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1.  Role of Vascular and Lymphatic Endothelial Cells in Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome Suggests Targeted Therapeutic Approaches 
Lymphatic Research and Biology  2013;11(3):128-135.
Hantaviruses in the Americas cause a highly lethal acute pulmonary edema termed hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). Hantaviruses nonlytically infect microvascular and lymphatic endothelial cells and cause dramatic changes in barrier functions without disrupting the endothelium. Hantaviruses cause changes in the function of infected endothelial cells that normally regulate fluid barrier functions. The endothelium of arteries, veins, and lymphatic vessels are unique and central to the function of vast pulmonary capillary beds that regulate pulmonary fluid accumulation.
We have found that HPS-causing hantaviruses alter vascular barrier functions of microvascular and lymphatic endothelial cells by altering receptor and signaling pathway responses that serve to permit fluid tissue influx and clear tissue edema. Infection of the endothelium provides several mechanisms for hantaviruses to cause acute pulmonary edema, as well as potential therapeutic targets for reducing the severity of HPS disease.
Here we discuss interactions of HPS-causing hantaviruses with the endothelium, roles for unique lymphatic endothelial responses in HPS, and therapeutic targeting of the endothelium as a means of reducing the severity of HPS disease.
PMCID: PMC3780285  PMID: 24024573
2.  Andes Virus Infection of Lymphatic Endothelial Cells Causes Giant Cell and Enhanced Permeability Responses That Are Rapamycin and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor C Sensitive 
Journal of Virology  2012;86(16):8765-8772.
Hantaviruses primarily infect endothelial cells (ECs) and nonlytically cause vascular changes that result in hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). Acute pulmonary edema during HPS may be caused by capillary leakage and failure of lymphatic vessels to clear fluids. Uniquely regulated lymphatic ECs (LECs) control fluid clearance, although roles for lymphatics in hantavirus disease remain undetermined. Here we report that hantaviruses productively infect LECs and that LEC infection by HPS causing Andes virus (ANDV) and HFRS causing Hantaan virus (HTNV) are inhibited by αvβ3 integrin antibodies. Although αvβ3 integrins regulate permeabilizing responses directed by vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), we found that only ANDV-infected LECs were hyperpermeabilized by the addition of VEGF-A. However, VEGF-C activation of LEC-specific VEGFR3 receptors blocked ANDV- and VEGF-A-induced LEC permeability. In addition, ∼75% of ANDV-infected LECs became viable mononuclear giant cells, >4 times larger than normal, in response to VEGF-A. Giant cells are associated with constitutive mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activation, and we found that both giant LECs and LEC permeability were sensitive to rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, and VEGF-C addition. These findings indicate that ANDV uniquely alters VEGFR2-mTOR signaling responses of LECs, resulting in giant cell and LEC permeability responses. This suggests that ANDV infection alters normal LEC and lymphatic vessel functions which may contribute to edematous fluid accumulation during HPS. Moreover, the ability of VEGF-C and rapamycin to normalize LEC responses suggests a potential therapeutic approach for reducing pulmonary edema and the severity of HPS following ANDV infection.
PMCID: PMC3421700  PMID: 22696643
3.  Slit2-Robo4 Receptor Responses Inhibit ANDV Directed Permeability of Human Lung Microvascular Endothelial Cells 
Antiviral research  2013;99(2):108-112.
Hantaviruses nonlytically infect human endothelial cells (ECs) and cause edematous and hemorrhagic diseases. Andes virus (ANDV) causes hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), and Hantaan virus (HTNV) causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). Hantaviruses enhance vascular endothelial growth factor directed EC permeability resulting in the disassembly of inter-endothelial cell adherens junctions (AJs). Recent studies demonstrate that Slit2 binding to Robo1/Robo4 receptors on ECs has opposing effects on AJ disassembly and vascular fluid barrier functions. Here we demonstrate that Slit2 inhibits ANDV and HTNV induced permeability and AJ disassembly of pulmonary microvascular ECs (PMECs) by interactions with Robo4. In contrast, Slit2 had no effect on the permeability of ANDV infected human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs). Analysis of Robo1/Robo4 expression determined that PMECs express Robo4, but not Robo1, while HUVECs expressed both Robo4 and Robo1 receptors. SiRNA knockdown of Robo4 in PMECs prevented Slit2 inhibition of ANDV induced permeability demonstrating that Robo4 receptors determine PMEC responsiveness to Slit2. Collectively, this data demonstrates a selective role for Slit2/Robo4 responses within PMECs that inhibits ANDV induced permeability and AJ disassembly. These findings suggest Slit2s utility as a potential HPS therapeutic that stabilizes the pulmonary endothelium and antagonizes ANDV induced pulmonary edema.
PMCID: PMC3723770  PMID: 23702092
4.  Pathogenic Hantaviruses Direct the Adherence of Quiescent Platelets to Infected Endothelial Cells▿  
Journal of Virology  2010;84(9):4832-4839.
Hantavirus infections are noted for their ability to infect endothelial cells, cause acute thrombocytopenia, and trigger 2 vascular-permeability-based diseases. However, hantavirus infections are not lytic, and the mechanisms by which hantaviruses cause capillary permeability and thrombocytopenia are only partially understood. The role of β3 integrins in hemostasis and the inactivation of β3 integrin receptors by pathogenic hantaviruses suggest the involvement of hantaviruses in altered platelet and endothelial cell functions that regulate permeability. Here, we determined that pathogenic hantaviruses bind to quiescent platelets via a β3 integrin-dependent mechanism. This suggests that platelets may contribute to hantavirus dissemination within infected patients and provides a means by which hantavirus binding to β3 integrin receptors prevents platelet activation. The ability of hantaviruses to bind platelets further suggested that cell-associated hantaviruses might recruit platelets to the endothelial cell surface. Our findings indicate that Andes virus (ANDV)- or Hantaan virus (HTNV)-infected endothelial cells specifically direct the adherence of calcein-labeled platelets. In contrast, cells comparably infected with nonpathogenic Tula virus (TULV) failed to recruit platelets to the endothelial cell surface. Platelet adherence was dependent on endothelial cell β3 integrins and neutralized by the addition of the anti-β3 Fab fragment, c7E3, or specific ANDV- or HTNV-neutralizing antibodies. These findings indicate that pathogenic hantaviruses displayed on the surface of infected endothelial cells bind platelets and that a platelet layer covers the surface of infected endothelial cells. This fundamentally changes the appearance of endothelial cells and has the potential to alter cellular immune responses, platelet activation, and endothelial cell functions that affect vascular permeability. Hantavirus-directed platelet quiescence and recruitment to vast endothelial cell beds further suggests mechanisms by which hantaviruses may cause thrombocytopenia and induce hypoxia. These findings are fundamental to our understanding of pathogenic-hantavirus regulation of endothelial cell responses that contribute to vascular permeability.
PMCID: PMC2863738  PMID: 20181715
5.  Hantaviruses Direct Endothelial Cell Permeability by Sensitizing Cells to the Vascular Permeability Factor VEGF, while Angiopoietin 1 and Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Inhibit Hantavirus-Directed Permeability▿  
Journal of Virology  2008;82(12):5797-5806.
Hantaviruses infect human endothelial cells and cause two vascular permeability-based diseases: hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. Hantavirus infection alone does not permeabilize endothelial cell monolayers. However, pathogenic hantaviruses inhibit the function of αvβ3 integrins on endothelial cells, and hemorrhagic disease and vascular permeability deficits are consequences of dysfunctional β3 integrins that normally regulate permeabilizing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) responses. Here we show that pathogenic Hantaan, Andes, and New York-1 hantaviruses dramatically enhance the permeability of endothelial cells in response to VEGF, while the nonpathogenic hantaviruses Prospect Hill and Tula have no effect on endothelial cell permeability. Pathogenic hantaviruses directed endothelial cell permeability 2 to 3 days postinfection, coincident with pathogenic hantavirus inhibition of αvβ3 integrin functions, and hantavirus-directed permeability was inhibited by antibodies to VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2). These studies demonstrate that pathogenic hantaviruses, similar to αvβ3 integrin-deficient cells, specifically enhance VEGF-directed permeabilizing responses. Using the hantavirus permeability assay we further demonstrate that the endothelial-cell-specific growth factor angiopoietin 1 (Ang-1) and the platelet-derived lipid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) inhibit hantavirus directed endothelial cell permeability at physiologic concentrations. These results demonstrate the utility of a hantavirus permeability assay and rationalize the testing of Ang-1, S1P, and antibodies to VEGFR2 as potential hantavirus therapeutics. The central importance of β3 integrins and VEGF responses in vascular leak and hemorrhagic disease further suggest that altering β3 or VEGF responses may be a common feature of additional viral hemorrhagic diseases. As a result, our findings provide a potential mechanism for vascular leakage after infection by pathogenic hantaviruses and the means to inhibit hantavirus-directed endothelial cell permeability that may be applicable to additional vascular leak syndromes.
PMCID: PMC2395149  PMID: 18367532
6.  VEGFR2 and Src Kinase Inhibitors Suppress Andes Virus-Induced Endothelial Cell Permeability ▿  
Journal of Virology  2010;85(5):2296-2303.
Hantaviruses predominantly infect human endothelial cells and, in the absence of cell lysis, cause two diseases resulting from increased vascular permeability. Andes virus (ANDV) causes a highly lethal acute pulmonary edema termed hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). ANDV infection enhances the permeability of endothelial cells in response to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by increasing signaling responses directed by the VEGFR2-Src-VE-cadherin pathway, which directs adherens junction (AJ) disassembly. Here we demonstrate that inhibiting pathway-specific VEGFR2 and Src family kinases (SFKs) blocks ANDV-induced endothelial cell permeability. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of Src within ANDV-infected endothelial cells resulted in an ∼70% decrease in endothelial cell permeability compared to that for siRNA controls. This finding suggested that existing FDA-approved small-molecule kinase inhibitors might similarly block ANDV-induced permeability. The VEGFR2 kinase inhibitor pazopanib as well as SFK inhibitors dasatinib, PP1, bosutinib, and Src inhibitor 1 dramatically inhibited ANDV-induced endothelial cell permeability. Consistent with their kinase-inhibitory concentrations, dasatinib, PP1, and pazopanib inhibited ANDV-induced permeability at 1, 10, and 100 nanomolar 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s), respectively. We further demonstrated that dasatinib and pazopanib blocked VE-cadherin dissociation from the AJs of ANDV-infected endothelial cells by >90%. These findings indicate that VEGFR2 and Src kinases are potential targets for therapeutically reducing ANDV-induced endothelial cell permeability and, as a result, capillary permeability during HPS. Since the functions of VEGFR2 and SFK inhibitors are already well defined and FDA approved for clinical use, these findings rationalize their therapeutic evaluation for efficacy in reducing HPS disease. Endothelial cell barrier functions are disrupted by a number of viruses that cause hemorrhagic, edematous, or neurologic disease, and as a result, our findings suggest that VEGFR2 and SFK inhibitors should be considered for regulating endothelial cell barrier functions altered by additional viral pathogens.
PMCID: PMC3067787  PMID: 21177802
7.  Hantavirus-infection Confers Resistance to Cytotoxic Lymphocyte-Mediated Apoptosis 
PLoS Pathogens  2013;9(3):e1003272.
Hantaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and hantavirus cardio-pulmonary syndrome (HCPS; also called hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS)), both human diseases with high case-fatality rates. Endothelial cells are the main targets for hantaviruses. An intriguing observation in patients with HFRS and HCPS is that on one hand the virus infection leads to strong activation of CD8 T cells and NK cells, on the other hand no obvious destruction of infected endothelial cells is observed. Here, we provide an explanation for this dichotomy by showing that hantavirus-infected endothelial cells are protected from cytotoxic lymphocyte-mediated induction of apoptosis. When dissecting potential mechanisms behind this phenomenon, we discovered that the hantavirus nucleocapsid protein inhibits the enzymatic activity of both granzyme B and caspase 3. This provides a tentative explanation for the hantavirus-mediated block of cytotoxic granule-mediated apoptosis-induction, and hence the protection of infected cells from cytotoxic lymphocytes. These findings may explain why infected endothelial cells in hantavirus-infected patients are not destroyed by the strong cytotoxic lymphocyte response.
Author Summary
Rodent-born hantaviruses cause two severe emerging diseases with high case-fatality rates in humans; hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Eurasia and hantavirus cardio-pulmonary syndrome (HCPS; also called hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS)) in the Americas. A hallmark of HFRS/HCPS is increased vascular permeability. While endothelial cells are the main targets for hantaviruses, infection per se is not lytic. Patients suffering from HFRS and HCPS show remarkable strong cytotoxic lymphocyte responses including high numbers of activated NK cells and antigen-specific CD8 T cells. Hence, it has been suggested that cytotoxic lymphocyte-mediated killing of hantavirus-infected endothelial cells might contribute to HFRS/HCPS-pathogenesis. Here, we show that hantaviruses protect infected endothelial cells from being killed by cytotoxic lymphocytes. Further, we also show that hantaviruses inhibit apoptosis in general. Hantaviruses are negative-stranded RNA viruses encoding four structural proteins. Interestingly, the nucleocapsid protein was shown to inhibit the enzymatic functions of both granzyme B and caspase 3, two enzymes crucial for cytotoxic lymphocyte-mediated killing of virus-infected cells. Our study provides new insights into the interactions between hantaviruses, infected cells, and cytotoxic lymphocytes, and argues against a role for cytotoxic lymphocyte-mediated killing of virus-infected endothelial cells in causing HFRS/HCPS.
PMCID: PMC3610645  PMID: 23555267
8.  Andes Virus Regulation of Cellular MicroRNAs Contributes to Hantavirus-Induced Endothelial Cell Permeability▿  
Journal of Virology  2010;84(22):11929-11936.
Hantaviruses infect human endothelial cells (ECs) and cause two diseases marked by vascular permeability defects, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). Vascular permeability occurs in the absence of EC lysis, suggesting that hantaviruses alter normal EC fluid barrier functions. ECs infected by pathogenic hantaviruses are hyperresponsive to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and this alters the fluid barrier function of EC adherens junctions, resulting in enhanced paracellular permeability. Vascular permeability and VEGF-directed responses are determined by EC-specific microRNAs (miRNAs), which regulate cellular mRNA transcriptional responses. miRNAs mature within cytoplasmic processing bodies (P bodies), and the hantavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein binds RNA and localizes to P bodies, suggesting that hantaviruses may modify miRNA functions within infected ECs. Here we assessed changes in EC miRNAs following infection by the HPS-causing Andes hantavirus (ANDV). We analyzed 352 human miRNAs within ANDV-infected ECs using quantitative real-time (RT)-PCR arrays. Fourteen miRNAs, including six miRNAs that are associated with regulating vascular integrity, were upregulated >4-fold following infection by ANDV. Nine miRNAs were downregulated 3- to 3,400-fold following ANDV infection; these included miR-410, involved in regulating secretion, and miR-218, which is linked to the regulation of EC migration and vascular permeability. We further analyzed changes in miR-126, an EC-specific miRNA that regulates vascular integrity by suppressing SPRED1 and PIK3R2 mRNAs. While miR-126 levels were only slightly altered, we found that SPRED1 and PIK3R2 mRNA levels were increased 10- and 7-fold, respectively, in ANDV-infected ECs but were unaltered in ECs infected by the nonpathogenic Tula hantavirus (TULV). Consistent with increased SPRED1 expression, we found that the level of phospho-cofilin was decreased within ANDV-infected ECs. Moreover, small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of SPRED1 dramatically decreased the permeability of ANDV-infected ECs in response to VEGF, suggesting that increased SPRED1 contributes to EC permeability following ANDV infection. These findings suggest that interference with normal miRNA functions contributes to the enhanced paracellular permeability of ANDV-infected ECs and that hantavirus regulation of miRNA functions is an additional determinant of hantavirus pathogenesis.
PMCID: PMC2977893  PMID: 20844033
9.  Cellular Entry of Hantaviruses Which Cause Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome Is Mediated by β3 Integrins 
Journal of Virology  1999;73(5):3951-3959.
Hantaviruses replicate primarily in the vascular endothelium and cause two human diseases, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). In this report, we demonstrate that the cellular entry of HFRS-associated hantaviruses is facilitated by specific integrins expressed on platelets, endothelial cells, and macrophages. Infection of human umbilical vein endothelial cells and Vero E6 cells by the HFRS-causing hantaviruses Hantaan (HTN), Seoul (SEO), and Puumala (PUU) is inhibited by antibodies to αvβ3 integrins and by the integrin ligand vitronectin. The cellular entry of HTN, SEO, and PUU viruses, but not the nonpathogenic Prospect Hill (PH) hantavirus (i.e., a virus with no associated human disease), was also mediated by introducting recombinant αIIbβ3 or αvβ3 integrins into β3-integrin-deficient CHO cells. In addition, PH infectivity was not inhibited by αvβ3-specific sera or vitronectin but was blocked by α5β1-specific sera and the integrin ligand fibronectin. RGD tripeptides, which are required for many integrin-ligand interactions, are absent from all hantavirus G1 and G2 surface glycoproteins, and GRGDSP peptides did not inhibit hantavirus infectivity. Further, a mouse-human hybrid β3 integrin-specific Fab fragment, c7E3 (ReoPro), also inhibited the infectivity of HTN, SEO, and PUU as well as HPS-associated hantaviruses, Sin Nombre (SN) and New York-1 (NY-1). These findings indicate that pathogenic HPS- and HFRS-causing hantaviruses enter cells via β3 integrins, which are present on the surfaces of platelets, endothelial cells, and macrophages. Since β3 integrins regulate vascular permeability and platelet function, these findings also correlate β3 integrin usage with common elements of hantavirus pathogenesis.
PMCID: PMC104173  PMID: 10196290
10.  Pathogenic Hantaviruses Andes Virus and Hantaan Virus Induce Adherens Junction Disassembly by Directing Vascular Endothelial Cadherin Internalization in Human Endothelial Cells▿  
Journal of Virology  2010;84(14):7405-7411.
Hantaviruses infect endothelial cells and cause 2 vascular permeability-based diseases. Pathogenic hantaviruses enhance the permeability of endothelial cells in response to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). However, the mechanism by which hantaviruses hyperpermeabilize endothelial cells has not been defined. The paracellular permeability of endothelial cells is uniquely determined by the homophilic assembly of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) within adherens junctions, which is regulated by VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR2) responses. Here, we investigated VEGFR2 phosphorylation and the internalization of VE-cadherin within endothelial cells infected by pathogenic Andes virus (ANDV) and Hantaan virus (HTNV) and nonpathogenic Tula virus (TULV) hantaviruses. We found that VEGF addition to ANDV- and HTNV-infected endothelial cells results in the hyperphosphorylation of VEGFR2, while TULV infection failed to increase VEGFR2 phosphorylation. Concomitant with the VEGFR2 hyperphosphorylation, VE-cadherin was internalized to intracellular vesicles within ANDV- or HTNV-, but not TULV-, infected endothelial cells. Addition of angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) or sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) to ANDV- or HTNV-infected cells blocked VE-cadherin internalization in response to VEGF. These findings are consistent with the ability of Ang-1 and S1P to inhibit hantavirus-induced endothelial cell permeability. Our results suggest that pathogenic hantaviruses disrupt fluid barrier properties of endothelial cell adherens junctions by enhancing VEGFR2-VE-cadherin pathway responses which increase paracellular permeability. These results provide a pathway-specific mechanism for the enhanced permeability of hantavirus-infected endothelial cells and suggest that stabilizing VE-cadherin within adherens junctions is a primary target for regulating endothelial cell permeability during pathogenic hantavirus infection.
PMCID: PMC2898267  PMID: 20463083
11.  The Pathogenic NY-1 Hantavirus G1 Cytoplasmic Tail Inhibits RIG-I- and TBK-1-Directed Interferon Responses 
Journal of Virology  2006;80(19):9676-9686.
Hantaviruses cause two diseases with prominent vascular permeability defects, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. All hantaviruses infect human endothelial cells, although it is unclear what differentiates pathogenic from nonpathogenic hantaviruses. We observed dramatic differences in interferon-specific transcriptional responses between pathogenic and nonpathogenic hantaviruses at 1 day postinfection, suggesting that hantavirus pathogenesis may in part be determined by viral regulation of cellular interferon responses. In contrast to pathogenic NY-1 virus (NY-1V) and Hantaan virus (HTNV), nonpathogenic Prospect Hill virus (PHV) elicits early interferon responses following infection of human endothelial cells. We determined that PHV replication is blocked in human endothelial cells and that RNA and protein synthesis by PHV, but not NY-1V or HTNV, is inhibited at 2 to 4 days postinfection. The addition of antibodies to beta interferon (IFN-β) blocked interferon-directed MxA induction by >90% and demonstrated that hantavirus infection induces the secretion of IFN-β from endothelial cells. Coinfecting endothelial cells with NY-1V and PHV resulted in a 60% decrease in the induction of interferon-responsive MxA transcripts by PHV and further suggested the potential for NY-1V to regulate early IFN responses. Expression of the NY-1V G1 cytoplasmic tail inhibited by >90% RIG-I- and downstream TBK-1-directed transcription from interferon-stimulated response elements or β-interferon promoters in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, expression of the NY-1V nucleocapsid or PHV G1 tail had no effect on RIG-I- or TBK-1-directed transcriptional responses. Further, neither the NY-1V nor PHV G1 tails inhibited transcriptional responses directed by a constitutively active form of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3 5D), and IRF-3 is a direct target of TBK-1 phosphorylation. These findings indicate that the pathogenic NY-1V G1 protein regulates cellular IFN responses upstream of IRF-3 phosphorylation at the level of the TBK-1 complex. These findings further suggest that the G1 cytoplasmic tail contains a virulence element which determines the ability of hantaviruses to bypass innate cellular immune responses and delineates a mechanism for pathogenic hantaviruses to successfully replicate within human endothelial cells.
PMCID: PMC1617216  PMID: 16973572
12.  Elevated VEGF Levels in Pulmonary Edema Fluid and PBMCs from Patients with Acute Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome 
Advances in Virology  2012;2012:674360.
Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome is characterized by vascular permeability, hypoxia, and acute pulmonary edema. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is induced by hypoxia, potently induces vascular permeability, and is associated with high-altitude-induced pulmonary edema. Hantaviruses alter the normal regulation of β3 integrins that restrict VEGF-directed permeability and hantavirus infected endothelial cells are hyperresponsive to the permeabilizing effects of VEGF. However, the role of VEGF in acute pulmonary edema observed in HPS patients remains unclear. Here we retrospectively evaluate VEGF levels in pulmonary edema fluid (PEF), plasma, sera, and PBMCs from 31 HPS patients. VEGF was elevated in HPS patients PEF compared to controls with the highest levels observed in PEF samples from a fatal HPS case. VEGF levels were highest in PBMC samples during the first five days of hospitalization and diminished during recovery. Significantly increased PEF and PBMC VEGF levels are consistent with acute pulmonary edema observed in HPS patients and HPS disease severity. We observed substantially lower VEGF levels in a severe HPS disease survivor after extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. These findings suggest the importance of patients' VEGF levels during HPS, support the involvement of VEGF responses in HPS pathogenesis, and suggest targeting VEGF responses as a potential therapeutic approach.
PMCID: PMC3432326  PMID: 22956954
13.  Pathogenesis and Host Response in Syrian Hamsters following Intranasal Infection with Andes Virus 
PLoS Pathogens  2011;7(12):e1002426.
Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), also referred to as hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS), is a rare but frequently fatal disease caused by New World hantaviruses. In humans HPS is associated with severe pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock; however, the pathogenesis of this disease remains unclear largely due to a lack of suitable animal models for the study of disease progression. In this study we monitored clinical, virological, pathophysiological parameters and host immunological responses to decipher pathological factors and events in the lethal Syrian hamster model of HPS following intranasal inoculation of Andes virus. Transcriptional profiling of the host gene responses demonstrated a suppression of innate immune responses in most organs analyzed during the early stage of infection, except for in the lung which had low level activation of several pro-inflammatory genes. During this phase Andes virus established a systemic infection in hamsters, with viral antigen readily detectable in the endothelium of the majority of tissues analyzed by 7–8 days post-inoculation. Despite wide-spread infection, histological analysis confirmed pathological abnormalities were almost exclusively found in the lungs. Immediately preceding clinical signs of disease, intense activation of pro-inflammatory and Th1/Th2 responses were observed in the lungs as well as the heart, but not in peripheral organs, suggesting that localized immune-modulations by infection is paramount to pathogenesis. Throughout the course of infection a strong suppression of regulatory T-cell responses was noted and is hypothesized to be the basis of the aberrant immune activations. The unique and comprehensive monitoring of host immune responses to hantavirus infection increases our understanding of the immuno-pathogenesis of HPS and will facilitate the development of treatment strategies targeting deleterious host immunological responses.
Author Summary
New World hantaviruses, including Andes virus (ANDV), are rodent-borne pathogens which are associated with hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) and case fatality rates up to 50%. The pathogenesis of HPS remains unclear; however, it is believed to involve a delicate balance of virus infection and deleterious immune-modulations. In this study, exploiting pathological and immunological approaches, we investigate the disease mechanisms of HPS caused by ANDV in the lethal Syrian hamster model. Despite systemic viral replication, pathological findings were almost exclusively observed in the lungs of infected hamsters. The most striking observations came from monitoring the host responses in infected and control hamsters. During early infection, innate responses in infected hamsters were down-regulated in all organs except lung, which demonstrated slight increases in pro-inflammatory transcripts. Immediately preceding the symptomatic phase, considerable increases in pro-inflammatory and T-cell activating cytokine responses were observed in lung and heart tissue, but not in other organs. Interestingly, expression of regulatory T-cell marker genes that might control deleterious inflammatory responses were suppressed throughout infection, suggesting a role in the immune-dysregulation during hantavirus infection. The results of this study provide an increased understanding of HPS pathogenesis and will aid in the development of novel therapeutic strategies to counter HPS.
PMCID: PMC3240607  PMID: 22194683
14.  The C-Terminal 42 Residues of the Tula Virus Gn Protein Regulate Interferon Induction▿ 
Journal of Virology  2011;85(10):4752-4760.
Hantaviruses primarily infect the endothelial cell lining of capillaries and cause two vascular permeability-based diseases. The ability of pathogenic hantaviruses to regulate the early induction of interferon determines whether hantaviruses replicate in endothelial cells. Tula virus (TULV) and Prospect Hill virus (PHV) are hantaviruses which infect human endothelial cells but fail to cause human disease. PHV is unable to inhibit early interferon (IFN) responses and fails to replicate within human endothelial cells. However, TULV replicates successfully in human endothelial cells, suggesting that TULV is capable of regulating cellular IFN responses. We observed a >300-fold reduction in the IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) MxA and ISG56 following TULV versus PHV infection of endothelial cells 1 day postinfection. Similar to results with pathogenic hantaviruses, expressing the TULV Gn protein cytoplasmic tail (Gn-T) blocked RIG-I- and TBK1-directed transcription from IFN-stimulated response elements (ISREs) and IFN-β promoters (>90%) but not transcription directed by constitutively active IFN regulatory factor-3 (IRF3). In contrast, expressing the PHV Gn-T had no effect on TBK1-induced transcriptional responses. Analysis of Gn-T truncations demonstrated that the C-terminal 42 residues of the Gn-T (Gn-T-C42) from TULV, but not PHV, inhibited IFN induction >70%. These findings demonstrate that the TULV Gn-T inhibits IFN- and ISRE-directed responses upstream of IRF3 at the level of the TBK1 complex and further define a 42-residue domain of the TULV Gn-T that inhibits IFN induction. In contrast to pathogenic hantavirus Gn-Ts, the TULV Gn-T lacks a C-terminal degron domain and failed to bind tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3), a TBK1 complex component required for IRF3 activation. These findings indicate that the nonpathogenic TULV Gn-T regulates IFN induction but accomplishes this via unique interactions with cellular TBK1 complexes. These findings fundamentally distinguish nonpathogenic hantaviruses, PHV and TULV, and demonstrate that IFN regulation alone is insufficient for hantaviruses to cause disease. Yet regulating the early IFN response is necessary for hantaviruses to replicate within human endothelial cells and to be pathogenic. Thus, in addition to IFN regulation, hantaviruses contain discrete virulence determinants which permit them to be human pathogens.
PMCID: PMC3126157  PMID: 21367904
15.  An Innate Immunity-Regulating Virulence Determinant Is Uniquely Encoded within the Andes Virus Nucleocapsid Protein 
mBio  2014;5(1):e01088-13.
Andes virus (ANDV) is the only hantavirus known to spread from person to person and shown to cause highly lethal hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in patients and Syrian hamsters. Hantaviruses replicate in human endothelial cells and accomplish this by restricting the early induction of beta interferon (IFN-β)- and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). Our studies reveal that the ANDV nucleocapsid (N) protein uniquely inhibits IFN signaling responses directed by cytoplasmic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) sensors RIG-I and MDA5. In contrast, N proteins from Sin Nombre, New York-1, and Prospect Hill hantaviruses had no effect on RIG-I/MDA5-directed transcriptional responses from IFN-β-, IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE)-, or κB-containing promoters. Ablating a potential S-segment nonstructural open reading frame (ORF) (NSs) within the ANDV plasmid expressing N protein failed to alter IFN regulation by ANDV N protein. Further analysis demonstrated that expressing the ANDV N protein inhibited downstream IFN pathway activation directed by MAVS, TBK1, and IκB kinase ε (IKKε) but failed to inhibit transcriptional responses directed by constitutive expression of active interferon regulatory factor IRF3-5D or after stimulation by alpha interferon (IFN-α) or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Consistent with IFN pathway-specific regulation, the ANDV N protein inhibited TBK1-directed IRF3 phosphorylation (phosphorylation of serine 396 [pS396]) and TBK1 autophosphorylation (pS172). Collectively, these findings indicate that the ANDV N inhibits IFN signaling responses by interfering with TBK1 activation, upstream of IRF3 phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. Moreover, our findings reveal that ANDV uniquely carries a gene encoding a virulence determinant within its N protein that is capable of restricting ISG and IFN-β induction and provide a rationale for the novel pathogenesis and spread of ANDV.
Andes virus (ANDV) is distinguished from other hantaviruses by its unique ability to spread from person to person and cause lethal hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS)-like disease in Syrian hamsters. However, virulence determinants that distinguish ANDV from other pathogenic hantaviruses have yet to be defined. Here we reveal that ANDV uniquely contains a virulence determinant within its nucleocapsid (N) protein that potently inhibits innate cellular signaling pathways. This novel function of the N protein provides a new mechanism for hantaviruses to regulate interferon (IFN) and IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) induction that is likely to contribute to the enhanced ability of ANDV to replicate, spread, and cause disease. These findings differentiate ANDV from other HPS-causing hantaviruses and provide a potential target for viral attenuation that needs to be considered in vaccine development.
PMCID: PMC3944819  PMID: 24549848
16.  Hypoxia Induces Permeability and Giant Cell Responses of Andes Virus-Infected Pulmonary Endothelial Cells by Activating the mTOR-S6K Signaling Pathway 
Journal of Virology  2013;87(23):12999-13008.
Andes virus (ANDV) is a South American hantavirus that causes a highly lethal hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) characterized by hypoxia, thrombocytopenia, and vascular leakage leading to acute pulmonary edema. ANDV infects human pulmonary microvascular and lymphatic endothelial cells (MECs and LECs, respectively) and nonlytically enhances the permeability of interendothelial cell adherence junctions in response to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Recent findings also indicate that ANDV causes the formation of giant endothelial cells. Here, we demonstrate that hypoxic conditions alone enhance permeability and giant cell responses of ANDV-infected MECs and LECs through activation of the mTOR signaling pathway. In contrast to infection of cells with nonpathogenic Tula virus (TULV), we observed that exposure of ANDV-infected MECs and LECs to hypoxic conditions resulted in a 3- to 6-fold increase in monolayer permeability and the formation of giant cells 3× to 5× normal size. ANDV infection in combination with hypoxic conditions resulted in the enhancement of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α)-directed VEGF A, angiopoietin 4, and EGLN3 transcriptional responses. Constitutive mTOR signaling induces the formation of giant cells via phosphorylation of S6K, and mTOR regulates hypoxia and VEGF A-induced cellular responses. We found that S6K was hyperphosphorylated in ANDV-infected, hypoxia-treated MECs and LECs and that rapamycin treatment for 1 h inhibited mTOR signaling responses and blocked permeability and giant cell formation in ANDV-infected monolayers. These findings indicate that ANDV infection and hypoxic conditions enhance mTOR signaling responses, resulting in enhanced endothelial cell permeability and suggest a role for rapamycin in therapeutically stabilizing the endothelium of microvascular and lymphatic vessels during ANDV infection.
PMCID: PMC3838155  PMID: 24067973
17.  Roles for Endothelial Cells in Dengue Virus Infection 
Advances in Virology  2012;2012:840654.
Dengue viruses cause two severe diseases that alter vascular fluid barrier functions, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). The endothelium is the primary fluid barrier of the vasculature and ultimately the effects of dengue virus infection that cause capillary leakage impact endothelial cell (EC) barrier functions. The ability of dengue virus to infect the endothelium provides a direct means for dengue to alter capillary permeability, permit virus replication, and induce responses that recruit immune cells to the endothelium. Recent studies focused on dengue virus infection of primary ECs have demonstrated that ECs are efficiently infected, rapidly produce viral progeny, and elicit immune enhancing cytokine responses that may contribute to pathogenesis. Furthermore, infected ECs have also been implicated in enhancing viremia and immunopathogenesis within murine dengue disease models. Thus dengue-infected ECs have the potential to directly contribute to immune enhancement, capillary permeability, viremia, and immune targeting of the endothelium. These effects implicate responses of the infected endothelium in dengue pathogenesis and rationalize therapeutic targeting of the endothelium and EC responses as a means of reducing the severity of dengue virus disease.
PMCID: PMC3431041  PMID: 22952474
18.  NK Cell Activation in Human Hantavirus Infection Explained by Virus-Induced IL-15/IL15Rα Expression 
PLoS Pathogens  2014;10(11):e1004521.
Clinical infection with hantaviruses cause two severe acute diseases, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). These diseases are characterized by strong immune activation, increased vascular permeability, and up to 50% case-fatality rates. One prominent feature observed in clinical hantavirus infection is rapid expansion of natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood of affected individuals. We here describe an unusually high state of activation of such expanding NK cells in the acute phase of clinical Puumala hantavirus infection. Expanding NK cells expressed markedly increased levels of activating NK cell receptors and cytotoxic effector molecules. In search for possible mechanisms behind this NK cell activation, we observed virus-induced IL-15 and IL-15Rα on infected endothelial and epithelial cells. Hantavirus-infected cells were shown to strongly activate NK cells in a cell-cell contact-dependent way, and this response was blocked with anti-IL-15 antibodies. Surprisingly, the strength of the IL-15-dependent NK cell response was such that it led to killing of uninfected endothelial cells despite expression of normal levels of HLA class I. In contrast, hantavirus-infected cells were resistant to NK cell lysis, due to a combination of virus-induced increase in HLA class I expression levels and hantavirus-mediated inhibition of apoptosis induction. In summary, we here describe a possible mechanism explaining the massive NK cell activation and proliferation observed in HFRS patients caused by Puumala hantavirus infection. The results add further insights into mechanisms behind the immunopathogenesis of hantavirus infections in humans and identify new possible targets for intervention.
Author Summary
Hantaviruses cause severe clinical infections with up to 50% case-fatality rates. The diseases represent an important global health problem as no vaccine or specific treatment is available. The most prominent hallmark in patients is strong immune activation, reflected as massive CD8 T and NK cell expansion, accompanied by severe vascular leakage. The mechanisms behind this massive immune activation are still not fully understood. Here, we first assessed the expression of several activation markers and receptors on NK cells derived from hantavirus-infected patients using flow cytometry. High NK cell activation was observed during the acute phase of clinical infection. To address possible underlying mechanisms explaining this NK cell activation, we established an in vitro hantavirus infection model using human primary endothelial cells, the natural in vivo targets of the virus. We demonstrate hantavirus-induced IL-15/IL-15Rα on infected endothelial cells, and show that this results in NK cell activation, similar to the profile found in hantavirus-infected patients. Interestingly, these activated NK cells were able to kill uninfected endothelial cells despite their normal expression of HLA class I. The present data add further insights into hantavirus-induced pathogenesis and suggest possible targets for future therapeutical interventions in these severe diseases.
PMCID: PMC4239055  PMID: 25412359
19.  Hantavirus Regulation of Type I Interferon Responses 
Advances in Virology  2012;2012:524024.
Hantaviruses primarily infect human endothelial cells (ECs) and cause two highly lethal human diseases. Early addition of Type I interferon (IFN) to ECs blocks hantavirus replication and thus for hantaviruses to be pathogenic they need to prevent early interferon induction. PHV replication is blocked in human ECs, but not inhibited in IFN deficient VeroE6 cells and consistent with this, infecting ECs with PHV results in the early induction of IFNβ and an array of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs). In contrast, ANDV, HTNV, NY-1V and TULV hantaviruses, inhibit early ISG induction and successfully replicate within human ECs. Hantavirus inhibition of IFN responses has been attributed to several viral proteins including regulation by the Gn proteins cytoplasmic tail (Gn-T). The Gn-T interferes with the formation of STING-TBK1-TRAF3 complexes required for IRF3 activation and IFN induction, while the PHV Gn-T fails to alter this complex or regulate IFN induction. These findings indicate that interfering with early IFN induction is necessary for hantaviruses to replicate in human ECs, and suggest that additional determinants are required for hantaviruses to be pathogenic. The mechanism by which Gn-Ts disrupt IFN signaling is likely to reveal potential therapeutic interventions and suggest protein targets for attenuating hantaviruses.
PMCID: PMC3423653  PMID: 22924041
20.  Endothelial Cells Elicit Immune-Enhancing Responses to Dengue Virus Infection 
Journal of Virology  2012;86(12):6408-6415.
Dengue viruses cause two severe diseases that alter vascular fluid barrier functions, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Preexisting antibodies to dengue virus disposes patients to immune-enhanced edema (DSS) or hemorrhagic (DHF) disease following infection by a discrete dengue virus serotype. Although the endothelium is the primary vascular fluid barrier, direct effects of dengue virus on endothelial cells (ECs) have not been considered primary factors in pathogenesis. Here, we show that dengue virus infection of human ECs elicits immune-enhancing EC responses. Our results suggest that rapid early dengue virus proliferation within ECs is permitted by dengue virus regulation of early, but not late, beta interferon (IFN-β) responses. The analysis of EC responses following synchronous dengue virus infection revealed the high-level induction and secretion of immune cells (T cells, B cells, and mast cells) as well as activating and recruiting cytokines BAFF (119-fold), IL-6/8 (4- to 7-fold), CXCL9/10/11 (45- to 338-fold), RANTES (724-fold), and interleukin-7 (IL-7; 128-fold). Moreover, we found that properdin factor B, an alternative pathway complement activator that directs chemotactic anaphylatoxin C3a and C5a production, was induced 34-fold. Thus, dengue virus-infected ECs evoke key inflammatory responses observed in dengue virus patients which are linked to DHF and DSS. Our findings suggest that dengue virus-infected ECs directly contribute to immune enhancement, capillary permeability, viremia, and immune targeting of the endothelium. These data implicate EC responses in dengue virus pathogenesis and further rationalize therapeutic targeting of the endothelium as a means of reducing the severity of dengue virus disease.
PMCID: PMC3393559  PMID: 22496214
21.  Endothelial Cell Permeability during Hantavirus Infection Involves Factor XII-Dependent Increased Activation of the Kallikrein-Kinin System 
PLoS Pathogens  2013;9(7):e1003470.
Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) are diseases caused by hantavirus infections and are characterized by vascular leakage due to alterations of the endothelial barrier. Hantavirus-infected endothelial cells (EC) display no overt cytopathology; consequently, pathogenesis models have focused either on the influx of immune cells and release of cytokines or on increased degradation of the adherens junction protein, vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, due to hantavirus-mediated hypersensitization of EC to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). To examine endothelial leakage in a relevant in vitro system, we co-cultured endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC) to generate capillary blood vessel-like structures. In contrast to results obtained in monolayers of cultured EC, we found that despite viral replication in both cell types as well as the presence of VEGF, infected in vitro vessels neither lost integrity nor displayed evidence of VE-cadherin degradation. Here, we present evidence for a novel mechanism of hantavirus-induced vascular leakage involving activation of the plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS). We show that incubation of factor XII (FXII), prekallikrein (PK), and high molecular weight kininogen (HK) plasma proteins with hantavirus-infected EC results in increased cleavage of HK, higher enzymatic activities of FXIIa/kallikrein (KAL) and increased liberation of bradykinin (BK). Measuring cell permeability in real-time using electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS), we identified dramatic increases in endothelial cell permeability after KKS activation and liberation of BK. Furthermore, the alterations in permeability could be prevented using inhibitors that directly block BK binding, the activity of FXIIa, or the activity of KAL. Lastly, FXII binding and autoactivation is increased on the surface of hantavirus-infected EC. These data are the first to demonstrate KKS activation during hantavirus infection and could have profound implications for treatment of hantavirus infections.
Author Summary
Primary manifestations of disease due to hantavirus infections include systemic vascular leakage and hypotension for which the underlying mechanism is not known. A particularly perplexing finding is that the vascular endothelium remains intact during hantavirus infection and with no apparent cytopathic effects to explain leakage and edema. Our studies show for the first time that hantavirus-infected EC have increased KKS activation resulting in liberation of the inflammatory peptide, BK. BK is a potent inducer of vascular permeability, edema formation, and hypotension; thus, our results provide a novel mechanism for hantavirus-induced vascular abnormalities. Additionally, we describe the use of an in vitro capillary blood vessel model to examine responses occurring locally in blood vessels during infection. This model could be used in future studies by others for assessing further aspects of hantavirus pathogenesis or that of other vascular tropic viruses.
PMCID: PMC3715459  PMID: 23874198
22.  Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome-Associated Hantaviruses Contain Conserved and Functional ITAM Signaling Elements 
Journal of Virology  2003;77(2):1638-1643.
Hantaviruses infect human endothelial and immune cells, causing two human diseases, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). We have identified key signaling elements termed immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) within the G1 cytoplasmic tail of all HPS-causing hantaviruses. ITAMs direct receptor signaling within immune and endothelial cells and the presence of ITAMs in all HPS-causing hantaviruses provides a means for altering normal cellular responses which maintain vascular integrity. The NY-1 G1 ITAM was shown to coprecipitate a complex of phosphoproteins from cells, and the G1 ITAM is a substrate for the Src family kinase Fyn. The hantavirus ITAM coprecipitated Lyn, Syk, and ZAP-70 kinases from T or B cells, while mutagenesis of the ITAM abolished these interactions. In addition, G1 ITAM tyrosines directed intracellular interactions with Syk by mammalian two-hybrid analysis. These findings demonstrate that G1 ITAMs bind key cellular kinases that regulate immune and endothelial cell functions. There is currently no means for establishing the role of the G1 ITAM in hantavirus pathogenesis. However, the conservation of G1 ITAMs in all HPS-causing hantaviruses and the role of these signaling elements in immune and endothelial cells suggest that functional G1 ITAMs are likely to dysregulate normal immune and endothelial cell responses and contribute to hantavirus pathogenesis.
PMCID: PMC140783  PMID: 12502882
23.  Productive Dengue Virus Infection of Human Endothelial Cells Is Directed by Heparan Sulfate-Containing Proteoglycan Receptors ▿ 
Journal of Virology  2011;85(18):9478-9485.
Dengue virus causes leakage of the vascular endothelium, resulting in dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. The endothelial cell lining of the vasculature regulates capillary permeability and is altered by immune and chemokine responses which affect fluid barrier functions of the endothelium. Our findings indicate that human endothelial cells are highly susceptible to infection by dengue virus (type 4). We found that dengue virus productively infects ∼80% of primary human endothelial cells, resulting in the rapid release of ∼105 virions 1 day postinfection. Analysis of potential inhibitors of dengue virus entry demonstrated that antibodies and ligands to integrins and cellular receptors were unable to inhibit dengue virus infection of endothelial cells. In contrast, pretreating cells with heparin or heparan sulfate resulted in a 60 to 80% reduction in dengue virus-infected cells, and pretreatment of endothelial cells with heparinase III or protease reduced dengue infectivity by >80%. Dengue virus bound specifically to resin immobilized heparin, and binding was competitively inhibited by excess heparin but not other ligands. Collectively, these findings suggest that dengue virus specifically attaches to heparan sulfate-containing proteoglycan receptors on endothelial cells. Following attachment to human endothelial cell receptors, dengue virus causes a highly productive infection that has the potential to increase viral dissemination and viremia. This provides the potential for dengue virus-infected endothelial cells to directly alter barrier functions of the endothelium, contribute to enhancement of immune cell activation, and serve as potential targets of immune responses which play a central role in dengue pathogenesis.
PMCID: PMC3165770  PMID: 21734047
24.  Influenza Infects Lung Microvascular Endothelium Leading to Microvascular Leak: Role of Apoptosis and Claudin-5 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(10):e47323.
Severe influenza infections are complicated by acute lung injury, a syndrome of pulmonary microvascular leak. The pathogenesis of this complication is unclear. We hypothesized that human influenza could directly infect the lung microvascular endothelium, leading to loss of endothelial barrier function. We infected human lung microvascular endothelium with both clinical and laboratory strains of human influenza. Permeability of endothelial monolayers was assessed by spectrofluorimetry and by measurement of the transendothelial electrical resistance. We determined the molecular mechanisms of flu-induced endothelial permeability and developed a mouse model of severe influenza. We found that both clinical and laboratory strains of human influenza can infect and replicate in human pulmonary microvascular endothelium, leading to a marked increase in permeability. This was caused by apoptosis of the lung endothelium, since inhibition of caspases greatly attenuated influenza-induced endothelial leak. Remarkably, replication-deficient virus also caused a significant degree of endothelial permeability, despite displaying no cytotoxic effects to the endothelium. Instead, replication-deficient virus induced degradation of the tight junction protein claudin-5; the adherens junction protein VE-cadherin and the actin cytoskeleton were unaffected. Over-expression of claudin-5 was sufficient to prevent replication-deficient virus-induced permeability. The barrier-protective agent formoterol was able to markedly attenuate flu-induced leak in association with dose-dependent induction of claudin-5. Finally, mice infected with human influenza developed pulmonary edema that was abrogated by parenteral treatment with formoterol. Thus, we describe two distinct mechanisms by which human influenza can induce pulmonary microvascular leak. Our findings have implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of acute lung injury from severe influenza.
PMCID: PMC3480371  PMID: 23115643
25.  Temporal Analysis of Andes Virus and Sin Nombre Virus Infections of Syrian Hamsters▿  
Journal of Virology  2007;81(14):7449-7462.
Andes virus (ANDV) and Sin Nombre virus (SNV) are rodent-borne hantaviruses that cause a highly lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans known as hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). There are no vaccines or specific drugs to prevent or treat HPS, and the pathogenesis is not understood. Syrian hamsters infected with ANDV, but not SNV, develop a highly lethal disease that closely resembles HPS in humans. Here, we performed a temporal pathogenesis study comparing ANDV and SNV infections in hamsters. SNV was nonpathogenic and viremia was not detected despite the fact that all animals were infected. ANDV was uniformly lethal with a mean time to death of 11 days. The first pathology detected was lymphocyte apoptosis starting on day 4. Animals were viremic and viral antigen was first observed in multiple organs by days 6 and 8, respectively. Levels of infectious virus in the blood increased 4 to 5 logs between days 6 and 8. Pulmonary edema was first detected ultrastructurally on day 6. Ultrastructural analysis of lung tissues revealed the presence of large inclusion bodies and substantial numbers of vacuoles within infected endothelial cells. Paraendothelial gaps were not observed, suggesting that fluid leakage was transcellular and directly attributable to infecting virus. Taken together, these data imply that HPS treatment strategies aimed at preventing virus replication and dissemination will have the greatest probability of success if administered before the viremic phase; however, because vascular leakage is associated with infected endothelial cells, a therapeutic strategy targeting viral replication might be effective even at later times (e.g., after disease onset).
PMCID: PMC1933362  PMID: 17475651

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