, Sang-Hun Lee
P110 A Bayesian algorithm for phoneme Perception and its neural implementation
Daeseob Lim, Sang-Hun Lee
P111 Complexity of EEG signals is reduced during unconsciousness induced by ketamine and propofol
Jisung Wang, Heonsoo Lee
P112 Self-organized criticality of neural avalanche in a neural model on complex networks
Nam Jung, Le Anh Quang, Seung Eun Maeng, Tae Ho Lee, Jae Woo Lee
P113 Dynamic alterations in connection topology of the hippocampal network during ictal-like epileptiform activity in an in vitro rat model
Chang-hyun Park, Sora Ahn, Jangsup Moon, Yun Seo Choi, Juhee Kim, Sang Beom Jun, Seungjun Lee, Hyang Woon Lee
P114 Computational model to replicate seizure suppression effect by electrical stimulation
Sora Ahn, Sumin Jo, Eunji Jun, Suin Yu, Hyang Woon Lee, Sang Beom Jun, Seungjun Lee
P115 Identifying excitatory and inhibitory synapses in neuronal networks from spike trains using sorted local transfer entropy
Felix Goetze, Pik-Yin Lai
P116 Neural network model for obstacle avoidance based on neuromorphic computational model of boundary vector cell and head direction cell
Seonghyun Kim, Jeehyun Kwag
P117 Dynamic gating of spike pattern propagation by Hebbian and anti-Hebbian spike timing-dependent plasticity in excitatory feedforward network model
Hyun Jae Jang, Jeehyun Kwag
P118 Inferring characteristics of input correlations of cells exhibiting up-down state transitions in the rat striatum
Marko Filipović, Ramon Reig, Ad Aertsen, Gilad Silberberg, Arvind Kumar
P119 Graph properties of the functional connected brain under the influence of Alzheimer’s disease
Claudia Bachmann, Simone Buttler, Heidi Jacobs, Kim Dillen, Gereon R. Fink, Juraj Kukolja, Abigail Morrison
P120 Learning sparse representations in the olfactory bulb
Daniel Kepple, Hamza Giaffar, Dima Rinberg, Steven Shea, Alex Koulakov
P121 Functional classification of homologous basal-ganglia networks
Jyotika Bahuguna,Tom Tetzlaff, Abigail Morrison, Arvind Kumar, Jeanette Hellgren Kotaleski
P122 Short term memory based on multistability
Tim Kunze, Andre Peterson, Thomas Knösche
P123 A physiologically plausible, computationally efficient model and simulation software for mammalian motor units
Minjung Kim, Hojeong Kim
P125 Decoding laser-induced somatosensory information from EEG
Ji Sung Park, Ji Won Yeon, Sung-Phil Kim
P126 Phase synchronization of alpha activity for EEG-based personal authentication
Jae-Hwan Kang, Chungho Lee, Sung-Phil Kim
P129 Investigating phase-lags in sEEG data using spatially distributed time delays in a large-scale brain network model
Andreas Spiegler, Spase Petkoski, Matias J. Palva, Viktor K. Jirsa
P130 Epileptic seizures in the unfolding of a codimension-3 singularity
Maria L. Saggio, Silvan F. Siep, Andreas Spiegler, William C. Stacey, Christophe Bernard, Viktor K. Jirsa
P131 Incremental dimensional exploratory reasoning under multi-dimensional environment
Oh-hyeon Choung, Yong Jeong
P132 A low-cost model of eye movements and memory in personal visual cognition
Yong-il Lee, Jaeseung Jeong
P133 Complex network analysis of structural connectome of autism spectrum disorder patients
Su Hyun Kim, Mir Jeong, Jaeseung Jeong
P134 Cognitive motives and the neural correlates underlying human social information transmission, gossip
Jeungmin Lee, Jaehyung Kwon, Jerald D. Kralik, Jaeseung Jeong
P135 EEG hyperscanning detects neural oscillation for the social interaction during the economic decision-making
Jaehwan Jahng, Dong-Uk Hwang, Jaeseung Jeong
P136 Detecting purchase decision based on hyperfrontality of the EEG
Jae-Hyung Kwon, Sang-Min Park, Jaeseung Jeong
P137 Vulnerability-based critical neurons, synapses, and pathways in the Caenorhabditis elegans connectome
Seongkyun Kim, Hyoungkyu Kim, Jerald D. Kralik, Jaeseung Jeong
P138 Motif analysis reveals functionally asymmetrical neurons in C. elegans
Pyeong Soo Kim, Seongkyun Kim, Hyoungkyu Kim, Jaeseung Jeong
P139 Computational approach to preference-based serial decision dynamics: do temporal discounting and working memory affect it?
Sangsup Yoon, Jaehyung Kwon, Sewoong Lim, Jaeseung Jeong
P141 Social stress induced neural network reconfiguration affects decision making and learning in zebrafish
Choongseok Park, Thomas Miller, Katie Clements, Sungwoo Ahn, Eoon Hye Ji, Fadi A. Issa
P142 Descriptive, generative, and hybrid approaches for neural connectivity inference from neural activity data
JeongHun Baek, Shigeyuki Oba, Junichiro Yoshimoto, Kenji Doya, Shin Ishii
P145 Divergent-convergent synaptic connectivities accelerate coding in multilayered sensory systems
Thiago S. Mosqueiro, Martin F. Strube-Bloss, Brian Smith, Ramon Huerta
P146 Swinging networks
Michal Hadrava, Jaroslav Hlinka
P147 Inferring dynamically relevant motifs from oscillatory stimuli: challenges, pitfalls, and solutions
Hannah Bos, Moritz Helias
P148 Spatiotemporal mapping of brain network dynamics during cognitive tasks using magnetoencephalography and deep learning
Charles M. Welzig, Zachary J. Harper
P149 Multiscale complexity analysis for the segmentation of MRI images
Won Sup Kim, In-Seob Shin, Hyeon-Man Baek, Seung Kee Han
P150 A neuro-computational model of emotional attention
René Richter, Julien Vitay, Frederick Beuth, Fred H. Hamker
P151 Multi-site delayed feedback stimulation in parkinsonian networks
Kelly Toppin, Yixin Guo
P152 Bistability in Hodgkin–Huxley-type equations
Tatiana Kameneva, Hamish Meffin, Anthony N. Burkitt, David B. Grayden
P153 Phase changes in postsynaptic spiking due to synaptic connectivity and short term plasticity: mathematical analysis of frequency dependency
Mark D. McDonnell, Bruce P. Graham
P154 Quantifying resilience patterns in brain networks: the importance of directionality
Penelope J. Kale, Leonardo L. Gollo
P155 Dynamics of rate-model networks with separate excitatory and inhibitory populations
Merav Stern, L. F. Abbott
P156 A model for multi-stable dynamics in action recognition modulated by integration of silhouette and shading cues
Leonid A. Fedorov, Martin A. Giese
P157 Spiking model for the interaction between action recognition and action execution
Mohammad Hovaidi Ardestani, Martin Giese
P158 Surprise-modulated belief update: how to learn within changing environments?
Mohammad Javad Faraji, Kerstin Preuschoff, Wulfram Gerstner
P159 A fast, stochastic and adaptive model of auditory nerve responses to cochlear implant stimulation
Margriet J. van Gendt, Jeroen J. Briaire, Randy K. Kalkman, Johan H. M. Frijns
P160 Quantitative comparison of graph theoretical measures of simulated and empirical functional brain networks
Won Hee Lee, Sophia Frangou
P161 Determining discriminative properties of fMRI signals in schizophrenia using highly comparative time-series analysis
Ben D. Fulcher, Patricia H. P. Tran, Alex Fornito
P162 Emergence of narrowband LFP oscillations from completely asynchronous activity during seizures and high-frequency oscillations
Stephen V. Gliske, William C. Stacey, Eugene Lim, Katherine A. Holman, Christian G. Fink
P163 Neuronal diversity in structure and function: cross-validation of anatomical and physiological classification of retinal ganglion cells in the mouse
Jinseop S. Kim, Shang Mu, Kevin L. Briggman, H. Sebastian Seung, the EyeWirers
P164 Analysis and modelling of transient firing rate changes in area MT in response to rapid stimulus feature changes
Detlef Wegener, Lisa Bohnenkamp, Udo A. Ernst
P165 Step-wise model fitting accounting for high-resolution spatial measurements: construction of a layer V pyramidal cell model with reduced morphology
Tuomo Mäki-Marttunen, Geir Halnes, Anna Devor, Christoph Metzner, Anders M. Dale, Ole A. Andreassen, Gaute T. Einevoll
P166 Contributions of schizophrenia-associated genes to neuron firing and cardiac pacemaking: a polygenic modeling approach
Tuomo Mäki-Marttunen, Glenn T. Lines, Andy Edwards, Aslak Tveito, Anders M. Dale, Gaute T. Einevoll, Ole A. Andreassen
P167 Local field potentials in a 4 × 4 mm2 multi-layered network model
Espen Hagen, Johanna Senk, Sacha J. van Albada, Markus Diesmann
P168 A spiking network model explains multi-scale properties of cortical dynamics
Maximilian Schmidt, Rembrandt Bakker, Kelly Shen, Gleb Bezgin, Claus-Christian Hilgetag, Markus Diesmann, Sacha Jennifer van Albada
P169 Using joint weight-delay spike-timing dependent plasticity to find polychronous neuronal groups
Haoqi Sun, Olga Sourina, Guang-Bin Huang, Felix Klanner, Cornelia Denk
P170 Tensor decomposition reveals RSNs in simulated resting state fMRI
Katharina Glomb, Adrián Ponce-Alvarez, Matthieu Gilson, Petra Ritter, Gustavo Deco
P171 Getting in the groove: testing a new model-based method for comparing task-evoked vs resting-state activity in fMRI data on music listening
Matthieu Gilson, Maria AG Witek, Eric F. Clarke, Mads Hansen, Mikkel Wallentin, Gustavo Deco, Morten L. Kringelbach, Peter Vuust
P172 STochastic engine for pathway simulation (STEPS) on massively parallel processors
Guido Klingbeil, Erik De Schutter
P173 Toolkit support for complex parallel spatial stochastic reaction–diffusion simulation in STEPS
Weiliang Chen, Erik De Schutter
P174 Modeling the generation and propagation of Purkinje cell dendritic spikes caused by parallel fiber synaptic input
Yunliang Zang, Erik De Schutter
P175 Dendritic morphology determines how dendrites are organized into functional subunits
Sungho Hong, Akira Takashima, Erik De Schutter
P176 A model of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activity in long term depression at Purkinje cells
Criseida Zamora, Andrew R. Gallimore, Erik De Schutter
P177 Reward-modulated learning of population-encoded vectors for insect-like navigation in embodied agents
Dennis Goldschmidt, Poramate Manoonpong, Sakyasingha Dasgupta
P178 Data-driven neural models part II: connectivity patterns of human seizures
Philippa J. Karoly, Dean R. Freestone, Daniel Soundry, Levin Kuhlmann, Liam Paninski, Mark Cook
P179 Data-driven neural models part I: state and parameter estimation
Dean R. Freestone, Philippa J. Karoly, Daniel Soundry, Levin Kuhlmann, Mark Cook
P180 Spectral and spatial information processing in human auditory streaming
Jaejin Lee, Yonatan I. Fishman, Yale E. Cohen
P181 A tuning curve for the global effects of local perturbations in neural activity: Mapping the systems-level susceptibility of the brain
Leonardo L. Gollo, James A. Roberts, Luca Cocchi
P182 Diverse homeostatic responses to visual deprivation mediated by neural ensembles
Yann Sweeney, Claudia Clopath
P183 Opto-EEG: a novel method for investigating functional connectome in mouse brain based on optogenetics and high density electroencephalography
Soohyun Lee, Woo-Sung Jung, Jee Hyun Choi
P184 Biphasic responses of frontal gamma network to repetitive sleep deprivation during REM sleep
Bowon Kim, Youngsoo Kim, Eunjin Hwang, Jee Hyun Choi
P185 Brain-state correlate and cortical connectivity for frontal gamma oscillations in top-down fashion assessed by auditory steady-state response
Younginha Jung, Eunjin Hwang, Yoon-Kyu Song, Jee Hyun Choi
P186 Neural field model of localized orientation selective activation in V1
James Rankin, Frédéric Chavane
P187 An oscillatory network model of Head direction and Grid cells using locomotor inputs
Karthik Soman, Vignesh Muralidharan, V. Srinivasa Chakravarthy
P188 A computational model of hippocampus inspired by the functional architecture of basal ganglia
Karthik Soman, Vignesh Muralidharan, V. Srinivasa Chakravarthy
P189 A computational architecture to model the microanatomy of the striatum and its functional properties
Sabyasachi Shivkumar, Vignesh Muralidharan, V. Srinivasa Chakravarthy
P190 A scalable cortico-basal ganglia model to understand the neural dynamics of targeted reaching
Vignesh Muralidharan, Alekhya Mandali, B. Pragathi Priyadharsini, Hima Mehta, V. Srinivasa Chakravarthy
P191 Emergence of radial orientation selectivity from synaptic plasticity
Catherine E. Davey, David B. Grayden, Anthony N. Burkitt
P192 How do hidden units shape effective connections between neurons?
Braden A. W. Brinkman, Tyler Kekona, Fred Rieke, Eric Shea-Brown, Michael Buice
P193 Characterization of neural firing in the presence of astrocyte-synapse signaling
Maurizio De Pittà, Hugues Berry, Nicolas Brunel
P194 Metastability of spatiotemporal patterns in a large-scale network model of brain dynamics
James A. Roberts, Leonardo L. Gollo, Michael Breakspear
P195 Comparison of three methods to quantify detection and discrimination capacity estimated from neural population recordings
Gary Marsat, Jordan Drew, Phillip D. Chapman, Kevin C. Daly, Samual P. Bradley
P196 Quantifying the constraints for independent evoked and spontaneous NMDA receptor mediated synaptic transmission at individual synapses
Sat Byul Seo, Jianzhong Su, Ege T. Kavalali, Justin Blackwell
P199 Gamma oscillation via adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire neurons
LieJune Shiau, Laure Buhry, Kanishka Basnayake
P200 Visual face representations during memory retrieval compared to perception
Sue-Hyun Lee, Brandon A. Levy, Chris I. Baker
P201 Top-down modulation of sequential activity within packets modeled using avalanche dynamics
Timothée Leleu, Kazuyuki Aihara
Q28 An auto-encoder network realizes sparse features under the influence of desynchronized vascular dynamics
Ryan T. Philips, Karishma Chhabria, V. Srinivasa Chakravarthy
doi:10.1186/s12868-016-0283-6
PMCID: PMC5001212  PMID: 27534393
5.  Infraorbital Nerve Block for Isolated Orbital Floor Fractures Repair: Review of 135 Consecutive Cases 
Background:
Orbital blowout fractures can be managed by several surgical specialties including plastic and maxillofacial surgery, otolaryngology, and ophthalmology. Recommendations for surgical fracture repair depend on a combination of clinical and imaging studies to evaluate muscle/nerve entrapment and periorbital tissue herniation.
Methods:
The aim of this study was to verify the applicability of regional anesthesia when repairing orbital floor fractures. A retrospective chart review was performed for isolated orbital floor fractures treated at the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery in Florence between May 2011 and July 2012. The study included 135 patients who met the inclusion criteria: 96 subjects were male (71%) and 39 were female (29%). The mean age was 45.3 years, ranging from 16 to 77 years.
Results:
The results revealed that isolated anterior orbital floor fractures can be safely repaired under regional and local anesthesia. Regional and local anesthesia should be combined with intravenous sedation when the fracture involves the posterior floor. The surgical outcome was comparable to the outcome achieved under general anesthesia. There was a lower rate of surgical revisions due to concealed malposition or entrapment of the inferior rectus muscle (19% vs 22%). However, this result was not statistically significant (P > 0.05).
Conclusions:
There are several advantages to surgically repairing isolated orbital floor fractures under regional and local anesthesia that include the following: surgeons can check the surgical outcome (enophthalmos and extrinsic ocular muscles function) intraoperatively, thereby reducing the reoperation rate; patient discomfort due to general anesthesia is eliminated; and the hospital stay is reduced, thus decreasing overall healthcare costs.
doi:10.1097/GOX.0000000000000039
PMCID: PMC4174218  PMID: 25289294
6.  Nonanalgesic benefits of combined thoracic epidural analgesia with general anesthesia in high risk elderly off pump coronary artery bypass patients 
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia  2015;18(3):385-391.
Objective:
Epidural anesthesia is a central neuraxial block technique with many applications. It is a versatile anesthetic technique, with applications in surgery, obstetrics and pain control. Its versatility means it can be used as an anesthetic, as an analgesic adjuvant to general anesthesia, and for postoperative analgesia. Off pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) surgery triggers a systemic stress response as seen in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA), combined with general anesthesia (GA) attenuates the stress response to CABG. There is Reduction in levels of Plasma epinephrine, Cortisol and catecholamine surge, tumor necrosis factor-Alpha(TNF ά), interleukin-6 and leucocyte count.
Design:
A prospective randomised non blind study.
Setting:
A clinical study in a multi specialty hospital.
Participants:
Eighty six patients.
Material and Methods/intervention:
The study was approved by hospital research ethics committee and written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Patients were randomised to receive either GA plus epidural (study group) or GA only (control group). Inclusion Criteria (for participants) were -Age ≥ 70 years, Patient posted for OPCAB surgery, and patient with comorbidities (diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral vascular disease, renal dysfunction). Serum concentration of Interlukin: – 6, TNF ά, cortisol, Troponin – I, CK-MB, and HsCRP (highly sensitive C reactive protein), was compared for both the group and venous blood samples were collected and compared just after induction, at day 2, and day 5 postoperatively. Time to mobilization, extubation, total intensive care unit stay and hospital stay were noted and compared. Independent t test was used for statistical analysis.
Primary Outcomes:
Postoperative complications, total intensive care unit stay and hospital stay.
Secondary Outcome:
Stress response.
Result:
Study group showed decreased Interlukin – 6 at day 2, TNF ά at day 2 and 5, troponin I at day 5, and decreased total hospital stay (p < 0.05).
Conclusion:
Thoracic epidural anesthesia decreases stress and inflammatory response to surgery and decreases hospital stay. However a large multicentre study may be needed to confirm it.
doi:10.4103/0971-9784.159810
PMCID: PMC4881722  PMID: 26139745
Coronary artery bypass grafting; inflammatory markers; off pump coronary artery bypass; thoracic epidural anesthesia
7.  Nanotechnology 
Executive Summary
Objective
Due to continuing advances in the development of structures, devices, and systems with a length of about 1 to 100 nanometres (nm) (1 nm is one billionth of a metre), the Medical Advisory Secretariat conducted a horizon scanning appraisal of nanotechnologies as new and emerging technologies, including an assessment of the possibly disruptive impact of future nanotechnologies.
The National Cancer Institute (NCI) in the United States proclaimed a 2015 challenge goal of eliminating suffering and death from cancer. To help meet this goal, the NCI is engaged in a concerted effort to introduce nanotechnology “to radically change the way we diagnose, treat and prevent cancer.” It is the NCI’s position that “melding nanotechnology and cancer research and development efforts will have a profound, disruptive effect on how we diagnose, treat, and prevent cancer.”
Thus, this appraisal sought to determine the systemic effects of nanotechnologies that target, image and deliver drugs, for example, with respect to health human resources, training, and new specialties; and to assess the current status of these nanotechnologies and their projected timeline to clinical utilization.
Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition
Cancer is a heterogeneous set of many malignant diseases. In each sex, 3 sites account for over one-half of all cancers. In women, these are the breast (28%), colorectum (13%) and lungs (12%). In men, these are the prostate (28%), lungs (15%), and the colorectum (13%).
It is estimated that 246,000 people in Ontario (2% of the population) have been diagnosed with cancer within the past 10 years and are still alive. Most were diagnosed with cancer of the breast (21%), prostate (20%), or colon or rectum (13%).
The number of new cancer cases diagnosed each year in Ontario is expected to increase from about 53,000 in 2001 to 80,000 in 2015. This represents more than a 50% increase in new cases over this period. An aging population, population growth, and rising cancer risk are thought to be the main factors that will contribute to the projected increase in the number of new cases.
The Technology Being Reviewed - Medical Advisory Secretariat Definition of Nanotechnology
First-Generation Nanotechnologies
Early application of nanotechnology-enabled products involved drug reformulation to deliver some otherwise toxic drugs (e.g., antifungal and anticancer agents) in a safer and more effective manner.
Examples of first-generation nanodevices include the following:
liposomes;
albumin bound nanoparticles;
gadolinium chelate for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI);
iron oxide particles for MRI;
silver nanoparticles (antibacterial wound dressing); and
nanoparticulate dental restoratives.
First-generation nanodevices have been in use for several years; therefore, they are not the focus of this report.
Second-Generation Nanotechnologies
Second-generation nanotechnologies are more sophisticated than first- generation nanotechnologies, due to novel molecular engineering that enables the devices to target, image, deliver a therapeutic agent, and monitor therapeutic efficacy in real time. Details and examples of second-generation nanodevices are discussed in the following sections of this report.
Review Strategy
The questions asked were as follows:
What is the status of these multifunctional nanotechnologies? That is, what is the projected timeline to clinical utilization?
What are the systemic effects of multifunctional nanodevices with integrated applications that target, image, and deliver drugs? That is, what are the implications of the emergence of nanotechnology on health human resources training, new specialties, etc.?
The Medical Advisory Secretariat used its usual search techniques to conduct the literature review by searching relevant databases. Outcomes of interest were improved imaging, improved sensitivity or specificity, improved response rates to therapeutic agents, and decreased toxicity.
Results
The search yielded 1 health technology assessment on nanotechnology by The Centre for Technology Assessment TA-Swiss and, in the grey literature, a technology review by RAND. These, in addition to data from the National Cancer Institute (United States) formed the basis for the conclusions of the review.
With respect to the question as to how soon until nanotechnology is used in patient care, overall, the use of second-generation nanodevices, (e.g., quantum dots [QDs]), nanoshells, dendrimers) that can potentially target, image, and deliver drugs; and image cell response to therapy in real time are still in the preclinical benchwork stage.
Table 1 summarizes the projected timelines to clinical utilization.
Summary of Timelines to Clinical Use*
NCI refers to National Cancer Institute; QD, quantum dot.
Medical Advisory Secretariat Estimated Timeline for Ontario
Upon synthesizing the estimated timelines from the NCI, the Swiss technology assessment and the RAND reports (Figure 1), it appears that:
the clinical use of separate imaging and therapeutic nanodevices is estimated to start occurring around 2010;
the clinical use of combined imaging and therapeutic nanodevices is estimated to start occurring around 2020;
changes in the way disease is diagnosed, treated and monitored are anticipated; and
the full (and realistic) extent of these changes within the next 10 to 20 years is uncertain.
Medical Advisory Secretariat Estimated Timeline for the Clinical Use of Second-Generation Nanodevices in Ontario
With respect to the question on potential systemic effects of second-generation nanodevices (i.e., the implications of the emergence of these nanodevices on health human resources training, new specialties etc.), Table 2 summarizes the findings from the review.
Potential Systemic Effects Caused by Second Generation Nanodevices*
MRI indicates magnetic resonance imaging; PSA, prostate-specific antigen; QD, quantum dot.
Uncertainties Not Addressed in the Literature
The United States National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) funds a variety of research in the economic, ethical, legal, and cultural implications of the use of nanotechnology, as well as the implications for science, education and quality of life.
There are many uncertainties that are sparsely or not addressed at all in the literature regarding second generation nanodevices. These include the following:
long-term stability and toxicology of nanodevices;
cost-effectiveness of nanodevices;
refinement of specific targeting;
effects on hospitals, physician/nurse training, creation/removal of specialties; and
that pertaining to the question, where does disease begin if therapy is applied before the symptoms have appeared?
PMCID: PMC3379172  PMID: 23074489
8.  Can the transition process from foundation doctor to neurosurgical specialty trainee be improved through “learner-centered induction programs”? 
The transition period from foundation program doctor to specialty trainee can be difficult for junior doctors. This difficult period often acts as a major obstacle for learning in the workplace. Existing induction programs are commonly seen as inadequate at easing this transition, and therefore, a pilot study intervention was undertaken to assess if the initiation of “learner-centered induction programs” could help improve the confidence, knowledge acquisition, and satisfaction of junior doctors as they begin specialty training in neurosurgery. Ethnographic and anecdotal evidences were collated from junior doctors, specialty trainees, and consultants in order to investigate if further work on this subject would be beneficial. All participants were working in the Department of Neurosurgery at University Hospital Coventry and Warwickshire, Coventry, UK, over a 4-week period in March/April 2015. A review of the relevant literature was also undertaken. This report found that despite the reservations around the increased organizational demands of induction programs of this nature, as well as concerns around a single junior doctor covering the ward alone during the induction period, feedback following the intervention was largely positive. Junior doctors appreciated being taught about their roles and responsibilities from their predecessors as well as deciding among themselves what topics they wanted covering. As a result, the induction sessions tended to focus on clinical skills rather than theoretical knowledge, which most of the junior doctors believed they could cover adequately in their own time. The junior doctors felt that they benefited from learning/refreshing their relevant practical skills in a safe environment under senior supervision, prior to starting on the wards. Finally, as the induction program was of a greater duration than the traditional half day, they felt they had sufficient time to ask questions and address concerns while “on the job”. Overall, “learner-centered induction programs” did appear to show promise in this pilot study with regards to increasing the confidence of junior doctors starting a neurosurgical placement and helped ease the transition process from foundation doctor to specialty trainee in neurosurgery. We believe further work to formalize and quantify these findings using questionnaires and a larger sample group as well as across successive is indicated and may help junior doctor learning and transition processes in future practice.
doi:10.2147/AMEP.S90256
PMCID: PMC4621194  PMID: 26527905
induction programs; foundation training; transition processes; junior doctor transitions
9.  Inclusion of Ethical Issues in Dementia Guidelines: A Thematic Text Analysis 
PLoS Medicine  2013;10(8):e1001498.
Background
Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) aim to improve professionalism in health care. However, current CPG development manuals fail to address how to include ethical issues in a systematic and transparent manner. The objective of this study was to assess the representation of ethical issues in general CPGs on dementia care.
Methods and Findings
To identify national CPGs on dementia care, five databases of guidelines were searched and national psychiatric associations were contacted in August 2011 and in June 2013. A framework for the assessment of the identified CPGs' ethical content was developed on the basis of a prior systematic review of ethical issues in dementia care. Thematic text analysis and a 4-point rating score were employed to assess how ethical issues were addressed in the identified CPGs. Twelve national CPGs were included. Thirty-one ethical issues in dementia care were identified by the prior systematic review. The proportion of these 31 ethical issues that were explicitly addressed by each CPG ranged from 22% to 77%, with a median of 49.5%. National guidelines differed substantially with respect to (a) which ethical issues were represented, (b) whether ethical recommendations were included, (c) whether justifications or citations were provided to support recommendations, and (d) to what extent the ethical issues were explained.
Conclusions
Ethical issues were inconsistently addressed in national dementia guidelines, with some guidelines including most and some including few ethical issues. Guidelines should address ethical issues and how to deal with them to help the medical profession understand how to approach care of patients with dementia, and for patients, their relatives, and the general public, all of whom might seek information and advice in national guidelines. There is a need for further research to specify how detailed ethical issues and their respective recommendations can and should be addressed in dementia guidelines.
Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary
Editors’ Summary
Background
In the past, doctors tended to rely on their own experience to choose the best treatment for their patients. Faced with a patient with dementia (a brain disorder that affects short-term memory and the ability tocarry out normal daily activities), for example, a doctor would use his/her own experience to help decide whether the patient should remain at home or would be better cared for in a nursing home. Similarly, the doctor might have to decide whether antipsychotic drugs might be necessary to reduce behavioral or psychological symptoms such as restlessness or shouting. However, over the past two decades, numerous evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been produced by governmental bodies and medical associations that aim to improve standards of clinical competence and professionalism in health care. During the development of each guideline, experts search the medical literature for the current evidence about the diagnosis and treatment of a disease, evaluate the quality of that evidence, and then make recommendations based on the best evidence available.
Why Was This Study Done?
Currently, CPG development manuals do not address how to include ethical issues in CPGs. A health-care professional is ethical if he/she behaves in accordance with the accepted principles of right and wrong that govern the medical profession. More specifically, medical professionalism is based on a set of binding ethical principles—respect for patient autonomy, beneficence, non-malfeasance (the “do no harm” principle), and justice. In particular, CPG development manuals do not address disease-specific ethical issues (DSEIs), clinical ethical situations that are relevant to the management of a specific disease. So, for example, a DSEI that arises in dementia care is the conflict between the ethical principles of non-malfeasance and patient autonomy (freedom-to-move-at-will). Thus, healthcare professionals may have to decide to physically restrain a patient with dementia to prevent the patient doing harm to him- or herself or to someone else. Given the lack of guidance on how to address ethical issues in CPG development manuals, in this thematic text analysis, the researchers assess the representation of ethical issues in CPGs on general dementia care. Thematic text analysis uses a framework for the assessment of qualitative data (information that is word-based rather than number-based) that involves pinpointing, examining, and recording patterns (themes) among the available data.
What Did the Researchers Do and Find?
The researchers identified 12 national CPGs on dementia care by searching guideline databases and by contacting national psychiatric associations. They developed a framework for the assessment of the ethical content in these CPGs based on a previous systematic review of ethical issues in dementia care. Of the 31 DSEIs included by the researchers in their analysis, the proportion that were explicitly addressed by each CPG ranged from 22% (Switzerland) to 77% (USA); on average the CPGs explicitly addressed half of the DSEIs. Four DSEIs—adequate consideration of advanced directives in decision making, usage of GPS and other monitoring techniques, covert medication, and dealing with suicidal thinking—were not addressed in at least 11 of the CPGs. The inclusion of recommendations on how to deal with DSEIs ranged from 10% of DSEIs covered in the Swiss CPG to 71% covered in the US CPG. Overall, national guidelines differed substantially with respect to which ethical issues were included, whether ethical recommendations were included, whether justifications or citations were provided to support recommendations, and to what extent the ethical issues were clearly explained.
What Do These Findings Mean?
These findings show that national CPGs on dementia care already address clinical ethical issues but that the extent to which the spectrum of DSEIs is considered varies widely within and between CPGs. They also indicate that recommendations on how to deal with DSEIs often lack the evidence that health-care professionals use to justify their clinical decisions. The researchers suggest that this situation can and should be improved, although more research is needed to determine how ethical issues and recommendations should be addressed in dementia guidelines. A more systematic and transparent inclusion of DSEIs in CPGs for dementia (and for other conditions) would further support the concept of medical professionalism as a core element of CPGs, note the researchers, but is also important for patients and their relatives who might turn to national CPGs for information and guidance at a stressful time of life.
Additional Information
Please access these Web sites via the online version of this summary at http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1001498.
Wikipedia contains a page on clinical practice guidelines (note: Wikipedia is a free online encyclopedia that anyone can edit; available in several languages)
The US National Guideline Clearinghouse provides information on national guidelines, including CPGs for dementia
The Guidelines International Network promotes the systematic development and application of clinical practice guidelines
The American Medical Association provides information about medical ethics; the British Medical Association provides information on all aspects of ethics and includes an essential tool kit that introduces common ethical problems and practical ways to deal with them
The UK National Health Service Choices website provides information about dementia, including a personal story about dealing with dementia
MedlinePlus provides links to additional resources about dementia and about Alzheimers disease, a specific type of dementia (in English and Spanish)
The UK Nuffield Council on Bioethics provides the report Dementia: ethical issues and additional information on the public consultation on ethical issues in dementia care
doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001498
PMCID: PMC3742442  PMID: 23966839
10.  A Workshop in Physician-Patient Communication for Anesthesiology Trainees 
Background
Although abundant literature demonstrates the importance of effective physician-patient communication, most research and teaching models in this area are based on a primary care setting, and may not apply to procedural specialties. Some research demonstrates that patients perceive their surgeons’ and anesthesiologists’ communication skills to be less effective than those of primary care specialists. In order to improve the effectiveness of anesthesiology trainee communication skills and simultaneously address the new ACGME general competency requirements pertaining to such skills, faculty from the Departments of Anesthesiology and Internal Medicine collaborated in the development of a workshop tailored to the needs of this group.
Methods
After reviewing the literature on physician-patient communication in primary care and in procedural specialties, we created and delivered a workshop.
Results
The literature review revealed that although the essential communication skills are the same in primary care and procedural specialties, the anesthesia-patient interaction is unique because it is inherently brief, its function is to prepare for a procedure, not to diagnose and treat, and patient anxiety is generally high due to the imminent surgical procedure. We created a workshop by adapting the Bayer Institute for Health Communication’s 4E Model to the anesthesia setting. This teaching model was chosen because it is based on literature that reflects both primary care and procedural settings, because it has been widely and successfully used in brief workshops to physicians, and because it achieves the overall goals of the course. They were 1) to teach the skills related to the essential elements for physician-patient communication and the functions of the pre-operative anesthesiologist-patient interaction and 2) to partially fulfill the ACGME general competency objectives. In addition to teaching the basic skills of the 4Es (Engage, Empathize, Educate and Enlist), specific examples, video cases, and role plays from the anesthesia setting were used to illustrate common problems in physician-patient communication.
Conclusions
Non-primary care specialties may need to tailor current physician-patient communication models to their setting in order to train residents in interpersonal and communication skills. Our proposal for a physician-patient communication workshop for anesthesiology trainees illustrates one way in which an existing teaching model can be adapted to meet the specific needs of a procedural specialty.
PMCID: PMC4803405  PMID: 27175421
11.  Encouraging patients and family caregivers to assert a more active role during care hand-offs: The Care Transitions Intervention™ 
What is the model
During a 4-week program, patients with complex care needs and family caregivers receive specific tools and work with a ‘Transitions Coach,’ to learn self-management skills that will ensure their needs are met during the transition from hospital to home. This is a low-cost, low-intensity intervention comprised of a home visit and three phone calls.
What makes this model unique
In contrast to traditional case management approaches, the Care Transitions Intervention is a self-management model. The Care Transitions Program has modeled national Medicare data sets to demonstrate the frequency with which older adults making care transitions across settings will experience another transition in the near future. In other words, for most of these individuals, there will be a ‘next time’. Using qualitative techniques, the Care Transitions Program worked with older adults to identify the key self-management skills needed to assert a more active role in their care. Next, a Transition Coach was introduced to help impart these skills and help the individual and the family caregiver become more confident in this new role. Although critics are quick to point out that this is only applicable to highly educated or motivated patients, our studies have shown that most patients and family caregivers are able to become engaged and do considerably more for themselves.
In essence, the model involves making an investment in helping patients and family caregivers become more comfortable and competent in participating in their care during care transitions. Five months after the Transition Coach signed off, these patients continued to remain out of the hospital demonstrating a sustained effect from coaching.
The intervention focuses on four conceptual domains referred to as pillars
1. Medication self-management
2. Use of a dynamic patient-centered record, the personal health record
3. Timely primary care/specialty care follow-up
4. Knowledge of red flags that indicate a worsening in their condition and how to respond
What are the key findings
Patients who received this program were significantly less likely to be readmitted to the hospital, and the benefits were sustained for five months after the end of the one-month intervention. Thus, rather than simply managing post-hospital care in a reactive manner, imparting self-management skills pays dividends long after the program ends. Anticipated net cost savings for a typical coach panel of 350 chronically ill adults with an initial hospitalization over 12 months is USD$ 295,594. Patients who received this program were also more likely to achieve self-identified personal goals around symptom management and functional recovery. To date more than 160 organizations have adopted the care transitions intervention.
Project sponsors
The John A. Hartford Foundation and The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Where Can I Learn More?
Please visit www.caretransitions.org or email: Eric.Coleman@ucdenver.edu
PMCID: PMC2807117
care transitions
12.  ACTIVE IMMUNITY PRODUCED BY SO CALLED BALANCED OR NEUTRAL MIXTURES OF DIPHTHERIA TOXIN AND ANTITOXIN 
The foregoing and earlier data taken together demonstrate that an active immunity lasting several years can be produced in guinea-pigs, by the injection of toxin-antitoxin mixtures which have no recognizable harmful effect either immediate or remote. They also show, what might have been anticipated, that under the same conditions mixtures which produce local lesions and which, therefore, contain an excess of toxin produce a much higher degree of immunity than the neutral mixtures, and that an excess of antitoxin reduces the possibility of producing an active immunity, and may extinguish it altogether. There is, therefore, a certain definite relation between the components of the mixture and the degree of immunity producible. Furthermore, toxin-antitoxin mixtures do not change materially within five days at room temperature. They are apparently more efficacious at the end of forty-eight hours than immediately after preparation. The experiments finally prove that a relatively high degree of active immunity can be induced by a harmless procedure, whereas the use of toxin alone leading to very severe local lesions is incapable of producing more than an insignificant protection. The method, therefore, invites further tests in regard to its ultimate applicability to the human being. Unless the subcutis of the guinea-pig reacts to toxin-antitoxin mixtures in a manner peculiar to itself, a practical, easily controlled method for active immunization can be worked out which should afford a larger protection than the serum alone and avoid the complications associated with horse serum. That proportion of toxin and antitoxin which would produce the highest desirable immunity consistent with the least discomfort would have to be carefully worked out for the human subject. From the nature of the immunity induced it is obvious, however, that such a method of immunization cannot take the place of a large dose of antitoxin in exposed individuals who must be protected at once. It would be applicable only as a general protective measure without reference to any immediate danger, since it would take several weeks, perhaps longer, to perfect the attainable immunity. Passing to the theoretical aspects of the facts observed, we find no publications bearing directly upon the subject before us. Madsen has, however, approached it very closely in his experiments on the immunization of animals with mixtures not fully balanced, or, in other words, in which the "toxones" were still free. He found that the injection of such mixtures in rabbits, goats and horses produces an active immunity. He makes the significant remark that perhaps in the immunizing capacity we may possess the keenest reagent for a poison which is not able to exert any toxic action in the body. This is fully borne out by the experiments described, for in these we pass beyond the visible spectrum, so to speak, of the toxin-antitoxin effects, and we are able to recognize toxic action only by the lasting immunizing effects. Another publication which touches upon some phases of the same problem is that of Morgenroth on the union between toxin and antitoxin. Morgenroth brought out the fact that a given toxin-antitoxin mixture is more toxic when injected directly into the circulation than when injected under the skin. Thus, an L+ dose of 0.78 c.c. toxin + one unit antitoxin applied subcutaneously was of the same toxicity as 0.68 c.c. toxin + one unit antitoxin injected into the circulation. When the mixture had stood twenty-four hours this (L+) dose was still 0.78 c.c. subcutaneously, but it had risen to 0.74 c.c. when introduced by the intracardiac route. The author makes two deductions from these results. He assumes that the velocity of reaction between toxin and antitoxin is slow, and that the union is not completed until the mixture has stood twenty-four hours. Hence, the L+ dose of toxin injected into the blood is higher after twenty-four hours than immediately after mixing the toxin and antitoxin. He furthermore explains the fact that the subcutaneous L+ dose remains the same whether the mixture is injected at once or after twenty-four hours, by assuming that in the subcutis of the guinea-pig there is a catalytic acceleration of the union of toxin and antitoxin. In view of the writer's results it seems that not only immediately, but four to five days after the preparation of the mixture of toxin and antitoxin, there are still toxic substances available for the production of immunity in the body of the guinea-pig, when the dose of toxin in the mixture is far below the L0 or neutral level. These toxins may be free, either because uncombined in vitro, or else because the mixture is partially dissociated in vivo, or there may be a third possibility. It is obvious that Morgenroth's investigations, however extensive and thorough, have not exhausted the subject, for both these inferences are incompatible with his. Perhaps his recent important studies on the recovery of toxin from its combination with antitoxin with weak acids may throw more light on this subject. The only conclusion which we may safely draw at this time is that the toxin-antitoxin mixture produces two sets of effects, essentially identical, however. One is visible, as injury (œdema, loss of hair, superficial and deep necrosis of skin, paralysis and death), and corresponds to the toxin spectrum of Ehrlich. The other is invisible and manifests itself only in degrees of active immunity. At what ratio of toxin to antitoxin in the mixture active immunity is no longer produced will vary somewhat with the guinea-pig used, but it is evident that traces of immunity are still transmitted to the young when the amount of toxin approaches half the L0 dose.
PMCID: PMC2124709  PMID: 19867246
13.  Using Rule-Based Machine Learning for Candidate Disease Gene Prioritization and Sample Classification of Cancer Gene Expression Data 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(7):e39932.
Microarray data analysis has been shown to provide an effective tool for studying cancer and genetic diseases. Although classical machine learning techniques have successfully been applied to find informative genes and to predict class labels for new samples, common restrictions of microarray analysis such as small sample sizes, a large attribute space and high noise levels still limit its scientific and clinical applications. Increasing the interpretability of prediction models while retaining a high accuracy would help to exploit the information content in microarray data more effectively. For this purpose, we evaluate our rule-based evolutionary machine learning systems, BioHEL and GAssist, on three public microarray cancer datasets, obtaining simple rule-based models for sample classification. A comparison with other benchmark microarray sample classifiers based on three diverse feature selection algorithms suggests that these evolutionary learning techniques can compete with state-of-the-art methods like support vector machines. The obtained models reach accuracies above 90% in two-level external cross-validation, with the added value of facilitating interpretation by using only combinations of simple if-then-else rules. As a further benefit, a literature mining analysis reveals that prioritizations of informative genes extracted from BioHEL’s classification rule sets can outperform gene rankings obtained from a conventional ensemble feature selection in terms of the pointwise mutual information between relevant disease terms and the standardized names of top-ranked genes.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0039932
PMCID: PMC3394775  PMID: 22808075
14.  Strategies to manage patients with dental anxiety and dental phobia: literature review 
Dental anxiety and phobia result in avoidance of dental care. It is a frequently encountered problem in dental offices. Formulating acceptable evidence-based therapies for such patients is essential, or else they can be a considerable source of stress for the dentist. These patients need to be identified at the earliest opportunity and their concerns addressed. The initial interaction between the dentist and the patient can reveal the presence of anxiety, fear, and phobia. In such situations, subjective evaluation by interviews and self-reporting on fear and anxiety scales and objective assessment of blood pressure, pulse rate, pulse oximetry, finger temperature, and galvanic skin response can greatly enhance the diagnosis and enable categorization of these individuals as mildly, moderately, or highly anxious or dental phobics. Broadly, dental anxiety can be managed by psychotherapeutic interventions, pharmacological interventions, or a combination of both, depending on the level of dental anxiety, patient characteristics, and clinical situations. Psychotherapeutic interventions are either behaviorally or cognitively oriented. Pharmacologically, these patients can be managed using either sedation or general anesthesia. Behavior-modification therapies aim to change unacceptable behaviors through learning, and involve muscle relaxation and relaxation breathing, along with guided imagery and physiological monitoring using biofeedback, hypnosis, acupuncture, distraction, positive reinforcement, stop-signaling, and exposure-based treatments, such as systematic desensitization, “tell-show-do”, and modeling. Cognitive strategies aim to alter and restructure the content of negative cognitions and enhance control over the negative thoughts. Cognitive behavior therapy is a combination of behavior therapy and cognitive therapy, and is currently the most accepted and successful psychological treatment for anxiety and phobia. In certain situations, where the patient is not able to respond to and cooperate well with psychotherapeutic interventions, is not willing to undergo these types of treatment, or is considered dental-phobic, pharmacological therapies such as sedation or general anesthesia should be sought.
doi:10.2147/CCIDE.S63626
PMCID: PMC4790493  PMID: 27022303
behavioral therapy; cognitive therapy; general anesthesia; psychotherapeutic intervention; pharmacological intervention; conscious sedation
15.  Prior Knowledge Enhances the Category Dimensionality Effect 
Memory & cognition  2008;36(2):256-270.
A study of the combined influence of prior knowledge and stimulus dimensionality on category learning was conducted. Subjects learned category structures with the same number of necessary dimensions but more or fewer additional redundant dimensions, and with either knowledge-related or knowledge-unrelated features. Minimal-learning models predict that all subjects, regardless of condition, should learn either the same number of dimensions, or else should respond more slowly to each dimension. Despite similar learning rates and response times, subjects learned more features in the high-dimensional than in the low-dimensional condition. Furthermore, prior knowledge interacted with dimensionality, increasing what was learned especially in the high-dimensional case. A second experiment confirmed that the participants did in fact learn more features during the training phase, rather than simply inferring them at test. These effects can be explained by direct associations among features (representing prior knowledge) combined with feedback between features and the category label, as shown by simulations of the knowledge-resonance, or KRES, model of category learning.
PMCID: PMC2586994  PMID: 18426059
16.  Medical students' views about an undergraduate curriculum in psychiatry before and after clinical placements 
Background
It has been suggested that medical students wish to focus their learning in psychiatry on general skills that are applicable to all doctors. This study seeks to establish what aspects of psychiatry students perceive to be relevant to their future careers and what psychiatric knowledge and skills they consider to be important. It is relevant to consider whether these expectations about learning needs vary prior to and post-placement in psychiatry. To what extent these opinions should influence curriculum development needs to be assessed.
Methods
A questionnaire was distributed to medical students before they commenced their psychiatry placement and after they had completed it. The questionnaire considered the relevance of psychiatry to their future careers, the relevance of particular knowledge and skills, the utility of knowledge of psychiatric specialties and the utility of different settings for learning psychiatry.
Results
The students felt skills relevant to all doctors, such as assessment of suicide risk, were more important than more specialist psychiatric skills, such as the management of schizophrenia. They felt that knowledge of how psychiatric illnesses present in general practice was important and it was a useful setting in which to learn psychiatry. They thought that conditions that are commonly seen in the general hospital are important and that liaison psychiatry was useful.
Conclusion
Two ways that medical students believe their teaching can be made more relevant to their future careers are highlighted in this study. Firstly, there is a need to focus on scenarios which students will commonly encounter in their initial years of employment. Secondly, psychiatry should be better integrated into the overall curriculum, with the opportunity for teaching in different settings. However, when developing curricula the need to listen to what students believe they should learn needs to be balanced against the necessity of teaching the fundamentals and principles of a speciality.
doi:10.1186/1472-6920-8-26
PMCID: PMC2383892  PMID: 18439278
17.  Harmonising Evidence-based medicine teaching: a study of the outcomes of e-learning in five European countries 
Background
We developed and evaluated the outcomes of an e-learning course for evidence based medicine (EBM) training in postgraduate medical education in different languages and settings across five European countries.
Methods
We measured changes in knowledge and attitudes with well-developed assessment tools before and after administration of the course. The course consisted of five e-learning modules covering acquisition (formulating a question and search of the literature), appraisal, application and implementation of findings from systematic reviews of therapeutic interventions, each with interactive audio-visual learning materials of 15 to 20 minutes duration. The modules were prepared in English, Spanish, German and Hungarian. The course was delivered to 101 students from different specialties in Germany (psychiatrists), Hungary (mixture of specialties), Spain (general medical practitioners), Switzerland (obstetricians-gynaecologists) and the UK (obstetricians-gynaecologists). We analysed changes in scores across modules and countries.
Results
On average across all countries, knowledge scores significantly improved from pre- to post-course for all five modules (p < 0.001). The improvements in scores were on average 1.87 points (14% of total score) for module 1, 1.81 points (26% of total score) for module 2, 1.9 points (11% of total score) for module 3, 1.9 points (12% of total score) for module 4 and 1.14 points (14% of total score) for module 5. In the country specific analysis, knowledge gain was not significant for module 4 in Spain, Switzerland and the UK, for module 3 in Spain and Switzerland and for module 2 in Spain. Compared to pre-course assessment, after completing the course participants felt more confident that they can assess research evidence and that the healthcare system in their country should have its own programme of research about clinical effectiveness.
Conclusion
E-learning in EBM can be harmonised for effective teaching and learning in different languages, educational settings and clinical specialties, paving the way for development of an international e-EBM course.
doi:10.1186/1472-6920-8-27
PMCID: PMC2386125  PMID: 18442424
18.  Specialized areas for value updating and goal selection in the primate orbitofrontal cortex 
eLife  null;4:e11695.
The macaque orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is essential for selecting goals based on current, updated values of expected reward outcomes. As monkeys consume a given type of reward to satiety, its value diminishes, and OFC damage impairs the ability to shift goal choices away from devalued outcomes. To examine the contributions of OFC’s components to goal selection, we reversibly inactivated either its anterior (area 11) or posterior (area 13) parts. We found that neurons in area 13 must be active during the selective satiation procedure to enable the updating of outcome valuations. After this updating has occurred, however, area 13 is not needed to select goals based on this knowledge. In contrast, neurons in area 11 do not need to be active during the value-updating process. Instead, inactivation of this area during choices causes an impairment. These findings demonstrate selective and complementary specializations within the OFC.
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11695.001
eLife digest
Everyone knows that somehow, somewhere, the brain translates knowledge into action. In some people, however, knowledge and action become disconnected. These people behave in a way that either ignores or contradicts the knowledge that they have. They know what to do and can explain it to others, but – when the time comes to act – they do something else, something wrong.
Murray et al. have now investigated how a brain region called the orbitofrontal cortex helps to link knowledge and action in macaque monkeys, which, unlike rodents, have all of the main brain areas that make up the orbitofrontal cortex of humans. The monkeys learned to associate images with different types of food, and then performed a task where they chose between two images in order to get the food they wanted. On some days, one of the foods was less ‘valuable’ because the monkeys had already eaten a lot of it. In these circumstances, monkeys chose fewer of the images associated with that food.
By temporarily inactivating either the front or back region of the monkey’s orbitofrontal cortex at different times, Murray et al. showed that these regions make different contributions to decision making. Inactivating the back region of the orbitofrontal cortex disrupted the ability of monkeys to update their knowledge about the value of a particular foodstuff. However, inactivating the front part of the orbitofrontal cortex disrupted their ability to use this knowledge to select the images that led to the most valuable food. This contradicts the widely held belief that the orbitofrontal cortex acts as a single entity to update values and translate this knowledge into action.
Future work will need to investigate how, having translated knowledge into a chosen action, the orbitofrontal cortex stimulates the motor areas of the brain to generate the movements needed to perform that action.
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11695.002
doi:10.7554/eLife.11695
PMCID: PMC4739757  PMID: 26673891
macaque monkey; decision making; reinforcer devaluation; goal neglect; Other
19.  Development of anesthesiology and medical service in KSA 1956-2011 
In this historical report, a new light is shed on details of the development of anesthesiology and medical service in Kingdom Saudi Arabia 1956-2011. What Dr. Al-khawashki has done between the period of 1956-1980 was commendable. He has found himself and few anesthetists from Egypt and Pakistan in the front of huge task. The shortage of anesthetists worldwide and the increasing surgical specialties in Saudi Arabia, imposed a huge dilemma on the service. In order to face this problem, there was only one way to cover the continuous expanding surgical services by establishing technical institutes to produce anesthesia technicians able to work under supervision of consultants. This was known as the technician's era. It continued for a long period, but the changes were introduced from 1980 onwards by me. This was the era of the development of an up-to-date anesthesia service from 1980-2011. the first, developing the-state-of- the-art anesthesia services in the university hospitals. Second, the Saudi Anaesthetic Association was established under the auspices of the King Saud University. Third, this period culminated by starting the residency training programmes in the country and the Arab world. Moreover the Saudi specialty of anaesthesia and intensive care graduated over 60 specialists and has 98 residents up till now in the programme. Finally three subspecialties fellowships in critical care, cardiac, and pediatric anesthesia were established. The total number of Saudi anaesthetists jumped from one or two anaesthetists in the seventies to almost 300 in 2011. The numbers of consultants or senior registrar are over 160 and the rest are residents in the training program nationally and internationally.
doi:10.4103/0259-1162.108317
PMCID: PMC4173470  PMID: 25885616
Alexandria University; GalalAref; I. Al-Khawashki; Mohammed Abdulla Seraj; development of anesthesia practice; saudi arabia
20.  Older Adults’ Pain Descriptions 
The purpose of this study was to describe the types of pain information described by older adults with chronic osteoarthritis pain. Pain descriptions were obtained from older adults’ who participated in a posttest only double blind study testing how the phrasing of healthcare practitioners’ pain questions affected the amount of communicated pain information. The 207 community dwelling older adults were randomized to respond to either the open-ended or closed-ended pain question. They viewed and orally responded to a computer displayed videotape of a practitioner asking them the respective pain question. All then viewed and responded to the general follow up question, ““What else can you tell me?” and lastly, “What else can you tell me about your pain, aches, soreness or discomfort?” Audio-taped responses were transcribed and content analyzed by trained, independent raters using 16 a priori criteria from the American Pain Society (2002) Guidelines for the Management of Pain in Osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Juvenile Chronic Arthritis. Older adults described important but limited types of information primarily about pain location, timing, and intensity. Pain treatment information was elicited after repeated questioning. Therefore, practitioners need to follow up older adults’ initial pain descriptions with pain questions that promote a more complete pain management discussion. Routine use of a multidimensional pain assessment instrument that measures information such as functional interference, current pain treatments, treatment effects, and side effects would be one way of insuring a more complete pain management discussion with older adults.
doi:10.1016/j.pmn.2008.09.004
PMCID: PMC2734091  PMID: 19706351
pain; communication; geriatrics; arthritis
21.  The complete sequence of the smallest known nuclear genome from the microsporidian Encephalitozoon intestinalis 
Nature Communications  2010;1:77-.
The genome of the microsporidia Encephalitozoon cuniculi is widely recognized as a model for extreme reduction and compaction. At only 2.9 Mbp, the genome encodes approximately 2,000 densely packed genes and little else. However, the nuclear genome of its sister, Encephalitozoon intestinalis, is even more reduced; at 2.3 Mbp, it represents a 20% reduction from an already severely compacted genome, raising the question, what else can be lost? In this paper, we describe the complete sequence of the E. intestinalis genome and its comparison with that of E. cuniculi. The two species share a conserved gene content, order and density over most of their genomes. The exceptions are the subtelomeric regions, where E. intestinalis chromosomes are missing large gene blocks of sequence found in E. cuniculi. In the remaining gene-dense chromosome 'cores', the diminutive intergenic sequences and introns are actually more highly conserved than the genes themselves, suggesting that they have reached the limits of reduction for a fully functional genome.
A comparison of related genomes provides valuable information about how they evolve. Here, the complete sequence of the smallest known nuclear genome from the microsporidia E. intestinalis is described and compared with its larger sister E. cuniculi, revealing what parts are indispensable in even the most reduced genomes.
doi:10.1038/ncomms1082
PMCID: PMC4355639  PMID: 20865802
22.  Can the chronic administration of the combination of buprenorphine and naloxone block dopaminergic activity causing anti-reward and relapse potential? 
Molecular neurobiology  2011;44(3):250-268.
Opiate addiction is associated with many adverse health and social harms, fatal overdose, infectious disease transmission, elevated health care costs, public disorder, and crime. Although community-based addiction treatment programs continue to reduce the harms of opiate addiction with narcotic substitution therapy such as methadone maintenance, there remains a need to find a substance that not only blocks opiate-type receptors (mu, delta, etc.) but also provides agonistic activity; hence the impetus arose for the development of a combination of narcotic antagonism and mu receptor agonist therapy. After three decades of extensive research the federal Drug Abuse Treatment Act 2000 (DATA) opened a window of opportunity for patients with addiction disorders by providing increased access to options for treatment. DATA allows physicians who complete a brief specialty-training course to become certified to prescribe buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone (Subutex, Suboxone) for treatment of patients with opioid dependence. Clinical studies indicate buprenorphine maintenance is as effective as methadone maintenance in retaining patients in substance abuse treatment and in reducing illicit opioid use. With that stated, we must consider the long-term benefits or potential toxicity attributed to Subutex or Suboxone. We describe a mechanism whereby chronic blockade of opiate receptors, in spite of only partial opiate agonist action, may ultimately block dopaminergic activity causing anti-reward and relapse potential. While the direct comparison is not as yet available, toxicity to buprenorphine can be found in the scientific literature. In considering our cautionary note in this commentary, we are cognizant that to date this is what we have available, and until such a time when the real magic bullet is discovered, we will have to endure. However, more than anything else this commentary should at least encourage the development of thoughtful new strategies to target the specific brain regions responsible for relapse prevention.
doi:10.1007/s12035-011-8206-0
PMCID: PMC3682495  PMID: 21948099
23.  A Comparison of Independent Event-Related Desynchronization Responses in Motor-Related Brain Areas to Movement Execution, Movement Imagery, and Movement Observation 
PLoS ONE  2016;11(9):e0162546.
Electroencephalographic (EEG) event-related desynchronization (ERD) induced by movement imagery or by observing biological movements performed by someone else has recently been used extensively for brain-computer interface-based applications, such as applications used in stroke rehabilitation training and motor skill learning. However, the ERD responses induced by the movement imagery and observation might not be as reliable as the ERD responses induced by movement execution. Given that studies on the reliability of the EEG ERD responses induced by these activities are still lacking, here we conducted an EEG experiment with movement imagery, movement observation, and movement execution, performed multiple times each in a pseudorandomized order in the same experimental runs. Then, independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to the EEG data to find the common motor-related EEG source activity shared by the three motor tasks. Finally, conditional EEG ERD responses associated with the three movement conditions were computed and compared. Among the three motor conditions, the EEG ERD responses induced by motor execution revealed the alpha power suppression with highest strengths and longest durations. The ERD responses of the movement imagery and movement observation only partially resembled the ERD pattern of the movement execution condition, with slightly better detectability for the ERD responses associated with the movement imagery and faster ERD responses for movement observation. This may indicate different levels of involvement in the same motor-related brain circuits during different movement conditions. In addition, because the resulting conditional EEG ERD responses from the ICA preprocessing came with minimal contamination from the non-related and/or artifactual noisy components, this result can play a role of the reference for devising a brain-computer interface using the EEG ERD features of movement imagery or observation.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0162546
PMCID: PMC5026344  PMID: 27636359
24.  Proceedings of the 3rd Biennial Conference of the Society for Implementation Research Collaboration (SIRC) 2015: advancing efficient methodologies through community partnerships and team science 
Lewis, Cara | Darnell, Doyanne | Kerns, Suzanne | Monroe-DeVita, Maria | Landes, Sara J. | Lyon, Aaron R. | Stanick, Cameo | Dorsey, Shannon | Locke, Jill | Marriott, Brigid | Puspitasari, Ajeng | Dorsey, Caitlin | Hendricks, Karin | Pierson, Andria | Fizur, Phil | Comtois, Katherine A. | Palinkas, Lawrence A. | Chamberlain, Patricia | Aarons, Gregory A. | Green, Amy E. | Ehrhart, Mark. G. | Trott, Elise M. | Willging, Cathleen E. | Fernandez, Maria E. | Woolf, Nicholas H. | Liang, Shuting Lily | Heredia, Natalia I. | Kegler, Michelle | Risendal, Betsy | Dwyer, Andrea | Young, Vicki | Campbell, Dayna | Carvalho, Michelle | Kellar-Guenther, Yvonne | Damschroder, Laura J. | Lowery, Julie C. | Ono, Sarah S. | Carlson, Kathleen F. | Cottrell, Erika K. | O’Neil, Maya E. | Lovejoy, Travis L. | Arch, Joanna J. | Mitchell, Jill L. | Lewis, Cara C. | Marriott, Brigid R. | Scott, Kelli | Coldiron, Jennifer Schurer | Bruns, Eric J. | Hook, Alyssa N. | Graham, Benjamin C. | Jordan, Katelin | Hanson, Rochelle F. | Moreland, Angela | Saunders, Benjamin E. | Resnick, Heidi S. | Stirman, Shannon Wiltsey | Gutner, Cassidy A. | Gamarra, Jennifer | Vogt, Dawne | Suvak, Michael | Wachen, Jennifer Schuster | Dondanville, Katherine | Yarvis, Jeffrey S. | Mintz, Jim | Peterson, Alan L. | Borah, Elisa V. | Litz, Brett T. | Molino, Alma | McCaughan, Stacey Young | Resick, Patricia A. | Pandhi, Nancy | Jacobson, Nora | Serrano, Neftali | Hernandez, Armando | Schreiter, Elizabeth Zeidler- | Wietfeldt, Natalie | Karp, Zaher | Pullmann, Michael D. | Lucenko, Barbara | Pavelle, Bridget | Uomoto, Jacqueline A. | Negrete, Andrea | Cevasco, Molly | Kerns, Suzanne E. U. | Franks, Robert P. | Bory, Christopher | Miech, Edward J. | Damush, Teresa M. | Satterfield, Jason | Satre, Derek | Wamsley, Maria | Yuan, Patrick | O’Sullivan, Patricia | Best, Helen | Velasquez, Susan | Barnett, Miya | Brookman-Frazee, Lauren | Regan, Jennifer | Stadnick, Nicole | Hamilton, Alison | Lau, Anna | Regan, Jennifer | Hamilton, Alison | Stadnick, Nicole | Barnett, Miya | Lau, Anna | Brookman-Frazee, Lauren | Stadnick, Nicole | Lau, Anna | Barnett, Miya | Regan, Jennifer | Roesch, Scott | Brookman-Frazee, Lauren | Powell, Byron J. | Waltz, Thomas J. | Chinman, Matthew J. | Damschroder, Laura | Smith, Jeffrey L. | Matthieu, Monica M. | Proctor, Enola K. | Kirchner, JoAnn E. | Waltz, Thomas J. | Powell, Byron J. | Chinman, Matthew J. | Damschroder, Laura J. | Smith, Jeffrey L. | Matthieu, Monica J. | Proctor, Enola K. | Kirchner, JoAnn E. | Matthieu, Monica M. | Rosen, Craig S. | Waltz, Thomas J. | Powell, Byron J. | Chinman, Matthew J. | Damschroder, Laura J. | Smith, Jeffrey L. | Proctor, Enola K. | Kirchner, JoAnn E. | Walker, Sarah C. | Bishop, Asia S. | Lockhart, Mariko | Rodriguez, Allison L. | Manfredi, Luisa | Nevedal, Andrea | Rosenthal, Joel | Blonigen, Daniel M. | Mauricio, Anne M. | Dishion, Thomas D. | Rudo-Stern, Jenna | Smith, Justin D. | Locke, Jill | Wolk, Courtney Benjamin | Harker, Colleen | Olsen, Anne | Shingledecker, Travis | Barg, Frances | Mandell, David | Beidas, Rinad S. | Hansen, Marissa C. | Aranda, Maria P. | Torres-Vigil, Isabel | Hartzler, Bryan | Steinfeld, Bradley | Gildred, Tory | Harlin, Zandrea | Shephard, Fredric | Ditty, Matthew S. | Doyle, Andrea | Bickel, John A. | Cristaudo, Katharine | Fox, Dan | Combs, Sonia | Lischner, David H. | Van Dorn, Richard A. | Tueller, Stephen J. | Hinde, Jesse M. | Karuntzos, Georgia T. | Monroe-DeVita, Maria | Peterson, Roselyn | Darnell, Doyanne | Berliner, Lucy | Dorsey, Shannon | Murray, Laura K. | Botanov, Yevgeny | Kikuta, Beverly | Chen, Tianying | Navarro-Haro, Marivi | DuBose, Anthony | Korslund, Kathryn E. | Linehan, Marsha M. | Harker, Colleen M. | Karp, Elizabeth A. | Edmunds, Sarah R. | Ibañez, Lisa V. | Stone, Wendy L. | Andrews, Jack H. | Johnides, Benjamin D. | Hausman, Estee M. | Hawley, Kristin M. | Prusaczyk, Beth | Ramsey, Alex | Baumann, Ana | Colditz, Graham | Proctor, Enola K. | Botanov, Yevgeny | Kikuta, Beverly | Chen, Tianying | Navarro-Haro, Marivi | DuBose, Anthony | Korslund, Kathryn E. | Linehan, Marsha M. | Harker, Colleen M. | Karp, Elizabeth A. | Edmunds, Sarah R. | Ibañez, Lisa V. | Stone, Wendy L. | Choy-Brown, Mimi | Andrews, Jack H. | Johnides, Benjamin D. | Hausman, Estee M. | Hawley, Kristin M. | Prusaczyk, Beth | Ramsey, Alex | Baumann, Ana | Colditz, Graham | Proctor, Enola K. | Meza, Rosemary D. | Dorsey, Shannon | Wiltsey-Stirman, Shannon | Sedlar, Georganna | Lucid, Leah | Dorsey, Caitlin | Marriott, Brigid | Zounlome, Nelson | Lewis, Cara | Gutner, Cassidy A. | Monson, Candice M. | Shields, Norman | Mastlej, Marta | Landy, Meredith SH | Lane, Jeanine | Stirman, Shannon Wiltsey | Finn, Natalie K. | Torres, Elisa M. | Ehrhart, Mark. G. | Aarons, Gregory A. | Malte, Carol A. | Lott, Aline | Saxon, Andrew J. | Boyd, Meredith | Scott, Kelli | Lewis, Cara C. | Pierce, Jennifer D. | Lorthios-Guilledroit, Agathe | Richard, Lucie | Filiatrault, Johanne | Hallgren, Kevin | Crotwell, Shirley | Muñoz, Rosa | Gius, Becky | Ladd, Benjamin | McCrady, Barbara | Epstein, Elizabeth | Clapp, John D. | Ruderman, Danielle E. | Barwick, Melanie | Barac, Raluca | Zlotkin, Stanley | Salim, Laila | Davidson, Marnie | Bunger, Alicia C. | Powell, Byron J. | Robertson, Hillary A. | Botsko, Christopher | Landes, Sara J. | Smith, Brandy N. | Rodriguez, Allison L. | Trent, Lindsay R. | Matthieu, Monica M. | Powell, Byron J. | Proctor, Enola K. | Harned, Melanie S. | Navarro-Haro, Marivi | Korslund, Kathryn E. | Chen, Tianying | DuBose, Anthony | Ivanoff, André | Linehan, Marsha M. | Garcia, Antonio R. | Kim, Minseop | Palinkas, Lawrence A. | Snowden, Lonnie | Landsverk, John | Sweetland, Annika C. | Fernandes, Maria Jose | Santos, Edilson | Duarte, Cristiane | Kritski, Afrânio | Krawczyk, Noa | Nelligan, Caitlin | Wainberg, Milton L. | Aarons, Gregory A. | Sommerfeld, David H. | Chi, Benjamin | Ezeanolue, Echezona | Sturke, Rachel | Kline, Lydia | Guay, Laura | Siberry, George | Bennett, Ian M. | Beidas, Rinad | Gold, Rachel | Mao, Johnny | Powers, Diane | Vredevoogd, Mindy | Unutzer, Jurgen | Schroeder, Jennifer | Volpe, Lane | Steffen, Julie | Dorsey, Shannon | Pullmann, Michael D | Kerns, Suzanne E. U. | Jungbluth, Nathaniel | Berliner, Lucy | Thompson, Kelly | Segell, Eliza | McGee-Vincent, Pearl | Liu, Nancy | Walser, Robyn | Runnals, Jennifer | Shaw, R. Keith | Landes, Sara J. | Rosen, Craig | Schmidt, Janet | Calhoun, Patrick | Varkovitzky, Ruth L. | Landes, Sara J. | Drahota, Amy | Martinez, Jonathan I. | Brikho, Brigitte | Meza, Rosemary | Stahmer, Aubyn C. | Aarons, Gregory A. | Williamson, Anna | Rubin, Ronnie M. | Powell, Byron J. | Hurford, Matthew O. | Weaver, Shawna L. | Beidas, Rinad S. | Mandell, David S. | Evans, Arthur C. | Powell, Byron J. | Beidas, Rinad S. | Rubin, Ronnie M. | Stewart, Rebecca E. | Wolk, Courtney Benjamin | Matlin, Samantha L. | Weaver, Shawna | Hurford, Matthew O. | Evans, Arthur C. | Hadley, Trevor R. | Mandell, David S. | Gerke, Donald R. | Prusaczyk, Beth | Baumann, Ana | Lewis, Ericka M. | Proctor, Enola K. | McWilliam, Jenna | Brown, Jacquie | Tucker, Michelle | Conte, Kathleen P | Lyon, Aaron R. | Boyd, Meredith | Melvin, Abigail | Lewis, Cara C. | Liu, Freda | Jungbluth, Nathaniel | Kotte, Amelia | Hill, Kaitlin A. | Mah, Albert C. | Korathu-Larson, Priya A. | Au, Janelle R. | Izmirian, Sonia | Keir, Scott | Nakamura, Brad J. | Higa-McMillan, Charmaine K. | Cooper, Brittany Rhoades | Funaiole, Angie | Dizon, Eleanor | Hawkins, Eric J. | Malte, Carol A. | Hagedorn, Hildi J. | Berger, Douglas | Frank, Anissa | Lott, Aline | Achtmeyer, Carol E. | Mariano, Anthony J. | Saxon, Andrew J. | Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate | Rawson, Richard | Ries, Richard | Roy-Byrne, Peter | Craske, Michelle | Simmons, Dena | Torrente, Catalina | Nathanson, Lori | Carroll, Grace | Smith, Justin D. | Brown, Kimbree | Ramos, Karina | Thornton, Nicole | Dishion, Thomas J. | Stormshak, Elizabeth A. | Shaw, Daniel S. | Wilson, Melvin N. | Choy-Brown, Mimi | Tiderington, Emmy | Smith, Bikki Tran | Padgett, Deborah K. | Rubin, Ronnie M. | Ray, Marilyn L. | Wandersman, Abraham | Lamont, Andrea | Hannah, Gordon | Alia, Kassandra A. | Hurford, Matthew O. | Evans, Arthur C. | Saldana, Lisa | Schaper, Holle | Campbell, Mark | Chamberlain, Patricia | Shapiro, Valerie B. | Kim, B.K. Elizabeth | Fleming, Jennifer L. | LeBuffe, Paul A. | Landes, Sara J. | Lewis, Cara C. | Rodriguez, Allison L. | Marriott, Brigid R. | Comtois, Katherine Anne | Lewis, Cara C. | Stanick, Cameo | Weiner, Bryan J. | Halko, Heather | Dorsey, Caitlin
Implementation Science : IS  2016;11(Suppl 1):85.
Table of contents
Introduction to the 3rd Biennial Conference of the Society for Implementation Research Collaboration: advancing efficient methodologies through team science and community partnerships
Cara Lewis, Doyanne Darnell, Suzanne Kerns, Maria Monroe-DeVita, Sara J. Landes, Aaron R. Lyon, Cameo Stanick, Shannon Dorsey, Jill Locke, Brigid Marriott, Ajeng Puspitasari, Caitlin Dorsey, Karin Hendricks, Andria Pierson, Phil Fizur, Katherine A. Comtois
A1: A behavioral economic perspective on adoption, implementation, and sustainment of evidence-based interventions
Lawrence A. Palinkas
A2: Towards making scale up of evidence-based practices in child welfare systems more efficient and affordable
Patricia Chamberlain
A3: Mixed method examination of strategic leadership for evidence-based practice implementation
Gregory A. Aarons, Amy E. Green, Mark. G. Ehrhart, Elise M. Trott, Cathleen E. Willging
A4: Implementing practice change in Federally Qualified Health Centers: Learning from leaders’ experiences
Maria E. Fernandez, Nicholas H. Woolf, Shuting (Lily) Liang, Natalia I. Heredia, Michelle Kegler, Betsy Risendal, Andrea Dwyer, Vicki Young, Dayna Campbell, Michelle Carvalho, Yvonne Kellar-Guenther
A3: Mixed method examination of strategic leadership for evidence-based practice implementation
Gregory A. Aarons, Amy E. Green, Mark. G. Ehrhart, Elise M. Trott, Cathleen E. Willging
A4: Implementing practice change in Federally Qualified Health Centers: Learning from leaders’ experiences
Maria E. Fernandez, Nicholas H. Woolf, Shuting (Lily) Liang, Natalia I. Heredia, Michelle Kegler, Betsy Risendal, Andrea Dwyer, Vicki Young, Dayna Campbell, Michelle Carvalho, Yvonne Kellar-Guenther
A5: Efficient synthesis: Using qualitative comparative analysis and the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research across diverse studies
Laura J. Damschroder, Julie C. Lowery
A6: Establishing a veterans engagement group to empower patients and inform Veterans Affairs (VA) health services research
Sarah S. Ono, Kathleen F. Carlson, Erika K. Cottrell, Maya E. O’Neil, Travis L. Lovejoy
A7: Building patient-practitioner partnerships in community oncology settings to implement behavioral interventions for anxious and depressed cancer survivors
Joanna J. Arch, Jill L. Mitchell
A8: Tailoring a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy implementation protocol using mixed methods, conjoint analysis, and implementation teams
Cara C. Lewis, Brigid R. Marriott, Kelli Scott
A9: Wraparound Structured Assessment and Review (WrapSTAR): An efficient, yet comprehensive approach to Wraparound implementation evaluation
Jennifer Schurer Coldiron, Eric J. Bruns, Alyssa N. Hook
A10: Improving the efficiency of standardized patient assessment of clinician fidelity: A comparison of automated actor-based and manual clinician-based ratings
Benjamin C. Graham, Katelin Jordan
A11: Measuring fidelity on the cheap
Rochelle F. Hanson, Angela Moreland, Benjamin E. Saunders, Heidi S. Resnick
A12: Leveraging routine clinical materials to assess fidelity to an evidence-based psychotherapy
Shannon Wiltsey Stirman, Cassidy A. Gutner, Jennifer Gamarra, Dawne Vogt, Michael Suvak, Jennifer Schuster Wachen, Katherine Dondanville, Jeffrey S. Yarvis, Jim Mintz, Alan L. Peterson, Elisa V. Borah, Brett T. Litz, Alma Molino, Stacey Young McCaughanPatricia A. Resick
A13: The video vignette survey: An efficient process for gathering diverse community opinions to inform an intervention
Nancy Pandhi, Nora Jacobson, Neftali Serrano, Armando Hernandez, Elizabeth Zeidler- Schreiter, Natalie Wietfeldt, Zaher Karp
A14: Using integrated administrative data to evaluate implementation of a behavioral health and trauma screening for children and youth in foster care
Michael D. Pullmann, Barbara Lucenko, Bridget Pavelle, Jacqueline A. Uomoto, Andrea Negrete, Molly Cevasco, Suzanne E. U. Kerns
A15: Intermediary organizations as a vehicle to promote efficiency and speed of implementation
Robert P. Franks, Christopher Bory
A16: Applying the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research constructs directly to qualitative data: The power of implementation science in action
Edward J. Miech, Teresa M. Damush
A17: Efficient and effective scaling-up, screening, brief interventions, and referrals to treatment (SBIRT) training: a snowball implementation model
Jason Satterfield, Derek Satre, Maria Wamsley, Patrick Yuan, Patricia O’Sullivan
A18: Matching models of implementation to system needs and capacities: addressing the human factor
Helen Best, Susan Velasquez
A19: Agency characteristics that facilitate efficient and successful implementation efforts
Miya Barnett, Lauren Brookman-Frazee, Jennifer Regan, Nicole Stadnick, Alison Hamilton, Anna Lau
A20: Rapid assessment process: Application to the Prevention and Early Intervention transformation in Los Angeles County
Jennifer Regan, Alison Hamilton, Nicole Stadnick, Miya Barnett, Anna Lau, Lauren Brookman-Frazee
A21: The development of the Evidence-Based Practice-Concordant Care Assessment: An assessment tool to examine treatment strategies across practices
Nicole Stadnick, Anna Lau, Miya Barnett, Jennifer Regan, Scott Roesch, Lauren Brookman-Frazee
A22: Refining a compilation of discrete implementation strategies and determining their importance and feasibility
Byron J. Powell, Thomas J. Waltz, Matthew J. Chinman, Laura Damschroder, Jeffrey L. Smith, Monica M. Matthieu, Enola K. Proctor, JoAnn E. Kirchner
A23: Structuring complex recommendations: Methods and general findings
Thomas J. Waltz, Byron J. Powell, Matthew J. Chinman, Laura J. Damschroder, Jeffrey L. Smith, Monica J. Matthieu, Enola K. Proctor, JoAnn E. Kirchner
A24: Implementing prolonged exposure for post-traumatic stress disorder in the Department of Veterans Affairs: Expert recommendations from the Expert Recommendations for Implementing Change (ERIC) project
Monica M. Matthieu, Craig S. Rosen, Thomas J. Waltz, Byron J. Powell, Matthew J. Chinman, Laura J. Damschroder, Jeffrey L. Smith, Enola K. Proctor, JoAnn E. Kirchner
A25: When readiness is a luxury: Co-designing a risk assessment and quality assurance process with violence prevention frontline workers in Seattle, WA
Sarah C. Walker, Asia S. Bishop, Mariko Lockhart
A26: Implementation potential of structured recidivism risk assessments with justice- involved veterans: Qualitative perspectives from providers
Allison L. Rodriguez, Luisa Manfredi, Andrea Nevedal, Joel Rosenthal, Daniel M. Blonigen
A27: Developing empirically informed readiness measures for providers and agencies for the Family Check-Up using a mixed methods approach
Anne M. Mauricio, Thomas D. Dishion, Jenna Rudo-Stern, Justin D. Smith
A28: Pebbles, rocks, and boulders: The implementation of a school-based social engagement intervention for children with autism
Jill Locke, Courtney Benjamin Wolk, Colleen Harker, Anne Olsen, Travis Shingledecker, Frances Barg, David Mandell, Rinad S. Beidas
A29: Problem Solving Teletherapy (PST.Net): A stakeholder analysis examining the feasibility and acceptability of teletherapy in community based aging services
Marissa C. Hansen, Maria P. Aranda, Isabel Torres-Vigil
A30: A case of collaborative intervention design eventuating in behavior therapy sustainment and diffusion
Bryan Hartzler
A31: Implementation of suicide risk prevention in an integrated delivery system: Mental health specialty services
Bradley Steinfeld, Tory Gildred, Zandrea Harlin, Fredric Shephard
A32: Implementation team, checklist, evaluation, and feedback (ICED): A step-by-step approach to Dialectical Behavior Therapy program implementation
Matthew S. Ditty, Andrea Doyle, John A. Bickel III, Katharine Cristaudo
A33: The challenges in implementing muliple evidence-based practices in a community mental health setting
Dan Fox, Sonia Combs
A34: Using electronic health record technology to promote and support evidence-based practice assessment and treatment intervention
David H. Lischner
A35: Are existing frameworks adequate for measuring implementation outcomes? Results from a new simulation methodology
Richard A. Van Dorn, Stephen J. Tueller, Jesse M. Hinde, Georgia T. Karuntzos
A36: Taking global local: Evaluating training of Washington State clinicians in a modularized cogntive behavioral therapy approach designed for low-resource settings
Maria Monroe-DeVita, Roselyn Peterson, Doyanne Darnell, Lucy Berliner, Shannon Dorsey, Laura K. Murray
A37: Attitudes toward evidence-based practices across therapeutic orientations
Yevgeny Botanov, Beverly Kikuta, Tianying Chen, Marivi Navarro-Haro, Anthony DuBose, Kathryn E. Korslund, Marsha M. Linehan
A38: Predicting the use of an evidence-based intervention for autism in birth-to-three programs
Colleen M. Harker, Elizabeth A. Karp, Sarah R. Edmunds, Lisa V. Ibañez, Wendy L. Stone
A39: Supervision practices and improved fidelity across evidence-based practices: A literature review
Mimi Choy-Brown
A40: Beyond symptom tracking: clinician perceptions of a hybrid measurement feedback system for monitoring treatment fidelity and client progress
Jack H. Andrews, Benjamin D. Johnides, Estee M. Hausman, Kristin M. Hawley
A41: A guideline decision support tool: From creation to implementation
Beth Prusaczyk, Alex Ramsey, Ana Baumann, Graham Colditz, Enola K. Proctor
A42: Dabblers, bedazzlers, or total makeovers: Clinician modification of a common elements cognitive behavioral therapy approach
Rosemary D. Meza, Shannon Dorsey, Shannon Wiltsey-Stirman, Georganna Sedlar, Leah Lucid
A43: Characterization of context and its role in implementation: The impact of structure, infrastructure, and metastructure
Caitlin Dorsey, Brigid Marriott, Nelson Zounlome, Cara Lewis
A44: Effects of consultation method on implementation of cognitive processing therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder
Cassidy A. Gutner, Candice M. Monson, Norman Shields, Marta Mastlej, Meredith SH Landy, Jeanine Lane, Shannon Wiltsey Stirman
A45: Cross-validation of the Implementation Leadership Scale factor structure in child welfare service organizations
Natalie K. Finn, Elisa M. Torres, Mark. G. Ehrhart, Gregory A. Aarons
A46: Sustainability of integrated smoking cessation care in Veterans Affairs posttraumatic stress disorder clinics: A qualitative analysis of focus group data from learning collaborative participants
Carol A. Malte, Aline Lott, Andrew J. Saxon
A47: Key characteristics of effective mental health trainers: The creation of the Measure of Effective Attributes of Trainers (MEAT)
Meredith Boyd, Kelli Scott, Cara C. Lewis
A48: Coaching to improve teacher implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs)
Jennifer D. Pierce
A49: Factors influencing the implementation of peer-led health promotion programs targeting seniors: A literature review
Agathe Lorthios-Guilledroit, Lucie Richard, Johanne Filiatrault
A50: Developing treatment fidelity rating systems for psychotherapy research: Recommendations and lessons learned
Kevin Hallgren, Shirley Crotwell, Rosa Muñoz, Becky Gius, Benjamin Ladd, Barbara McCrady, Elizabeth Epstein
A51: Rapid translation of alcohol prevention science
John D. Clapp, Danielle E. Ruderman
A52: Factors implicated in successful implementation: evidence to inform improved implementation from high and low-income countries
Melanie Barwick, Raluca Barac, Stanley Zlotkin, Laila Salim, Marnie
Davidson
A53: Tracking implementation strategies prospectively: A practical approach
Alicia C. Bunger, Byron J. Powell, Hillary A. Robertson
A54: Trained but not implementing: the need for effective implementation planning tools
Christopher Botsko
A55: Evidence, context, and facilitation variables related to implementation of Dialectical Behavior Therapy: Qualitative results from a mixed methods inquiry in the Department of Veterans Affairs
Sara J. Landes, Brandy N. Smith, Allison L. Rodriguez, Lindsay R. Trent, Monica M. Matthieu
A56: Learning from implementation as usual in children’s mental health
Byron J. Powell, Enola K. Proctor
A57: Rates and predictors of implementation after Dialectical Behavior Therapy Intensive Training
Melanie S. Harned, Marivi Navarro-Haro, Kathryn E. Korslund, Tianying Chen, Anthony DuBose, André Ivanoff, Marsha M. Linehan
A58: Socio-contextual determinants of research evidence use in public-youth systems of care
Antonio R. Garcia, Minseop Kim, Lawrence A. Palinkas, Lonnie Snowden, John Landsverk
A59: Community resource mapping to integrate evidence-based depression treatment in primary care in Brazil: A pilot project
Annika C. Sweetland, Maria Jose Fernandes, Edilson Santos, Cristiane Duarte, Afrânio Kritski, Noa Krawczyk, Caitlin Nelligan, Milton L. Wainberg
A60: The use of concept mapping to efficiently identify determinants of implementation in the National Institute of Health--President’s Emergent Plan for AIDS Relief Prevention of Mother to Child HIV Transmission Implementation Science Alliance
Gregory A. Aarons, David H. Sommerfeld, Benjamin Chi, Echezona Ezeanolue, Rachel Sturke, Lydia Kline, Laura Guay, George Siberry
A61: Longitudinal remote consultation for implementing collaborative care for depression
Ian M. Bennett, Rinad Beidas, Rachel Gold, Johnny Mao, Diane Powers, Mindy Vredevoogd, Jurgen Unutzer
A62: Integrating a peer coach model to support program implementation and ensure long- term sustainability of the Incredible Years in community-based settings
Jennifer Schroeder, Lane Volpe, Julie Steffen
A63: Efficient sustainability: Existing community based supervisors as evidence-based treatment supports
Shannon Dorsey, Michael D Pullmann, Suzanne E. U. Kerns, Nathaniel Jungbluth, Lucy Berliner, Kelly Thompson, Eliza Segell
A64: Establishment of a national practice-based implementation network to accelerate adoption of evidence-based and best practices
Pearl McGee-Vincent, Nancy Liu, Robyn Walser, Jennifer Runnals, R. Keith Shaw, Sara J. Landes, Craig Rosen, Janet Schmidt, Patrick Calhoun
A65: Facilitation as a mechanism of implementation in a practice-based implementation network: Improving care in a Department of Veterans Affairs post-traumatic stress disorder outpatient clinic
Ruth L. Varkovitzky, Sara J. Landes
A66: The ACT SMART Toolkit: An implementation strategy for community-based organizations providing services to children with autism spectrum disorder
Amy Drahota, Jonathan I. Martinez, Brigitte Brikho, Rosemary Meza, Aubyn C. Stahmer, Gregory A. Aarons
A67: Supporting Policy In Health with Research: An intervention trial (SPIRIT) - protocol and early findings
Anna Williamson
A68: From evidence based practice initiatives to infrastructure: Lessons learned from a public behavioral health system’s efforts to promote evidence based practices
Ronnie M. Rubin, Byron J. Powell, Matthew O. Hurford, Shawna L. Weaver, Rinad S. Beidas, David S. Mandell, Arthur C. Evans
A69: Applying the policy ecology model to Philadelphia’s behavioral health transformation efforts
Byron J. Powell, Rinad S. Beidas, Ronnie M. Rubin, Rebecca E. Stewart, Courtney Benjamin Wolk, Samantha L. Matlin, Shawna Weaver, Matthew O. Hurford, Arthur C. Evans, Trevor R. Hadley, David S. Mandell
A70: A model for providing methodological expertise to advance dissemination and implementation of health discoveries in Clinical and Translational Science Award institutions
Donald R. Gerke, Beth Prusaczyk, Ana Baumann, Ericka M. Lewis, Enola K. Proctor
A71: Establishing a research agenda for the Triple P Implementation Framework
Jenna McWilliam, Jacquie Brown, Michelle Tucker
A72: Cheap and fast, but what is “best?”: Examining implementation outcomes across sites in a state-wide scaled-up evidence-based walking program, Walk With Ease
Kathleen P Conte
A73: Measurement feedback systems in mental health: Initial review of capabilities and characteristics
Aaron R. Lyon, Meredith Boyd, Abigail Melvin, Cara C. Lewis, Freda Liu, Nathaniel Jungbluth
A74: A qualitative investigation of case managers’ attitudes toward implementation of a measurement feedback system in a public mental health system for youth
Amelia Kotte, Kaitlin A. Hill, Albert C. Mah, Priya A. Korathu-Larson, Janelle R. Au, Sonia Izmirian, Scott Keir, Brad J. Nakamura, Charmaine K. Higa-McMillan
A75: Multiple pathways to sustainability: Using Qualitative Comparative Analysis to uncover the necessary and sufficient conditions for successful community-based implementation
Brittany Rhoades Cooper, Angie Funaiole, Eleanor Dizon
A76: Prescribers’ perspectives on opioids and benzodiazepines and medication alerts to reduce co-prescribing of these medications
Eric J. Hawkins, Carol A. Malte, Hildi J. Hagedorn, Douglas Berger, Anissa Frank, Aline Lott, Carol E. Achtmeyer, Anthony J. Mariano, Andrew J. Saxon
A77: Adaptation of Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management for comorbid anxiety and substance use disorders: Delivery of evidence-based treatment for anxiety in addictions treatment centers
Kate Wolitzky-Taylor, Richard Rawson, Richard Ries, Peter Roy-Byrne, Michelle Craske
A78: Opportunities and challenges of measuring program implementation with online surveys
Dena Simmons, Catalina Torrente, Lori Nathanson, Grace Carroll
A79: Observational assessment of fidelity to a family-centered prevention program: Effectiveness and efficiency
Justin D. Smith, Kimbree Brown, Karina Ramos, Nicole Thornton, Thomas J. Dishion, Elizabeth A. Stormshak, Daniel S. Shaw, Melvin N. Wilson
A80: Strategies and challenges in housing first fidelity: A multistate qualitative analysis
Mimi Choy-Brown, Emmy Tiderington, Bikki Tran Smith, Deborah K. Padgett
A81: Procurement and contracting as an implementation strategy: Getting To Outcomes® contracting
Ronnie M. Rubin, Marilyn L. Ray, Abraham Wandersman, Andrea Lamont, Gordon Hannah, Kassandra A. Alia, Matthew O. Hurford, Arthur C. Evans
A82: Web-based feedback to aid successful implementation: The interactive Stages of Implementation Completion (SIC)TM tool
Lisa Saldana, Holle Schaper, Mark Campbell, Patricia Chamberlain
A83: Efficient methodologies for monitoring fidelity in routine implementation: Lessons from the Allentown Social Emotional Learning Initiative
Valerie B. Shapiro, B.K. Elizabeth Kim, Jennifer L. Fleming, Paul A. LeBuffe
A84: The Society for Implementation Research Collaboration (SIRC) implementation development workshop: Results from a new methodology for enhancing implementation science proposals
Sara J. Landes, Cara C. Lewis, Allison L. Rodriguez, Brigid R. Marriott, Katherine Anne Comtois
A85: An update on the Society for Implementation Research Collaboration (SIRC) Instrument Review Project
doi:10.1186/s13012-016-0428-0
PMCID: PMC4928139  PMID: 27357964
25.  On Finding and Using Identifiable Parameter Combinations in Nonlinear Dynamic Systems Biology Models and COMBOS: A Novel Web Implementation 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(10):e110261.
Parameter identifiability problems can plague biomodelers when they reach the quantification stage of development, even for relatively simple models. Structural identifiability (SI) is the primary question, usually understood as knowing which of P unknown biomodel parameters p1,…, pi,…, pP are-and which are not-quantifiable in principle from particular input-output (I-O) biodata. It is not widely appreciated that the same database also can provide quantitative information about the structurally unidentifiable (not quantifiable) subset, in the form of explicit algebraic relationships among unidentifiable pi. Importantly, this is a first step toward finding what else is needed to quantify particular unidentifiable parameters of interest from new I–O experiments. We further develop, implement and exemplify novel algorithms that address and solve the SI problem for a practical class of ordinary differential equation (ODE) systems biology models, as a user-friendly and universally-accessible web application (app)–COMBOS. Users provide the structural ODE and output measurement models in one of two standard forms to a remote server via their web browser. COMBOS provides a list of uniquely and non-uniquely SI model parameters, and–importantly-the combinations of parameters not individually SI. If non-uniquely SI, it also provides the maximum number of different solutions, with important practical implications. The behind-the-scenes symbolic differential algebra algorithms are based on computing Gröbner bases of model attributes established after some algebraic transformations, using the computer-algebra system Maxima. COMBOS was developed for facile instructional and research use as well as modeling. We use it in the classroom to illustrate SI analysis; and have simplified complex models of tumor suppressor p53 and hormone regulation, based on explicit computation of parameter combinations. It’s illustrated and validated here for models of moderate complexity, with and without initial conditions. Built-in examples include unidentifiable 2 to 4-compartment and HIV dynamics models.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0110261
PMCID: PMC4211654  PMID: 25350289

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