PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-25 (662961)

Clipboard (0)
None

Related Articles

1.  Correlation of vitamin D, bone mineral density and parathyroid hormone levels in adults with low bone density 
Indian Journal of Orthopaedics  2013;47(4):402-407.
Background:
Bone mineral densiy (BMD) is known to be affected by serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH) D) levels, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels. Indian data pertinent to above observation is scant. Our study aimed to investigate the relationships between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH) D) levels, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels and bone mineral density (BMD) in a cohort of Indian patients.
Materials and Methods:
Adults with or without fragility fractures with low BMD at the hip or lumbar spine were evaluated clinically along with laboratory investigations. T-scores of the hip and spine were derived from BMD-DEXA (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry). Multivariate regression models were used to investigate the relationships between serum 25(OH) D, iPTH and BMD.
Results:
Total of 102 patients (male:female = 38:64) with a mean age of 62.5 ± 6.4 years were included in the study. Forty-four patients had osteopenia. Osteoporosis was present in 58 patients. The mean values for serum 25(OH) D and iPTH levels were 21.3 ± 0.5 ng/ml and 53.1 ± 22.3 pg/ml, respectively. In 84.3% of patients, serum 25(OH) D levels were below 30 ng/ml (Normal = 30-74 ng/ml), confirming vitamin D deficiency. There was no association between 25(OH) D levels and BMD at the hip or lumbar spine (P = 0.473 and 0.353, respectively). Both at the hip and lumbar spine; iPTH levels, male gender, body mass index (BMI) and age were found to be significant predictors of BMD. Patients with higher BMI had significantly lower BMD and T-score. At levels <30 ng/ml, 25(OH) D was negatively associated with iPTH (P = 0.041).
Conclusion:
Among our cohort of patients with low BMD, no direct relationship between serum 25(OH) D levels and BMD was observed. However, a negative correlation between iPTH and 25(OH) D at serum 25(OH) D concentrations <30 ng/ml. Serum iPTH levels showed a significant negative association with BMD at the hip and lumbar spine. Our findings underscore the critical role of parathyroid hormone in bone metabolism and health.
doi:10.4103/0019-5413.114932
PMCID: PMC3745696  PMID: 23960286
Bone mineral density; osteoporosis; parathyroid hormone; vitamin D
2.  Noninvasive assessment of bone health in Indian patients with chronic kidney disease 
Indian Journal of Nephrology  2013;23(3):161-167.
Abnormalities in mineral and bone disease are common in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Evaluation of bone health requires measurement of parameters of bone turnover, mineralization, and volume. There are no data on bone health in CKD patients from India. In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated serum biomarkers of bone turnover: Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP) and total deoxypyridinoline (tDPD) along with parathyroid hormone, 25(OH) vitamin D, and bone mineral density (BMD) using dual absorption X-ray absorptiometry in a cohort of 74 treatment-naive patients with newly diagnosed stage 4 and 5 CKD (age 42 ± 14.5 years, 54 men) and 52 non-CKD volunteers (age 40.2 ± 9.3 years, 40 men). Compared to the controls, CKD subjects showed elevated intact PTH (iPTH), BAP, and tDPD and lower BMD. There was a strong correlation between iPTH and BAP (r = 0.88, P < 0.0001), iPTH and tDPD (r = 0.51, P < 0.0001), and BAP and tDPD (r = 0.46, P = 0.0004). The iPTH elevation was greater than twice the upper range of normal in 73% cases, and BAP was >40 U/L in 66% cases. The combination of these markers suggests high turnover bone disease in over 60% cases. The prevalence of osteopenia and osteoporosis was 37% and 12%, respectively. Osteoporotic subjects had higher iPTH, BAP, and tDPD, suggesting a role of high turnover in genesis of osteoporosis. Vitamin D deficiency was seen in 80%, and another 13% had insufficient levels. Vitamin D correlated inversely with BAP (r = −0.3, P = 0.009), and levels were lower in those with iPTH >300 pg/ml (P = 0.0.04). In conclusion, over 60% of newly diagnosed Indian stage 4–5 CKD patients show biochemical parameters consistent with high turnover bone disease. High turnover could contribute to the development of osteoporosis in CKD subjects. Deficiency of 25 (OH) vitamin D is widespread and seems to have a role in the genesis of renal bone disease. Studies on the effect of supplementation of native vitamin D are needed.
doi:10.4103/0971-4065.111831
PMCID: PMC3692139  PMID: 23814412
Bone mineral density; bone-specific alkaline phosphatase; chronic kidney disease; deoxypyrinolidine; parathyroid hormone; renal osteodystrophy; vitamin D
3.  Correlates of parathyroid hormone concentration in hemodialysis patients 
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation  2013;28(6):1516-1525.
Background
The implications of chemical hyperparathyroidism on bone and mineral metabolism measures in maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) are not well known. We hypothesized that a higher serum intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) level is associated with the higher likelihood of hyperphosphatemia, hyperphosphatasemia [high serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels] and hypercalcemia.
Methods
Over an 8-year period (July 2001–June 2009), we identified 106 760 MHD patients with iPTH and calcium (Ca), phosphorous (P) and ALP data from a large dialysis clinic. Logistic regression models were examined to assess the association between serum iPTH increments and the likelihood of hyperphosphatemia (P ≥5.5 mg/dL), hypercalcemia (Ca ≥10.2 mg/dL) and hyperphosphatasemia (ALP ≥120 U/L).
Results
Patients were 61 ± 16 years old and included 45% women, 59% diabetics and 33% Blacks. Compared with an iPTH level of 100 to <200 pg/mL, patients with an iPTH level of 600–700, 700 to <800 and ≥800 pg/mL had 122% (OR: 2.22, 95% CI: 2.04–2.41), 153% (OR: 2.53, 95% CI: 2.29–2.80) and 243% (OR: 3.43, 95% CI: 3.22–3.66) higher risk of hyperphosphatemia, respectively, and had 109% (OR: 2.09, 95% CI: 1.93–2.26), 130% (OR: 2.30, 95% CI: 2.10–2.52) and 376% (OR: 4.76, 95% CI: 4.50–5.04) higher risk of hyperphosphatasemia, respectively. Compared with an iPTH level of 100 to <200 pg/mL, both the low iPTH (<100 pg/mL, OR: 2.45, 95% CI: 2.27–2.64) and the high iPTH (≥800 pg/mL: OR: 2.13, 95% CI: 1.95–2.33) levels were associated with hypercalcemia.
Conclusions
Higher levels of iPTH are incremental correlates of hyperphosphatemia and hyperphosphatasemia, whereas both very low and high PTH levels are linked to hypercalcemia. If these associations are causal, correction of hyperparathyroidism may have overarching implications on bone and mineral disorders in MHD patients.
doi:10.1093/ndt/gfs598
PMCID: PMC3685307  PMID: 23348879
hemodialysis; serum alkaline phosphatase; serum calcium; serum intact parathyroid hormone; serum phosphorous
4.  Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, parathyroid hormone and blood pressure in an elderly cohort from Germany: a cross-sectional study 
Background
Although several studies indicate a link between vitamin D status and blood pressure (BP), the results are inconsistent. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether in predominantly non-obese elderly people without vitamin D deficiency or very high intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] and iPTH are independently associated with BP.
Methods
Cross-sectional data of 132 non-institutionalised subjects (90 women and 42 men, aged 66- 96 years) from Giessen, Germany, were analysed. Serum 25(OH)D3 and iPTH were measured by an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay and BP was determined with a sphygmomanometer. We performed univariate and multiple regression analyses to examine the influence of 25(OH)D3 and iPTH on BP with adjustments for age, body composition and lifestyle factors.
Results
While iPTH had no impact on BP, 25(OH)D3 was negatively associated with systolic BP in men, but not in women. After splitting the cohort into antihypertensive medication users and non-users, 25(OH)D3 was a significant predictor for systolic and diastolic BP only in men not receiving antihypertensive medicine, even after multiple adjustment. Adjustment for 25(OH)D3 resulted in an inverse association of iPTH with diastolic BP also only in men without intake of antihypertensive medicine.
Conclusions
In elderly men without vitamin D deficiency and not taking antihypertensive medicine, 25(OH)D3 may be a negative determinant of BP, independent of iPTH, body composition and lifestyle factors. Furthermore, iPTH may be an independent negative determinant of diastolic BP in men not taking antihypertensive medicine.
doi:10.1186/1743-7075-9-20
PMCID: PMC3362780  PMID: 22433818
25-Hydroxyvitamin D3; Parathyroid hormone; Blood pressure; Elderly
5.  Response of bone metabolism related hormones to a single session of strenuous exercise in active elderly subjects 
Objective: To evaluate the effect of strenuous exercise on bone metabolism and related hormones in elderly subjects.
Methods: Twenty one active elderly subjects (11 men and 10 women; mean age 73.3 years) showing a mean theoretical Vo2max of 151.4% participated. Concentrations of plasma ionised calcium (iCa), serum intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), and 1.25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3 (1.25(OH)2D3), as well as the bone biochemical markers type I collagen C-telopeptide for bone resorption and osteocalcin and bone alkaline phosphatase for bone formation, were analysed before and after a maximal incremental exercise test.
Results: At basal level, iPTH was positively correlated with age (r = 0.56, p<0.01) and negatively correlated with 25(OH)D (r = –0.50; p<0.01) and 1.25(OH)2D3 (r = –0.47; p<0.05). Moreover, 25(OH)D and 1.25(OH)2D3 levels were negatively correlated with age (r = –0.50, p<0.01 and r = –0.53, p<0.01, respectively). After exercise, iCa and 25(OH)D decreased (p<0.001 and p = 0.01, respectively) while iPTH increased (p<0.001). The levels of 1.25(OH)2D3, bone biochemical markers, haematocrit, and haemoglobin were unchanged. The variations in iCa and 25(OH)D were not related to age and/or sex. The iPTH variation was directly related to basal iPTH levels (p<0.01) and indirectly related to age.
Conclusions: In active elderly subjects, strenuous exercise disturbed calcium homeostasis and bone related hormones without immediate measurable effect on bone turnover. Although an increase in iPTH could have an anabolic action on bone tissue, our findings from our short term study did not allow us to conclude that such action occurred.
doi:10.1136/bjsm.2004.013151
PMCID: PMC1725278  PMID: 16046330
6.  Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and body composition in an elderly cohort from Germany: a cross-sectional study 
Background
Emerging evidence indicates that there is an association between vitamin D and obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the level of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] in the elderly is influenced by parameters of anthropometry and body composition independent of potential confounding lifestyle factors and the level of serum intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH).
Methods
Cross-sectional data of 131 independently living participants (90 women, 41 men; aged 66–96 years) of the longitudinal study on nutrition and health status in senior citizens of Giessen, Germany were analysed. Concentrations of 25(OH)D3 and iPTH were ascertained by an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. Body composition was measured by a bioelectrical impedance analysis. We performed univariate and multiple regression analyses to examine the influence of body composition on 25(OH)D3 with adjustments for age, iPTH and lifestyle factors.
Results
In univariate regression analyses, 25(OH)D3 was associated with body mass index (BMI), hip circumference and total body fat (TBF) in women, but not in men. Using multiple regression analyses, TBF was shown to be a negative predictor of 25(OH)D3 levels in women even after controlling for age, lifestyle and iPTH (ß = −0.247; P = 0.016), whereas the associations between BMI, hip circumference and 25(OH)D3 lost statistical significance after adjusting for iPTH. In men, 25(OH)D3 was not affected by anthropometric or body composition variables.
Conclusions
The results indicate that 25(OH)D3 levels are affected by TBF, especially in elderly women, independent of lifestyle factors and iPTH.
doi:10.1186/1743-7075-9-42
PMCID: PMC3484027  PMID: 22607088
25-Hydroxyvitamin D3; Body composition; Fat mass; Elderly
7.  Pakistanis living in Oslo have lower serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels but higher serum ionized calcium levels compared with ethnic Norwegians. The Oslo Health Study 
Background
Persons of Pakistani origin living in Oslo have a much higher prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and secondary hyperparathyroidism but similar bone mineral density compared with ethnic Norwegians. Our objective was to investigate whether Pakistani immigrants living in Oslo have an altered vitamin D metabolism by means of compensatory higher serum levels of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (s-1,25(OH)2D) compared with ethnic Norwegians; and whether serum levels of ionized calcium (s-Ca2+) differ between Pakistanis and Norwegians.
Methods
In a cross-sectional, population-based study venous serum samples were drawn from 94 Pakistani men and 67 Pakistani women aged 30–60 years, and 290 Norwegian men and 270 Norwegian women aged 45–60 years; in total 721 subjects.
Results
Pakistanis had lower s-1,25(OH)2D compared with Norwegians (p < 0.001). Age- and gender adjusted mean (95% CI) levels were 93 (86, 99) pmol/l in Pakistanis and 123 (120, 126) pmol/l in Norwegians, p < 0.001. The difference persisted after controlling for body mass index. There was a positive relation between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (s-25(OH)D) and s-1,25(OH)2D in both groups. S-Ca2+ was higher in Pakistanis; age-adjusted mean (95% CI) levels were 1.28 (1.27, 1.28) mmol/l in Pakistanis and 1.26 (1.26, 1.26) mmol/l in Norwegians, p < 0.001. In both groups, s-Ca2+ was inversely correlated to serum intact parathyroid hormone levels (s-iPTH). For any s-iPTH, s-Ca2+ was higher in Pakistanis, also when controlling for age.
Conclusion
Community-dwelling Pakistanis in Oslo with low vitamin D status and secondary hyperparathyroidism have lower s-1,25(OH)2D compared with ethnic Norwegians. However, the Pakistanis have higher s-Ca2+. The cause of the higher s-Ca2+ in Pakistanis in spite of their higher iPTH remains unclear.
doi:10.1186/1472-6823-7-9
PMCID: PMC2235861  PMID: 17945003
8.  Is serum phosphorus control related to parathyroid hormone control in dialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism? 
BMC Nephrology  2012;13:76.
Background
Elevated serum phosphorus (P) levels have been linked to increased morbidity and mortality in dialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) but may be difficult to control if parathyroid hormone (PTH) is persistently elevated. We conducted a post hoc analysis of data from an earlier interventional study (OPTIMA) to explore the relationship between PTH control and serum P.
Methods
The OPTIMA study randomized dialysis patients with intact PTH (iPTH) 300–799 pg/mL to receive conventional care alone (vitamin D and/or phosphate binders [PB]; n = 184) or a cinacalcet-based regimen (n = 368). For patients randomized to conventional care, investigators were allowed flexibility in using a non-cinacalcet regimen (with no specific criteria for vitamin D analogue dosage) to attain KDOQI™ targets for iPTH, P, Ca and Ca x P. For those assigned to the cinacalcet-based regimen, dosages of cinacalcet, vitamin D sterols, and PB were optimized over the first 16 weeks of the study, using a predefined treatment algorithm. The present analysis examined achievement of serum P targets (≤4.5 and ≤5.5 mg/dL) in relation to achievement of iPTH ≤300 pg/mL during the efficacy assessment phase (EAP; weeks 17–23).
Results
Patients who achieved iPTH ≤ 300 pg/mL (or a reduction of ≥30% from baseline) were more likely to achieve serum P targets than those who did not, regardless of treatment group. Of those who did achieve iPTH ≤ 300 pg/mL, 43% achieved P ≤4.5 mg/dL and 70% achieved P ≤5.5 mg/dL, versus 21% and 46% of those who did not achieve iPTH ≤ 300 pg/mL. Doses of PB tended to be higher in patients not achieving serum P targets. Patients receiving cinacalcet were more likely to achieve iPTH ≤300 pg/mL than those receiving conventional care (73% vs 23% of patients). Logistic regression analysis identified lower baseline P, no PB use at baseline and cinacalcet treatment to be predictors of achieving P ≤4.5 mg/dL during EAP in patients above this threshold at baseline.
Conclusions
This post hoc analysis found that control of serum P in dialysis patients was better when serum PTH levels were lowered effectively, regardless of treatment received.
Trial registration
Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00110890
doi:10.1186/1471-2369-13-76
PMCID: PMC3473247  PMID: 22863242
9.  The Sclerostin-Independent Bone Anabolic Activity of Intermittent PTH Treatment Is Mediated by T-Cell–Produced Wnt10b 
Both blunted osteocytic production of the Wnt inhibitor sclerostin (Scl) and increased T-cell production of the Wnt ligand Wnt10b contribute to the bone anabolic activity of intermittent parathyroid hormone (iPTH) treatment. However, the relative contribution of these mechanisms is unknown. In this study, we modeled the repressive effects of iPTH on Scl production in mice by treatment with a neutralizing anti-Scl antibody (Scl-Ab) to determine the contribution of T-cell–produced Wnt10b to the Scl-independent modalities of action of iPTH. We report that combined treatment with Scl-Ab and iPTH was more potent than either iPTH or Scl-Ab alone in increasing stromal cell production of OPG, osteoblastogenesis, osteoblast life span, bone turnover, bone mineral density, and trabecular bone volume and structure in mice with T cells capable of producing Wnt10b. In T-cell–null mice and mice lacking T-cell production of Wnt10b, combined treatment increased bone turnover significantly more than iPTH or Scl-Ab alone. However, in these mice, combined treatment with Scl-Ab and iPTH was equally effective as Scl-Ab alone in increasing the osteoblastic pool, bone volume, density, and structure. These findings demonstrate that the Scl-independent activity of iPTH on osteoblasts and bone mass is mediated by T-cell–produced Wnt10b. The data provide a proof of concept of a more potent therapeutic effect of combined treatment with iPTH and Scl-Ab than either alone. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
doi:10.1002/jbmr.2044
PMCID: PMC4326235  PMID: 24357520
PTH; BONE; SCL; ANTIBODY; T CELLS; WNT10B
10.  Clinical Utility of Vitamin D Testing 
Executive Summary
This report from the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) was intended to evaluate the clinical utility of vitamin D testing in average risk Canadians and in those with kidney disease. As a separate analysis, this report also includes a systematic literature review of the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in these two subgroups.
This evaluation did not set out to determine the serum vitamin D thresholds that might apply to non-bone health outcomes. For bone health outcomes, no high or moderate quality evidence could be found to support a target serum level above 50 nmol/L. Similarly, no high or moderate quality evidence could be found to support vitamin D’s effects in non-bone health outcomes, other than falls.
Vitamin D
Vitamin D is a lipid soluble vitamin that acts as a hormone. It stimulates intestinal calcium absorption and is important in maintaining adequate phosphate levels for bone mineralization, bone growth, and remodelling. It’s also believed to be involved in the regulation of cell growth proliferation and apoptosis (programmed cell death), as well as modulation of the immune system and other functions. Alone or in combination with calcium, Vitamin D has also been shown to reduce the risk of fractures in elderly men (≥ 65 years), postmenopausal women, and the risk of falls in community-dwelling seniors. However, in a comprehensive systematic review, inconsistent results were found concerning the effects of vitamin D in conditions such as cancer, all-cause mortality, and cardiovascular disease. In fact, no high or moderate quality evidence could be found concerning the effects of vitamin D in such non-bone health outcomes. Given the uncertainties surrounding the effects of vitamin D in non-bone health related outcomes, it was decided that this evaluation should focus on falls and the effects of vitamin D in bone health and exclusively within average-risk individuals and patients with kidney disease.
Synthesis of vitamin D occurs naturally in the skin through exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation from sunlight, but it can also be obtained from dietary sources including fortified foods, and supplements. Foods rich in vitamin D include fatty fish, egg yolks, fish liver oil, and some types of mushrooms. Since it is usually difficult to obtain sufficient vitamin D from non-fortified foods, either due to low content or infrequent use, most vitamin D is obtained from fortified foods, exposure to sunlight, and supplements.
Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population
Vitamin D deficiency may lead to rickets in infants and osteomalacia in adults. Factors believed to be associated with vitamin D deficiency include:
darker skin pigmentation,
winter season,
living at higher latitudes,
skin coverage,
kidney disease,
malabsorption syndromes such as Crohn’s disease, cystic fibrosis, and
genetic factors.
Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at a higher risk of vitamin D deficiency due to either renal losses or decreased synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D.
Health Canada currently recommends that, until the daily recommended intakes (DRI) for vitamin D are updated, Canada’s Food Guide (Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide) should be followed with respect to vitamin D intake. Issued in 2007, the Guide recommends that Canadians consume two cups (500 ml) of fortified milk or fortified soy beverages daily in order to obtain a daily intake of 200 IU. In addition, men and women over the age of 50 should take 400 IU of vitamin D supplements daily. Additional recommendations were made for breastfed infants.
A Canadian survey evaluated the median vitamin D intake derived from diet alone (excluding supplements) among 35,000 Canadians, 10,900 of which were from Ontario. Among Ontarian males ages 9 and up, the median daily dietary vitamin D intake ranged between 196 IU and 272 IU per day. Among females, it varied from 152 IU to 196 IU per day. In boys and girls ages 1 to 3, the median daily dietary vitamin D intake was 248 IU, while among those 4 to 8 years it was 224 IU.
Vitamin D Testing
Two laboratory tests for vitamin D are available, 25-hydroxy vitamin D, referred to as 25(OH)D, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. Vitamin D status is assessed by measuring the serum 25(OH)D levels, which can be assayed using radioimmunoassays, competitive protein-binding assays (CPBA), high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). These may yield different results with inter-assay variation reaching up to 25% (at lower serum levels) and intra-assay variation reaching 10%.
The optimal serum concentration of vitamin D has not been established and it may change across different stages of life. Similarly, there is currently no consensus on target serum vitamin D levels. There does, however, appear to be a consensus on the definition of vitamin D deficiency at 25(OH)D < 25 nmol/l, which is based on the risk of diseases such as rickets and osteomalacia. Higher target serum levels have also been proposed based on subclinical endpoints such as parathyroid hormone (PTH). Therefore, in this report, two conservative target serum levels have been adopted, 25 nmol/L (based on the risk of rickets and osteomalacia), and 40 to 50 nmol/L (based on vitamin D’s interaction with PTH).
Ontario Context
Volume & Cost
The volume of vitamin D tests done in Ontario has been increasing over the past 5 years with a steep increase of 169,000 tests in 2007 to more than 393,400 tests in 2008. The number of tests continues to rise with the projected number of tests for 2009 exceeding 731,000. According to the Ontario Schedule of Benefits, the billing cost of each test is $51.7 for 25(OH)D (L606, 100 LMS units, $0.517/unit) and $77.6 for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (L605, 150 LMS units, $0.517/unit). Province wide, the total annual cost of vitamin D testing has increased from approximately $1.7M in 2004 to over $21.0M in 2008. The projected annual cost for 2009 is approximately $38.8M.
Evidence-Based Analysis
The objective of this report is to evaluate the clinical utility of vitamin D testing in the average risk population and in those with kidney disease. As a separate analysis, the report also sought to evaluate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in Canada. The specific research questions addressed were thus:
What is the clinical utility of vitamin D testing in the average risk population and in subjects with kidney disease?
What is the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in the average risk population in Canada?
What is the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in patients with kidney disease in Canada?
Clinical utility was defined as the ability to improve bone health outcomes with the focus on the average risk population (excluding those with osteoporosis) and patients with kidney disease.
Literature Search
A literature search was performed on July 17th, 2009 using OVID MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Cochrane Library, and the International Agency for Health Technology Assessment (INAHTA) for studies published from January 1, 1998 until July 17th, 2009. Abstracts were reviewed by a single reviewer and, for those studies meeting the eligibility criteria, full-text articles were obtained. Reference lists were also examined for any additional relevant studies not identified through the search. Articles with unknown eligibility were reviewed with a second clinical epidemiologist, then a group of epidemiologists until consensus was established. The quality of evidence was assessed as high, moderate, low or very low according to GRADE methodology.
Observational studies that evaluated the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in Canada in the population of interest were included based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria listed below. The baseline values were used in this report in the case of interventional studies that evaluated the effect of vitamin D intake on serum levels. Studies published in grey literature were included if no studies published in the peer-reviewed literature were identified for specific outcomes or subgroups.
Considering that vitamin D status may be affected by factors such as latitude, sun exposure, food fortification, among others, the search focused on prevalence studies published in Canada. In cases where no Canadian prevalence studies were identified, the decision was made to include studies from the United States, given the similar policies in vitamin D food fortification and recommended daily intake.
Inclusion Criteria
Studies published in English
Publications that reported the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in Canada
Studies that included subjects from the general population or with kidney disease
Studies in children or adults
Studies published between January 1998 and July 17th 2009
Exclusion Criteria
Studies that included subjects defined according to a specific disease other than kidney disease
Letters, comments, and editorials
Studies that measured the serum vitamin D levels but did not report the percentage of subjects with serum levels below a given threshold
Outcomes of Interest
Prevalence of serum vitamin D less than 25 nmol/L
Prevalence of serum vitamin D less than 40 to 50 nmol/L
Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was the metabolite used to assess vitamin D status. Results from adult and children studies were reported separately. Subgroup analyses according to factors that affect serum vitamin D levels (e.g., seasonal effects, skin pigmentation, and vitamin D intake) were reported if enough information was provided in the studies
Quality of Evidence
The quality of the prevalence studies was based on the method of subject recruitment and sampling, possibility of selection bias, and generalizability to the source population. The overall quality of the trials was examined according to the GRADE Working Group criteria.
Summary of Findings
Fourteen prevalence studies examining Canadian adults and children met the eligibility criteria. With the exception of one longitudinal study, the studies had a cross-sectional design. Two studies were conducted among Canadian adults with renal disease but none studied Canadian children with renal disease (though three such US studies were included). No systematic reviews or health technology assessments that evaluated the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in Canada were identified. Two studies were published in grey literature, consisting of a Canadian survey designed to measure serum vitamin D levels and a study in infants presented as an abstract at a conference. Also included were the results of vitamin D tests performed in community laboratories in Ontario between October 2008 and September 2009 (provided by the Ontario Association of Medical Laboratories).
Different threshold levels were used in the studies, thus we reported the percentage of subjects with serum levels of between 25 and 30 nmol/L and between 37.5 and 50 nmol/L. Some studies stratified the results according to factors affecting vitamin D status and two used multivariate models to investigate the effects of these characteristics (including age, season, BMI, vitamin D intake, skin pigmentation, and season) on serum 25(OH)D levels. It’s unclear, however, if these studies were adequately powered for these subgroup analyses.
Study participants generally consisted of healthy, community-dwelling subjects and most excluded individuals with conditions or medications that alter vitamin D or bone metabolism, such as kidney or liver disease. Although the studies were conducted in different parts of Canada, fewer were performed in Northern latitudes, i.e. above 53°N, which is equivalent to the city of Edmonton.
Adults
Serum vitamin D levels of < 25 to 30 nmol/L were observed in 0% to 25.5% of the subjects included in five studies; the weighted average was 3.8% (95% CI: 3.0, 4.6). The preliminary results of the Canadian survey showed that approximately 5% of the subjects had serum levels below 29.5 nmol/L. The results of over 600,000 vitamin D tests performed in Ontarian community laboratories between October 2008 and September 2009 showed that 2.6% of adults (> 18 years) had serum levels < 25 nmol/L.
The prevalence of serum vitamin D levels below 37.5-50 nmol/L reported among studies varied widely, ranging from 8% to 73.6% with a weighted average of 22.5%. The preliminary results of the CHMS survey showed that between 10% and 25% of subjects had serum levels below 37 to 48 nmol/L. The results of the vitamin D tests performed in community laboratories showed that 10% to 25% of the individuals had serum levels between 39 and 50 nmol/L.
In an attempt to explain this inter-study variation, the study results were stratified according to factors affecting serum vitamin D levels, as summarized below. These results should be interpreted with caution as none were adjusted for other potential confounders. Adequately powered multivariate analyses would be necessary to determine the contribution of risk factors to lower serum 25(OH)D levels.
Seasonal variation
Three adult studies evaluating serum vitamin D levels in different seasons observed a trend towards a higher prevalence of serum levels < 37.5 to 50 nmol/L during the winter and spring months, specifically 21% to 39%, compared to 8% to 14% in the summer. The weighted average was 23.6% over the winter/spring months and 9.6% over summer. The difference between the seasons was not statistically significant in one study and not reported in the other two studies.
Skin Pigmentation
Four studies observed a trend toward a higher prevalence of serum vitamin D levels < 37.5 to 50 nmol/L in subjects with darker skin pigmentation compared to those with lighter skin pigmentation, with weighted averages of 46.8% among adults with darker skin colour and 15.9% among those with fairer skin.
Vitamin D intake and serum levels
Four adult studies evaluated serum vitamin D levels according to vitamin D intake and showed an overall trend toward a lower prevalence of serum levels < 37.5 to 50 nmol/L with higher levels of vitamin D intake. One study observed a dose-response relationship between higher vitamin D intake from supplements, diet (milk), and sun exposure (results not adjusted for other variables). It was observed that subjects taking 50 to 400 IU or > 400 IU of vitamin D per day had a 6% and 3% prevalence of serum vitamin D level < 40 nmol/L, respectively, versus 29% in subjects not on vitamin D supplementation. Similarly, among subjects drinking one or two glasses of milk per day, the prevalence of serum vitamin D levels < 40 nmol/L was found to be 15%, versus 6% in those who drink more than two glasses of milk per day and 21% among those who do not drink milk. On the other hand, one study observed little variation in serum vitamin D levels during winter according to milk intake, with the proportion of subjects exhibiting vitamin D levels of < 40 nmol/L being 21% among those drinking 0-2 glasses per day, 26% among those drinking > 2 glasses, and 20% among non-milk drinkers.
The overall quality of evidence for the studies conducted among adults was deemed to be low, although it was considered moderate for the subgroups of skin pigmentation and seasonal variation.
Newborn, Children and Adolescents
Five Canadian studies evaluated serum vitamin D levels in newborns, children, and adolescents. In four of these, it was found that between 0 and 36% of children exhibited deficiency across age groups with a weighted average of 6.4%. The results of over 28,000 vitamin D tests performed in children 0 to 18 years old in Ontario laboratories (Oct. 2008 to Sept. 2009) showed that 4.4% had serum levels of < 25 nmol/L.
According to two studies, 32% of infants 24 to 30 months old and 35.3% of newborns had serum vitamin D levels of < 50 nmol/L. Two studies of children 2 to 16 years old reported that 24.5% and 34% had serum vitamin D levels below 37.5 to 40 nmol/L. In both studies, older children exhibited a higher prevalence than younger children, with weighted averages 34.4% and 10.3%, respectively. The overall weighted average of the prevalence of serum vitamin D levels < 37.5 to 50 nmol/L among pediatric studies was 25.8%. The preliminary results of the Canadian survey showed that between 10% and 25% of subjects between 6 and 11 years (N= 435) had serum levels below 50 nmol/L, while for those 12 to 19 years, 25% to 50% exhibited serum vitamin D levels below 50 nmol/L.
The effects of season, skin pigmentation, and vitamin D intake were not explored in Canadian pediatric studies. A Canadian surveillance study did, however, report 104 confirmed cases1 (2.9 cases per 100,000 children) of vitamin D-deficient rickets among Canadian children age 1 to 18 between 2002 and 2004, 57 (55%) of which from Ontario. The highest incidence occurred among children living in the North, i.e., the Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut. In 92 (89%) cases, skin pigmentation was categorized as intermediate to dark, 98 (94%) had been breastfed, and 25 (24%) were offspring of immigrants to Canada. There were no cases of rickets in children receiving ≥ 400 IU VD supplementation/day.
Overall, the quality of evidence of the studies of children was considered very low.
Kidney Disease
Adults
Two studies evaluated serum vitamin D levels in Canadian adults with kidney disease. The first included 128 patients with chronic kidney disease stages 3 to 5, 38% of which had serum vitamin D levels of < 37.5 nmol/L (measured between April and July). This is higher than what was reported in Canadian studies of the general population during the summer months (i.e. between 8% and 14%). In the second, which examined 419 subjects who had received a renal transplantation (mean time since transplantation: 7.2 ± 6.4 years), the prevalence of serum vitamin D levels < 40 nmol/L was 27.3%. The authors concluded that the prevalence observed in the study population was similar to what is expected in the general population.
Children
No studies evaluating serum vitamin D levels in Canadian pediatric patients with kidney disease could be identified, although three such US studies among children with chronic kidney disease stages 1 to 5 were. The mean age varied between 10.7 and 12.5 years in two studies but was not reported in the third. Across all three studies, the prevalence of serum vitamin D levels below the range of 37.5 to 50 nmol/L varied between 21% and 39%, which is not considerably different from what was observed in studies of healthy Canadian children (24% to 35%).
Overall, the quality of evidence in adults and children with kidney disease was considered very low.
Clinical Utility of Vitamin D Testing
A high quality comprehensive systematic review published in August 2007 evaluated the association between serum vitamin D levels and different bone health outcomes in different age groups. A total of 72 studies were included. The authors observed that there was a trend towards improvement in some bone health outcomes with higher serum vitamin D levels. Nevertheless, precise thresholds for improved bone health outcomes could not be defined across age groups. Further, no new studies on the association were identified during an updated systematic review on vitamin D published in July 2009.
With regards to non-bone health outcomes, there is no high or even moderate quality evidence that supports the effectiveness of vitamin D in outcomes such as cancer, cardiovascular outcomes, and all-cause mortality. Even if there is any residual uncertainty, there is no evidence that testing vitamin D levels encourages adherence to Health Canada’s guidelines for vitamin D intake. A normal serum vitamin D threshold required to prevent non-bone health related conditions cannot be resolved until a causal effect or correlation has been demonstrated between vitamin D levels and these conditions. This is as an ongoing research issue around which there is currently too much uncertainty to base any conclusions that would support routine vitamin D testing.
For patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), there is again no high or moderate quality evidence supporting improved outcomes through the use of calcitriol or vitamin D analogs. In the absence of such data, the authors of the guidelines for CKD patients consider it best practice to maintain serum calcium and phosphate at normal levels, while supplementation with active vitamin D should be considered if serum PTH levels are elevated. As previously stated, the authors of guidelines for CKD patients believe that there is not enough evidence to support routine vitamin D [25(OH)D] testing. According to what is stated in the guidelines, decisions regarding the commencement or discontinuation of treatment with calcitriol or vitamin D analogs should be based on serum PTH, calcium, and phosphate levels.
Limitations associated with the evidence of vitamin D testing include ambiguities in the definition of an ‘adequate threshold level’ and both inter- and intra- assay variability. The MAS considers both the lack of a consensus on the target serum vitamin D levels and assay limitations directly affect and undermine the clinical utility of testing. The evidence supporting the clinical utility of vitamin D testing is thus considered to be of very low quality.
Daily vitamin D intake, either through diet or supplementation, should follow Health Canada’s recommendations for healthy individuals of different age groups. For those with medical conditions such as renal disease, liver disease, and malabsorption syndromes, and for those taking medications that may affect vitamin D absorption/metabolism, physician guidance should be followed with respect to both vitamin D testing and supplementation.
Conclusions
Studies indicate that vitamin D, alone or in combination with calcium, may decrease the risk of fractures and falls among older adults.
There is no high or moderate quality evidence to support the effectiveness of vitamin D in other outcomes such as cancer, cardiovascular outcomes, and all-cause mortality.
Studies suggest that the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in Canadian adults and children is relatively low (approximately 5%), and between 10% and 25% have serum levels below 40 to 50 nmol/L (based on very low to low grade evidence).
Given the limitations associated with serum vitamin D measurement, ambiguities in the definition of a ‘target serum level’, and the availability of clear guidelines on vitamin D supplementation from Health Canada, vitamin D testing is not warranted for the average risk population.
Health Canada has issued recommendations regarding the adequate daily intake of vitamin D, but current studies suggest that the mean dietary intake is below these recommendations. Accordingly, Health Canada’s guidelines and recommendations should be promoted.
Based on a moderate level of evidence, individuals with darker skin pigmentation appear to have a higher risk of low serum vitamin D levels than those with lighter skin pigmentation and therefore may need to be specially targeted with respect to optimum vitamin D intake. The cause-effect of this association is currently unclear.
Individuals with medical conditions such as renal and liver disease, osteoporosis, and malabsorption syndromes, as well as those taking medications that may affect vitamin D absorption/metabolism, should follow their physician’s guidance concerning both vitamin D testing and supplementation.
PMCID: PMC3377517  PMID: 23074397
11.  Defining Physiologically “Normal” Vitamin D in African Americans 
Purpose
Vitamin D levels ≥30 ng/ml are commonly considered “normal” based upon maximal suppression of intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH); however, this has recently been challenged and the optimal 25(OH)D level among non-Caucasians is unclear. We evaluated the cross-sectional relationship between serum 25(OH)D and iPTH in a sample of Caucasian and African American adults.
Method
We used baseline serum samples of participants from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST) for this analysis, and used three methods to model the relationship between 25(OH)D and iPTH: ordinary least squares regression (OLS), segmented regression, and Helmert contrasts.
Results
Among Caucasians (n=1,258), 25(OH)D and iPTH ranged from 4-51 ng/ml and 2-120 pg/ml and from 3-32 ng/ml and 3-119 pg/ml in African Americans (n=423). We observed different thresholds between African Americans and Caucasians using each analytic technique. Using 25(OH)D as a categorical variable in OLS, iPTH was statistically higher at lower 25(OH)D categories than the 24-32 ng/ml referent group among Caucasians. However, in African Americans, the mean iPTH was only significantly higher at 25(OH)D levels below 15 ng/ml. Using segmented regression, iPTH appeared to stabilize at a lower 25(OH)D level in African Americans (19-23 ng/ml) compared to in Caucasians (>32 ng/ml). Helmert contrasts also revealed a lower threshold in African Americans than Caucasians.
Conclusion
Among MOST participants, the 25(OH)D thresholds at which no further change in iPTH was observed was approximately 20 ng/ml in African Americans versus approximately 30 ng/ml in Caucasians, suggesting optimal vitamin D levels in Caucasians may not be applicable to African Americans.
doi:10.1007/s00198-011-1877-6
PMCID: PMC3677509  PMID: 22189572
vitamin D; parathyroid hormone; racial differences; African American; thresholds; osteoporosis
12.  Impact of mineral and bone disorder on healthcare resource use and associated costs in the European Fresenius medical care dialysis population: a retrospective cohort study 
BMC Nephrology  2012;13:140.
Background
Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) is associated with mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the economic consequences of SHPT have not been adequately studied in the European population. We assessed the relationship between SHPT parameters (intact parathyroid hormone [iPTH], calcium, and phosphate) and hospitalisations, medication use, and associated costs among CKD patients in Europe.
Methods
The analysis of this retrospective cohort study used records of randomly selected patients who underwent haemodialysis between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2006 at participating European Fresenius Medical Care facilities in 10 countries. Patients had ≥ 1 iPTH value recorded, and ≥ 1 month of follow-up after a 3-month baseline period during which SHPT parameters were assessed. Time at risk was post-baseline until death, successful renal transplantation, loss to follow-up, or the end of follow-up. Outcomes included cost per patient-month, rates of hospitalisations (cardiovascular disease [CVD], fractures, and parathyroidectomy [PTX]), and use of SHPT-, diabetes-, and CVD-related medications. National costs were applied to hospitalisations and medication use. Generalised linear models compared costs across strata of iPTH, total calcium, and phosphate, adjusting for baseline covariates.
Results
There were 6369 patients included in the analysis. Mean ± SD person-time at risk was 13.1 ± 6.4 months. Patients with iPTH > 600 pg/mL had a higher hospitalisation rate than those with lower iPTH. Hospitalisation rates varied little across calcium and phosphate levels. SHPT-related medication use varied with iPTH, calcium, and phosphate. After adjusting for demographic and clinical variables, patients with baseline iPTH > 600 pg/mL had 41% (95% CI: 25%, 59%) higher monthly total healthcare costs compared with those with iPTH in the K/DOQI target range (150–300 pg/mL). Patients with baseline phosphate and total calcium levels above target ranges (1.13–1.78 mmol/L and 2.10–2.37 mmol/L, respectively) had 38% (95% CI: 27%, 50%) and 8% (95% CI: 0%, 17%) higher adjusted monthly costs, respectively. Adjusted costs were 25% (95% CI: 18%, 32%) lower among patients with baseline phosphate levels below the target range. Results were consistent in sensitivity analyses.
Conclusions
These data suggest that elevated SHPT parameters increase the economic burden of CKD in Europe.
doi:10.1186/1471-2369-13-140
PMCID: PMC3504570  PMID: 23106934
13.  Rapid Decrease of Intact Parathyroid Hormone Could Be a Predictor of Better Response to Cinacalcet in Hemodialysis Patients 
Yonsei Medical Journal  2013;54(2):453-463.
Purpose
Cinacalcet is effective for treating refractory secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT), but little is known about the response rates and clinical factors influencing the response.
Materials and Methods
A prospective, single-arm, multi-center study was performed for 24 weeks. Cinacalcet was administered to patients with intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) level greater than 300 pg/mL. Cinacalcet was started at a dose of 25 mg daily and titrated until 100 mg to achieve a serum iPTH level <300 pg/mL (primary end point). Early response to cinacalcet was defined as a decrease of iPTH more than 50% within one month.
Results
Fifty-seven patients were examined. Based on the magnitude of iPTH decrease, patients were divided into responder (n=47, 82.5%) and non-responder (n=10, 17.5%) groups. Among the responders, 38 achieved the primary end point, whereas 9 patients showed a reduction in serum iPTH of 30% or more, but did not reach the primary end point. Compared to non-responders, responders were significantly older (p=0.026), female (p=0.041), and diabetics (p<0.001). Additionally, early response was observed more frequently in the responders (30/47, 63.8%), of whom the majority (27/30, 90.0%) achieved the primary end point. Multivariate analysis showed that lower baseline iPTH levels [odds ratio (OR) 0.96, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.93-0.99], the presence of diabetes (OR 46.45, CI 1.92-1125.6) and early response (OR 21.54, CI 2.94-157.7) were significant clinical factors affecting achievement of iPTH target.
Conclusion
Cinacalcet was effective in most hemodialysis patients with refractory SHPT. The presence of an early response was closely associated with the achievement of target levels of iPTH.
doi:10.3349/ymj.2013.54.2.453
PMCID: PMC3575968  PMID: 23364981
Cinacalcet; end-stage renal disease; hemodialysis; parathyroid hormone; secondary hyperparathyroidism
14.  Effect of dietary phosphorus on circulating concentrations of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and immunoreactive parathyroid hormone in children with moderate renal insufficiency. 
Journal of Clinical Investigation  1984;73(6):1580-1589.
The hyperparathyroidism characteristic of patients with moderate renal insufficiency could be caused by decreases in the plasma concentration of ionized calcium (Ca++) evoked by: (a) recurring increases in the plasma concentration of inorganic phosphorus that may be detectable only in the post-prandial period; (b) a reversible, phosphorus-mediated suppression of renal 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1 alpha-hydroxylase that decreases the plasma concentration of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25-(OH)2D) enough to decrease both gut absorption and bone resorption of Ca++; (c) both of these. In a group of eight children with moderate renal insufficiency, mean glomerular filtration rate (GFR) 45 +/- 4 (SE) ml/min per 1.73 M2, ages 6-17 yr, we tested these hypotheses by determining the effect of short term (5 d) restriction and supplementation of dietary intake of phosphorus on the plasma concentration of 1,25-(OH)2D, the serum concentrations of immunoreactive parathyroid hormone (iPTH) and phosphorus, and the fractional renal excretion of phosphorus ( FEPi ). When dietary phosphorus was normal, 1.2 g/d, the serum concentrations of phosphorus throughout the day were not greater than those of normal control children, and the serum concentrations of carboxyl-terminal iPTH (C-iPTH) were greater, 59 +/- 9 vs. 17 +/- 3 mu leq/ml, and unchanging; the serum concentration of intact-iPTH was also greater, 198 +/- 14 vs. 119 +/- 8 pg/ml. The plasma concentration of 1,25-(OH)2D was lower than that of age-matched controls, 27 +/- 3 vs. 36 +/- 2 pg/ml (P less than 0.01). When dietary phosphorus was restricted to 0.35 g/d, the plasma concentration of 1,25-(OH)2D increased by 60% to a mean value not different from that of normal controls, while serum concentrations of C-iPTH and intact-iPTH decreased by 25%, the latter concentration to a mean value not different from that of controls. FEPi decreased from 31 to 9%. When dietary phosphorus was supplemented to 2.4 g/d, the plasma concentration of 1,25-(OH)2D decreased 32%, while those of C-iPTH and intact-iPTH increased by 131 and 45%, respectively; FEPi increased from 27 to 53%. Plasma concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D remained normal and unchanged, and GFR did not change when dietary phosphorus was manipulated. The data demonstrate that in children with moderate renal insufficiency: (a) A normal dietary intake of phosphorus in attended by a decreased circulating concentration of 1,25-(OH)2D and an increased concentration of iPTH, but not by recurring increases in the serum concentration of phosphorus at any time of the day; (b) Dietary phosphorus is, however, a major determinant of the circulating concentrations of both 1,25-(OH)2D and iPTH, which vary inversely and directly, respectively, with dietary intake of phosphorus, and increase and decrease, respectively, to normal values when phosphorus is restricted for 5 d; (c) Restriction and supplementation of dietary phosphorus induces changes in the serum concentration of iPTH that correlate strongly but inversely with those induced in the plasma concentration of 1,25-(OH)2D (r = -0.88, P < 0.001); and (d) The physiologic responsiveness of the renal tubule to changes in dietary phosphorus is to a substantial extent intact. The data provide support for the second hypothesis stated.
PMCID: PMC437069  PMID: 6547151
15.  Nutritional Status of Vitamin D and the Effect of Vitamin D Supplementation in Korean Breast-fed Infants 
We investigated the vitamin D status and the effect of vitamin D supplementation in Korean breast-fed infants. The healthy term newborns were divided into 3 groups; A, formula-fed; B, breast-fed only; S, breast-fed with vitamin D supplementation. We measured serum concentrations of vitamin D (25OHD3), calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), alkaline phosphatase (AP), intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) and bone mineral density (BMD) at 6 and 12 months of age. Using questionnaires, average duration of sun-light exposure and dietary intake of vitamin D, Ca and P were obtained. At 6 and 12 months of age, 25OHD3 was significantly higher in group S than in group B (P<0.001). iPTH was significantly lower in group S than in group B at 6 months (P=0.001), but did not differ at 12 months. Regardless of vitamin D supplementation, BMD was lower in group B and S than in group A (P<0.05). Total intake of vitamin D differed among 3 groups (P<0.001, A>S>B), but total intake of Ca and P were higher in group A than in group B and S (P<0.001). In conclusion, breast-fed infants show lower vitamin D status and bone mineralization than formula-fed infants. Vitamin D supplementation (200 IU/day) in breast-fed infants increases serum 25-OH vitamin D3, but not bone mineral density.
doi:10.3346/jkms.2010.25.1.83
PMCID: PMC2800022  PMID: 20052352
Vitamin D; Nutritional Status; Bone Density; Vitamin D Deficiency; Dietary Supplements; Breast feeding; Infant
16.  Serum 25(OH)D Level and Parathyroid Hormone in Chinese Adult Population: A Cross-Sectional Study in Guiyang Urban Community from Southeast of China 
Objective. To evaluate vitamin D status and serum parathyroid hormone (IPTH) of healthy adults living in Guiyang. Design and Participants. We conducted a cross-sectional evaluation in the General Community in Guiyang by cluster sampling method. The data was a part of 1510 participants (634 men, 876 women) aged 20–79 years median 45.2 years from November 2009 to February 2010 in Guiyang Health Measures Survey. Measurements. Aradioimmunoassay was used to measure the level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH). Results.The mean serum 25(OH)D level was (20.4 ± 9.0) ng/mL and the highest level among participants aged 40–59 years (22.8 ng/mL). The mean serum PTH level was (32.1 ± 13.7) pg/mL and the lowest level among participants aged 40–50 years (30.8 ng/mL). Serum 25(OH)D was below 50 nmol/liter in 52.3%, below 75 nmol/liter in 84.6%, and above 75 nmol/liter in 15.4% of the respondents. Secondary hyperparathyroidism was 5.4% (5.4% among men and 4.6% among women). The prevalence of secondary hyperparathyroidism increased (5.8%, 6.5%, and 7.1%, resp.) with decreasing serum 25(OH)D levels among subjects who were 30 to 20, 19.9 to 10, and <10 ng/mL, respectively. Serum 25(OH)D was inversely associated with serum PTH. Conclusions. Vitamin D insufficiency and its complication of secondary hyperparathyroidism are common.
doi:10.1155/2013/150461
PMCID: PMC3771443  PMID: 24065989
17.  Hypertension and hyperparathyroidism are associated with left ventricular hypertrophy in patients on hemodialysis 
Indian Journal of Nephrology  2009;19(4):153-157.
Conflicting data for association between left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and secondary hyperparathyroidism has been reported previously among dialysis patients. The present study was conducted to evaluate the association of hyperparathyroidism and hypertension with LVH. Charts of 130 patients on hemodialysis for at least six months were reviewed. All were subjected to M-mode echocardiography. Left ventricular mass (LVM) was calculated by Devereux's formula. LVM Index (LVMI) was calculated by dividing LVM by body surface area. Sera were analyzed for intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH). iPTH of > 32 pmol/l and a mean blood pressure (MAP) of > 107 mmHg were considered high. Patients were stratified into groups according to their MAP and iPTH. A total of (47.7%) patients were males and 68 (52.3%) were females. Their median age was 57 years. The median duration on dialysis was 26 months. Forty eight (36.9%) patients had high BP and 54 (41.5%) had high iPTH. Both high BP and high iPTH were present in 38 (29.2%) patients. Analysis of the relationship between LVM, LVMI, MAP and iPTH showed that LVM and LVMI were significantly (P < 0.001) higher in patients with concomitant high BP and high iPTH. LVMI was significantly higher in patients with high iPTH alone. Concomitant high iPTH and high MAP increase the risk of LVH in hemodialysis patients. High iPTH alone might contribute in escalating LVH. Adequate control of hypertension and hyperparathyroidism might reduce the risk of developing LVH.
doi:10.4103/0971-4065.59337
PMCID: PMC2875705  PMID: 20535251
Hemodialysis; hypertension; hyperparathyroidism; left ventricular hypertrophy
18.  Modifications in Bone Matrix of Estrogen-Deficient Rats Treated with Intermittent PTH 
BioMed Research International  2015;2015:454162.
Bone matrix dictates strength, elasticity, and stiffness to the bone. Intermittent parathyroid hormone (iPTH), a bone-forming treatment, is widely used as a therapy for osteoporosis. We investigate whether low doses of intermittent PTH (1-34) change the profile of organic components in the bone matrix after 30 days of treatment. Forty 6-month-old female Wistar rats underwent ovariectomy and after 3 months received low doses of iPTH administered for 30 days: daily at 0.3 µg/kg/day (PTH03) or 5 µg/kg/day (PTH5); or 3 times per week at 0.25 µg/kg/day (PTH025). After euthanasia, distal femora were processed for bone histomorphometry, histochemistry for collagen and glycosaminoglycans, biochemical quantification of sulfated glycosaminoglycans, and hyaluronan by ELISA and TUNEL staining. Whole tibiae were used to estimate the bone mineral density (BMD). Histomorphometric analysis showed that PTH5 increased cancellous bone volume by 6% over vehicle-treated rats. In addition, PTH5 and PTH03 increased cortical thickness by 21% and 20%, respectively. Tibial BMD increased in PTH5-treated rats and this group exhibited lower levels of chondroitin sulfate; on the other hand, hyaluronan expression was increased. Hormonal administration in the PTH5 group led to decreased collagen maturity. Further, TUNEL-positive osteocytes were decreased in the cortical compartment of PTH5 whereas administration of PTH025 increased the osteocyte death. Our findings suggest that daily injections of PTH at low doses alter the pattern of organic components from the bone matrix, favoring the increase of bone mass.
doi:10.1155/2015/454162
PMCID: PMC4324816
19.  Measurement of vitamin D levels in inflammatory bowel disease patients reveals a subset of Crohn’s disease patients with elevated 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and low bone mineral density 
Gut  2004;53(8):1129-1136.
Objectives: Many patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) have low bone mineral density (BMD) that may not be solely attributable to glucocorticoid use. We hypothesised that low BMD in patients with CD is associated with elevated circulating levels of the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D). We further hypothesised that this was secondary to increased synthesis of 1,25(OH)2D by inflammatory cells in the intestine. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between 1,25(OH)2D levels and BMD in patients with CD.
Methods: An IRB approved retrospective review of medical records from patients with CD (n = 138) or ulcerative colitis (UC, n = 29). Measurements of vitamin D metabolites and immunoreactive parathyroid hormone (iPTH) were carried out. BMD results were available for 88 CD and 20 UC patients. Immunohistochemistry or real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the enzyme 1α-hydroxylase was performed on colonic biopsies from patients with CD (14) or UC (12) and normal colons (4).
Results: Inappropriately high levels of serum 1,25(OH)2D (>60 pg/ml) were observed in 42% of patients with CD compared with only 7% in UC, despite no differences in mean iPTH. Serum 1,25(OH)2D levels were higher in CD (57 pg/ml) versus UC (41 pg/ml) (p = 0.0001). In patients with CD, there was a negative correlation between 1,25(OH)2D levels and lumbar BMD (r = −0.301, p = 0.005) independent of therapeutic glucocorticoid use. 1,25(OH)2D levels also correlated with CD activity. Lastly, immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR demonstrated increased expression of intestinal 1α-hydroxylase in patients with CD.
Conclusions: These data demonstrate that elevated 1,25(OH)2D is more common in CD than previously appreciated and is independently associated with low bone mineral density. The source of the active vitamin D may be the inflamed intestine. Treatment of the underlying inflammation may improve metabolic bone disease in this subgroup of patients.
doi:10.1136/gut.2003.036657
PMCID: PMC1774134  PMID: 15247180
vitamin D; inflammatory bowel disease; Crohn’s disease; bone mineral density; osteoporosis
20.  Human Parathyroid Hormone IMMUNOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ANTIBODIES AGAINST A GLANDULAR EXTRACT AND THE SYNTHETIC AMINO-TERMINAL FRAGMENTS 1-12 AND 1-34 AND THEIR USE IN THE DETERMINATION OF IMMUNOREACTIVE HORMONE IN HUMAN SERA 
Journal of Clinical Investigation  1974;54(6):1382-1394.
Antibodies to a urea-trichloroacetic acid extract [hPTH-(TCA)] of human parathyroid tumors and to the synthetic NH2-terminal fragments of human parathyroid hormone hPTH-(1-12) and -(1-34) were developed in goats to characterize immunochemically various PTH preparations and to estimate immunoreactive PTH (iPTH) in human sera. They were quantitated on the basis of their capacity to bind [131I]-hPTH-(1-12), [131I]hPTH-(1-34) or [131I]bovine PTH (bPTH-(1-84)). The quality of the antibodies was assessed by reference to inhibition of their interaction with labeled peptides by synthetic hPTH comprising 34 NH2-terminal amino acid residues or fragments thereof [hPTH-(1-12), -(13-34), -(18-34), -(25-34), -(18-24)] or by the Sephadex G-100-purified full-length peptide hPTH-(1-84) [hPTH-(1-84)G-100]. The synthetic peptides used in this work correspond in their structure to the NH2-terminal amino acid sequence 1-34, as elucidated by Brewer and collaborators (1972. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A.69: 3583-3588). Inhibition studies were also carried out with bPTH-(1-34) and bPTH-(1-84). Anti-hPTH-(TCA) exhibited specificities directed to determinants in the COOH-terminal and NH2-terminal part of hPTH-(1-84) and exhibited cross-reactivity with bPTH-(1-84). Anti-hPTH-(1-34), on the other hand, showed immunological specificities mainly directed to antigenic determinants located in the COOH-terminal half of hPTH-(1-34). In addition, some reactivity with the NH2-terminal hPTH-(1-12) and with the extractive full-length peptides of human and bovine origin was observed. Antibodies to hPTH-(1-12) cross-reacted with hPTH-(1-34) and -(1-84)G-100.
iPTH was radioimmunologically determined in human sera by the following systems: (a) [131I]bPTH-(1-84), anti-hPTH-(TCA) and hPTH-(1-84)G-100 as standard; (b) [131I]hPTH-(1-34), anti-hPTH-(1-34) and hPTH-(1-34) as standard. With system (a), COOH-terminal fragments of hPTH-(1-84) having a molecular weight of approximately 7,000 were detected, and there was an almost total discrimination of serum iPTH levels in normal and in hyperparathyroid subjects. With system (b), on the other hand, several molecular species of iPTH were detected, including a component larger than hPTH-(1-84) and others similar to hPTH-(1-84) and to a fragment co-eluting with the NH2-terminal fragment hPTH-(1-34). When serum iPTH was assayed in system (b), there was a large overlap of iPTH levels in control subjects and in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism.
PMCID: PMC301693  PMID: 4474187
21.  Hypovitaminosis D: Are Medical Students at Risk? 
Background:
Vitamin D deficiency is a pandemic problem mostly diagnosed in elderly. Few studies are available exclusively done on the topic among young adults. Specific professions such as medical students may have higher risk for developing hypovitaminosis D. We aimed to assess the vitamin D status in medical students of Iran University of Medical Sciences; and to define a cut-off point for 25-hydroxyvitamin-D (25(OH)D) level based on secondary hyperparathyroidism.
Methods:
This was a cross-sectional study on 100 medical students conducted during October 2012. Serum 25(OH)D, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), and calcium were measured. Age, sex, body mass index, daily dietary fish and egg consumption, sun exposure, and sunscreen usage were recorded. The association between serum 25(OH)D and iPTH was assessed. Receiver operating characteristics curve analysis was performed.
Results:
25-hydroxyvitamin-D level was <30 ng/ml in 99% of all participants, and <20 ng/ml in 77%. Mean serum 25(OH)D level was 16.8 ± 4.7 ng/ml. iPTH level in the group with 25(OH)D level of <10 ng/ml was significantly higher than in those with serum 25(OH)D level of 10 to <20 ng/ml and 20 to <30 ng/ml (109 ± 47 pg/ml, 47 ± 27 pg/ml and 46 ± 19 pg/ml, respectively; P = 0.0001). There was a significant linear inverse correlation between serum iPTH and 25(OH)D (r = -0.36, P = 0.0001). 25(OH)D level of 15.4 ng/ml was determined as the optimal cut-off point in detecting possible secondary hyperparathyroidism.
Conclusions:
To improve the community vitamin D status, in addition to population-based food fortification programs, educational programs seem essential; not only for general population, but also for the more educated groups.
PMCID: PMC4192779  PMID: 25317300
Cut-off; hypovitaminosis D; medical students; parathyroid hormone; vitamin D deficiency
22.  Vitamin D Deficiency in Postmenopausal Women – Biological Correlates 
Mædica  2014;9(4):316-322.
Introduction:
Low vitamin D (VD) is associated with secondary hyperparathyroidism and both contribute to deleterious consequences (reduced bone mineral density (BMD), risk of fractures and falls).
Objective:
To study the VD status and biological correlates in a group of postmenopausal women.
Material and methods:
We studied 123 postmenopausal women evaluated in the C.I.Parhon National Institute of Endocrinology, the Pituitary and Neuroendocrine Diseases department. All cases had been reffered for the evaluation of BMD by the general practitioner. The evaluation included serum measurements of total and ionised calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), 25 hydroxi vitaminD (25OHD), parathyroid hormone (PTH), osteocalcin, betacrosslaps. Central DXA osteodensitometry was performed.
Results:
91.9% of cases had 25OHD serum levels below 30 ng/ml (74.8% had VD deficiency, 17.1% VD insufficiency). Only 8.1% had sufficient VD levels. A history of fragility fractures was present in 45.83% of the osteoporotic patients, 27.27% of the osteopenic ones and 15.15% of the women with normal BMD.
32 women (26%) were on VD supplementation at the time of evaluation. Among these subjects, the 25OHD level was significantly higher in those with prior fragility fractures (p=0.018) and osteoporosis (p=0.008).
25OHD concentration negatively correlated with PTH, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin. The bone markers evaluated had a significant inverse correlation with the radius BMD, T and Z scores (p=0.004).
27.17% of the cases with VD deficiency had secondary hyperparathyroidism. The 25OHD concentration was significantly lower in these cases (p=0.000).
Conclusions:
VD insufficiency is widely prevalent but still under-recognized and under-treated, possibly leading to secondary hyperparathyroidism. The compliance to VD supplementation is lower in subjects without osteoporosis or fragility fractures. Primary prevention measures should be more actively implemented.
PMCID: PMC4316873
vitamin D; deficiency; postmenopausal; secondary hyperparathyroidism
23.  Vitamin D inadequacy in Belgian postmenopausal osteoporotic women 
BMC Public Health  2007;7:64.
Background
Inadequate serum vitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations are associated with secondary hyperparathyroidism, increased bone turnover and bone loss, which increase fracture risk. The objective of this study is to assess the prevalence of inadequate serum 25(OH)D concentrations in postmenopausal Belgian women. Opinions with regard to the definition of vitamin D deficiency and adequate vitamin D status vary widely and there are no clear international agreements on what constitute adequate concentrations of vitamin D.
Methods
Assessment of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and parathyroid hormone was performed in 1195 Belgian postmenopausal women aged over 50 years. Main analysis has been performed in the whole study population and according to the previous use of vitamin D and calcium supplements. Four cut-offs of 25(OH)D inadequacy were fixed : < 80 nmol/L, <75 nmol/L, < 50 nmol/L and < 30 nmol/L.
Results
Mean (SD) age of the patients was 76.9 (7.5) years, body mass index was 25.7 (4.5) kg/m2. Concentrations of 25(OH)D were 52.5 (21.4) nmol/L. In the whole study population, the prevalence of 25(OH)D inadequacy was 91.3 %, 87.5 %, 43.1 % and 15.9% when considering cut-offs of 80, 75, 50 and 30 nmol/L, respectively. Women who used vitamin D supplements, alone or combined with calcium supplements, had higher concentrations of 25(OH)D than non-users. Significant inverse correlations were found between age/serum PTH and serum 25(OH)D (r = -0.23/r = -0.31) and also between age/serum PTH and femoral neck BMD (r = -0.29/r = -0.15). There is a significant positive relation between age and PTH (r = 0.16), serum 25(OH)D and femoral neck BMD (r = 0.07). (P < 0.05)
Vitamin D concentrations varied with the season of sampling but did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.09).
Conclusion
This study points out a high prevalence of vitamin D inadequacy in Belgian postmenopausal osteoporotic women, even among subjects receiving vitamin D supplements.
doi:10.1186/1471-2458-7-64
PMCID: PMC1866237  PMID: 17462085
24.  Effects of paricalcitol on calcium and phosphate metabolism and markers of bone health in patients with diabetic nephropathy: results of the VITAL study 
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation  2013;28(9):2260-2268.
Background
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with elevations in serum phosphate, calcium–phosphorus product and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), with attendant risks of cardiovascular and bone disorders. Active vitamin D can suppress parathyroid hormone (PTH), but may raise serum calcium and phosphate concentrations. Paricalcitol, a selective vitamin D activator, suppressed PTH in CKD patients (stages 3 and 4) with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) with minimal changes in calcium and phosphate metabolism.
Methods
The VITAL study enrolled patients with CKD stages 2–4. We examined the effect and relationship of paricalcitol to calcium and phosphate metabolism and bone markers in a post hoc analysis of VITAL. The study comprised patients with diabetic nephropathy enrolled in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial of paricalcitol (1 or 2 μg/day). Urinary and serum calcium and phosphate, serum BAP, and intact PTH (iPTH) concentrations were measured throughout the study.
Results
Baseline demographics and calcium, phosphate, PTH (49% with iPTH <70 pg/mL), and BAP concentrations were similar between groups. A transient, modest yet significant increase in phosphate was observed for paricalcitol 2 μg/day (+0.29 mg/dL; P < 0.001). Dose-dependent increases in serum and urinary calcium were observed; however, there were few cases of hypercalcemia: one in the 1-μg/day group (1.1%) and three in the 2-μg/day group (3.2%). Significant reductions in BAP were observed that persisted for 60 days after paricalcitol discontinuation (P < 0.001 for combined paricalcitol groups versus placebo). Paricalcitol dose-dependent reductions in iPTH were observed. Paricalcitol in CKD patients (±SHPT) was associated with modest increases in calcium and phosphate.
Conclusion
Paricalcitol reduces BAP levels, which may be beneficial for reducing vascular calcification.
Trial registration
Trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00421733.
doi:10.1093/ndt/gft227
PMCID: PMC3769981  PMID: 23787544
bone-specific alkaline phosphatase; calcitriol; hypercalcemia; hyperphosphatemia; paricalcitol; vitamin D receptor activation
25.  Vitamin D Deficiency and Secondary Hyperparathyroidism Are Common Complications in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease 
OBJECTIVE
To investigate via the vitamin D status whether patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) tend to develop vitamin D deficiency that in turn influences their clinical symptoms.
DESIGN
Cross-sectional.
SETTING
University hospital.
PATIENTS AND PARTICIPANTS
Three hundred twenty-seven patients were evaluated; subjects with secondary causes of bone disease or bone active medication were excluded. One hundred sixty-one patients with either PAD stage II (n = 84) or stage IV (n = 77) were enrolled and compared to 45 age- and sex-matched healthy controls.
MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS
All patients underwent determinations of serum chemistry, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (vitamin D3) intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and osteocalcin and were further stratified according to an individual restriction score into 3 groups: mildly, moderately, or severely restricted in daily life due to the underlying disease. Patients with PAD IV showed significantly lower vitamin D3 (P = .0001), and calcium (P = .0001) values and significantly higher iPTH (P = .0001), osteocalcin (P = .0001) and ALP (P = .02) levels as compared to patients with PAD II. Patients considering themselves as severely restricted due to the underlying disease showed lower vitamin D3 and higher iPTH levels than those who described only a moderate (vitamin D3: P < .001; iPTH: P < .01) or mild (vitamin D3: P < .001; iPTH: P < .001) restriction in daily life.
CONCLUSION
Patients with PAD IV, especially those who feel severely restricted due to the disease, are at high risk of developing vitamin D deficiency, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and ultimately osteomalacia due to immobilization and subsequent lack of exposure to sunlight, all of which in turn lead to further deterioration. Monitoring of vitamin D metabolism and vitamin D replacement therapy could be a simple, inexpensive approach to mitigating clinical symptoms and improving quality of life in patients with advanced PAD.
doi:10.1046/j.1525-1497.2002.11033.x
PMCID: PMC1495101  PMID: 12220361
vitamin D3; secondary hyperparathyroidism; osteomalacia; immobilization; peripheral arterial disease

Results 1-25 (662961)