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1.  Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a terminal oxygenase of carbazole 1,9a-­dioxygenase from Novosphingobium sp. KA1 
The terminal oxygenase component (Oxy) of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO) catalyzes dihydroxylation of the aromatic ring. The Oxy of CARDO from Novosphingobium sp. KA1 was crystallized and the crystals diffracted to a resolution of 2.1 Å.
Carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO) is the initial dioxygenase in the carbazole-degradation pathway of Novosphingobium sp. KA1. The CARDO from KA1 consists of a terminal oxygenase (Oxy), a putidaredoxin-type ferredoxin and a ferredoxin reductase. The Oxy from Novosphingobium sp. KA1 was crystallized at 277 K using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.1 Å. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P21. Self-rotation function analysis suggested that the asymmetric unit contained two Oxy trimers; the Matthews coefficient and solvent content were calculated to be 5.9 Å3 Da−1 and 79.1%, respectively.
doi:10.1107/S1744309110034949
PMCID: PMC3001653  PMID: 21045300
carbazole; Novosphingobium; Rieske nonhaem iron oxygenases; sphingomonads; terminal oxygenases
2.  Diverse Oxygenations Catalyzed by Carbazole 1,9a-Dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. Strain CA10 
Journal of Bacteriology  1999;181(10):3105-3113.
Carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO) from Pseudomonas sp. strain CA10 is a multicomponent enzyme that catalyzes the angular dioxygenation of carbazole, dibenzofuran, and dibenzo-p-dioxin. It was revealed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance analyses that xanthene and phenoxathiin were converted to 2,2′,3-trihydroxydiphenylmethane and 2,2′,3-trihydroxydiphenyl sulfide, respectively. Thus, for xanthene and phenoxathiin, angular dioxygenation by CARDO occurred at the angular position adjacent to the oxygen atom to yield hetero ring-cleaved compounds. In addition to the angular dioxygenation, CARDO catalyzed the cis dihydroxylation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and biphenyl. Naphthalene and biphenyl were converted by CARDO to cis-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene and cis-2,3-dihydroxy-2,3-dihydrobiphenyl, respectively. On the other hand, CARDO also catalyzed the monooxygenation of sulfur heteroatoms in dibenzothiophene and of the benzylic methylenic group in fluorene to yield dibenzothiophene-5-oxide and 9-hydroxyfluorene, respectively. These results indicate that CARDO has a broad substrate range and can catalyze diverse oxygenation: angular dioxygenation, cis dihydroxylation, and monooxygenation. The diverse oxygenation catalyzed by CARDO for several aromatic compounds might reflect the differences in the binding of the substrates to the reaction center of CARDO.
PMCID: PMC93765  PMID: 10322011
3.  Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a novel ferredoxin involved in the dioxygenation of carbazole by Novosphingobium sp. KA1 
The ferredoxin component of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO-F) is involved in an electron-transfer reaction. The CARDO-F from Novosphingobium sp. KA1 was crystallized under anaerobic conditions and diffracted to a resolution of 1.9 Å.
Novosphingobium sp. KA1 uses carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO) as the first dioxygenase in its carbazole-degradation pathway. The CARDO of KA1 contains a terminal oxygenase component and two electron-transfer components: ferredoxin and ferredoxin reductase. In contrast to the CARDO systems of other species, the ferredoxin component of KA1 is a putidaredoxin-type protein. This novel ferredoxin was crystallized at 293 K by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG MME 550 as the precipitant under anaerobic conditions. The crystals belong to space group C2221 and diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 1.9 Å (the diffraction limit was 1.6 Å).
doi:10.1107/S1744309108016278
PMCID: PMC2443972  PMID: 18607094
carbazole; putidaredoxin-type proteins; Rieske nonhaem iron oxygenases
4.  Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a ferredoxin reductase component of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase from Novosphingobium sp. KA1 
The ferredoxin reductase component of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (Red) is involved in electron transfer from NAD(P)H to ferredoxin. The class IIA Red from Novosphingobium sp. KA1 was crystallized and the crystal diffracted to a resolution of 1.58 Å.
Carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO) is the initial enzyme of the carbazole-degradation pathway. The CARDO of Novosphingobium sp. KA1 consists of a terminal oxygenase, a putidaredoxin-type ferredoxin and a ferredoxin-NADH oxidoreductase (Red) and is classified as a class IIA Rieske oxygenase. Red from KA1 was crystallized at 278 K by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 4000. The crystal diffracted to 1.58 Å resolution and belonged to space group P32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 92.2, c = 78.6 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 120°. Preliminary analysis of the X-ray diffraction data revealed that the asymmetric unit contained two Red monomers. The crystal appeared to be a merohedral twin, with a twin fraction of 0.32 and twin law (−h, −k, l).
doi:10.1107/S1744309110014491
PMCID: PMC2882777  PMID: 20516607
carbazole; Rieske nonhaem iron oxygenases; ferredoxin reductases
5.  Radical Intermediates in Monooxygenase Reactions of Rieske Dioxygenases 
Rieske dioxygenases catalyze the cis-dihydroxylation of a wide range of aromatic compounds to initiate their biodegradation. The archetypal Rieske dioxygenase naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase (NDOS) catalyzes dioxygenation of naphthalene to form (+)-cis-(1R,2S)-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene. NDOS is composed of three proteins: a reductase, a ferredoxin, and an α3β3 oxygenase (NDO). In each α subunit, NDO contains a Rieske Fe2S2 cluster and a mononuclear iron site where substrate dihydroxylation occurs. NDOS also catalyzes monooxygenase reactions for many substrates. The mechanism of the reaction is unknown for either the mono- or di-oxygenase reactions, but has been postulated to involve either direct reaction of a structurally characterized Fe(III)-hydroperoxy intermediate or the electronically equivalent Fe(V)-oxo-hydroxo intermediate formed by O-O bond cleavage before reaction with substrate. The reaction for the former intermediate is expected to proceed through cationic intermediates while the latter is anticipated to initially form a radical intermediate. Here the monooxygenation reactions of the diagnostic probe molecules norcarane and bicyclohexane are investigated. In each case, a significant amount of the rearrangement product derived from a radical intermediate (lifetime of 11–18 ns) is observed while little or no ring expansion product from a cationic intermediate is formed. Thus, monooxygenation of these molecules appears to proceed via the Fe(V)-oxo-hydroxo intermediate. The formation of this high-valent intermediate shows that it must also be considered as a possible participant in the dioxygenation reaction, in contrast to computational studies but in accord with previous biomimetic studies.
doi:10.1021/ja068188v
PMCID: PMC2720596  PMID: 17341076
6.  Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the electron-transfer complex between the terminal oxygenase component and ferredoxin in the Rieske non-haem iron oxygenase system carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase 
The electron-transfer complex between the terminal oxygenase and ferredoxin of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 1.90 Å resolution.
Carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase, which consists of an oxygenase component (CARDO-O) and the electron-transport components ferredoxin (CARDO-F) and ferredoxin reductase (CARDO-R), catalyzes dihydroxylation at the C1 and C9a positions of carbazole. The electron-transport complex between CARDO-­O and CARDO-F crystallizes at 293 K using hanging-drop vapour diffusion with the precipitant PEG MME 2000 (type I crystals) or PEG 3350 (type II). Blossom-shaped crystals form from a pile of triangular plate-shaped crystals. The type I crystal diffracts to a maximum resolution of 1.90 Å and belongs to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 97.1, b = 89.8, c = 104.9 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 103.8°. Diffraction data for the type I crystal gave an overall R merge of 8.0% and a completeness of 100%. Its V M value is 2.63 Å3 Da−1, indicating a solvent content of 53.2%.
doi:10.1107/S1744309105014557
PMCID: PMC1952320  PMID: 16511100
angular dioxygenases; carbazole; electron-transfer complexes; Rieske non-haem iron oxygenase systems; Rieske-type ferredoxins; Rieske-type proteins
7.  Purification and Characterization of Carbazole 1,9a-Dioxygenase, a Three-Component Dioxygenase System of Pseudomonas resinovorans Strain CA10 
Applied and Environmental Microbiology  2002;68(12):5882-5890.
The carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO) system of Pseudomonas resinovorans strain CA10 consists of terminal oxygenase (CarAa), ferredoxin (CarAc), and ferredoxin reductase (CarAd). Each component of CARDO was expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3) as a native form (CarAa) or a His-tagged form (CarAc and CarAd) and was purified to apparent homogeneity. CarAa was found to be trimeric and to have one Rieske type [2Fe-2S] cluster and one mononuclear iron center in each monomer. Both His-tagged proteins were found to be monomeric and to contain the prosthetic groups predicted from the deduced amino acid sequence (His-tagged CarAd, one FAD and one [2Fe-2S] cluster per monomer protein; His-tagged CarAc, one Rieske type [2Fe-2S] cluster per monomer protein). Both NADH and NADPH were effective as electron donors for His-tagged CarAd. However, since the kcat/Km for NADH is 22.3-fold higher than that for NADPH in the 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol reductase assay, NADH was supposed to be the physiological electron donor of CarAd. In the presence of NADH, His-tagged CarAc was reduced by His-tagged CarAd. Similarly, CarAa was reduced by His-tagged CarAc, His-tagged CarAd, and NADH. The three purified proteins could reconstitute the CARDO activity in vitro. In the reconstituted CARDO system, His-tagged CarAc seemed to be indispensable for electron transport, while His-tagged CarAd could be replaced by some unrelated reductases.
doi:10.1128/AEM.68.12.5882-5890.2002
PMCID: PMC134387  PMID: 12450807
8.  Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the ferredoxin reductase component in the Rieske nonhaem iron oxygenase system carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase 
The NAD(P)H:ferredoxin oxidoreductase in carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase from Janthinobacterium sp. J3 was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 2.60 Å resolution.
Carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO), which consists of an oxygenase component (CARDO-O) and the electron-transport components ferredoxin (CARDO-F) and ferredoxin reductase (CARDO-R), catalyzes dihydroxylation at the C1 and C9a positions of carbazole. CARDO-R was crystallized at 277 K using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with the precipitant PEG 8000. Two crystal types (types I and II) were obtained. The type I crystal diffracted to a maximum resolution of 2.80 Å and belonged to space group P42212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 158.7, c = 81.4 Å. The type II crystal was obtained in drops from which type I crystals had been removed; it diffracted to 2.60 Å resolution and belonged to the same space group, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 161.8, c = 79.5 Å.
doi:10.1107/S174430910702163X
PMCID: PMC2335075  PMID: 17554172
angular dioxygenases; NAD(P)H:ferredoxin oxidoreductases; Rieske nonhaem iron oxygenase system; electron transfer; carbazole
9.  Substrate Specificity and Structural Characteristics of the Novel Rieske Nonheme Iron Aromatic Ring-Hydroxylating Oxygenases NidAB and NidA3B3 from Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1 
mBio  2010;1(2):e00135-10.
The Rieske nonheme iron aromatic ring-hydroxylating oxygenases (RHOs) NidAB and NidA3B3 from Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1 have been implicated in the initial oxidation of high-molecular-weight (HMW) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), forming cis-dihydrodiols. To clarify how these two RHOs are functionally different with respect to the degradation of HMW PAHs, we investigated their substrate specificities to 13 representative aromatic substrates (toluene, m-xylene, phthalate, biphenyl, naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, benzo[a]pyrene, carbazole, and dibenzothiophene) by enzyme reconstitution studies of Escherichia coli. Both Nid systems were identified to be compatible with type V electron transport chain (ETC) components, consisting of a [3Fe-4S]-type ferredoxin and a glutathione reductase (GR)-type reductase. Metabolite profiles indicated that the Nid systems oxidize a wide range of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, producing various isomeric dihydrodiol and phenolic compounds. NidAB and NidA3B3 showed the highest conversion rates for pyrene and fluoranthene, respectively, with high product regiospecificity, whereas other aromatic substrates were converted at relatively low regiospecificity. Structural characteristics of the active sites of the Nid systems were investigated and compared to those of other RHOs. The NidAB and NidA3B3 systems showed the largest substrate-binding pockets in the active sites, which satisfies spatial requirements for accepting HMW PAHs. Spatially conserved aromatic amino acids, Phe-Phe-Phe, in the substrate-binding pockets of the Nid systems appeared to play an important role in keeping aromatic substrates within the reactive distance from the iron atom, which allows each oxygen to attack the neighboring carbons.
IMPORTANCE
Since the discovery of microbial ring-hydroxylating oxygenases (RHOs) in 1970, the sequences, structures, and enzyme biochemistry, including enantiospecific products, of RHOs have been studied and discussed extensively from the perspective of biodegradation, biotransformation, and biocatalysis processes. However, with all that effort to elucidate the enzymatic mechanisms of RHOs, little is known about the biochemistry and enzymology underlying high-molecular-weight (HMW) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degradation. We used Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1 Nid enzymes, the first type V RHO members to display an apparent substrate preference for HMW PAHs. Here, we examine the mechanism of the RHO reaction by integrating structural information of the NidAB and NidA3B3 enzymes with substrate and product data. This study gives us an understanding of how the model RHO systems of M. vanbaalenii PYR-1 metabolize HMW PAHs. The information obtained would also be helpful for successful application of RHO enzymes to the production of industrially and medically important chiral chemicals and the development of PAH bioremediation technologies.
doi:10.1128/mBio.00135-10
PMCID: PMC2921158  PMID: 20714442
10.  Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the terminal oxygenase component of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase from Nocardioides aromaticivorans IC177 
The terminal oxygenase component of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase from N. aromaticivorans IC177 was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 2.30 Å resolution.
Carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO) catalyzes the dihydroxylation of carbazole by angular-position (C9a) carbon bonding to the imino nitrogen and its adjacent C1 carbon. CARDO consists of a terminal oxygenase component and two electron-transfer components: ferredoxin and ferredoxin reductase. The terminal oxygenase component (43.9 kDa) of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase from Nocardioides aromaticivorans IC177 was crystallized at 293 K using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG 8000 as the precipitant. The crystals diffract to 2.3 Å resolution and belong to space group C2.
doi:10.1107/S1744309106044939
PMCID: PMC2225353  PMID: 17142899
angular dioxygenases; carbazole; Rieske nonhaem iron oxygenase system; Rieske-type protein
11.  Molecular Characterization and Substrate Specificity of Nitrobenzene Dioxygenase from Comamonas sp. Strain JS765 
Comamonas sp. strain JS765 can grow with nitrobenzene as the sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. We report here the sequence of the genes encoding nitrobenzene dioxygenase (NBDO), which catalyzes the first step in the degradation of nitrobenzene by strain JS765. The components of NBDO were designated ReductaseNBZ, FerredoxinNBZ, OxygenaseNBZα, and OxygenaseNBZβ, with the gene designations nbzAa, nbzAb, nbzAc, and nbzAd, respectively. Sequence analysis showed that the components of NBDO have a high level of homology with the naphthalene family of Rieske nonheme iron oxygenases, in particular, 2-nitrotoluene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain JS42. The enzyme oxidizes a wide range of substrates, and relative reaction rates with partially purified OxygenaseNBZ revealed a preference for 3-nitrotoluene, which was shown to be a growth substrate for JS765. NBDO is the first member of the naphthalene family of Rieske nonheme iron oxygenases reported to oxidize all of the isomers of mono- and dinitrotoluenes with the concomitant release of nitrite.
doi:10.1128/AEM.68.2.634-641.2002
PMCID: PMC126692  PMID: 11823201
12.  Structures of the multicomponent Rieske non-heme iron toluene 2,3-dioxygenase enzyme system 
The crystal structures of the three-component toluene 2,3-dioxygenase system provide a model for electron transfer among bacterial Rieske non-heme iron dioxygenases.
Bacterial Rieske non-heme iron oxygenases catalyze the initial hydroxylation of aromatic hydrocarbon substrates. The structures of all three components of one such system, the toluene 2,3-dioxygenase system, have now been determined. This system consists of a reductase, a ferredoxin and a terminal dioxygenase. The dioxygenase, which was cocrystallized with toluene, is a heterohexamer containing a catalytic and a structural subunit. The catalytic subunit contains a Rieske [2Fe–2S] cluster and mononuclear iron at the active site. This iron is not strongly bound and is easily removed during enzyme purification. The structures of the enzyme with and without mononuclear iron demonstrate that part of the structure is flexible in the absence of iron. The orientation of the toluene substrate in the active site is consistent with the regiospecificity of oxygen incorporation seen in the product formed. The ferredoxin is Rieske type and contains a [2Fe–2S] cluster close to the protein surface. The reductase belongs to the glutathione reductase family of flavoenzymes and consists of three domains: an FAD-binding domain, an NADH-binding domain and a C-terminal domain. A model for electron transfer from NADH via FAD in the reductase and the ferredoxin to the terminal active-site mononuclear iron of the dioxygenase is proposed.
doi:10.1107/S0907444908036524
PMCID: PMC2628974  PMID: 19153463
toluene; dioxygenases; electron transfer; Rieske clusters; reductases; ferredoxins; NADH; FAD
13.  Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the ferredoxin component of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase from Nocardioides aromaticivorans IC177 
The ferredoxin component of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase from N. aromaticivorans IC177 was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution.
Carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO) catalyzes the dihydroxylation of carbazole by angular position (C9a) carbon bonding to the imino nitrogen and its adjacent C1 carbon. CARDO consists of a terminal oxygenase component and two electron-transfer components: ferredoxin and ferredoxin reductase. The ferredoxin component of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase from Nocardioides aromaticivorans IC177 was crystallized at 293 K using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. The crystals, which were improved by macroseeding, diffract to 2.0 Å resolution and belong to space group P41212.
doi:10.1107/S1744309107041437
PMCID: PMC2339720  PMID: 17909288
ferredoxins; carbazole; Rieske nonhaem iron oxygenase system; Rieske-type proteins
14.  Structural investigations of the ferredoxin and terminal oxygenase components of the biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase from Sphingobium yanoikuyae B1 
Background
The initial step involved in oxidative hydroxylation of monoaromatic and polyaromatic compounds by the microorganism Sphingobium yanoikuyae strain B1 (B1), previously known as Sphingomonas yanoikuyae strain B1 and Beijerinckia sp. strain B1, is performed by a set of multiple terminal Rieske non-heme iron oxygenases. These enzymes share a single electron donor system consisting of a reductase and a ferredoxin (BPDO-FB1). One of the terminal Rieske oxygenases, biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase (BPDO-OB1), is responsible for B1's ability to dihydroxylate large aromatic compounds, such as chrysene and benzo[a]pyrene.
Results
In this study, crystal structures of BPDO-OB1 in both native and biphenyl bound forms are described. Sequence and structural comparisons to other Rieske oxygenases show this enzyme to be most similar, with 43.5 % sequence identity, to naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4. While structurally similar to naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase, the active site entrance is significantly larger than the entrance for naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase. Differences in active site residues also allow the binding of large aromatic substrates. There are no major structural changes observed upon binding of the substrate. BPDO-FB1 has large sequence identity to other bacterial Rieske ferredoxins whose structures are known and demonstrates a high structural homology; however, differences in side chain composition and conformation around the Rieske cluster binding site are noted.
Conclusion
This is the first structure of a Rieske oxygenase that oxidizes substrates with five aromatic rings to be reported. This ability to catalyze the oxidation of larger substrates is a result of both a larger entrance to the active site as well as the ability of the active site to accommodate larger substrates. While the biphenyl ferredoxin is structurally similar to other Rieske ferredoxins, there are distinct changes in the amino acids near the iron-sulfur cluster. Because this ferredoxin is used by multiple oxygenases present in the B1 organism, this ferredoxin-oxygenase system provides the structural platform to dissect the balance between promiscuity and selectivity in protein-protein electron transport systems.
doi:10.1186/1472-6807-7-10
PMCID: PMC1847435  PMID: 17349044
15.  Plasmid pCAR3 Contains Multiple Gene Sets Involved in the Conversion of Carbazole to Anthranilate†  
The carbazole degradative car-I gene cluster (carAaIBaIBbICIAcI) of Sphingomonas sp. strain KA1 is located on the 254-kb circular plasmid pCAR3. Carbazole conversion to anthranilate is catalyzed by carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO; CarAaIAcI), meta-cleavage enzyme (CarBaIBbI), and hydrolase (CarCI). CARDO is a three-component dioxygenase, and CarAaI and CarAcI are its terminal oxygenase and ferredoxin components. The car-I gene cluster lacks the gene encoding the ferredoxin reductase component of CARDO. In the present study, based on the draft sequence of pCAR3, we found multiple carbazole degradation genes dispersed in four loci on pCAR3, including a second copy of the car gene cluster (carAaIIBaIIBbIICIIAcII) and the ferredoxin/reductase genes fdxI-fdrI and fdrII. Biotransformation experiments showed that FdrI (or FdrII) could drive the electron transfer chain from NAD(P)H to CarAaI (or CarAaII) with the aid of ferredoxin (CarAcI, CarAcII, or FdxI). Because this electron transfer chain showed phylogenetic relatedness to that consisting of putidaredoxin and putidaredoxin reductase of the P450cam monooxygenase system of Pseudomonas putida, CARDO systems of KA1 can be classified in the class IIA Rieske non-heme iron oxygenase system. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed that two car gene clusters constituted operons, and their expression was induced when KA1 was exposed to carbazole, although the fdxI-fdrI and fdrII genes were expressed constitutively. Both terminal oxygenases of KA1 showed roughly the same substrate specificity as that from the well-characterized carbazole degrader Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10, although slight differences were observed.
doi:10.1128/AEM.72.5.3198-3205.2006
PMCID: PMC1472349  PMID: 16672458
16.  Crystal Structure of the Terminal Oxygenase Component of Cumene Dioxygenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens IP01†  
Journal of Bacteriology  2005;187(7):2483-2490.
The crystal structure of the terminal component of the cumene dioxygenase multicomponent enzyme system of Pseudomonas fluorescens IP01 (CumDO) was determined at a resolution of 2.2 Å by means of molecular replacement by using the crystal structure of the terminal oxygenase component of naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4 (NphDO). The ligation of the two catalytic centers of CumDO (i.e., the nonheme iron and Rieske [2Fe-2S] centers) and the bridging between them in neighboring catalytic subunits by hydrogen bonds through a single amino acid residue, Asp231, are similar to those of NphDO. An unidentified external ligand, possibly dioxygen, was bound at the active site nonheme iron. The entrance to the active site of CumDO is different from the entrance to the active site of NphDO, as the two loops forming the lid exhibit great deviation. On the basis of the complex structure of NphDO, a biphenyl substrate was modeled in the substrate-binding pocket of CumDO. The residues surrounding the modeled biphenyl molecule include residues that have already been shown to be important for its substrate specificity by a number of engineering studies of biphenyl dioxygenases.
doi:10.1128/JB.187.7.2483-2490.2005
PMCID: PMC1065230  PMID: 15774891
17.  Structure and Increased Thermostability of Rhodococcus sp. Naphthalene 1,2-Dioxygenase 
Journal of Bacteriology  2005;187(21):7222-7231.
Rieske nonheme iron oxygenases form a large class of aromatic ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases found in microorganisms. These enzymes enable microorganisms to tolerate and even exclusively utilize aromatic compounds for growth, making them good candidates for use in synthesis of chiral intermediates and bioremediation. Studies of the chemical stability and thermostability of these enzymes thus become important. We report here the structure of free and substrate (indole)-bound forms of naphthalene dioxygenase from Rhodococcus sp. strain NCIMB12038. The structure of the Rhodococcus enzyme reveals that, despite a ∼30% sequence identity between these naphthalene dioxygenases, their overall structures superpose very well with a root mean square deviation of less than 1.6 Å. The differences in the active site of the two enzymes are pronounced near the entrance; however, indole binds to the Rhodococcus enzyme in the same orientation as in the Pseudomonas enzyme. Circular dichroism spectroscopy experiments show that the Rhodococcus enzyme has higher thermostability than the naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas species. The Pseudomonas enzyme has an apparent melting temperature of 55°C while the Rhodococcus enzyme does not completely unfold even at 95°C. Both enzymes, however, show similar unfolding behavior in urea, and the Rhodococcus enzyme is only slightly more tolerant to unfolding by guanidine hydrochloride. Structure analysis suggests that the higher thermostability of the Rhodococcus enzyme may be attributed to a larger buried surface area and extra salt bridge networks between the α and β subunits in the Rhodococcus enzyme.
doi:10.1128/JB.187.21.7222-7231.2005
PMCID: PMC1272967  PMID: 16237006
18.  Assessment of Toluene/Biphenyl Dioxygenase Gene Diversity in Benzene-Polluted Soils: Links between Benzene Biodegradation and Genes Similar to Those Encoding Isopropylbenzene Dioxygenases†  
The PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique was used to assess the diversity and distribution of Rieske nonheme iron oxygenases of the toluene/biphenyl subfamily in soil DNA and bacterial isolates recovered from sites contaminated with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). The central cores of genes encoding the catalytic α subunits were targeted, since they are responsible for the substrate specificities of these enzymes. SSCP functional genotype fingerprinting revealed a substantial diversity of oxygenase genes in three differently BTEX-contaminated soil samples, and sequence analysis indicated that in both the soil DNA and the bacterial isolates, genes for oxygenases related to the isopropylbenzene (cumene) dioxygenase branch of the toluene/biphenyl oxygenase subfamily were predominant among the detectable genotypes. The peptide sequences of the two most abundant α subunit sequence types differed by only five amino acids (residues 258, 286, 288, 289, and 321 according to numbering in cumene dioxygenase α subunit CumA1 of Pseudomonas fluorescens IP01). However, a strong correlation between sequence type and substrate utilization pattern was observed in isolates harboring these genes. Two of these residues were located at positions contributing, according to the resolved crystal structure of cumene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens IP01, to the inner surface of the substrate-binding pocket. Isolates containing an α subunit with isoleucine and leucine at positions 288 and 321, respectively, were capable of degrading benzene and toluene, whereas isolates containing two methionine substitutions were found to be incapable of degrading toluene, indicating that the more bulky methionine residues significantly narrowed the available space within the substrate-binding pocket.
doi:10.1128/AEM.72.5.3504-3514.2006
PMCID: PMC1472391  PMID: 16672497
19.  Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the three components of the toluene 2,3-dioxygenase enzyme system 
All three components of the toluene dioxygenase system have been expressed, purified and crystallized.
Pseudomonas putida F1 can grow with toluene as its sole source of carbon and energy. The initial reaction of the degradation of toluene is catalyzed by a three-component toluene dioxygenase enzyme system consisting of a reductase (ReductaseTOL), a ferredoxin (FerredoxinTOL) and a Rieske non-heme iron dioxygenase (OxygenaseTOL). The three components and the apoenzyme of the dioxygenase (apo-OxygenaseTOL) were overexpressed, purified and crystallized. ReductaseTOL diffracts to 1.8 Å and belongs to space group P41212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 77.1, c = 156.3 Å. FerredoxinTOL diffracts to 1.2 Å and belongs to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 30.5, b = 52.0, c = 30.95 Å, β = 113.7°. Apo-OxygenaseTOL and OxygenaseTOL diffract to 3.2 Å and belong to space group P4332, with unit-cell parameters a = 235.9 Å and a = 234.5 Å, respectively.
doi:10.1107/S1744309105017549
PMCID: PMC1952458  PMID: 16511124
toluene 2,3-dioxygenase enzyme system
20.  Near-IR MCD of the Non-Heme Ferrous Active Site in Naphthalene 1,2-Dioxygenase: Correlation to Crystallography and Structural Insight into the Mechanism of Rieske Dioxygenases 
Near-IR MCD and variable temperature, variable field (VTVH) MCD have been applied to Naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase (NDO) to describe the coordination geometry and electronic structure of the mononuclear non-heme ferrous catalytic site in the resting and substrate-bound forms with the Rieske 2Fe2S cluster oxidized and reduced. The structural results are correlated with the crystallographic studies of NDO and other related Rieske non-heme iron oxygenases to develop molecular level insights into the structure/function correlation for this class of enzymes. The MCD data for resting NDO with the Rieske center oxidized indicate the presence of a six-coordinate high-spin ferrous site with a weak axial ligand which becomes more tightly coordinated when the Rieske center is reduced. Binding of naphthalene to resting NDO (Rieske oxidized and reduced) converts the six-coordinate sites into five-coordinate (5c) sites with elimination of a water ligand. In the Rieske oxidized form the 5c sites are square pyramidal, but transform to a 1:2 mixture of trigonal bipyramial/square pyramidal sites when the Rieske center is reduced. Thus the geometric and electronic structure of the catalytic site in the presence of substrate can be significantly affected by the redox state of the Rieske center. The catalytic ferrous site is primed for the O2 reaction when substrate is bound in the active site in the presence of the reduced Rieske site. These structural changes insure that two electrons and the substrate are present before the binding and activation of O2, which avoids the uncontrolled formation and release of reactive oxygen species.
doi:10.1021/ja074769o
PMCID: PMC2886598  PMID: 18189388
21.  Characterization and Evolution of Anthranilate 1,2-Dioxygenase from Acinetobacter sp. Strain ADP1 
Journal of Bacteriology  2001;183(1):109-118.
The two-component anthranilate 1,2-dioxygenase of the bacterium Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1 was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. This enzyme converts anthranilate (2-aminobenzoate) to catechol with insertion of both atoms of O2 and consumption of one NADH. The terminal oxygenase component formed an α3β3 hexamer of 54- and 19-kDa subunits. Biochemical analyses demonstrated one Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] center and one mononuclear nonheme iron center in each large oxygenase subunit. The reductase component, which transfers electrons from NADH to the oxygenase component, was found to contain approximately one flavin adenine dinucleotide and one ferredoxin-type [2Fe-2S] center per 39-kDa monomer. Activities of the combined components were measured as rates and quantities of NADH oxidation, substrate disappearance, product appearance, and O2 consumption. Anthranilate conversion to catechol was stoichiometrically coupled to NADH oxidation and O2 consumption. The substrate analog benzoate was converted to a nonaromatic benzoate 1,2-diol with similarly tight coupling. This latter activity is identical to that of the related benzoate 1,2-dioxygenase. A variant anthranilate 1,2-dioxygenase, previously found to convey temperature sensitivity in vivo because of a methionine-to-lysine change in the large oxygenase subunit, was purified and characterized. The purified M43K variant, however, did not hydroxylate anthranilate or benzoate at either the permissive (23°C) or nonpermissive (39°C) growth temperatures. The wild-type anthranilate 1,2-dioxygenase did not efficiently hydroxylate methylated or halogenated benzoates, despite its sequence similarity to broad-substrate specific dioxygenases that do. Phylogenetic trees of the α and β subunits of these terminal dioxygenases that act on natural and xenobiotic substrates indicated that the subunits of each terminal oxygenase evolved from a common ancestral two-subunit component.
doi:10.1128/JB.183-1.109-118.2001
PMCID: PMC94856  PMID: 11114907
22.  A DFT Study of the cis-Dihydroxylation of Nitroaromatic Compounds Catalyzed by Nitrobenzene Dioxygenase 
The Journal of Physical Chemistry. B  2014;118(12):3245-3256.
The mechanism of cis-dihydroxylation of nitrobenzene and 2-nitrotoluene catalyzed by nitrobenzene 1,2-dioxygenase (NBDO), a member of the naphthalene family of Rieske non-heme iron dioxygenases, was studied by means of the density functional theory method using four models of the enzyme active site. Different possible reaction pathways for the substrate dioxygenation initiated either by the FeIII–OOH or HO–FeV=O attack on the aromatic ring were considered and the computed activation barriers compared with the Gibbs free energy of activation for the oxygen–oxygen cleavage leading to the formation of the iron(V)–oxo species from its ferric hydroperoxo precursor. The mechanism of the substrate cis-dihydroxylation leading to the formation of a cis-dihydrodiol was then investigated, and the most feasible mechanism was found to be starting with the attack of the high-valent iron–oxo species on the substrate ring yielding a radical intermediate, which further evolves toward the final product.
doi:10.1021/jp4076299
PMCID: PMC3970850  PMID: 24624972
23.  X-ray structure of a soluble Rieske-type ferredoxin from Mus musculus  
The X-ray crystal structure of a soluble Rieske ferredoxin from M. musculus was solved at 2.07 Å resolution, revealing an iron–sulfur cluster-binding domain with similar architecture to the Rieske-type domains of bacterial aromatic dioxygenases. The ferredoxin was also shown to be capable of accepting electrons from both eukaryotic and prokaryotic oxidoreductases.
The 2.07 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of a soluble Rieske-type ferredoxin from Mus musculus encoded by the gene Mm.266515 is reported. Although they are present as covalent domains in eukaryotic membrane oxidase complexes, soluble Rieske-type ferredoxins have not previously been observed in eukaryotes. The overall structure of the mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin is typical of this class of iron–sulfur proteins and consists of a larger partial β-barrel domain and a smaller domain containing Cys57, His59, Cys80 and His83 that binds the [2Fe–2S] cluster. The S atoms of the cluster are hydrogen-bonded by six backbone amide N atoms in a pattern typical of membrane-bound high-potential eukaryotic respiratory Rieske ferredoxins. However, phylogenetic analysis suggested that the mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin was more closely related to bacterial Rieske-type ferredoxins. Correspondingly, the structure revealed an extended loop most similar to that seen in Rieske-type ferredoxin subunits of bacterial aromatic dioxygenases, including the positioning of an aromatic side chain (Tyr85) between this loop and the [2Fe–2S] cluster. The mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin was shown to be capable of accepting electrons from both eukaryotic and prokaryotic oxidoreductases, although it was unable to serve as an electron donor for a bacterial monooxygenase complex. The human homolog of mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin was also cloned and purified. It behaved identically to mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin in all biochemical characterizations but did not crystallize. Based on its high sequence identity, the structure of the human homolog is likely to be modeled well by the mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin structure.
doi:10.1107/S0907444908021653
PMCID: PMC2631127  PMID: 18703841
Rieske-type ferredoxins; iron–sulfur proteins; oxidoreductases
24.  Cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of the plasmid-encoded genes for the two-component 2-halobenzoate 1,2-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas cepacia 2CBS. 
Journal of Bacteriology  1995;177(3):667-675.
The two-component nonheme iron dioxygenase system 2-halobenzoate 1,2-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas cepacia 2CBS catalyzes the double hydroxylation of 2-halobenzoates with concomitant release of halogenide and carbon dioxide, yielding catechol. The gene cluster encoding this enzyme, cbdABC, was localized on a 70-kbp conjugative plasmid designated pBAH1. The nucleotide sequences of cbdABC and flanking regions were determined. In the deduced amino acid sequence of the large subunit of the terminal oxygenase component (CbdA), a conserved motif proposed to bind the Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] cluster was identified. In the NADH:acceptor reductase component (CbdC), a putative binding site for a chloroplast-type [2Fe-2S] center and possible flavin adenine dinucleotide- and NAD-binding domains were identified. The cbdABC sequences show significant homology to benABC, which encode benzoate 1,2-dioxygenase from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus (52% identity at the deduced amino acid level), and to xylXYZ, which encode toluate 1,2-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 (51% amino acid identity). Recombinant pkT231 harboring cbdABC and flanking regions complemented a plasmid-free mutant of wild-type P. cepacia 2CBS for growth on 2-chlorobenzoate, and it also allowed recombinant P. putida KT2440 to metabolize 2-chlorobenzoate. Functional NADH:acceptor reductase and oxygenase components of 2-halobenzoate 1,2-dioxygenase were enriched from recombinant Pseudomonas clones.
PMCID: PMC176642  PMID: 7530709
25.  Nucleotide sequencing and transcriptional mapping of the genes encoding biphenyl dioxygenase, a multicomponent polychlorinated-biphenyl-degrading enzyme in Pseudomonas strain LB400. 
Journal of Bacteriology  1992;174(9):2903-2912.
The DNA region encoding biphenyl dioxygenase, the first enzyme in the biphenyl-polychlorinated biphenyl degradation pathway of Pseudomonas species strain LB400, was sequenced. Six open reading frames were identified, four of which are homologous to the components of toluene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida F1 and have been named bphA, bphE, bphF, and bphG. From this comparison, biphenyl dioxygenase was found to be a multicomponent enzyme containing a two-subunit iron-sulfur protein, a ferredoxin, and a reductase. Comparison of the large subunit of the iron-sulfur protein and the ferredoxin with other multicomponent dioxygenases identified amino acid sequences similar to Rieske iron-sulfur proteins for binding a [2Fe-2S] cluster. Sequences have also been identified in the reductase component that match the consensus sequence for FAD or NAD binding. Transcription of the biphenyl dioxygenase region was examined, and three transcription initiation sites were identified. Transcription initiating at the site furthest upstream is greatly increased when the LB400 cells are grown on biphenyl as the sole carbon source.
Images
PMCID: PMC205943  PMID: 1569021

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