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1.  Body Composition in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease 
Mædica  2014;9(1):25-32.
Objectives:
Body composition assessment in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is important, as weight loss and muscular wasting are responsible for low exercise capacity in these patients, and low body mass index (BMI) and fat free mass index (FFMI) are important prognostic factors. Our study aims were: (a) to describe body composition in COPD patients referred to a pulmonary rehabilitation center in Bucharest; (b) to examine the relationships between body composition and disease severity (bronchial obstruction, exercise capacity, quality of life); (c) to test if segmental wasting of lower limbs muscle mass (measured by segmental body composition analysis) correlates with decreased exercise capacity.
Material and methods:
We studied 36 consecutive COPD patients referred to our clinic for pulmonary rehabilitation. Patients performed pulmonary function tests, six minutes walking test (6MWT), and health status was evaluated with COPD Assessment Test (CAT). Body composition measurements were performed by direct segmental multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA).
Outcomes:
This study offers the first data on body composition of Romanian COPD patients
The prevalence of nutritional depletion (defined by low BMI and/or low FFMI) among our COPD patients was 22.2%. Mean FFMI was significantly lower in normal or underweight patients versus overweight or obese patients. Patients with low FFMI had lower exercise capacity at the 6MWT and higher CAT scores than patients with normal FFMI.
Depending on the BMI and FFMI values the patients were divided in four categories: normal, semistarvation, sarcopenia and cachexia. The group of patients with sarcopenia (low FFMI and normal BMI) had the lowest mean MIP (Maximal Inspiratory Pressure), the lowest mean 6MWD (six minutes walking distance) and the higher CAT mean scores among all groups. Exercise capacity was significantly lower in muscular depleted patients (with low skeletal muscle mass index - SSMI). MIP correlated significantly with FFMI and SMMI. No correlations were found between parameters of body composition and FEV1 or CAT. Segmental body composition assessment revealed that unbalanced upper/lower skeletal muscle mass is associated with a lower exercise capacity as measured by 6WMT.
Conclusions:
This study offers the first data on body composition of Romanian COPD patients. The prevalence of nutritional depletion is similar to that found in other European studies. No significant correlations were found between FFMI and severity of the disease (bronchial obstruction, distance walked, CAT score). FFMI and SSMI correlated significantly with MIP. Sarcopenic patients had the lowest mean 6MWD, the lowest mean MIP and the highest CAT mean scores. SMMI significantly correlated with 6MWD. Segmental body composition assessment of revealed that "unbalanced" patients had lower results at 6MWT. These results show that body composition evaluation is useful for the assessment of COPD patients referred to pulmonary rehabilitation and should be routinely performed
PMCID: PMC4268286  PMID: 25553122
body composition; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; pulmonary rehabilitation
2.  Genome-wide Association Study Identifies BICD1 as a Susceptibility Gene for Emphysema 
Rationale: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), characterized by airflow limitation, is a disorder with high phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. Pulmonary emphysema is a major but variable component of COPD; familial data suggest that different components of COPD, such as emphysema, may be influenced by specific genetic factors.
Objectives: To identify genetic determinants of emphysema assessed through high-resolution chest computed tomography in individuals with COPD.
Methods: We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of emphysema determined from chest computed tomography scans with a total of 2,380 individuals with COPD in three independent cohorts of white individuals from (1) a cohort from Bergen, Norway, (2) the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE) Study, and (3) the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT). We tested single-nucleotide polymorphism associations with the presence or absence of emphysema determined by radiologist assessment in two of the three cohorts and a quantitative emphysema trait (percentage of lung voxels less than –950 Hounsfield units) in all three cohorts.
Measurements and Main Results: We identified association of a single-nucleotide polymorphism in BICD1 with the presence or absence of emphysema (P = 5.2 × 10−7 with at least mild emphysema vs. control subjects; P = 4.8 × 10−8 with moderate and more severe emphysema vs. control subjects).
Conclusions: Our study suggests that genetic variants in BICD1 are associated with qualitative emphysema in COPD. Variants in BICD1 are associated with length of telomeres, which suggests that a mechanism linked to accelerated aging may be involved in the pathogenesis of emphysema.
Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00292552).
doi:10.1164/rccm.201004-0541OC
PMCID: PMC3040393  PMID: 20709820
emphysema; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; BICD1; single-nucleotide polymorphism
3.  A Genome-Wide Association Study in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): Identification of Two Major Susceptibility Loci 
PLoS Genetics  2009;5(3):e1000421.
There is considerable variability in the susceptibility of smokers to develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The only known genetic risk factor is severe deficiency of α1-antitrypsin, which is present in 1–2% of individuals with COPD. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in a homogenous case-control cohort from Bergen, Norway (823 COPD cases and 810 smoking controls) and evaluated the top 100 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the family-based International COPD Genetics Network (ICGN; 1891 Caucasian individuals from 606 pedigrees) study. The polymorphisms that showed replication were further evaluated in 389 subjects from the US National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT) and 472 controls from the Normative Aging Study (NAS) and then in a fourth cohort of 949 individuals from 127 extended pedigrees from the Boston Early-Onset COPD population. Logistic regression models with adjustments of covariates were used to analyze the case-control populations. Family-based association analyses were conducted for a diagnosis of COPD and lung function in the family populations. Two SNPs at the α-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (CHRNA 3/5) locus were identified in the genome-wide association study. They showed unambiguous replication in the ICGN family-based analysis and in the NETT case-control analysis with combined p-values of 1.48×10−10, (rs8034191) and 5.74×10−10 (rs1051730). Furthermore, these SNPs were significantly associated with lung function in both the ICGN and Boston Early-Onset COPD populations. The C allele of the rs8034191 SNP was estimated to have a population attributable risk for COPD of 12.2%. The association of hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) locus on chromosome 4 was also consistently replicated, but did not reach genome-wide significance levels. Genome-wide significant association of the HHIP locus with lung function was identified in the Framingham Heart study (Wilk et al., companion article in this issue of PLoS Genetics; doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1000429). The CHRNA 3/5 and the HHIP loci make a significant contribution to the risk of COPD. CHRNA3/5 is the same locus that has been implicated in the risk of lung cancer.
Author Summary
There is considerable variability in the susceptibility of smokers to develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which is a heritable multi-factorial trait. Identifying the genetic determinants of COPD risk will have tremendous public health importance. This study describes the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) in COPD. We conducted a GWAS in a homogenous case-control cohort from Norway and evaluated the top 100 single nucleotide polymorphisms in the family-based International COPD Genetics Network. The polymorphisms that showed replication were further evaluated in subjects from the US National Emphysema Treatment Trial and controls from the Normative Aging Study and then in a fourth cohort of extended pedigrees from the Boston Early-Onset COPD population. Two polymorphisms in the α-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor 3/5 locus on chromosome 15 showed unambiguous evidence of association with COPD. This locus has previously been implicated in both smoking behavior and risk of lung cancer, suggesting the possibility of multiple functional polymorphisms in the region or a single polymorphism with wide phenotypic consequences. The hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) locus on chromosome 4, which is associated with COPD, is also a significant risk locus for COPD.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1000421
PMCID: PMC2650282  PMID: 19300482
4.  A genome-wide association study of COPD identifies a susceptibility locus on chromosome 19q13 
Human Molecular Genetics  2011;21(4):947-957.
The genetic risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are still largely unknown. To date, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of limited size have identified several novel risk loci for COPD at CHRNA3/CHRNA5/IREB2, HHIP and FAM13A; additional loci may be identified through larger studies. We performed a GWAS using a total of 3499 cases and 1922 control subjects from four cohorts: the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE); the Normative Aging Study (NAS) and National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT); Bergen, Norway (GenKOLS); and the COPDGene study. Genotyping was performed on Illumina platforms with additional markers imputed using 1000 Genomes data; results were summarized using fixed-effect meta-analysis. We identified a new genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 19q13 (rs7937, OR = 0.74, P = 2.9 × 10−9). Genotyping this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and another nearby SNP in linkage disequilibrium (rs2604894) in 2859 subjects from the family-based International COPD Genetics Network study (ICGN) demonstrated supportive evidence for association for COPD (P = 0.28 and 0.11 for rs7937 and rs2604894), pre-bronchodilator FEV1 (P = 0.08 and 0.04) and severe (GOLD 3&4) COPD (P = 0.09 and 0.017). This region includes RAB4B, EGLN2, MIA and CYP2A6, and has previously been identified in association with cigarette smoking behavior.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddr524
PMCID: PMC3298111  PMID: 22080838
5.  Body Composition in Severe Refractory Asthma: Comparison with COPD Patients and Healthy Smokers 
PLoS ONE  2010;5(10):e13233.
Background
Body composition is an important parameter for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) whereas the association between asthma and obesity is not fully understood. The impact of severe refractory asthma (SRA) on fat free mass (FFM) has not been investigated.
Methodology and Principal Findings
213 subjects (70 healthy smokers, 71 COPD patients and 72 asthma patients) without significant comorbidities were included in the study. In all patients, body composition assessment (using bioelectrical impendance analysis, skinfold and anthropometric measurements) and spirometry were performed. Differences in fat free mass index (FFMI) between groups were assessed and determinants of FFMI in asthma were evaluated. Patients with SRA had lower values of FFMI compared to patients with mild-to-moderate asthma [18.0(17.3–18.3)–19.5(18.4–21.5), p<0.001], despite the fact that they were more obese. The levels of FFMI in SRA were lower than those of GOLD stage I–III COPD and comparable to those of stage IV COPD patients [18.0(17.3–18.3)–18.8(17.8–20.1), p = ns]. These differences were present even after proper adjustments for sex, age, smoking status, daily dose of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and daily use of oral corticosteroids (OCS). In multivariate analysis, independent predictors of FFMI in asthmatic patients were age, use of OCS and the presence of SRA, but not smoking, sex or cumulative dose of ICS used.
Conclusions and Significance
SRA is related to the presence of low FFMI that is comparable to that of GOLD stage IV COPD. The impact of this observation on asthma mechanisms and outcomes should be further investigated in large prospective studies.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0013233
PMCID: PMC2950851  PMID: 20949085
6.  Genome-wide mRNA expression profiling in vastus lateralis of COPD patients with low and normal fat free mass index and healthy controls 
Respiratory Research  2015;16(1):1.
Background
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) has significant systemic effects beyond the lungs amongst which muscle wasting is a prominent contributor to exercise limitation and an independent predictor of morbidity and mortality. The molecular mechanisms leading to skeletal muscle dysfunction/wasting are not fully understood and are likely to be multi-factorial. The need to develop therapeutic strategies aimed at improving skeletal muscle dysfunction/wasting requires a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for these abnormalities. Microarrays are powerful tools that allow the investigation of the expression of thousands of genes, virtually the whole genome, simultaneously. We aim at identifying genes and molecular pathways involved in skeletal muscle wasting in COPD.
Methods
We assessed and compared the vastus lateralis transcriptome of COPD patients with low fat free mass index (FFMI) as a surrogate of muscle mass (COPDL) (FEV1 30 ± 3.6%pred, FFMI 15 ± 0.2 Kg.m−2) with patients with COPD and normal FFMI (COPDN) (FEV1 44 ± 5.8%pred, FFMI 19 ± 0.5 Kg.m−2) and a group of age and sex matched healthy controls (C) (FEV1 95 ± 3.9%pred, FFMI 20 ± 0.8 Kg.m−2) using Agilent Human Whole Genome 4x44K microarrays. The altered expression of several of these genes was confirmed by real time TaqMan PCR. Protein levels of P21 were assessed by immunoblotting.
Results
A subset of 42 genes was differentially expressed in COPDL in comparison to both COPDN and C (PFP < 0.05; −1.5 ≥ FC ≥ 1.5). The altered expression of several of these genes was confirmed by real time TaqMan PCR and correlated with different functional and structural muscle parameters. Five of these genes (CDKN1A, GADD45A, PMP22, BEX2, CGREF1, CYR61), were associated with cell cycle arrest and growth regulation and had been previously identified in studies relating muscle wasting and ageing. Protein levels of CDKN1A, a recognized marker of premature ageing/cell cycle arrest, were also found to be increased in COPDL.
Conclusions
This study provides evidence of differentially expressed genes in peripheral muscle in COPD patients corresponding to relevant biological processes associated with skeletal muscle wasting and provides potential targets for future therapeutic interventions to prevent loss of muscle function and mass in COPD.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12931-014-0139-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/s12931-014-0139-5
PMCID: PMC4333166  PMID: 25567521
COPD; Skeletal Muscle Dysfunction; Skeletal muscle wasting; Gene expression; Ageing
7.  TNF-α is associated with loss of lean body mass only in already cachectic COPD patients 
Respiratory Research  2012;13(1):48.
Background
Systemic inflammation may contribute to cachexia in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In this longitudinal study we assessed the association between circulating C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1ß, and IL-6 levels and subsequent loss of fat free mass and fat mass in more than 400 COPD patients over three years.
Methods
The patients, aged 40–76, GOLD stage II-IV, were enrolled in 2006/07, and followed annually. Fat free mass and fat mass indexes (FFMI & FMI) were calculated using bioelectrical impedance, and CRP, TNF-α, IL-1ß, and IL-6 were measured using enzyme immunoassays. Associations with mean change in FFMI and FMI of the four inflammatory plasma markers, sex, age, smoking, FEV1, inhaled steroids, arterial hypoxemia, and Charlson comorbidity score were analyzed with linear mixed models.
Results
At baseline, only CRP was significantly (but weakly) associated with FFMI (r = 0.18, p < 0.01) and FMI (r = 0.27, p < 0.01). Univariately, higher age, lower FEV1, and use of beta2-agonists were the only significant predictors of decline in FFMI, whereas smoking, hypoxemia, Charlson score, and use of inhaled steroids predicted increased loss in FMI. Multivariately, high levels of TNF-α (but not CRP, IL-1ß or IL-6) significantly predicted loss of FFMI, however only in patients with established cachexia at entry.
Conclusion
This study does not support the hypothesis that systemic inflammation is the cause of accelerated loss of fat free mass in COPD patients, but suggests a role for TNF-α in already cachectic COPD patients.
doi:10.1186/1465-9921-13-48
PMCID: PMC3487870  PMID: 22708547
Inflammation; TNF-α; COPD; Cachexia
8.  Polymorphisms in Surfactant Protein–D Are Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease 
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by alveolar destruction and abnormal inflammatory responses to noxious stimuli. Surfactant protein–D (SFTPD) is immunomodulatory and essential to host defense. We hypothesized that polymorphisms in SFTPD could influence the susceptibility to COPD. We genotyped six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in surfactant protein D in 389 patients with COPD in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT) and 472 smoking control subjects from the Normative Aging Study (NAS). Case-control association analysis was performed using Cochran–Armitage trend tests and multivariate logistic regression. The replication of significant associations was attempted in the Boston Early-Onset COPD Study, the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE) Study, and the Bergen Cohort. We also correlated SFTPD genotypes with serum concentrations of surfactant protein–D (SP-D) in the ECLIPSE Study. In the NETT–NAS case-control analysis, four SFTPD SNPs were associated with susceptibility to COPD: rs2245121 (P = 0.01), rs911887 (P = 0.006), rs6413520 (P = 0.004), and rs721917 (P = 0.006). In the family-based analysis of the Boston Early-Onset COPD Study, rs911887 was associated with prebronchodilator and postbronchodilator FEV1 (P = 0.003 and P = 0.02, respectively). An intronic SNP in SFTPD, rs7078012, was associated with COPD in the ECLIPSE Study and the Bergen Cohort. Multiple SFTPD SNPs were associated with serum SP-D concentrations in the ECLIPSE Study. We demonstrated an association of polymorphisms in SFTPD with COPD in multiple populations. We demonstrated a correlation between SFTPD SNPs and SP-D protein concentrations. The SNPs associated with COPD and SP-D concentrations differed, suggesting distinct genetic influences on susceptibility to COPD and SP-D concentrations.
doi:10.1165/rcmb.2009-0360OC
PMCID: PMC3095932  PMID: 20448057
COPD; surfactant protein–D; single-nucleotide polymorphisms; genetics
9.  DNAH5 is associated with total lung capacity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease 
Respiratory Research  2014;15(1):97.
Background
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by expiratory flow limitation, causing air trapping and lung hyperinflation. Hyperinflation leads to reduced exercise tolerance and poor quality of life in COPD patients. Total lung capacity (TLC) is an indicator of hyperinflation particularly in subjects with moderate-to-severe airflow obstruction. The aim of our study was to identify genetic variants associated with TLC in COPD.
Methods
We performed genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in white subjects from three cohorts: the COPDGene Study; the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE); and GenKOLS (Bergen, Norway). All subjects were current or ex-smokers with at least moderate airflow obstruction, defined by a ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) <0.7 and FEV1 < 80% predicted on post-bronchodilator spirometry. TLC was calculated by using volumetric computed tomography scans at full inspiration (TLCCT). Genotyping in each cohort was completed, with statistical imputation of additional markers. To find genetic variants associated with TLCCT, linear regression models were used, with adjustment for age, sex, pack-years of smoking, height, and principal components for genetic ancestry. Results were summarized using fixed-effect meta-analysis.
Results
Analysis of a total of 4,543 COPD subjects identified one genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 5p15.2 (rs114929486, β = 0.42L, P = 4.66 × 10−8).
Conclusions
In COPD, TLCCT was associated with a SNP in dynein, axonemal, heavy chain 5 (DNAH5), a gene in which genetic variants can cause primary ciliary dyskinesia. DNAH5 could have an effect on hyperinflation in COPD.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12931-014-0097-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/s12931-014-0097-y
PMCID: PMC4169636  PMID: 25134640
Pulmonary disease; Chronic obstructive; Hyperinflation; Genome-wide association analysis; Total lung capacity; DNAH5
10.  Resting energy expenditure and carbohydrate oxidation are higher in elderly patients with COPD: a case control study 
Nutrition Journal  2012;11:37.
Background
Elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) usually have a compromised nutritional status which is an independent predictor of morbidity and mortality. To know the Resting Energy Expenditure (REE) and the substrate oxidation measurement is essential to prevent these complications. This study aimed to compare the REE, respiratory quotient (RQ) and body composition between patients with and without COPD.
Methods
This case–control study assessed 20 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease attending a pulmonary rehabilitation program. The group of subjects without COPD (control group) consisted of 20 elderly patients attending a university gym, patients of a private service and a public healthy care. Consumption of oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) was determined by indirect calorimetry and used for calculating the resting energy expenditure and respiratory quotient. Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) were also measured. Percentage of body fat (%BF), lean mass (kg) and muscle mass (kg) were determined by bioimpedance. The fat free mass index (FFMI) and muscle mass index (MMI) were then calculated.
Results
The COPD group had lower BMI than control (p = 0.02). However, WC, % BF, FFMI and MM-I did not differ between the groups. The COPD group had greater RQ (p = 0.01), REE (p = 0.009) and carbohydrate oxidation (p = 0.002).
Conclusions
Elderly patients with COPD had higher REE, RQ and carbohydrate oxidation than controls.
doi:10.1186/1475-2891-11-37
PMCID: PMC3502439  PMID: 22672689
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; Resting energy expenditure; Elderly; Carbohydrate oxidation
11.  Loci Identified by Genome-wide Association Studies Influence Different Disease-related Phenotypes in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease 
Rationale: Genome-wide association studies have shown significant associations between variants near hedgehog interacting protein HHIP, FAM13A, and cholinergic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor CHRNA3/5 with increased risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in smokers; however, the disease mechanisms behind these associations are not well understood.
Objectives: To identify the association between replicated loci and COPD-related phenotypes in well-characterized patient populations.
Methods: The relationship between these three loci and COPD-related phenotypes was assessed in the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate End-point (ECLIPSE) cohort. The results were validated in the family-based International COPD Genetics Network (ICGN).
Measurements and Main Results: The CHRNA3/5 locus was significantly associated with pack-years of smoking (P = 0.002 and 3 × 10−4), emphysema assessed by a radiologist using high-resolution computed tomography (P = 2 × 10−4 and 4.8 × 10−5), and airflow obstruction (P = 0.004 and 1.8 × 10−5) in the ECLIPSE and ICGN populations, respectively. However, variants in the IREB2 gene were only significantly associated with FEV1. The HHIP locus was not associated with smoking intensity but was associated with FEV1/FVC (P = 1.9 × 10−4 and 0.004 in the ECLIPSE and ICGN populations). The HHIP locus was also associated with fat-free body mass (P = 0.007) and with both retrospectively (P = 0.015) and prospectively (P = 0.024) collected COPD exacerbations in the ECLIPSE cohort. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the FAM13A locus were associated with lung function.
Conclusions: The CHRNA3/5 locus was associated with increased smoking intensity and emphysema in individuals with COPD, whereas the HHIP and FAM13A loci were not associated with smoking intensity. The HHIP locus was associated with the systemic components of COPD and with the frequency of COPD exacerbations. FAM13A locus was associated with lung function.
doi:10.1164/rccm.201002-0151OC
PMCID: PMC3029936  PMID: 20656943
COPD exacerbations; nicotine addiction; high-resolution CT; genetic association analysis; emphysema
12.  Nutritional Status is Related to Fat-Free Mass, Exercise Capacity and Inspiratory Strength in Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients 
Clinics  2010;65(6):599-605.
INTRODUCTION:
Being overweight or obese is associated with a higher rate of survival in patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This paradoxical relationship indicates that the influence of nutritional status on functional parameters should be further investigated.
OBJECTIVE:
To investigate the impact of nutritional status on body composition, exercise capacity and respiratory muscle strength in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.
METHODS:
Thirty-two patients (nine women) were divided into three groups according to their body mass indices (BMI): overweight/obese (25 ≤ BMI ≤ 34.9 kg/m2, n=8), normal weight (18.5 ≤ BMI ≤ 24.9 kg/m2, n=17) and underweight (BMI <18.5 kg/m2, n=7). Spirometry, bioelectrical impedance, a six-minute walking distance test and maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures were assessed.
RESULTS:
Airway obstruction was similar among the groups (p=0.30); however, overweight/obese patients had a higher fat-free mass (FFM) index [FFMI=FFM/body weight2 (mean±SEM: 17±0.3 vs. 15±0.3 vs. 14±0.5 m/kg2, p<0.01)], exercise capacity (90±8 vs. 79±6 vs. 57±8 m, p=0.02) and maximal inspiratory pressure (63±7 vs. 57±5 vs. 35±8 % predicted, p=0.03) in comparison to normal weight and underweight patients, respectively. In addition, on backward multiple regression analysis, FFMI was the unique independent predictor of exercise capacity (partial r=0.52, p<0.01).
CONCLUSIONS:
Severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients who were overweight or obese had a greater FFM, exercise capacity and inspiratory muscle strength than patients with the same degree of airflow obstruction who were of normal weight or underweight, and higher FFM was independently associated with higher exercise capacity. These characteristics of overweight or obese patients might counteract the drawbacks of excess weight and lead to an improved prognosis in COPD.
doi:10.1590/S1807-59322010000600007
PMCID: PMC2898542  PMID: 20613936
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; Body mass index; Body composition; fitness; Respiratory muscle strength
13.  The Association of Genome-Wide Significant Spirometric Loci with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Susceptibility 
Two recent metaanalyses of genome-wide association studies conducted by the CHARGE and SpiroMeta consortia identified novel loci yielding evidence of association at or near genome-wide significance (GWS) with FEV1 and FEV1/FVC. We hypothesized that a subset of these markers would also be associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) susceptibility. Thirty-two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in or near 17 genes in 11 previously identified GWS spirometric genomic regions were tested for association with COPD status in four COPD case-control study samples (NETT/NAS, the Norway case-control study, ECLIPSE, and the first 1,000 subjects in COPDGene; total sample size, 3,456 cases and 1,906 controls). In addition to testing the 32 spirometric GWS SNPs, we tested a dense panel of imputed HapMap2 SNP markers from the 17 genes located near the 32 GWS SNPs and in a set of 21 well studied COPD candidate genes. Of the previously identified GWS spirometric genomic regions, three loci harbored SNPs associated with COPD susceptibility at a 5% false discovery rate: the 4q24 locus including FLJ20184/INTS12/GSTCD/NPNT, the 6p21 locus including AGER and PPT2, and the 5q33 locus including ADAM19. In conclusion, markers previously associated at or near GWS with spirometric measures were tested for association with COPD status in data from four COPD case-control studies, and three loci showed evidence of association with COPD susceptibility at a 5% false discovery rate.
doi:10.1165/rcmb.2011-0055OC
PMCID: PMC3262664  PMID: 21659657
14.  Genetic susceptibility for chronic bronchitis in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease 
Respiratory Research  2014;15(1):113.
Background
Chronic bronchitis (CB) is one of the classic phenotypes of COPD. The aims of our study were to investigate genetic variants associated with COPD subjects with CB relative to smokers with normal spirometry, and to assess for genetic differences between subjects with CB and without CB within the COPD population.
Methods
We analyzed data from current and former smokers from three cohorts: the COPDGene Study; GenKOLS (Bergen, Norway); and the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE). CB was defined as having a cough productive of phlegm on most days for at least 3 consecutive months per year for at least 2 consecutive years. CB COPD cases were defined as having both CB and at least moderate COPD based on spirometry. Our primary analysis used smokers with normal spirometry as controls; secondary analysis was performed using COPD subjects without CB as controls. Genotyping was performed on Illumina platforms; results were summarized using fixed-effect meta-analysis.
Results
For CB COPD relative to smoking controls, we identified a new genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 11p15.5 (rs34391416, OR = 1.93, P = 4.99 × 10-8) as well as significant associations of known COPD SNPs within FAM13A. In addition, a GWAS of CB relative to those without CB within COPD subjects showed suggestive evidence for association on 1q23.3 (rs114931935, OR = 1.88, P = 4.99 × 10-7).
Conclusions
We found genome-wide significant associations with CB COPD on 4q22.1 (FAM13A) and 11p15.5 (EFCAB4A, CHID1 and AP2A2), and a locus associated with CB within COPD subjects on 1q23.3 (RPL31P11 and ATF6). This study provides further evidence that genetic variants may contribute to phenotypic heterogeneity of COPD.
Trial registration
ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00608764, NCT00292552
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12931-014-0113-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/s12931-014-0113-2
PMCID: PMC4190389  PMID: 25241909
Pulmonary disease; Chronic obstructive; Chronic bronchitis; Genome-wide association study
15.  Predictors' Factors of Nutritional Status of Male Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients 
ISRN Nursing  2012;2012:782626.
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a systemic disease that leads to weight loss and muscle dysfunction resulting in an increase in mortality. This study aimed to determine the prevalence rate of malnutrition and nutritional status and also factors associated with nutritional status. A total of 149 subjects were involved in the cross-sectional study. The study was conducted at two medical centers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The results of the study showed that malnutrition was more prevalent (52.4%) in the subjects with severe stages of COPD as compared to mild and moderate COPD stages (26.2%) (P < 0.05). Fat-free mass depletion as assessed using fat-free mass index (FFMI) affected 41.9% of the subjects. Plasma vitamin A, peak expiratory flow (PEF), and handgrip were the predictors for body mass index (BMI) (R2 = 0.190, P < 0.001). Plasma vitamin A and force expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) were the predictors of FFMI (R2 = 0.082, P = 0.007). BMI was the predictor of respiratory factors, that is, FEV1% predicted (R2 = 0.052, P = 0.011). It can be concluded that there is a need to identify malnourished COPD patients for an appropriate nutrition intervention.
doi:10.5402/2012/782626
PMCID: PMC3504379  PMID: 23209935
16.  Non-emphysematous chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is associated with diabetes mellitus 
BMC Pulmonary Medicine  2014;14(1):164.
Background
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been classically divided into blue bloaters and pink puffers. The utility of these clinical subtypes is unclear. However, the broader distinction between airway-predominant and emphysema-predominant COPD may be clinically relevant. The objective was to define clinical features of emphysema-predominant and non-emphysematous COPD patients.
Methods
Current and former smokers from the Genetic Epidemiology of COPD Study (COPDGene) had chest computed tomography (CT) scans with quantitative image analysis. Emphysema-predominant COPD was defined by low attenuation area at -950 Hounsfield Units (LAA-950) ≥10%. Non-emphysematous COPD was defined by airflow obstruction with minimal to no emphysema (LAA-950 < 5%).
Results
Out of 4197 COPD subjects, 1687 were classified as emphysema-predominant and 1817 as non-emphysematous; 693 had LAA-950 between 5–10% and were not categorized. Subjects with emphysema-predominant COPD were older (65.6 vs 60.6 years, p < 0.0001) with more severe COPD based on airflow obstruction (FEV1 44.5 vs 68.4%, p < 0.0001), greater exercise limitation (6-minute walk distance 1138 vs 1331 ft, p < 0.0001) and reduced quality of life (St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire score 43 vs 31, p < 0.0001). Self-reported diabetes was more frequent in non-emphysematous COPD (OR 2.13, p < 0.001), which was also confirmed using a strict definition of diabetes based on medication use. The association between diabetes and non-emphysematous COPD was replicated in the ECLIPSE study.
Conclusions
Non-emphysematous COPD, defined by airflow obstruction with a paucity of emphysema on chest CT scan, is associated with an increased risk of diabetes. COPD patients without emphysema may warrant closer monitoring for diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia and vice versa.
Trial registration
Clinicaltrials.gov identifiers: COPDGene NCT00608764, ECLIPSE NCT00292552.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/1471-2466-14-164) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/1471-2466-14-164
PMCID: PMC4216374  PMID: 25341556
Airway disease; CT scan; Diabetes mellitus; Emphysema; Spirometry
17.  MuRF-1 and Atrogin-1 Protein Expression and Quadriceps Fiber Size and Muscle Mass in Stable Patients with COPD 
COPD  2013;10(5):618-624.
Introduction
Animal studies demonstrate the importance of the E3 ubiquitin ligases, Muscle RING-Finger Protein 1 (MuRF-1) and atrogin-1, in muscle protein degradation during acute muscle atrophy. Small clinical studies suggest MuRF-1 and atrogin-1 expression in the quadriceps muscle is also increased in stable patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease compared to controls. However, it remains unclear whether these ligases have a role in maintaining a muscle-wasted state in COPD patients.
Methods
32 stable COPD patients (16 with a low fat-free mass index (FFMI), 16 with a normal FFMI) and 15 controls underwent lung function and quadriceps strength tests and a percutaneous quadriceps biopsy. Quadriceps MuRF-1 and atrogin-1 protein were quantified with western blotting. Quadriceps fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) and fiber proportions were determined by immunohistochemistry on muscle sections. MuRF-1 and atrogin-1 levels were compared between COPD patients with and without a low FFMI, and between patients and controls, and correlations between MuRF-1 and atrogin-1 levels and quadriceps fiber CSA in the patients were investigated.
Results
Atrogin-1 protein levels were lower in patients than controls, but similar in patients with a low and normal FFMI. MuRF-1 levels did not differ between any groups. MuRF-1 and atrogin-1 levels were not associated with quadriceps fiber CSA or quadriceps strength in patients.
Conclusions
Chronic upregulation of ubiquitin ligases was not evident in the quadriceps muscle of stable COPD patients with a low muscle mass. This does not exclude the possibility of transient increases in ubiquitin ligases during acute catabolic episodes.
doi:10.3109/15412555.2013.781577
PMCID: PMC4002632  PMID: 23844868
muscle atrophy; muscle protein breakdown; ubiquitin ligases
18.  Quantitative CT: Associations between Emphysema, Airway Wall Thickness and Body Composition in COPD 
Pulmonary Medicine  2011;2011:419328.
The objective of the present study was to determine the association between CT phenotypes—emphysema by low attenuation area and bronchitis by airway wall thickness—and body composition parameters in a large cohort of subjects with and without COPD. In 452 COPD subjects and 459 subjects without COPD, CT scans were performed to determine emphysema (%LAA), airway wall thickness (AWT-Pi10), and lung mass. Muscle wasting based on FFMI was assessed by bioelectrical impedance. In both the men and women with COPD, FFMI was negatively associated with %LAA. FMI was positively associated with AWT-Pi10 in both subjects with and without COPD. Among the subjects with muscle wasting, the percentage emphysema was high, but the predictive value was moderate. In conclusion, the present study strengthens the hypothesis that the subgroup of COPD cases with muscle wasting have emphysema. Airway wall thickness is positively associated with fat mass index in both subjects with and without COPD.
doi:10.1155/2011/419328
PMCID: PMC3100107  PMID: 21647214
19.  Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Gene Expression in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease 
Although most cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) occur in smokers, only a fraction of smokers develop the disease. We hypothesized distinct molecular signatures for COPD and emphysema in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of current and former smokers. To test this hypothesis, we identified and validated PBMC gene expression profiles in smokers with and without COPD. We generated expression data on 136 subjects from the COPDGene study, using Affymetrix U133 2.0 microarrays (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA). Multiple linear regression with adjustment for covariates (gender, age, body mass index, family history, smoking status, and pack-years) was used to identify candidate genes, and ingenuity pathway analysis was used to identify candidate pathways. Candidate genes were validated in 149 subjects according to multiplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, which included 75 subjects not previously profiled. Pathways that were differentially expressed in subjects with COPD and emphysema included those that play a role in the immune system, inflammatory responses, and sphingolipid (ceramide) metabolism. Twenty-six of the 46 candidate genes (e.g., FOXP1, TCF7, and ASAH1) were validated in the independent cohort. Plasma metabolomics was used to identify a novel glycoceramide (galabiosylceramide) as a biomarker of emphysema, supporting the genomic association between acid ceramidase (ASAH1) and emphysema. COPD is a systemic disease whose gene expression signatures in PBMCs could serve as novel diagnostic or therapeutic targets.
doi:10.1165/rcmb.2012-0230OC
PMCID: PMC3824029  PMID: 23590301
airflow obstruction; chronic; microarray analysis; leukocytes; mononuclear
20.  The association of plasma biomarkers with computed tomography-assessed emphysema phenotypes 
Respiratory Research  2014;15(1):127.
Rationale
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a phenotypically heterogeneous disease. In COPD, the presence of emphysema is associated with increased mortality and risk of lung cancer. High resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scans are useful in quantifying emphysema but are associated with radiation exposure and high incidence of false positive findings (i.e., nodules). Using a comprehensive biomarker panel, we sought to determine if there was a peripheral blood biomarker signature of emphysema.
Methods
114 plasma biomarkers were measured using a custom assay in 588 individuals enrolled in the COPDGene study. Quantitative emphysema measurements included percent low lung attenuation (%LAA) ≤ −950 HU, ≤ − 910 HU and mean lung attenuation at the 15th percentile on lung attenuation curve (LP15A). Multiple regression analysis was performed to determine plasma biomarkers associated with emphysema independent of covariates age, gender, smoking status, body mass index and FEV1. The findings were subsequently validated using baseline blood samples from a separate cohort of 388 subjects enrolled in the Treatment of Emphysema with a Selective Retinoid Agonist (TESRA) study.
Results
Regression analysis identified multiple biomarkers associated with CT-assessed emphysema in COPDGene, including advanced glycosylation end-products receptor (AGER or RAGE, p < 0.001), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM, p < 0.001), and chemokine ligand 20 (CCL20, p < 0.001). Validation in the TESRA cohort revealed significant associations with RAGE, ICAM1, and CCL20 with radiologic emphysema (p < 0.001 after meta-analysis). Other biomarkers that were associated with emphysema include CDH1, CDH 13 and SERPINA7, but were not available for validation in the TESRA study. Receiver operating characteristics analysis demonstrated a benefit of adding a biomarker panel to clinical covariates for detecting emphysema, especially in those without severe airflow limitation (AUC 0.85).
Conclusions
Our findings, suggest that a panel of blood biomarkers including sRAGE, ICAM1 and CCL20 may serve as a useful surrogate measure of emphysema, and when combined with clinical covariates, may be useful clinically in predicting the presence of emphysema compared to just using covariates alone, especially in those with less severe COPD. Ultimately biomarkers may shed light on disease pathogenesis, providing targets for new treatments.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12931-014-0127-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/s12931-014-0127-9
PMCID: PMC4198701  PMID: 25306249
COPD; Biomarkers; RAGE; ICAM1; CCL20; Emphysema
21.  Systemic and pulmonary inflammation is independent of skeletal muscle changes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease 
Background
Nutritional depletion is an important manifestation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which has been related to systemic inflammation. It remains unclear to what degree airway inflammation contributes to the presence or progression of nutritional depletion.
Objectives
To determine whether airway inflammation and lung bacterial colonization are related to nutritional status or predict progressive weight loss and muscle atrophy in patients with COPD.
Methods
Body composition using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, indices of airway inflammation, and bacterial colonization were measured in 234 COPD patients. Systemic inflammation was assessed from serum C reactive protein (CRP) and circulating total and differential leukocyte counts. Nutritional depletion was defined as a body mass index (BMI) less than 21 kg/m2 and/or fat-free mass index (FFMI) less than 15 or 17 kg/m2 in women and men, respectively. FFMI was calculated as the fat-free mass (FFM) corrected for body surface area. Measurements were repeated in 94 patients after a median 16-month follow-up. Regression analysis was used to assess the relationships of weight change and FFM change with indices of bacterial colonization and airway and systemic inflammation.
Results
Nutritional depletion occurred in 37% of patients. Lung function was worsened in patients with nutritional depletion compared to those without (forced expiratory volume in 1 second 1.17 L versus 1.41 L, mean difference 0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.10 to 0.38, P<0.01). There were no differences in airway inflammation and bacterial colonization in patients with and without nutritional depletion. At baseline, BMI correlated positively with serum CRP (rs=0.14, P=0.04). Change in weight and change in FFM over time could not be predicted from baseline patient characteristics.
Conclusion
Nutritional depletion and progressive muscle atrophy are not related to airway inflammation or bacterial colonization. Overspill of pulmonary inflammation is not a key driver of muscle atrophy in COPD.
doi:10.2147/COPD.S63568
PMCID: PMC4168852  PMID: 25246784
muscle atrophy; fat-free mass; dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA); airway inflammation; bacteria
22.  The Effect of Body Composition on Pulmonary Function 
Background
The pulmonary function test is the most basic test method to diagnosis lung disease. The purpose of this study was to research the correlation of the body mass index (BMI), the fat percentage of the body mass (fat%), the muscle mass, the fat-free mass (FFM) and the fat-free mass index (FFMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR), on the forced expiratory volume curve.
Methods
Between March and April 2009, a total of 291 subjects were enrolled. There were 152 men and 139 female (mean age, 46.3±9.92 years), and they were measured for the following: forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume at 1 second (FEV1), and forced expiratory flow during the middle half of the FVC (FEF25-75) from the forced expiratory volume curve by the spirometry, and the body composition by the bioelectrical impedance method. Correlation and a multiple linear regression, between the body composition and pulmonary function, were used.
Results
BMI and fat% had no correlation with FVC, FEV1 in male, but FFMI showed a positive correlation. In contrast, BMI and fat% had correlation with FVC, FEV1 in female, but FFMI showed no correlation. Both male and female, FVC and FEV1 had a negative correlation with WHR (male, FVC r=-0.327, FEV1 r=-0.36; p<0.05; female, FVC r=-0.175, FEV1 r=-0.213; p<0.05). In a multiple linear regression of considering the body composition of the total group, FVC explained FFM, BMI, and FFMI in order (r2=0.579, 0.657, 0.663). FEV1 was explained only fat% (r2=0.011), and FEF25-75 was explained muscle mass, FFMI, FFM (r2=0.126, 0.138, 0.148).
Conclusion
The BMI, fat%, muscle mass, FFM, FFMI, WHR have significant association with pulmonary function but r2 (adjusted coefficient of determination) were not high enough for explaining lung function.
doi:10.4046/trd.2012.72.5.433
PMCID: PMC3475466  PMID: 23101008
Pulmonary Function Tests; Body Compostion; Factor Analysis, Statistical
23.  Comprehensive out-patient pulmonary rehabilitation: Treatment outcomes in early and late stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease 
Annals of Thoracic Medicine  2011;6(2):70-76.
BACKGROUND:
The aim was to evaluate the outcomes of a comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to establish whether in early disease stage PR is as effective as in late stages of disease.
METHODS:
A total of 55 stable COPD patients, 28 with early and 27 with late disease stages, were assessed. Patients underwent a comprehensive out-patient PR program for 8 weeks. To eluciate the effects of PR and compare the level of improvement; lung function, dyspnea sensation [Medical Research Council (MRC)], body composition [body mass index (BMI), fat free mass (FFM), fat free mass index (FFMI)], exercise capacity [incremental shuttle walking test, endurance shuttle walking test], health related quality of life (HRQoL) with St. George Respiratory Disease Questionnaire, psycohological status (Hospital anxiety–depression (HAD) scale) were evaluated before and after PR.
RESULTS:
At the end of PR in the early disease stage group, the improvement in forced vital capacity (FVC) reached a statistically significant level (P < 0.05). In both disease stages, there were no significant differences in BMI, FFM, and FFMI. The decrease in exertional dyspnea for the two groups evaluated with the modified BORG scale were not found statistically significant, though the dyspnea scores evaluated with MRC showed significant improvements (P < 0.001). HRQoL and exercise capacity were significantly improved for the two groups (P < 0.001). Psychological status evaluated with the HAD scale improved after PR (P < 0.001) both in early and late stages. Gainings in the study parameters did not differ in the early and the late disease stages.
CONCLUSIONS:
These results showed that patients with COPD had benefited from a comprehensive PR program in an out-patient setting regardless of disease severity. Even patients with earlier stage of disease should be referred and encouraged to participate in a PR program.
doi:10.4103/1817-1737.78420
PMCID: PMC3081559  PMID: 21572695
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; disease severity; functional status; pulmonary rehabilitation; shuttle walk test
24.  Clinical and Radiographic Predictors of GOLD–Unclassified Smokers in the COPDGene Study 
Rationale: A significant proportion of smokers have lung function impairment characterized by a reduced FEV1 with a preserved FEV1/FVC ratio. These smokers are a poorly characterized group due to their systematic exclusion from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) studies.
Objectives: To characterize the clinical, functional, and radiographic features of Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD)-Unclassified (FEV1/FVC ≥ 0.7 and FEV1 < 80% predicted) and lower limits of normal (LLN)-unclassified (FEV1/FVC ≥ LLN and FEV1 < LLN) subjects compared to smokers with normal lung function and subjects with COPD.
Methods: Data from the first 2,500 subjects enrolled in the COPDGene study were analyzed. All subjects had 10 or more pack-years of smoking and were between the ages of 45 and 80 years. Multivariate regression models were constructed to determine the clinical and radiological variables associated with GOLD-Unclassified (GOLD-U) and LLN-Unclassified status. Separate multivariate regressions were performed in the subgroups of subjects with complete radiologic measurement variables available.
Measurements and Main Results: GOLD-U smokers account for 9% of smokers in COPDGene and have increased body mass index (BMI), a disproportionately reduced total lung capacity, and a higher proportion of nonwhite subjects and subjects with diabetes. GOLD-U subjects exhibit increased airway wall thickness compared to smoking control subjects and decreased gas trapping and bronchodilator responsiveness compared to subjects with COPD. When LLN criteria were used to define the “unclassified” group, African American subjects were no longer overrepresented. Both GOLD-U and LLN-Unclassified subjects demonstrated a wide range of lung function impairment, BMI, and percentage of total lung emphysema.
Conclusions: Subjects with reduced FEV1 and a preserved FEV1/FVC ratio are a heterogeneous group with significant symptoms and functional limitation who likely have a variety of underlying etiologies beyond increased BMI.
Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT000608764).
doi:10.1164/rccm.201101-0021OC
PMCID: PMC3172890  PMID: 21493737
lung diseases, classification; lung diseases, diagnosis; lung diseases, epidemiology
25.  The Association of Adiponectin with Computed Tomography Phenotypes in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease 
Rationale: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disorder associated with systemic manifestations that contribute to its morbidity and mortality. Recent work suggests that biomarker signatures in the blood may be useful in evaluating COPD phenotypes and may provide insight into the pathophysiology of systemic manifestations. Adiponectin, primarily produced by fat cells, has been implicated in the pathophysiology of emphysema.
Objectives: To investigate the association of adiponectin with clinical and radiologic COPD phenotypes.
Methods: Adiponectin levels were determined in 633 individuals, including 432 individuals with COPD from a cohort of former or current smokers enrolled in the COPDGene study. Univariate and multiple regression analysis were used to examine the association of adiponectin with clinical and physiologic data together with quantitative high-resolution computed tomography parameters.
Measurements and Main Results: Multiple regression analysis confirmed that higher plasma adiponectin levels were independently associated with emphysema, decreasing body mass index, female sex, older age, and lower percentage change in prebronchodilator/post-bronchodilator FEV1.
Conclusions: The association between plasma adiponectin and computed tomography–assessed emphysema suggests a contribution of adiponectin to the development of emphysema and highlights a role for metabolic derangements in the pathophysiology of emphysema.
doi:10.1164/rccm.201212-2299OC
PMCID: PMC3827701  PMID: 23777323
phenotypes; adiponectin; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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