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1.  Pharmacodynamics of Glucose Regulation by Methylprednisolone. II. Normal Rats 
A physiologic pharmacodynamic model was developed to jointly describe the effects of methylprednisolone (MPL) on adrenal suppression and glycemic control in normal rats. Six groups of animals were given MPL intravenously at 0, 10 and 50 mg/kg, or by subcutaneous 7 day infusion at rates of 0, 0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg/h. Plasma concentrations of MPL, corticosterone (CST), glucose and insulin were determined at various times up to 72 h after injection and 336 h after infusion. The pharmacokinetics of MPL was described by a two-compartment model. A circadian rhythm for CST was found in untreated rats with a stress-altered baseline caused by handling, which was captured by a circadian harmonic secretion rate with an increasing mesor. All drug treatments caused CST suppression. Injection of MPL caused temporary increases in glucose over 4 h. Insulin secretion was thereby stimulated yielding a later peak around 6 h. In turn, insulin can normalize glucose. However, long-term dosing caused continuous hyperglycemia during and after infusion. Hyperinsulinemia was achieved during infusion, but diminished immediately after dosing despite the high glucose concentration. The effects of CST and MPL on glucose production were described with a competitive stimulation function. A disease progression model incorporating reduced endogenous glucose uptake/utilization was used to describe glucose metabolism under different treatments. The results exemplify the roles of endogenous and exogenous hormones in mediating glucose dynamics. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model is valuable for quantitating diabetogenic effects of corticosteroid treatments and provides mechanistic insights into the hormonal control of the metabolic system.
doi:10.1002/bdd.642
PMCID: PMC3712293  PMID: 19156669
corticosterone; methylprednisolone; pharmacodynamics; pharmacokinetics; glucose; insulin
2.  Meta-Modeling of Methylprednisolone Effects on Glucose Regulation in Rats 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(12):e81679.
A retrospective meta-modeling analysis was performed to integrate previously reported data of glucocorticoid (GC) effects on glucose regulation following a single intramuscular dose (50 mg/kg), single intravenous doses (10, 50 mg/kg), and intravenous infusions (0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 mg/kg/h) of methylprednisolone (MPL) in normal and adrenalectomized (ADX) male Wistar rats. A mechanistic pharmacodynamic (PD) model was developed based on the receptor/gene/protein-mediated GC effects on glucose regulation. Three major target organs (liver, white adipose tissue and skeletal muscle) together with some selected intermediate controlling factors were designated as important regulators involved in the pathogenesis of GC-induced glucose dysregulation. Assessed were dynamic changes of food intake and systemic factors (plasma glucose, insulin, free fatty acids (FFA) and leptin) and tissue-specific biomarkers (cAMP, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) mRNA and enzyme activity, leptin mRNA, interleukin 6 receptor type 1 (IL6R1) mRNA and Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) mRNA) after acute and chronic dosing with MPL along with the GC receptor (GR) dynamics in each target organ. Upon binding to GR in liver, MPL dosing caused increased glucose production by stimulating hepatic cAMP and PEPCK activity. In adipose tissue, the rise in leptin mRNA and plasma leptin caused reduction of food intake, the exogenous source of glucose input. Down-regulation of IRS-1 mRNA expression in skeletal muscle inhibited the stimulatory effect of insulin on glucose utilization further contributing to hyperglycemia. The nuclear drug-receptor complex served as the driving force for stimulation or inhibition of downstream target gene expression within different tissues. Incorporating information such as receptor dynamics, as well as the gene and protein induction, allowed us to describe the receptor-mediated effects of MPL on glucose regulation in each important tissue. This advanced mechanistic model provides unique insights into the contributions of major tissues and quantitative hypotheses for the multi-factor control of a complex metabolic system.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0081679
PMCID: PMC3847111  PMID: 24312573
3.  Pharmacodynamics of Glucose Regulation by Methylprednisolone. I. Adrenalectomized Rats 
Mechanisms related to the adverse effects of corticosteroids on glucose homeostasis were studied. Five groups of adrenalectomized (ADX) rats were given methylprednisolone (MPL) intravenously at 10 and 50 mg/kg, or a continuous 7 day infusion at rates of 0, 0.1, 0.3 mg/kg/h via subcutaneously implanted Alzet mini-pumps. Plasma concentrations of MPL, glucose and insulin were determined at various time points up to 72 h after injection or 336 h after infusion. The pharmacokinetics of MPL was captured with a two-compartment model. The Adapt II software was used in modeling. Injection of MPL caused a temporary glucose increase over 6 h by stimulating gluconeogenesis. The glucose changes stimulated pancreatic β-cell secretion yielding a later insulin peak at around 10 h. In turn, insulin can stimulate glucose disposition. However, long-term MPL treatment caused continuous hyperglycemia during and after infusion. Insulin was increased during infusion, and immediately returned to baseline after the infusion was terminated, despite the almost doubled glucose concentration. A disease progression model incorporating the reduced endogenous glucose disposition was included to capture glucose homeostasis under different treatments. The results exemplify the importance of the steroid dosing regimen in mediating pharmacological and adverse metabolic effects. This mechanistic pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model quantitatively describes the induction of hyperglycemia and provides additional insights into metabolic disorders such as diabetes.
doi:10.1002/bdd.643
PMCID: PMC3712292  PMID: 19156931
corticosteroids; methylprednisolone; pharmacodynamics; pharmacokinetics; glucose; insulin
4.  Effect of insulin and acute diabetes on plasma FFA and ketone bodies in the fasting rat 
Journal of Clinical Investigation  1970;49(9):1685-1693.
The metabolism of FFA and ketone bodies was studied in fasted rats by infusing at a constant rate tracer amounts of FFA-3H, β-hydroxybutyrate-14C or acetoacetate-14C for periods up to 2 hr. Blood that was removed for analyses was replaced by continuous transfusion. The rates of turnover of FFA, β-hydroxybutyrate, and acetoacetate in rats fasted for 2 days were, respectively, 3.2, 5.6, and 2.5 μmoles/100 g body weight per min.
Infusion of mannoheptulose with anti-insulin serum increased plasma glucose, FFA, and ketone body concentrations and decreased the specific activity of plasma FFA. Injection of insulin (20 mU i.v.) decreased almost simultaneously plasma glucose, FFA, and ketone body concentrations and increased the specific activity of FFA, but it did not affect the plasma concentration of FFA-3H. The findings indicate that insulin deprivation increased and insulin injection decreased the release of FFA from body tissues in fasting rats.
The plasma FFA concentration in fasting rats was increased by infusing chylomicrons and heparin, but this had very little effect on either plasma ketone body or glucose concentrations. Insulin injection (20 mU i.v.) lowered the plasma ketone body concentration in these animals. Studies using β-hydroxybutyrate-14C showed that insulin (50 mU i.v.) decreased ketogenesis in the presence of a sustained high plasma FFA concentration and had no effect on uptake of circulating ketone bodies.
The results indicate that plasma FFA concentration is not the sole determinant of plasma ketone body concentration and that insulin can suppress ketone body production through some means other than lowering plasma FFA concentration.
PMCID: PMC322652  PMID: 5452413
5.  Differential regulation of PGC-1α expression in rat liver and skeletal muscle in response to voluntary running 
Background
The beneficial actions of exercise training on lipid, glucose and energy metabolism and insulin sensitivity appear to be in part mediated by PGC-1α. Previous studies have shown that spontaneously exercised rats show at rest enhanced responsiveness to exogenous insulin, lower plasma insulin levels and increased skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity. This study was initiated to examine the functional interaction between exercise-induced modulation of skeletal muscle and liver PGC-1α protein expression, whole body insulin sensitivity, and circulating FFA levels as a measure of whole body fatty acid (lipid) metabolism.
Methods
Two groups of male Wistar rats (2 Mo of age, 188.82 ± 2.77 g BW) were used in this study. One group consisted of control rats placed in standard laboratory cages. Exercising rats were housed individually in cages equipped with running wheels and allowed to run at their own pace for 5 weeks. At the end of exercise training, insulin sensitivity was evaluated by comparing steady-state plasma glucose (SSPG) concentrations at constant plasma insulin levels attained during the continuous infusion of glucose and insulin to each experimental group. Subsequently, soleus and plantaris muscle and liver samples were collected and quantified for PGC-1α protein expression by Western blotting. Collected blood samples were analyzed for glucose, insulin and FFA concentrations.
Results
Rats housed in the exercise wheel cages demonstrated almost linear increases in running activity with advancing time reaching to maximum value around 4 weeks. On an average, the rats ran a mean (Mean ± SE) of 4.102 ± 0.747 km/day and consumed significantly more food as compared to sedentary controls (P < 0.001) in order to meet their increased caloric requirement. Mean plasma insulin (P < 0.001) and FFA (P < 0.006) concentrations were lower in the exercise-trained rats as compared to sedentary controls. Mean steady state plasma insulin (SSPI) and glucose (SSPG) concentrations were not significantly different in sedentary control rats as compared to exercise-trained animals. Plantaris PGC-1α protein expression increased significantly from a 1.11 ± 0.12 in the sedentary rats to 1.74 ± 0.09 in exercising rats (P < 0.001). However, exercise had no effect on PGC-1α protein content in either soleus muscle or liver tissue. These results indicate that exercise training selectively up regulates the PGC-1α protein expression in high-oxidative fast skeletal muscle type such as plantaris muscle.
Conclusion
These data suggest that PGC-1α most likely plays a restricted role in exercise-mediated improvements in insulin resistance (sensitivity) and lowering of circulating FFA levels.
doi:10.1186/1743-7075-7-36
PMCID: PMC2874794  PMID: 20433743
6.  Fifth-Generation Model for Corticosteroid Pharmacodynamics: Application to Steady-State Receptor Down-Regulation and Enzyme Induction Patterns during Seven-Day Continuous Infusion of Methylprednisolone in Rats 
A fifth-generation model for receptor/gene-mediated corticosteroid effects was proposed based on results from a 50 mg/kg IV bolus dose of methylprednisolone (MPL) in male adrenalectomized rats, and confirmed using data from other acute dosage regimens. Steady-state equations for receptor down-regulation and tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) enzyme induction patterns were derived. Five groups of male Wistar rats (n=5/group) were subcutaneously implanted with Alzet mini-pumps primed to release saline or 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mg/kg/hr of MPL for 7 days. Rats were sacrificed at the end of the infusion. Plasma MPL concentrations, blood lymphocyte counts, and hepatic cytosolic free receptor density, receptor mRNA, TAT mRNA, and TAT enzyme levels were quantitated. The pronounced steroid effects were evidenced by marked losses in body weights and changes in organ weights. All four treatments caused a dose-dependent reduction in hepatic receptor levels, which correlated with the induction of TAT mRNA and TAT enzyme levels. The 7 day receptor mRNA and free receptor density correlated well with the model predicted steady-state levels. However, the extent of enzyme induction was markedly higher than that predicted by the model suggesting that the usual receptor/gene-mediated effects observed upon single/intermittent dosing of MPL may be countered by alterations in other aspects of the system. A mean IC50 of 6.1 ng/mL was estimated for the immunosuppressive effects of methylprednisolone on blood lymphocytes. The extent and duration of steroid exposure play a critical role in mediating steroid effects and advanced PK/PD models provide unique insights into controlling factors.
PMCID: PMC4207287  PMID: 12194533
pharmacodynamics; pharmacogenomics; methylprednisolone; tyrosine amino-transferase
7.  Glucose and free fatty acid metabolism in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Evidence for multiple sites of insulin resistance. 
Journal of Clinical Investigation  1989;84(1):205-213.
The effect of graded, physiologic hyperinsulinemia (+5, +15, +30, +70, +200 microU/ml) on oxidative and nonoxidative pathways of glucose and FFA metabolism was examined in nine lean non-insulin dependent diabetic patients (NIDDM) and in eight age- and weight-matched control subjects. Glucose and FFA metabolism were assessed using stepwise insulin clamp in combination with indirect calorimetry and infusion of [3H]3-glucose/[14C]palmitate. The basal rate of hepatic glucose production (HGP) was higher in NIDDM than in control subjects, and suppression of HGP by insulin was impaired at all but the highest insulin concentration. Glucose disposal was reduced in the NIDD patients at the three highest plasma insulin concentrations, and this was accounted for by defects in both glucose oxidation and nonoxidative glucose metabolism. In NIDDs, suppression of plasma FFA by insulin was impaired at all five insulin steps. This was associated with impaired suppression by insulin of plasma FFA turnover, FFA oxidation (measured by [14C]palmitate) and nonoxidative FFA disposal (an estimate of reesterification of FFA). FFA oxidation and net lipid oxidation (measured by indirect calorimetry) correlated positively with the rate of HGP in the basal state and during the insulin clamp. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that insulin resistance is a general characteristic of glucose and FFA metabolism in NIDDM, and involves both oxidative and nonoxidative pathways. The data also demonstrate that FFA/lipid and glucose metabolism are interrelated in NIDDM, and suggest that an increased rate of FFA/lipid oxidation may contribute to the impaired suppression of HGP and diminished stimulation of glucose oxidation by insulin in these patients.
PMCID: PMC303971  PMID: 2661589
8.  Modeling receptor/gene-mediated effects of corticosteroids on hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase dynamics in rats: dual regulation by endogenous and exogenous corticosteroids 
Receptor/gene-mediated effects of corticosteroids on hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) were evaluated in normal rats. A group of normal male Wistar rats were injected with 50 mg/kg methylprednisolone (MPL) intramuscularly at the nadir of their plasma corticosterone (CST) rhythm (early light cycle) and sacrificed at various time points up to 96 h post-treatment. Blood and livers were collected to measure plasma MPL, CST, hepatic glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA, cytosolic GR density, TAT mRNA, and TAT activity. The pharmacokinetics of MPL showed bi-exponential disposition with two first-order absorption components from the injection site and bioavailability was 21%. Plasma CST was reduced after MPL dosing, but resumed its daily circadian pattern within 36 h. Cytosolic receptor density was significantly suppressed (90%) and returned to baseline by 72 h resuming its biphasic pattern. Hepatic GR mRNA follows a circadian pattern which was disrupted by MPL and did not return during the study. MPL caused significant down-regulation (50%) in GR mRNA which was followed by a delayed rebound phase (60–70 h). Hepatic TAT mRNA and activity showed up-regulation as a consequence of MPL, and returned to their circadian baseline within 72 and 24 h of treatment. A mechanistic receptor/gene-mediated pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model was able to satisfactorily describe the complex interplay of exogenous and endogenous corticosteroid effects on hepatic GR mRNA, cytosolic free GR, TAT mRNA, and TAT activity in normal rats.
doi:10.1007/s10928-007-9063-3
PMCID: PMC4180077  PMID: 17593325
Methylprednisolone; Corticosteroids; Pharmacokinetics; Pharmacodynamics; Tyrosine aminotransferase; Glucocorticoid receptors
9.  Effects of nonesterified fatty acid availability on tissue-specific glucose utilization in rats in vivo. 
Journal of Clinical Investigation  1988;82(1):293-299.
The pathophysiological significance of the glucose-fatty acid cycle in skeletal muscle in vivo is uncertain. We have examined the short term effects of increased availability of nonesterified FFA on tissue-specific glucose uptake and storage in rat tissues in vivo basally and during a hyperinsulinemic (150 mU/liter) euglycemic clamp. Circulating FFA were elevated to 2 mmol/liter (FFA 1) or 4 mmol/liter (FFA 2). Elevated FFA produced a dose-dependent inhibition of myocardial glucose utilization in both basal (FFA1, 42%; FFA2, 68%; P less than 0.001, by analysis of variance) and clamp groups (FFA1, 39%; FFA2, 49%; P less than 0.001) and also suppressed brown adipose tissue glucose utilization during the clamp (-42%, P less than 0.001). In contrast to heart, glucose utilization in skeletal muscle was suppressed by FFA only in the FFA1 basal group (-36%, P less than 0.001); in other groups (e.g., FFA2 clamp) elevated FFA produced increased skeletal muscle glucose utilization (+68%, P less than 0.001) that was directed toward glycogen (+175%, P less than 0.05) and lipid deposition (+125%, P less than 0.005). FFA stimulated basal glucose utilization in white (e.g., FFA2, +220%, P less than 0.005) and brown adipose tissue (e.g., FFA2, +200%, P less than 0.005). Thus elevated FFA can acutely inhibit glucose utilization in skeletal muscle in addition to cardiac muscle in vivo supporting a possible role for the glucose-fatty acid cycle in skeletal muscle in acute insulin resistance. However, at high levels or with elevated insulin, FFA stimulates glucose utilization and storage in skeletal muscle. By promoting accumulation of glucose storage products, chronic elevation of FFA may lead to skeletal muscle (and therefore whole body) insulin resistance.
Images
PMCID: PMC303508  PMID: 3292587
10.  Effects of Metformin on the Regulation of Free Fatty Acids in Insulin Resistance: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study 
Introduction. Impaired free fatty acid (FFA) metabolism is closely linked to insulin resistance. Our aim was to evaluate plasma FFA changes in insulin resistance in a physiological situation after improvement of insulin sensitivity by metformin. Methods. A double-blind, placebo-controlled intervention with metformin was carried out in patients with insulin resistance. Nineteen patients were randomized to receive metformin 850 mg b.i.d. during 6 weeks or placebo. Participants underwent a mental stress test and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) before and after treatment. Results. Fasting plasma glucose, FFA, and HOMA-IR tended to decrease after metformin, suggesting improved insulin sensitivity. FFA concentrations during the mental stress test showed a similar pattern after metformin, albeit lower at all time points, in contrast to the placebo group. The decrease in fasting plasma FFAs was positively associated to the decrease in HbA1c (r = 0.70; P = 0.03) and in fasting glucose (r = 0.74; P = 0.01). The suppression of plasma FFAs during OGTT did not change by metformin or placebo. Conclusion. Metformin in insulin resistance did not lead to improved FFA dynamics despite a trend of improved insulin sensitivity. Metformin most likely decreases plasma FFAs mainly by suppressing fasting FFA concentrations and not by suppression of acute stress-induced lipolysis.
doi:10.1155/2012/394623
PMCID: PMC3475305  PMID: 23094143
11.  Regulation by insulin of myocardial glucose and fatty acid metabolism in the conscious dog. 
Journal of Clinical Investigation  1984;74(3):1073-1079.
In vivo small doses of insulin inhibit lipolysis, lower plasma FFA, and stimulate glucose disposal. Lowering of plasma FFA, either in the absence of a change in insulin or during combined hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, promotes glucose uptake by heart muscle in vivo. In the isolated perfused heart, large doses of insulin directly stimulate heart glucose uptake. To assess the effect of physiological elevations of plasma insulin upon myocardial glucose and FFA uptake in vivo independent of changes in plasma substrate concentration, we measured arterial and coronary sinus concentrations of glucose, lactate, and FFA, and coronary blood flow in conscious dogs during a 30 min basal and a 2 h experimental period employing three protocols: (a) euglycemic hyperinsulinemia (insulin clamp, n = 5), (b) euglycemic hyperinsulinemia with FFA replacement (n = 5), (c) hyperglycemic euinsulinemia (hyperglycemic clamp with somatostatin, n = 5). In group 1, hyperinsulinemia (insulin = 73 +/- 13 microU/ml) stimulated heart glucose uptake (7.3 +/- 4.4 vs. 28.2 +/- 2.8 mumol/min, P less than 0.002), lowered plasma FFA levels by 80% (P less than 0.05), and decreased heart FFA uptake (28.4 +/- 4 vs. 1.5 +/- 0.9, P less than 0.01). When the fall in plasma FFA was prevented by FFA infusion (group 2), hyperinsulinemia (86 +/- 10 microU/ml) provoked a lesser (P less than 0.05) stimulation of glucose uptake (delta = 8.2 +/- 4.2 mumol/min) than in group 1, and there was no significant change in FFA uptake (25.3 +/- 16 vs. 16.5 +/- 4). Hyperglycemia (plasma glucose = 186 +/- 8 mg/100 ml) during somatostatin infusion resulted in only a small rise in plasma insulin (delta = 12 +/- 7 microU/ml), and although plasma FFA tended to decline, heart glucose uptake did not rise significantly (delta = 5.5 +/- 3.2 mumol/min, P = NS). There was no significant change in coronary blood flow during any of the three study protocols. We conclude that, in the dog, insulin at physiologic concentrations: (a) stimulates heart glucose uptake, both directly and by suppressing the plasma FFA concentration, and (b) does not alter coronary blood flow. Hyperglycemia per se has little effect on heart glucose uptake.
PMCID: PMC425266  PMID: 6381537
12.  Essentiality of circulating fatty acids for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the fasted rat. 
Journal of Clinical Investigation  1996;97(12):2728-2735.
We asked whether the well known starvation-induced impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) seen in isolated rat pancreas preparations also applies in vivo. Accordingly, fed and 18-24-h-fasted rats were subjected to an intravenous glucose challenge followed by a hyperglycemic clamp protocol, during which the plasma-insulin concentration was measured. Surprisingly, the acute (5 min) insulin response was equally robust in the two groups. However, after infusion of the antilipolytic agent, nicotinic acid, to ensure low levels of plasma FFA before the glucose load, GSIS was essentially ablated in fasted rats, but unaffected in fed animals. Maintenance of a high plasma FFA concentration by coadministration of Intralipid plus heparin to nicotinic acid-treated rats (fed or fasted), or further elevation of the endogenous FFA level in nonnicotinic acid-treated fasted animals by infusion of etomoxir (to block hepatic fatty acid oxidation), resulted in supranormal GSIS. The in vivo findings were reproduced in studies with the perfused pancreas from fed and fasted rats in which GSIS was examined in the absence and presence of palmitate. The results establish that in the rat, the high circulating concentration of FFA that accompanies food deprivation is a sine qua non for efficient GSIS when a fast is terminated. They also serve to underscore the powerful interaction between glucose and fatty acids in normal beta cell function and raise the possibility that imbalances between the two fuels in vivo could have pathological consequences.
PMCID: PMC507365  PMID: 8675683
13.  Salsalate Attenuates Free Fatty Acid–Induced Microvascular and Metabolic Insulin Resistance in Humans 
Diabetes Care  2011;34(7):1634-1638.
OBJECTIVE
Insulin recruits muscle microvasculature, thereby increasing endothelial exchange surface area. Free fatty acids (FFAs) cause insulin resistance by activating inhibitor of κB kinase β. Elevating plasma FFAs impairs insulin’s microvascular and metabolic actions in vivo. Whether salsalate, an anti-inflammatory agent, prevents FFA-induced microvascular and/or metabolic insulin resistance in humans is unknown.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
Eleven healthy, young adults were studied three times in random order. After an overnight fast, on two occasions each subject received a 5-h systemic infusion of Intralipid ± salsalate pretreatment (50 mg/kg/day for 4 days). On the third occasion, saline replaced Intralipid. A 1 mU/kg/min euglycemic insulin clamp was superimposed over the last 2-h of each study. Skeletal and cardiac muscle microvascular blood volume (MBV), microvascular flow velocity (MFV), and microvascular blood flow (MBF) were determined before and after insulin infusion. Whole body glucose disposal rates were calculated from glucose infusion rates.
RESULTS
Insulin significantly increased skeletal and cardiac muscle MBV and MBF without affecting MFV. Lipid infusion abolished insulin-mediated microvascular recruitment in both skeletal and cardiac muscle and lowered insulin-stimulated whole body glucose disposal (P < 0.001). Salsalate treatment rescued insulin’s actions to recruit muscle microvasculature and improved insulin-stimulated whole body glucose disposal in the presence of high plasma FFAs.
CONCLUSIONS
High plasma concentrations of FFAs cause both microvascular and metabolic insulin resistance, which can be prevented or attenuated by salsalate treatment. Our data suggest that treatments aimed at inhibition of inflammatory response might help alleviate vascular insulin resistance and improve metabolic control in patients with diabetes.
doi:10.2337/dc10-2345
PMCID: PMC3120177  PMID: 21617098
14.  Modeling of Corticosteroid Effects on Hepatic Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptors and Plasma Lipid Dynamics in Rats 
Pharmaceutical research  2007;25(4):769-780.
Purpose
This study examines methylprednisolone (MPL) effects on the dynamics of hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) mRNA and plasma lipids associated with increased risks for atherosclerosis.
Materials and methods
Normal male Wistar rats were given 50 mg/kg MPL intramuscularly (IM) and sacrificed at various times. Measurements included plasma MPL and CST, hepatic glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA, cytosolic GR density and hepatic LDLR mRNA, and plasma total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), and triglycerides (TG).
Results
MPL showed bi-exponential disposition with two first-order absorption components. Hepatic GR and LDLR mRNA exhibited circadian patterns which were disrupted by MPL. Down-regulation in GR mRNA (40–50%) was followed by a delayed rebound phase. LDLR mRNA exhibited transient down-regulation (60–70%). Cytosolic GR density was significantly suppressed but returned to baseline by 72 h. Plasma TC and LDLC showed increases (55 and 142%) at 12 h. A mechanistic receptor/gene pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model was developed to describe CS effects on hepatic LDLR mRNA and plasma cholesterols.
Conclusions
Our PK/PD model was able to satisfactorily capture the MPL effects on hepatic LDLR, its relationship to various plasma cholesterols, and builds the foundation to explore this area in the future.
doi:10.1007/s11095-007-9371-8
PMCID: PMC4196440  PMID: 17674160
cholesterol; corticosteroids; glucocorticoid receptors; LDL receptors; lipids; pharmacodynamics
15.  Effect of fatty acids on glucose production and utilization in man. 
Journal of Clinical Investigation  1983;72(5):1737-1747.
Since the initial proposal of the glucose fatty acid cycle, considerable controversy has arisen concerning its physiologic significance in vivo. In the present study, we examined the effect of acute, physiologic elevations of FFA concentrations on glucose production and uptake in normal subjects under three controlled experimental conditions. In group A, plasma insulin levels were raised and maintained at approximately 100 microU/ml above base line by an insulin infusion, while holding plasma glucose at the fasting level by a variable glucose infusion. In group B, plasma glucose concentration was raised by 125 mg/100 ml and plasma insulin was clamped at approximately 50 microU/ml by a combined infusion of somatostatin and insulin. In group C, plasma glucose was raised by 200 mg/100 ml above the fasting level, while insulin secretion was inhibited with somatostatin and peripheral glucagon levels were replaced with a glucagon infusion (1 ng/min X kg). Each protocol was repeated in the same subject in combination with a lipid-heparin infusion designed to raise plasma FFA levels by 1.5-2.0 mumol/ml. With euglycemic hyperinsulinemia (study A), lipid infusion caused a significant inhibition of total glucose uptake (6.3 +/- 1.3 vs. 7.4 +/- 0.6 mg/min X kg, P less than 0.02). Endogenous glucose production (estimated by the [3-3H]glucose technique) was completely suppressed both with and without lipid infusion. With hyperglycemic hyperinsulinemia (study B), lipid infusion also induced a marked impairment in glucose utilization (6.2 +/- 1.1 vs. 9.8 +/- 1.9 mg/min X kg, P less than 0.05); endogenous glucose production was again completely inhibited despite the increase in FFA concentrations. Under both conditions (A and B), the percentage inhibition of glucose uptake by FFA was positively correlated with the total rate of glucose uptake (r = 0.69, P less than 0.01). In contrast, when hyperglycemia was associated with relative insulinopenia and hyperglucagonemia (study C), thus simulating a diabetic state, lipid infusion had no effect on glucose uptake (2.9 +/- 0.2 vs. 2.6 +/- 0.2 mg/min X kg) but markedly stimulated endogenous glucose production (1.4 +/- 0.5 vs. 0.5 +/- 0.4 mg/min X kg, P less than 0.005). Under the same conditions as study C, a glycerol infusion producing plasma glycerol levels similar to those achieved with lipid-heparin, enhanced endogenous glucose production (1.5 +/- 0.5 vs. 0.7 +/- 0.6 mg/min X kg, P less than 0.05). We conclude that, in the well-insulinized state raised FFA levels effectively compete with glucose for uptake by peripheral tissues, regardless of the presence of hyperglycemia. When insulin is deficient, on the other hand, elevated rates of lipolysis may contribute to hyperglycemia not by competition for fuel utilization, but through an enhancement of endogenous glucose output.
PMCID: PMC370462  PMID: 6138367
16.  Turnover and splanchnic metabolism of free fatty acids and ketones in insulin-dependent diabetics at rest and in response to exercise. 
Journal of Clinical Investigation  1984;73(5):1367-1376.
Nine insulin-dependent diabetics and six healthy controls were studied at rest, during, and after 60 min of bicycle exercise at a work load corresponding to 45% of their maximal oxygen intake. The catheter technique was employed to determine splanchnic and leg exchange of metabolites. FFA turnover and regional exchange was evaluated using [14C]oleate infusion. Basal glucose (13.8 +/- 1.1 mmol/l), ketone body (1.12 +/- 0.12 mmol/l), and FFA (967 +/- 110 mumol/l) concentrations were elevated in the diabetics in comparison with controls. In the resting state, splanchnic ketone acid production in the diabetics was 6-10-fold greater than in controls. Uptake of oleic acid by the splanchnic bed was increased 2-3-fold, and the proportion of splanchnic FFA uptake converted to ketones (61%) was threefold greater than in controls. In contrast, splanchnic fractional extraction of oleic acid was identical in diabetics and controls. A direct relationship was observed between splanchnic uptake and splanchnic inflow (plasma concentration X hepatic plasma flow) of oleic acid that could be described by the same regression line in the diabetic and control groups. During exercise, splanchnic ketone production rose in both groups. In the control group the increase in ketogenesis was associated with a rise in splanchnic inflow and in uptake of oleic acid, a rise in splanchnic fractional extraction of oleate, and an increase in the proportion of splanchnic FFA uptake converted to ketone acids from 20-40%. In the diabetic group, the increase in ketogenesis occurred in the absence of a rise in splanchnic inflow or uptake of oleic acid, but was associated with an increase in splanchnic fractional extraction of oleic acid and a marked increase in hepatic conversion of FFA to ketones, so that the entire uptake of FFA was accountable as ketone acid output. Splanchnic uptake of oleic acid correlated directly with splanchnic oleic acid inflow in both groups, but the slope of the regression line was steeper than in the resting state. Plasma glucagon levels were higher in the diabetic group at rest and during exercise, while plasma norepinephrine showed a twofold greater increment in response to exercise in the diabetic group (to 1,400-1,500 pg/ml). A net uptake of ketone acids by the leg was observed during exercise but could account for less than 5% of leg oxidative metabolism in the diabetics and less than 1% in controls. Despite the increase in ketogenesis during exercise, a rise in arterial ketone acid levels was not observed in the diabetics until postexercise recovery, during which sustained increments to values of 1.8-1.9 mmol/l and sustained increases in splanchnic ketone production were observed at 30-60 min. The largest increment in blood ketone acids and in splanchnic ketone production above values observed in controls thus occurred in the diabetics after 60 min of recovery from exercise. We concluded that: (a) In the resting state, increased ketogenesis in the diabetic is a consequence of augmented splanchnic inflow of FFA and increased intrahepatic conversion of FFA to ketones, but does not depend on augmented fractional extraction of circulating FFA by the splanchnic bed. (b) Exercise-induced increases in ketogenesis in normal subjects are due to augmented splanchnic inflow and fractional extraction of FFA as well as increased intrahepatic conversion of FFA to ketones. (c) When exercise and diabetes are combined, ketogenesis increases further despite the absence of a rise in splanchnic inflow of FFA. An increase in splanchnic fractional extraction of FFA and a marked increase intrahepatic conversion of FFA to ketones accounts for the exaggerated ketogenic response to exercise in the diabetic. (d) Elevated levels of plasma glucagon and/or norepinephrine may account for the increased hepatic ketogenic response to exercise in the diabetic. (e) Ketone utilization by muscle increases during exercise but constitutes a quantitatively minor oxidative fuel for muscle even in the diabetic. (f) The accelerated ketogenesis during exercise in the diabetic continues unabated during the recovery period, resulting in an exaggerated postexercise ketosis.
PMCID: PMC425159  PMID: 6715541
17.  Olanzapine promotes fat accumulation in male rats by decreasing physical activity, repartitioning energy and increasing adipose tissue lipogenesis while impairing lipolysis 
Molecular psychiatry  2010;16(5):569-581.
Olanzapine and other atypical antipsychotics cause metabolic side effects leading to obesity and diabetes; while these continue to be an important public health concern, their underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Therefore, an animal model of these side effects was developed in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Chronic administration of olanzapine elevated fasting glucose, impaired glucose and insulin tolerance, increased fat mass but, in contrast to female rats, did not increase body weight or food intake. Acute studies were conducted to delineate the mechanisms responsible for these effects. Olanzapine markedly decreased physical activity without a compensatory decline in food intake. It also acutely elevated fasting glucose, and worsened oral glucose and insulin tolerance, suggesting these effects are adiposity independent. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies measuring 14C-2-deoxyglucose (14C-DOG) uptake revealed tissue-specific insulin resistance. Insulin sensitivity was impaired in skeletal muscle, but either unchanged or increased in adipose tissue depots. Consistent with the olanzapine-induced hyperglycemia there was a tendency for increased 14C-DOG uptake into fat depots of fed rats and, surprisingly, free fatty acid (FFA) uptake into fat depots was elevated approximately 2-fold. The increased glucose and FFA uptake into adipose tissue was coupled with increased adipose tissue lipogenesis. Finally, olanzapine lowered fasting plasma FFA and whereas it had no effect on isoproterenol-stimulated rises in plasma glucose, it blunted isoproterenol-stimulated in vivo lipolysis in fed rats. Collectively, these results suggest olanzapine exerts several metabolic effects that together favor increased accumulation of fuel into adipose tissue, thereby increasing adiposity.
doi:10.1038/mp.2010.33
PMCID: PMC2892549  PMID: 20308992
atypical antipsychotics; insulin resistance; nutrient partitioning; hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp; free fatty acid uptake; lipogenesis
18.  Mathematical Modeling of Corticosteroid Pharmacogenomics in Rat Muscle following Acute and Chronic Methylprednisolone Dosing 
Molecular pharmaceutics  2008;5(2):328-339.
The pharmacogenomic effects of a corticosteroid (CS) were assessed in rat skeletal muscle using microarrays. Adrenalectomized (ADX) rats were treated with methylprednisolone (MPL) by either 50 mg/kg intravenous injection or 7-day 0.3 mg/kg/h infusion through subcutaneously implanted pumps. RNAs extracted from individual rat muscles were hybridized to Affymetrix Rat Genome Genechips. Data mining yielded 653 and 2316 CS-responsive probe sets following MPL bolus and infusion treatments. Of these, 196 genes were controlled by MPL under both dosing conditions. Cluster analysis revealed that 124 probe sets exhibited three typical expression dynamic profiles following acute dosing. Cluster A consisted of up-regulated probe sets which were grouped into five subclusters each exhibiting unique temporal patterns during the infusion. Cluster B comprised down-regulated probe sets which were divided into two subclusters with distinct dynamics during the infusion. Cluster C probe sets exhibited delayed down-regulation under both bolus and infusion conditions. Among those, 104 probe sets were further grouped into subclusters based on their profiles following chronic MPL dosing. Several mathematical models were proposed and adequately captured the temporal patterns for each subcluster. Multiple types of dosing regimens are needed to resolve common determinants of gene regulation as chronic exposure results in unexpected differences in gene expression compared to acute dosing. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling provides a quantitative tool for elucidating the complexities of CS pharmacogenomics in skeletal muscle.
doi:10.1021/mp700094s
PMCID: PMC4196382  PMID: 18271548
Microarray studies; pharmacokinetics; pharmacodynamics; mathematical models; computational biology
19.  Pharmacokinetics of Methylprednisolone after Intravenous and Intramuscular Administration in Rats 
Methylprednisolone (MPL) pharmacokinetics was examined in adrenalectomized (ADX) and normal rats to assess the feasibility of intramuscular (i.m.) dosing for use in pharmacodynamic studies. Several study phases were pursued. Parallel group studies were performed in normal and ADX rats given 50 mg/kg MPL (i.v. or i.m.) and blood samples were collected up to 6 h. Data from studies where normal rats were dosed with 50 mg/kg MPL i.m. and killed over either 6 or 96 h were combined to determine muscle site and plasma MPL concentrations. Lastly, ADX rats were dosed with 50 mg/kg MPL i.m. and killed over 18 h to assess hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) dynamics. MPL exhibited bi-exponential kinetics after i.v. dosing with a terminal slope of 2.1 h−1. The i.m. drug was absorbed slowly with two first-order absorption rate constants, 1.26 and 0.219 h−1 indicating flip-flop kinetics with overall 50% bioavailability. The kinetics of MPL at the injection site exhibited slow, dual absorption rates. Although i.m. MPL showed lower bioavailability compared with other corticosteroids in rats, TAT dynamics revealed similar i.m. and i.v. response profiles. The more convenient intramuscular dosing can replace the i.v. route without causing marked differences in pharmacodynamics.
doi:10.1002/bdd.551
PMCID: PMC4181331  PMID: 17569107
methylprednisolone; corticosteroids; pharmacokinetics; intramuscular injection; tyrosine aminotransferase
20.  β-Cell Lipotoxicity in Response to Free Fatty Acid Elevation in Prepubertal Youth 
Diabetes  2013;62(8):2917-2922.
Prepubertal African American (AA) youth compared with their Caucasian (C) peers have higher insulin secretion, which correlates positively with free fatty acid (FFA) concentration. In our continued efforts to explain the racial disparity in insulinemia, and because FFAs modulate insulin secretion, we hypothesized that AA youth would have a greater response to FFA-induced β-cell insulin secretion than C youth. We compared the short-term effects of FFA elevation on fasting and glucose-stimulated C-peptide–modeled insulin secretion in prepubertal normal-weight AA versus C peers during a 2-h hyperglycemic clamp (12.5 mmol/L) on two occasions: 1) infusion of normal saline and 2) infusion of 20% intralipid (IL). During IL infusion, insulin sensitivity (IS) declined comparably in AA and C youth. Glucose sensitivity of first- and second-phase insulin secretion showed a significant condition × race interaction being higher in AA youth. Disposition index, β-cell function relative to IS, declined with IL infusion in AA and C youth, with a significantly greater decrease in Cs compared with AAs. In conclusion, AA and C prepubertal youth both demonstrated a decline in β-cell function relative to IS during IL infusion, indicative of acute lipotoxicity. The greater decline in C youth compared with AAs may suggest that C youth are more susceptible to β-cell lipotoxicity than AA youth, or alternatively, that AA youth are hypersensitive to FFA stimulation of β-cell insulin secretion, consistent with our theory.
doi:10.2337/db12-1664
PMCID: PMC3717834  PMID: 23557704
21.  Yi-Qi-Zeng-Min-Tang, a Chinese medicine, ameliorates insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic rats 
AIM: To investigate the effects of the Chinese herbal decoction, Yi-Qi-Zeng-Min-Tang (YQZMT), on insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic rats.
METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two dietary regiments by feeding either normal pellet diet (NPD) or high fat diet (HFD). Four weeks later, the HFD-fed rats were injected intraperitoneally with low-dose streptozotocin (STZ). Rats with non-fasting blood glucose level ≥ 16.67 mmol/L were considered type 2 diabetic and further divided into five subgroups: the type 2 diabetes model group, low-dose, medium-dose and high-dose YQZMT groups, and rosiglitazone group. Age-matched NPD-fed rats served as controls. YQZMT or rosiglitazone were administered for 8 wk. Intraperitoneal glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed before and after the treatment to measure the glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Serum levels of biochemical parameters, adipocytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), as well as free fatty acids (FFAs), were also analyzed.
RESULTS: There was significant elevation of insulin resistance and serum levels of fasting glucose (12.82 ± 1.08 mmol/L vs 3.60 ± 0.31 mmol/L, P < 0.01), insulin (7197.36 ± 253.89 pg/mL vs 4820.49 ± 326.89 pg/mL, P < 0.01), total cholesterol (TC) (8.40 ± 0.49 mmol/L vs 2.14 ± 0.06 mmol/L, P < 0.01), triglyceride (2.24 ± 0.12 mmol/L vs 0.78 ± 0.05 mmol/L, P < 0.01), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) (7.84 ± 0.51 mmol/L vs 0.72 ± 0.04 mmol/L, P < 0.01) and decrease in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) (0.57 ± 0.03 mmol/L vs 1.27 ± 0.03 mmol/L, P < 0.01) in the low-dose STZ and high-fat diet induced type 2 diabetic group when compared with the control group. Administration of YQZMT induced dose- and time-dependent changes in insulin resistance, glucose and lipid profile, and reduced levels of FFA, TNF-α and IL-6 in the type 2 diabetic rats. After the treatment, compared with the diabetic group, the insulin resistance was ameliorated in the high-dose YQZMT (2.82 g/100 g per day) group, with a significant reduction in serum glucose (12.16 ± 1.00 mmol/L vs 17.65 ± 2.22 mmol/L, P < 0.01), homeostasis model assessment of basal insulin resistance (22.68 ± 2.37 vs 38.79 ± 9.02, P < 0.05), triglyceride (0.87 ± 0.15 mmol/L vs 1.99 ± 0.26 mmol/L, P < 0.01), TC (3.31 ± 0.52 mmol/L vs 6.50 ± 1.04 mmol/L, P < 0.01) and LDL-c (2.47 ± 0.50 mmol/L vs 6.00 ± 1.07 mmol/L, P < 0.01), and a significant increase in HDL-c (0.84 ± 0.08 mmol/L vs 0.50 ± 0.03 mmol/L, P < 0.01). But the body weight was not changed significantly.
CONCLUSION: YQZMT, which ameliorates insulin resistance and does not cause increase in body weight, may be a suitable therapeutic adjunct for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.
doi:10.3748/wjg.v17.i8.987
PMCID: PMC3057160  PMID: 21448349
Yi-Qi-Zeng-Min-Tang; Insulin resistance; Type 2 diabetes; Lipids; Adipocytokines; Free fatty acids
22.  Studies on the relationship between plasma free fatty acids and growth hormone secretion in man 
Journal of Clinical Investigation  1972;51(9):2388-2398.
The influence of plasma free fatty acid (FFA) concentration on the secretion of human growth hormone (HGH) was investigated. (a) FFA depression was produced by means of a nicotinic acid (NA) infusion for either 1 or 5 hr in the presence of glucose-induced hyperglycemia. Controls received only saline. (b) FFA depression was also produced by a 90 min NA infusion and then rapid FFA elevation by a lipid-plus-heparin (lipid) infusion. This procedure was compared with a similar NA infusion not followed by lipid. (c) FFA elevation was produced either by a lipid or by a norepinephrine (NE) infusion and then HGH secretion was stimulated by insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Each subject in this group received both the lipid and the NE infusion on seperate days as well as two control tests (insulin alone and NE alone).
Depression of FFA resulted in an increase of HGH with a lag period of approximately 2 hr. Maximal HGH rise after 1 hr NA infusion was 7.7±1.9 ng/ml and with 5 hr NA infusion 14.3±3.6 ng/ml (both significantly higher than during saline infusion, P < 0.025 and < 0.005 respectively) and occurred despite continuous hyperglycemia. Lipid infusion just before the expected HGH increase prevented the HGH response to FFA depression. HGH rise during insulin hypoglycemia (32.2±6.5 ng/ml) was significantly inhibited by prior FFA elevation whether achieved by lipid infusion (maximum HGH rise 11.4±1.6 ng/ml) or by NE infusion (maximum HGH rise 19.0±6.2 ng/ml).
The results are suggestive of a negative feedback loop between plasma FFA and HGH secretion, of importance for subacute rather than acute changes in the plasma FFA concentration. FFA lack itself seems to be the signal for HGH release despite the lag period between FFA decrease and HGH increase. Glucose and FFA can at least not fully replace each other in their respective influence on HGH release.
PMCID: PMC292406  PMID: 4639023
23.  Mechanisms of Glucose Homeostasis After Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery in the Obese, Insulin-Resistant Zucker Rat 
Annals of surgery  2009;249(2):277-285.
Objective
Obesity-related diabetes is caused by insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction. The current study examines changes in food intake, weight loss, body fat depots, oxygen consumption, insulin sensitivity, and incretin levels as potential mechanisms for improved glucose tolerance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB).
Methods
Three groups of genetically obese Zucker rats were studied: RYGB, sham surgery pair-fed (PF), and sham surgery ad libitum (AL) fed rats. Changes in body weight, visceral and subcutaneous fat depots, oral glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and the plasma concentrations of insulin, glucagon, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, and peptide YY (PYY) were measured.
Results
Body weight and subcutaneous fat were decreased after RYGB, compared with the PF and AL groups. The reduction in visceral fat after RYGB appeared largely because of food restriction. Glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were significantly improved in only the RYGB group (P <0.05 vs. AL, PF). Euglycemic, hyperinsulinemic clamp studies indicated RYGB improved the ability of insulin to stimulate peripheral (eg, skeletal muscle) glucose uptake. Fasting total GLP-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, and PYY levels were similar between the groups, whereas postprandial plasma levels of intact GLP-1 (7–36) amide, total GLP-1, and PYY were increased in the RYGB group compared with PF and AL controls.
Conclusions
Glucose homeostasis after RYGB is associated with decreased subcutaneous fat, increased postprandial PYY, GLP-1, and insulin, as well as improved insulin sensitivity/action. Changes in food intake and visceral fat do not seem to explain improvements in insulin action after RYGB in the Zucker rat model.
doi:10.1097/SLA.0b013e3181904af0
PMCID: PMC2748974  PMID: 19212182
gastric bypass; obesity; diabetes; incretin; GLP-1
24.  Effect of ketone bodies on glucose production and utilization in the miniature pig. 
Journal of Clinical Investigation  1984;74(1):249-261.
The effect of ketone bodies on glucose production (Ra) and utilization (Rd) was investigated in the 24-h starved, conscious unrestrained miniature pig. Infusing Na-DL-beta-OH-butyrate (Na-DL-beta-OHB) and thus shifting the blood pH from 7.40 to 7.56 resulted in a decrease of Ra by 52% and of Rd by 45%, as determined by the isotope dilution technique. Simultaneously, the concentrations of arterial insulin and glucagon were slightly enhanced, whereas the plasma levels of glucose, lactate, pyruvate, alanine, alpha-amino-N, and free fatty acids (FFA) were all reduced. Infusion of Na-bicarbonate, which yielded a similar shift in blood pH, did not mimick these effects. Infusion of equimolar amounts of the ketoacid, yielding a blood pH of 7.35, induced similar metabolic alterations with respect to plasma glucose, Ra, Rd, and insulin; however, plasma alanine and alpha-amino-N increased. Infusing different amounts of Na-DL-beta-OHB resulting in plasma steady state levels of ketones from 0.25 to 1.5 mM had similar effects on arterial insulin and glucose kinetics. No dose dependency was observed. Prevention of the Na-DL-beta-OHB-induced hypoalaninemia by simultaneous infusion of alanine (1 mumol/kg X min) did not prevent hypoglycemia. Infusion of Na-DL-beta-OHB plus insulin (0.4 mU/kg X min) showed no additive effect on the inhibition of Ra. Ketones did not inhibit the insulin-stimulated metabolic clearance rate (MCR) for glucose. Infusion of somatostatin (0.2 micrograms/kg X min) initially decreased plasma glucose, Ra, and Rd, which was followed by an increase in plasma glucose and Ra; however, on infusion of somatostatin plus Na-DL-beta-OHB, hypoglycemia and the reduced Ra were maintained. In the anaesthetized 24-h starved miniature pig, Na-DL-beta-OHB infusion decreased the hepatic exchange for glucose, lactate, and FFA, whereas the exchange for glycerol, alanine, and alpha-amino-N as well as liver perfusion rate were unaffected. Simultaneously, portal glucagon and insulin as well as hepatic insulin extraction rate were elevated. Leg exchange for glucose, lactate, glycerol, alanine, alpha-amino-N, and FFA were decreased, while ketone body utilization increased. Repeated infusion of Na-DL-beta-OHB at the fourth, fifth, and sixth day of starvation in the conscious, unrestrained mini-pig resulted in a significant drop in urinary nitrogen (N)-excretion. However, this effect was mimicked by infusing equimolar amounts of Na-bicarbonate. In contrast, when only the ketoacid was given, urinary N-excretion accelerated. To summarize: (a) Ketone bodies decrease endogenous glucose production via an insulin-dependent mechanism; in addition, ketones probably exert a direct inhibitory action on gluconeogenesis. The ketone body-induced hypoalaninemia does not contribute to this effect. (b) The counterregulatory response to hypoglycemia is reduced by ketones. (c) As a consequence of the decrease in R(a), glucose utilization declines during ketone infusion. (d)The insulin-stimulated MCR for glucose is not affected by ketones. (e) Ketones in their physiological moiety do not show a protein-sparing effect.
PMCID: PMC425207  PMID: 6376544
25.  Effect of Acipimox on Plasma Lipids and Glucose/Insulin in Pregnant Rats 
To determine how a reduction in maternal hypertriglyceridemia during late pregnancy may affect glucose/insulin relationships, pregnant and virgin rats were orally treated with acipimox, a potent antilipolytic agent. In 20-day pregnant rats receiving 80 mg of acipimox, plasma triglycerides (TG), free fatty acids (FFA), and glycerol decreased more than in virgin rats shortly after the drug (up to 7 hours), when compared with animals treated with distilled water, whereas plasma glucose level was unaffected by the treatment in either group of rats. When acipimox was given every 12 hours from day 17 to day 20 of pregnancy, plasma TG, FFA, and glycerol levels progressively increased, whereas they either decreased or did not change in virgin rats receiving the same treatment, with no effect in plasma glucose levels in either group. Fetal body weight was lower than in controls in 20-day pregnant rats that received acipimox for 3 days. On day 20 of pregnancy, 3 hours after receiving acipimox or distilled water, rats received a 2 g glucose/kg oral load and it was found that the change in plasma glucose was similar in both groups, whereas the increase in plasma insulin was greater in pregnant rats treated with acipimox. However, no difference was found in either variable after the oral glucose load in virgin rats receiving acipimox or distilled water. No differences in plasma glucose levels were found after intravenous (IV) administration of insulin in pregnant rats treated or not treated with acipimox. In conclusion, present results show that administration of acipimox during the last days of gestation inhibited lipolysis and decreased fetal weight. Over a short period of time, in pregnant rats, reductions of plasma FFA and TG after acipimox treatment improved the glucose-induced insulin release, but did not seem to have any effect in peripheral insulin resistance.
doi:10.1080/15604280214938
PMCID: PMC2478592  PMID: 12546276

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