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1.  Utilization of DXA Bone Mineral Densitometry in Ontario 
Executive Summary
Issue
Systematic reviews and analyses of administrative data were performed to determine the appropriate use of bone mineral density (BMD) assessments using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and the associated trends in wrist and hip fractures in Ontario.
Background
Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry Bone Mineral Density Assessment
Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry bone densitometers measure bone density based on differential absorption of 2 x-ray beams by bone and soft tissues. It is the gold standard for detecting and diagnosing osteoporosis, a systemic disease characterized by low bone density and altered bone structure, resulting in low bone strength and increased risk of fractures. The test is fast (approximately 10 minutes) and accurate (exceeds 90% at the hip), with low radiation (1/3 to 1/5 of that from a chest x-ray). DXA densitometers are licensed as Class 3 medical devices in Canada. The World Health Organization has established criteria for osteoporosis and osteopenia based on DXA BMD measurements: osteoporosis is defined as a BMD that is >2.5 standard deviations below the mean BMD for normal young adults (i.e. T-score <–2.5), while osteopenia is defined as BMD that is more than 1 standard deviation but less than 2.5 standard deviation below the mean for normal young adults (i.e. T-score< –1 & ≥–2.5). DXA densitometry is presently an insured health service in Ontario.
Clinical Need
 
Burden of Disease
The Canadian Multicenter Osteoporosis Study (CaMos) found that 16% of Canadian women and 6.6% of Canadian men have osteoporosis based on the WHO criteria, with prevalence increasing with age. Osteopenia was found in 49.6% of Canadian women and 39% of Canadian men. In Ontario, it is estimated that nearly 530,000 Ontarians have some degrees of osteoporosis. Osteoporosis-related fragility fractures occur most often in the wrist, femur and pelvis. These fractures, particularly those in the hip, are associated with increased mortality, and decreased functional capacity and quality of life. A Canadian study showed that at 1 year after a hip fracture, the mortality rate was 20%. Another 20% required institutional care, 40% were unable to walk independently, and there was lower health-related quality of life due to attributes such as pain, decreased mobility and decreased ability to self-care. The cost of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures in Canada was estimated to be $1.3 billion in 1993.
Guidelines for Bone Mineral Density Testing
With 2 exceptions, almost all guidelines address only women. None of the guidelines recommend blanket population-based BMD testing. Instead, all guidelines recommend BMD testing in people at risk of osteoporosis, predominantly women aged 65 years or older. For women under 65 years of age, BMD testing is recommended only if one major or two minor risk factors for osteoporosis exist. Osteoporosis Canada did not restrict its recommendations to women, and thus their guidelines apply to both sexes. Major risk factors are age greater than or equal to 65 years, a history of previous fractures, family history (especially parental history) of fracture, and medication or disease conditions that affect bone metabolism (such as long-term glucocorticoid therapy). Minor risk factors include low body mass index, low calcium intake, alcohol consumption, and smoking.
Current Funding for Bone Mineral Density Testing
The Ontario Health Insurance Program (OHIP) Schedule presently reimburses DXA BMD at the hip and spine. Measurements at both sites are required if feasible. Patients at low risk of accelerated bone loss are limited to one BMD test within any 24-month period, but there are no restrictions on people at high risk. The total fee including the professional and technical components for a test involving 2 or more sites is $106.00 (Cdn).
Method of Review
This review consisted of 2 parts. The first part was an analysis of Ontario administrative data relating to DXA BMD, wrist and hip fractures, and use of antiresorptive drugs in people aged 65 years and older. The Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences extracted data from the OHIP claims database, the Canadian Institute for Health Information hospital discharge abstract database, the National Ambulatory Care Reporting System, and the Ontario Drug Benefit database using OHIP and ICD-10 codes. The data was analyzed to examine the trends in DXA BMD use from 1992 to 2005, and to identify areas requiring improvement.
The second part included systematic reviews and analyses of evidence relating to issues identified in the analyses of utilization data. Altogether, 8 reviews and qualitative syntheses were performed, consisting of 28 published systematic reviews and/or meta-analyses, 34 randomized controlled trials, and 63 observational studies.
Findings of Utilization Analysis
Analysis of administrative data showed a 10-fold increase in the number of BMD tests in Ontario between 1993 and 2005.
OHIP claims for BMD tests are presently increasing at a rate of 6 to 7% per year. Approximately 500,000 tests were performed in 2005/06 with an age-adjusted rate of 8,600 tests per 100,000 population.
Women accounted for 90 % of all BMD tests performed in the province.
In 2005/06, there was a 2-fold variation in the rate of DXA BMD tests across local integrated health networks, but a 10-fold variation between the county with the highest rate (Toronto) and that with the lowest rate (Kenora). The analysis also showed that:
With the increased use of BMD, there was a concomitant increase in the use of antiresorptive drugs (as shown in people 65 years and older) and a decrease in the rate of hip fractures in people age 50 years and older.
Repeat BMD made up approximately 41% of all tests. Most of the people (>90%) who had annual BMD tests in a 2-year or 3-year period were coded as being at high risk for osteoporosis.
18% (20,865) of the people who had a repeat BMD within a 24-month period and 34% (98,058) of the people who had one BMD test in a 3-year period were under 65 years, had no fracture in the year, and coded as low-risk.
Only 19% of people age greater than 65 years underwent BMD testing and 41% received osteoporosis treatment during the year following a fracture.
Men accounted for 24% of all hip fractures and 21 % of all wrist fractures, but only 10% of BMD tests. The rates of BMD tests and treatment in men after a fracture were only half of those in women.
In both men and women, the rate of hip and wrist fractures mainly increased after age 65 with the sharpest increase occurring after age 80 years.
Findings of Systematic Review and Analysis
Serial Bone Mineral Density Testing for People Not Receiving Osteoporosis Treatment
A systematic review showed that the mean rate of bone loss in people not receiving osteoporosis treatment (including postmenopausal women) is generally less than 1% per year. Higher rates of bone loss were reported for people with disease conditions or on medications that affect bone metabolism. In order to be considered a genuine biological change, the change in BMD between serial measurements must exceed the least significant change (variability) of the testing, ranging from 2.77% to 8% for precisions ranging from 1% to 3% respectively. Progression in BMD was analyzed, using different rates of baseline BMD values, rates of bone loss, precision, and BMD value for initiating treatment. The analyses showed that serial BMD measurements every 24 months (as per OHIP policy for low-risk individuals) is not necessary for people with no major risk factors for osteoporosis, provided that the baseline BMD is normal (T-score ≥ –1), and the rate of bone loss is less than or equal to 1% per year. The analyses showed that for someone with a normal baseline BMD and a rate of bone loss of less than 1% per year, the change in BMD is not likely to exceed least significant change (even for a 1% precision) in less than 3 years after the baseline test, and is not likely to drop to a BMD level that requires initiation of treatment in less than 16 years after the baseline test.
Serial Bone Mineral Density Testing in People Receiving Osteoporosis Therapy
Seven published meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 2 recent RCTs on BMD monitoring during osteoporosis therapy showed that although higher increases in BMD were generally associated with reduced risk of fracture, the change in BMD only explained a small percentage of the fracture risk reduction.
Studies showed that some people with small or no increase in BMD during treatment experienced significant fracture risk reduction, indicating that other factors such as improved bone microarchitecture might have contributed to fracture risk reduction.
There is conflicting evidence relating to the role of BMD testing in improving patient compliance with osteoporosis therapy.
Even though BMD may not be a perfect surrogate for reduction in fracture risk when monitoring responses to osteoporosis therapy, experts advised that it is still the only reliable test available for this purpose.
A systematic review conducted by the Medical Advisory Secretariat showed that the magnitude of increases in BMD during osteoporosis drug therapy varied among medications. Although most of the studies yielded mean percentage increases in BMD from baseline that did not exceed the least significant change for a 2% precision after 1 year of treatment, there were some exceptions.
Bone Mineral Density Testing and Treatment After a Fragility Fracture
A review of 3 published pooled analyses of observational studies and 12 prospective population-based observational studies showed that the presence of any prevalent fracture increases the relative risk for future fractures by approximately 2-fold or more. A review of 10 systematic reviews of RCTs and 3 additional RCTs showed that therapy with antiresorptive drugs significantly reduced the risk of vertebral fractures by 40 to 50% in postmenopausal osteoporotic women and osteoporotic men, and 2 antiresorptive drugs also reduced the risk of nonvertebral fractures by 30 to 50%. Evidence from observational studies in Canada and other jurisdictions suggests that patients who had undergone BMD measurements, particularly if a diagnosis of osteoporosis is made, were more likely to be given pharmacologic bone-sparing therapy. Despite these findings, the rate of BMD investigation and osteoporosis treatment after a fracture remained low (<20%) in Ontario as well as in other jurisdictions.
Bone Mineral Density Testing in Men
There are presently no specific Canadian guidelines for BMD screening in men. A review of the literature suggests that risk factors for fracture and the rate of vertebral deformity are similar for men and women, but the mortality rate after a hip fracture is higher in men compared with women. Two bisphosphonates had been shown to reduce the risk of vertebral and hip fractures in men. However, BMD testing and osteoporosis treatment were proportionately low in Ontario men in general, and particularly after a fracture, even though men accounted for 25% of the hip and wrist fractures. The Ontario data also showed that the rates of wrist fracture and hip fracture in men rose sharply in the 75- to 80-year age group.
Ontario-Based Economic Analysis
The economic analysis focused on analyzing the economic impact of decreasing future hip fractures by increasing the rate of BMD testing in men and women age greater than or equal to 65 years following a hip or wrist fracture. A decision analysis showed the above strategy, especially when enhanced by improved reporting of BMD tests, to be cost-effective, resulting in a cost-effectiveness ratio ranging from $2,285 (Cdn) per fracture avoided (worst-case scenario) to $1,981 (Cdn) per fracture avoided (best-case scenario). A budget impact analysis estimated that shifting utilization of BMD testing from the low risk population to high risk populations within Ontario would result in a saving of $0.85 million to $1.5 million (Cdn) to the health system. The potential net saving was estimated at $1.2 million to $5 million (Cdn) when the downstream cost-avoidance due to prevention of future hip fractures was factored into the analysis.
Other Factors for Consideration
There is a lack of standardization for BMD testing in Ontario. Two different standards are presently being used and experts suggest that variability in results from different facilities may lead to unnecessary testing. There is also no requirement for standardized equipment, procedure or reporting format. The current reimbursement policy for BMD testing encourages serial testing in people at low risk of accelerated bone loss. This review showed that biannual testing is not necessary for all cases. The lack of a database to collect clinical data on BMD testing makes it difficult to evaluate the clinical profiles of patients tested and outcomes of the BMD tests. There are ministry initiatives in progress under the Osteoporosis Program to address the development of a mandatory standardized requisition form for BMD tests to facilitate data collection and clinical decision-making. Work is also underway for developing guidelines for BMD testing in men and in perimenopausal women.
Conclusion
Increased use of BMD in Ontario since 1996 appears to be associated with increased use of antiresorptive medication and a decrease in hip and wrist fractures.
Data suggest that as many as 20% (98,000) of the DXA BMD tests in Ontario in 2005/06 were performed in people aged less than 65 years, with no fracture in the current year, and coded as being at low risk for accelerated bone loss; this is not consistent with current guidelines. Even though some of these people might have been incorrectly coded as low-risk, the number of tests in people truly at low risk could still be substantial.
Approximately 4% (21,000) of the DXA BMD tests in 2005/06 were repeat BMDs in low-risk individuals within a 24-month period. Even though this is in compliance with current OHIP reimbursement policies, evidence showed that biannual serial BMD testing is not necessary in individuals without major risk factors for fractures, provided that the baseline BMD is normal (T-score < –1). In this population, BMD measurements may be repeated in 3 to 5 years after the baseline test to establish the rate of bone loss, and further serial BMD tests may not be necessary for another 7 to 10 years if the rate of bone loss is no more than 1% per year. Precision of the test needs to be considered when interpreting serial BMD results.
Although changes in BMD may not be the perfect surrogate for reduction in fracture risk as a measure of response to osteoporosis treatment, experts advised that it is presently the only reliable test for monitoring response to treatment and to help motivate patients to continue treatment. Patients should not discontinue treatment if there is no increase in BMD after the first year of treatment. Lack of response or bone loss during treatment should prompt the physician to examine whether the patient is taking the medication appropriately.
Men and women who have had a fragility fracture at the hip, spine, wrist or shoulder are at increased risk of having a future fracture, but this population is presently under investigated and under treated. Additional efforts have to be made to communicate to physicians (particularly orthopaedic surgeons and family physicians) and the public about the need for a BMD test after fracture, and for initiating treatment if low BMD is found.
Men had a disproportionately low rate of BMD tests and osteoporosis treatment, especially after a fracture. Evidence and fracture data showed that the risk of hip and wrist fractures in men rises sharply at age 70 years.
Some counties had BMD utilization rates that were only 10% of that of the county with the highest utilization. The reasons for low utilization need to be explored and addressed.
Initiatives such as aligning reimbursement policy with current guidelines, developing specific guidelines for BMD testing in men and perimenopausal women, improving BMD reports to assist in clinical decision making, developing a registry to track BMD tests, improving access to BMD tests in remote/rural counties, establishing mechanisms to alert family physicians of fractures, and educating physicians and the public, will improve the appropriate utilization of BMD tests, and further decrease the rate of fractures in Ontario. Some of these initiatives such as developing guidelines for perimenopausal women and men, and developing a standardized requisition form for BMD testing, are currently in progress under the Ontario Osteoporosis Strategy.
PMCID: PMC3379167  PMID: 23074491
2.  Influence of Obesity on Bone Mineral Density in Postmenopausal Asthma Patients Undergoing Treatment with Inhaled Corticosteroids 
Clinics (Sao Paulo, Brazil)  2009;64(4):313-318.
OBJECTIVES:
The etiology of osteoporosis in asthma is complex as various factors contribute to its pathogenesis. The purpose of our study was to investigate the effects of obesity and inhaled steroids, as well as the severity and duration of asthma, on osteoporosis in postmenopausal asthma patients as compared to healthy controls.
METHODS:
A total of 46 patients with asthma and 60 healthy female controls, all postmenopausal, were enrolled in our study. Bone mineral density was assessed at the lumbar spine and hip using a Lunar DPX-L densitometer.
RESULTS:
Bone mineral density (BMD) scores were comparable between the asthmatic and control groups, with average scores of 0.95 ± 0.29 and 0.88 ± 0.14 g/cm2, respectively. Likewise, osteoporosis was diagnosed in a similar percentage of patients in the asthmatic (39.1%) and control (43.3%) groups. Bone fracture was identified in four patients with asthma (8.6%) and in six patients from the control group (10%). We could not detect any relationship between BMD and duration of asthma, asthma severity, inhaled steroids or body mass index (BMI). There was no difference between the two groups with respect to age or years since menopause. Although asthma patients were more likely to be overweight and presented higher BMD scores on average than the control subjects, these differences were not statistically significant.
CONCLUSIONS:
There is a slight positive protective effect of high BMI against osteoporosis in asthma patients, but this effect is overcome by time and menopause status. Therefore, the protective effect of obesity against osteoporosis in asthma patients seems to not be significant.
doi:10.1590/S1807-59322009000400008
PMCID: PMC2694454  PMID: 19488588
Asthma; Obesity; Osteoporosis; Bone mineral densitometry; Inhaled steroids
3.  Relationship between blood pressure levels and bone mineral density in postmenopausal Turkish women 
Introduction
We investigated the association between bone mineral density (BMD) detected by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometric (DXA) method and blood pressure (BP) in a large sample of postmenopausal women.
Material and methods
The current study was based on a retrospective analysis of 586 postmenopausal women with a mean age of 60.8 ±8.8 years, who were screened for osteopenia or osteoporosis by DXA. Patients with hypertension (HT, n= 306) were compared with normotensive (NT, n = 290) individuals. Bone mineral density results for the femur neck and spine were classified into 3 groups according to World Health Organization criteria: normal (T score > –1.0 SD), osteopenia (T score –1.0 to –2.5 SD) and osteoporosis (T score < –2.5 SD). Patients with osteopenia or osteoporosis (T score < –1.0 SD) were grouped as having low bone mass (LBM).
Results
There were no significant differences in femur T score, femur BMD, femur Z score, spinal T score, spinal BMD and spinal Z score between hypertensive and normotensive groups. The group of patients with low bone mass calculated from femur T scores had higher age, systolic BP, duration of hypertension and duration of menopause, but lower BMI. Similarly, patients with low spine BMD had higher age and duration of menopause, but lower BMI. Linear regression analysis showed a significant correlation between systolic BP and femur BMD and T score values. Furthermore, logistic regression analysis revealed that hypertension is an independent predictor of spinal osteopenia and osteoporosis.
Conclusions
The presence of hypertension is an independent predictor of spinal low bone density in Turkish women after menopause.
doi:10.5114/aoms.2011.22077
PMCID: PMC3258724  PMID: 22291766
blood pressure; bone mineral density; dual-energy X-ray absorptiometric
4.  The clinical diagnosis of osteoporosis: a position statement from the National Bone Health Alliance Working Group 
Osteoporosis International  2014;25:1439-1443.
Summary
Osteoporosis causes an elevated fracture risk. We propose the continued use of T-scores as one means for diagnosis but recommend that, alternatively, hip fracture; osteopenia-associated vertebral, proximal humerus, pelvis, or some wrist fractures; or FRAX scores with ≥3 % (hip) or 20 % (major) 10-year fracture risk also confer an osteoporosis diagnosis.
Introduction
Osteoporosis is a common disorder of reduced bone strength that predisposes to an increased risk for fractures in older individuals. In the USA, the standard criterion for the diagnosis of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women and older men is a T-score of ≤ −2.5 at the lumbar spine, femur neck, or total hip by bone mineral density testing.
Methods
Under the direction of the National Bone Health Alliance, 17 clinicians and clinical scientists were appointed to a working group charged to determine the appropriate expansion of the criteria by which osteoporosis can be diagnosed.
Results
The group recommends that postmenopausal women and men aged 50 years should be diagnosed with osteoporosis if they have a demonstrable elevated risk for future fractures. This includes having a T-score of less than or equal to −2.5 at the spine or hip as one method for diagnosis but also permits a diagnosis for individuals in this population who have experienced a hip fracture with or without bone mineral density (BMD) testing and for those who have osteopenia by BMD who sustain a vertebral, proximal humeral, pelvic, or, in some cases, distal forearm fracture. Finally, the term osteoporosis should be used to diagnose individuals with an elevated fracture risk based on the World Health Organization Fracture Risk Algorithm, FRAX.
Conclusions
As new ICD-10 codes become available, it is our hope that this new understanding of what osteoporosis represents will allow for an appropriate diagnosis when older individuals are recognized as being at an elevated risk for fracture.
doi:10.1007/s00198-014-2655-z
PMCID: PMC3988515  PMID: 24577348
Clinical diagnosis; Criteria; Osteoporosis; Position statement
5.  Radiographic Emphysema Predicts Low Bone Mineral Density in a Tobacco-exposed Cohort 
Rationale: Studies demonstrating an association between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and low bone mineral density (BMD) implicate factors distinct from treatments and severity of lung disease in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Whereas emphysema has been independently associated with vascular disease and other comorbidities, its association with BMD has not been well studied.
Objectives: We explored the associations of BMD with computed tomography (CT) measures of emphysema and other risk factors in current and former smokers.
Methods: One hundred ninety subjects completed a CT scan, pulmonary function testing, questionnaires, and dual x-ray absorptiometry measurements of hip and lumbar spine BMD. Subjects were classified as having normal BMD, osteopenia, or osteoporosis. Demographic, physiologic, and radiographic characteristics were compared and the association of BMD with radiographic emphysema, airflow obstruction, and osteoporosis risk factors was assessed.
Measurements and Main Results: No difference existed in age, tobacco exposure, oral steroid use, or physical activity across BMD categories. Both osteopenia and osteoporosis were associated with the presence of airflow obstruction, inhaled corticosteroid use, and female sex, and demonstrated a significant relationship with the presence of visual emphysema (P = 0.0003). Quantitative emphysema, but not CT-measured indices of airway wall thickness, was inversely associated with BMD. Visual emphysema alone was a significant predictor of osteopenia/osteoporosis (odds ratio = 2.55; 95% confidence interval, 1.24–5.25) in a model including obstruction severity, age, sex, and inhaled and oral steroid use.
Conclusions: Radiographic emphysema is a strong, independent predictor of low BMD in current and former smokers. This relationship suggests a common mechanistic link between emphysema and osteopenia/osteoporosis.
doi:10.1164/rccm.201004-0666OC
PMCID: PMC3086755  PMID: 20935108
pulmonary disease, chronic obstructive; emphysema; osteoporosis
6.  The effect of breast-feeding duration on bone mineral density in postmenopausal Turkish women: a population-based study 
Introduction
In the present study, we investigated the effects of breast-feeding time on bone mineral density (BMD) later in life.
Material and methods
The current study was based on a retrospective analysis of 586 postmenopausal women with a mean age of 60.8 years, who were screened for osteoporosis by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA).They were classified into 4 groups with respect to the duration of their breast-feeding as never (group 1), 1-24 months (group 2), 25-60 months (group 3), or > 60 months (group 4). Bone mineral density results for the femur neck and lumbar spine were classified into 3 groups according to WHO criteria as normal (T score > –1.0 SD), osteopenia (T score –1.0 to –2.5 SD), and osteoporosis (T score < –2.5 SD). Patients with osteopenia or osteoporosis (T score < –1.0 SD) were considered as having low bone mass (LBM).
Results
We found a correlation between duration of lactation and femur BMD or spine BMD in the study population (r = 0.116, p < 0.005; r = –0.151, p = 0.001, respectively). Significant differences were found between femur BMD and spine BMD of groups in one-way ANOVA analysis (p = 0.025, p = 0.005, respectively). Additionally, when compared with the other three groups, group 4 was older and had longer duration of menopause (p < 0.01). In logistic regression analysis, age and body mass index were found as independent risk factors of LBM [odds ratio: 1.084 (95% CI 1.031-1.141); odds ratio: 0.896 (95% CI 0.859-0.935)], while duration of lactation was not found as an independent predictor of LBM.
Conclusions
In this study, we have found that changes of bone metabolism during lactation had no effect on postmenopausal BMD measured by DXA. Consequently, it can be suggested that long breast-feeding duration is not a risk factor for low bone mass later in life.
doi:10.5114/aoms.2011.23416
PMCID: PMC3258757  PMID: 22295033
breast-feeding time; bone mineral density; postmenopausal women
7.  Bone-Density Testing Interval and Transition to Osteoporosis in Older Women 
The New England Journal of Medicine  2012;366(3):225-233.
BACKGROUND
Although bone mineral density (BMD) testing to screen for osteoporosis (BMD T score, −2.50 or lower) is recommended for women 65 years of age or older, there are few data to guide decisions about the interval between BMD tests.
METHODS
We studied 4957 women, 67 years of age or older, with normal BMD (T score at the femoral neck and total hip, −1.00 or higher) or osteopenia (T score, −1.01 to −2.49) and with no history of hip or clinical vertebral fracture or of treatment for osteoporosis, followed prospectively for up to 15 years. The BMD testing interval was defined as the estimated time for 10% of women to make the transition to osteoporosis before having a hip or clinical vertebral fracture, with adjustment for estrogen use and clinical risk factors. Transitions from normal BMD and from three subgroups of osteopenia (mild, moderate, and advanced) were analyzed with the use of parametric cumulative incidence models. Incident hip and clinical vertebral fractures and initiation of treatment with bisphosphonates, calcitonin, or raloxifene were treated as competing risks.
RESULTS
The estimated BMD testing interval was 16.8 years (95% confidence interval [CI], 11.5 to 24.6) for women with normal BMD, 17.3 years (95% CI, 13.9 to 21.5) for women with mild osteopenia, 4.7 years (95% CI, 4.2 to 5.2) for women with moderate osteopenia, and 1.1 years (95% CI, 1.0 to 1.3) for women with advanced osteopenia.
CONCLUSIONS
Our data indicate that osteoporosis would develop in less than 10% of older, post-menopausal women during rescreening intervals of approximately 15 years for women with normal bone density or mild osteopenia, 5 years for women with moderate osteopenia, and 1 year for women with advanced osteopenia. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.)
doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1107142
PMCID: PMC3285114  PMID: 22256806
8.  Osteoporotic profiles in elderly patients with symptomatic lumbar spinal canal stenosis 
Indian Journal of Orthopaedics  2012;46(3):279-284.
Background:
The osteoporosis and lumbar canal stenosis, in elderly patients are under diagnosed and under reported. We report a cross sectional study to demonstrate the osteoporotic profile in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and to determine the proportion of patients with LSS who need to be treated for osteoporosis.
Materials and Methods:
One hundred and six postmenopausal patients with symptomatic LSS were evaluated for osteoporotic profile, which included lumbar and hip bone mineral density (BMD), serum vitamin D concentration, bone resorption and formation markers. Demographic and disease related variables were analyzed to identify the association with the risk of osteoporosis or osteopenia. Statistical analysis used were multivariate logistic regression with a forward stepwise procedure.
Results:
Twenty-four patients (22.6%) had osteoporosis and 60 (56.6%) had osteopenia. Overall, 84 patients (79.2%) with symptomatic LSS had osteoporosis or osteopenia. Fifty-nine patients (55.6%) had hypovitaminosis D. All bone turnover makers [alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, urinary-N-terminal telopeptide (u-NTx)] were demonstrated to be within normal range. Only age was associated with the risk of osteoporosis or osteopenia in the hip region. In the lumbar spine, all variables were not associated with osteoporosis or osteopenia. 44 patients (41.5%) required treatment for osteoporosis as per risk factors for osteoporosis. According to the guidelines from the Health Insurance Review Agency, however, only 20 patients (18.8% required) qualified for reimbursement for osteoporosis medications.
Conclusions:
LSS is associated with osteopenia, osteoporosis, and hypovitaminosis D, which should prompt careful screening and treatment in cases of osteoporosis and osteoarthritis.
doi:10.4103/0019-5413.96379
PMCID: PMC3377137  PMID: 22719113
Bone mineral density; bone turnover marker; hypovitaminosis D; lumbar spinal stenosis; osteoporosis
9.  Vitamin K Supplementation in Postmenopausal Women with Osteopenia (ECKO Trial): A Randomized Controlled Trial 
PLoS Medicine  2008;5(10):1-12.
Background
Vitamin K has been widely promoted as a supplement for decreasing bone loss in postmenopausal women, but the long-term benefits and potential harms are unknown. This study was conducted to determine whether daily high-dose vitamin K1 supplementation safely reduces bone loss, bone turnover, and fractures.
Methods and Findings
This single-center study was designed as a 2-y randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial, extended for earlier participants for up to an additional 2 y because of interest in long-term safety and fractures. A total of 440 postmenopausal women with osteopenia were randomized to either 5 mg of vitamin K1 or placebo daily. Primary outcomes were changes in BMD at the lumbar spine and total hip at 2 y. Secondary outcomes included changes in BMD at other sites and other time points, bone turnover markers, height, fractures, adverse effects, and health-related quality of life. This study has a power of 90% to detect 3% differences in BMD between the two groups. The women in this study were vitamin D replete, with a mean serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of 77 nmol/l at baseline. Over 2 y, BMD decreased by −1.28% and −1.22% (p = 0.84) (difference of −0.06%; 95% confidence interval [CI] −0.67% to 0.54%) at the lumbar spine and −0.69% and −0.88% (p = 0.51) (difference of 0.19%; 95% CI −0.37% to 0.75%) at the total hip in the vitamin K and placebo groups, respectively. There were no significant differences in changes in BMD at any site between the two groups over the 2- to 4-y period. Daily vitamin K1 supplementation increased serum vitamin K1 levels by 10-fold, and decreased the percentage of undercarboxylated osteocalcin and total osteocalcin levels (bone formation marker). However, C-telopeptide levels (bone resorption marker) were not significantly different between the two groups. Fewer women in the vitamin K group had clinical fractures (nine versus 20, p = 0.04) and fewer had cancers (three versus 12, p = 0.02). Vitamin K supplements were well-tolerated over the 4-y period. There were no significant differences in adverse effects or health-related quality of life between the two groups. The study was not powered to examine fractures or cancers, and their numbers were small.
Conclusions
Daily 5 mg of vitamin K1 supplementation for 2 to 4 y does not protect against age-related decline in BMD, but may protect against fractures and cancers in postmenopausal women with osteopenia. More studies are needed to further examine the effect of vitamin K on fractures and cancers.
Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov (#NCT00150969) and Current Controlled Trials (#ISRCTN61708241)
Angela Cheung and colleagues investigate whether vitamin K1 can prevent bone loss among postmenopausal women with osteopenia.
Editors' Summary
Background.
Osteoporosis is a bone disease in which the bones gradually become less dense and more likely to break. In the US, 10 million people have osteoporosis and 18 million have osteopenia, a milder condition that precedes osteoporosis. In both conditions, insufficient new bone is made and/or too much old bone is absorbed. Although bone appears solid and unchanging, very little bone in the human body is more than 10 y old. Old bone is continually absorbed and new bone built using calcium, phosphorous, and proteins. Because the sex hormones control calcium and phosphorous deposition in the bones and thus bone strength, the leading cause of osteoporosis in women is reduced estrogen levels after menopause. In men, an age-related decline in testosterone levels can cause osteoporosis. Most people discover they have osteoporosis only when they break a bone, but the condition can be diagnosed and monitored using bone mineral density (BMD) scans. Treatments can slow down or reverse bone loss (antiresorptive therapies) and some (bone formation therapies) can even make bone and build bone tissue.
Why Was This Study Done?
Although regular exercise and a healthy diet can help to keep bones strong, other ways of preventing osteoporosis are badly needed. Recently, the lay media has promoted vitamin K supplements as a way to reduce bone loss in postmenopausal women. Vitamin K (which is found mainly in leafy green vegetables) is required for a chemical modification of proteins called carboxylation. This modification is essential for the activity of three bone-building proteins. In addition, there is some evidence that low bone density and fractures are associated with a low vitamin K intake. However, little is known about the long-term benefits or harms of vitamin K supplements. In this study, the researchers investigate whether a high-dose daily vitamin K supplement can safely reduce bone loss, bone turnover, and fractures in postmenopausal women with osteopenia in a randomized controlled trial called the “Evaluation of the Clinical Use of Vitamin K Supplementation in Post-Menopausal Women With Osteopenia” (ECKO) trial.
What Did the Researchers Do and Find?
In the study, 440 postmenopausal women with osteopenia were randomized to receive 5mg of vitamin K1 (the type of vitamin K in North American food; the recommended daily adult intake of vitamin K1 is about 0.1 mg) or an inactive tablet (placebo) daily for 2 y; 261 of the women continued their treatment for 2 y to gather information about the long-term effects of vitamin K1 supplementation. All the women had regular bone density scans of their lower back and hips and were examined for fractures and for changes in bone turnover. After 2 y and after 4 y, lower back and hip bone density measurements had decreased by similar amounts in both treatment groups. The women who took vitamin K1 had 10-fold higher amounts of vitamin K1 in their blood than the women who took placebo and lower amounts of a bone formation marker; the levels of a bone resorption marker were similar in both groups. Over the 4-y period, fewer women in the vitamin K group had fractures (nine versus 20 women in the placebo group), and fewer had cancer (three versus 12). Finally, vitamin K supplementation was well tolerated over the 4-y period and adverse health effects were similar in the two treatment groups.
What Do These Findings Mean?
These findings indicate that a high daily dose of vitamin K1 provides no protection against the age-related decline in bone density in postmenopausal women with osteopenia, but that vitamin K1 supplementation may protect against fractures and cancers in these women. The apparent contradiction between the effects of vitamin K1 on bone density and on fractures could mean that vitamin K1 supplements strengthen bone by changing factors other than bone density, e.g., by changing its fine structure rather than making it denser. However, because so few study participants had fractures, the difference in the fracture rate between the two treatment groups might have occurred by chance. Larger studies are therefore needed to examine the effect of vitamin K1 on fractures (and on cancer) and, until these are done, high-dose vitamin K1 supplementation should not be recommended for the prevention of osteoporosis.
Additional Information.
Please access these Web sites via the online version of this summary at http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.0050196.
The US National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases provides detailed information about osteoporosis (in English and Spanish) and links to other resources, including an interactive web tool called Check Up On Your Bones
MedlinePlus provides links to additional information about osteoporosis (in English and Spanish)
The MedlinePlus Encyclopedia has a page about vitamin K
The UK Food Standards Agency provides information about vitamin K
Full details about the ECKO trial are available on the ClinicalTrials.gov Web site
The Canadian Task Force for Preventive Health Care provides recommendations on the prevention of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures in postmenopausal women
Osteoporosis Canada provides information on current topics related to osteoporosis
doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.0050196
PMCID: PMC2566998  PMID: 18922041
10.  Osteoporosis in ankylosing spondylitis - prevalence, risk factors and methods of assessment 
Arthritis Research & Therapy  2012;14(3):R108.
Introduction
Osteoporosis can be a complication of ankylosing spondylitis (AS), but diagnosing spinal osteoporosis can be difficult since pathologic new bone formation interferes with the assessment of the bone mineral density (BMD). The aims of the current study were to investigate prevalence and risk factors for reduced BMD in a Swedish cohort of AS patients, and to examine how progressive ankylosis influences BMD with the use of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) of the lumbar spine in different projections.
Methods
Methods of assessment were questionnaires, back mobility tests, blood samples, lateral spine radiographs for syndesmophyte grading (mSASSS), DXA of the hip, radius and lumbar spine in anteroposterior (AP) and lateral projections with estimation of volumetric BMD (vBMD).
Results
AS patients (modified New York criteria), 87 women and 117 men, mean age 50 ± 13 years and disease duration 15 ± 11 years were included. According to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria 21% osteoporosis and 44% osteopenia was diagnosed in patients > = 50 years. Under age 50 BMD below expected range for age was found in 5%. Interestingly lateral lumbar DXA showed significantly lower BMD and revealed significantly more cases with osteoporosis as compared with AP DXA. Lumbar vBMD was not different between sexes, but women had significantly more lumbar osteoporosis measured with AP DXA (P < 0.001). Men had significantly higher mSASSS (P < 0.001). Low BMD was associated with high age, disease duration, mSASSS, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), inflammatory parameters and low body mass index (BMI). Increasing mSASSS correlated significantly with decreasing lateral and volumetric lumbar BMD, while AP lumbar BMD showed tendency to increase.
Conclusions
Osteoporosis and osteopenia is common in AS and associated with high disease burden. Lateral and volumetric lumbar DXA are more sensitive than AP DXA in detecting osteoporosis and are less affected by syndesmophyte formation.
doi:10.1186/ar3833
PMCID: PMC3446485  PMID: 22569245
11.  Age effect on bone mineral density changes in breast cancer patients receiving anastrozole: results from the ARBI prospective clinical trial 
Purpose
We investigated whether age at anastrozole (A) initiation influences the effect of treatment on bone mineral density (BMD). We conducted a post hoc analysis of the dataset of Arimidex Bone Mass Index Oral Bisphosphonates prospective trial, studying the effect of risedronate (R) on BMD of postmenopausal, early breast cancer patients receiving A.
Methods
Patients were stratified into those with normal BMD or mild osteopenia (T > −2) receiving A-only and patients with mild or severe osteopenia (T ≤ −2) or osteoporosis (T < −2.5) receiving A and per os R (A + R). Depending on age on treatment initiation, patients were grouped into two age cohorts, above and below 65 years. BMD change in lumbar spine (LS) and hip (HP) was evaluated at 12 months. An analysis of patients with normal BMD at baseline was additionally performed.
Results
Among patients receiving A-only, women ≤65 years were more likely to have a decrease in LS-BMD than older (p = 0.034). HP-BMD decrease at 12 months was not related to age (p = 0.182). In patients with mild or severe osteopenia or osteoporosis, treated with A + R, no age effect was observed for LS or HP (p = 0.099 and p = 0.939, respectively). Among patients with normal BMD at baseline, the age effect on LS-BMD change was more profound (p = 0.026).
Conclusions
Our study suggests that younger postmenopausal women with normal BMD or mild osteopenia receiving A-only face an increased risk of bone loss in LS. Among patients with mild or severe osteopenia or osteoporosis treated with A + R, 12 months LS or HP BMD variations were configured regardless of age group.
doi:10.1007/s00432-012-1233-z
PMCID: PMC3418493  PMID: 22552718
Breast cancer; Aromatase inhibitors; Anastrozole; Bisphosphonates; Risedronate; Bone mineral density
12.  Influence of Insurance Benefit Criteria on the Administration Rate of Osteoporosis Drugs in Postmenopausal Females 
Clinics in Orthopedic Surgery  2014;6(1):56-61.
Background
Preventive measures need to be implemented to lower the incidence of osteoporotic fractures. Osteoporotic fractures increase morbidity and mortality as well as impose a socioeconomic burden; however, current research is limited to the administration rates of osteoporosis drugs for Korean postmenopausal females.
Methods
This study represents a nationwide, observational, and cross-sectional survey that investigates the administration rates of osteoporosis drugs based upon a bone mineral density (BMD) test performed on Korean postmenopausal patients who visited outpatient orthopedic clinics. BMD test results were examined in postmenopausal female patients (50 to 80 years of age); subsequently, the patients were classified into an osteoporosis group, osteopenia group, and normal group. The administration rates of osteoporosis drugs and bisphosphonates were then analyzed. The osteoporosis group was subdivided into a T-score less than -3.0 group and a T-score between -3.0 and -2.5 group that were separately analyzed.
Results
Based on the lumbar spine BMD, the rate of administration of osteoporosis drugs in the osteoporosis group was 42.1%, which was significantly higher compared to the osteopenia group or normal group. A significantly low bone mineral density was observed in patients who were administered bisphosphonates. Based on the lumbar spine BMD, the administration rate of osteoporosis drugs in the group with a T-score between -3.0 and -2.5 (34.2%) was significantly lower than the group with a T-score less that -3.0 (46.2%). The bisphosphonate administration rate was also significantly low; however, the administration rate for osteoporosis drugs was significantly lower than that of the osteopenia group.
Conclusions
Only about 40% of Korean postmenopausal female patients with osteoporosis were administered osteoporosis drugs. The administration rate in patients with a T-score between -3.0 and -2.5 was particularly low and active treatment to prevent osteoporotic fractures is required in this group.
doi:10.4055/cios.2014.6.1.56
PMCID: PMC3942603  PMID: 24605190
Postmenopausal osteoporosis; Korean; Osteoporosis medication; Bisphophonate; National Health Insurance Service
13.  Osteoporosis and osteopenia in adults and adolescents with cystic fibrosis: prevalence and associated factors 
Thorax  2000;55(9):798-804.
BACKGROUND—Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) have many risk factors for reduced bone mineral density (BMD). The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of osteoporosis and osteopenia in a large cross section of patients and to identify risk factors.
METHODS—All patients attending the regional centre were invited to participate in the study. Bone mineral density was measured at the lumbar spine, femoral neck, and for total body with a Lunar DPX-L densitometer. Multiple indices of disease severity were investigated, and liver and thyroid function, blood calcium, phosphate, 25-OH vitamin D, follicle stimulating and luteinising hormone, oestradiol, and testosterone levels were measured. Patients completed a four day prospective dietary diary. Exercise was assessed by a seven day activity recall questionnaire. Sexual development and treatment histories were obtained. The relationship between all these variables and BMD measurements was analysed.
RESULTS—Sixty six percent of 114 patients assessed had osteopenia or osteoporosis. The Shwachman-Kulczycki (SK) clinical score (higher score = less severe disease) correlated significantly with BMD at the lumbar spine and femoral neck, and with total body BMD (p<0.001). There was a predicted increase of 0.0032 g/cm2 in lumbar spine BMD for every unit increase in the SK score. Oral steroid use was significantly associated with reduced BMD at the lumbar spine (p = 0.017) and femoral neck (p = 0.027).
CONCLUSIONS—Osteopenia and osteoporosis are common findings in a heterogeneous population of adults with CF. Patients at most risk are those with severe disease and those who have used corticosteroids.


doi:10.1136/thorax.55.9.798
PMCID: PMC1745849  PMID: 10950902
14.  Frequency of Low Bone Mineral Density in Saudi Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease 
Background/Aims:
Metabolic bone disease is common in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Our aim was to determine the frequency of bone loss among Saudi patients with IBD and possible contributing risk factors.
Settings and Design:
We retrospectively reviewed Saudi patients with IBD, between 18 and 70 years of age, who had bone mass density (BMD) determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning at one of three hospitals in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from 2001 to 2008.
Patients and Methods:
Case notes and BMDs results were carefully reviewed for demographic and clinical data. Low bone mass, osteopenia, and osteoporosis were defined according to the WHO guidelines.
Statistical Analysis Used:
Predictive factors for BMD were analyzed using group comparisons and stepwise regression analyses.
Results:
Ninety-five patients were included; 46% had Crohn's disease (CD) and 54% had ulcerative colitis (UC). The average age was 30.9±11.6 years. Using T-scores, the frequency of osteopenia was 44.2%, and the frequency of osteoporosis was 30.5% at both lumbar spine and proximal femur. Only 25.3% of patients exhibited a BMD within the normal range. Our results revealed a positive correlation between the Z-score in both the lumbar spine and the proximal femur and body mass index (BMI) (P=0.042 and P=0.018, respectively). On regression analysis BMI, age, and calcium supplementation were found to be the most important independent predictors of BMD.
Conclusions:
Saudi patients with IBD are at an increased risk of low BMD and the frequency of decreased BMD in Saudi patients with CD and UC were similar. BMI and age were the most important independent predictors of low BMD.
doi:10.4103/1319-3767.96458
PMCID: PMC3371423  PMID: 22626800
Bone mineral density; inflammatory bowel disease; osteopenia; osteoporosis; Saudi
15.  Association of LRP5 genotypes with osteoporosis in Tunisian post-menopausal women 
Background
Osteoporosis is a highly heritable trait. Among the genes associated with bone mineral density (BMD), the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 gene (LRP5) has been consistently identified in Caucasians. However LRP5 contribution to osteoporosis in populations of other ethnicities remains poorly known.
Methods
To determine whether LRP5 polymorphisms Ala1330Val and Val667Met are associated with BMD in North Africans, these genotypes were analyzed in 566 post-menopausal Tunisian women with mean age of 59.5 ± 7.7 years, of which 59.1% have low bone mass (T-score < −1 at spine or hip).
Results
In post-menopausal Tunisian women, 1330Val was weakly associated with reduced BMD T-score at lumbar spine (p = 0.047) but not femur neck. Moreover, the TT/TC genotypes tended to be more frequent in women with osteopenia and osteoporosis than in women with normal BMD (p = 0.066). Adjusting for body size and other potential confounders, LRP5 genotypes were no longer significantly associated with aBMD at any site.
Conclusions
The less common Val667Met polymorphism showed no association with osteoporosis. The Ala1330Val polymorphism is weakly associated with lower lumbar spine bone density and osteopenia/osteoporosis in postmenopausal Tunisian women. These observations expand our knowledge about the contribution of LRP5 genetic variation to osteoporosis risk in populations of diverse ethnic origin.
doi:10.1186/1471-2474-15-144
PMCID: PMC4012028  PMID: 24885293
LRP5; Ala1330Val; Val667Met; Lumbar spine BMD; Fractures; Post-menopausal Tunisian population
16.  Relationships between endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene polymorphisms and osteoporosis in postmenopausal women*  
Objective: To investigate the relationships between endothelial nitric oxide synthases (eNOS) G894T and 27 bp-variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) gene polymorphisms and osteoporosis in the postmenopausal women of Chinese Han nationality. Methods: In the present study, 281 postmenopausal women from Xi’an urban area in West China were recruited, and divided into osteoporosis, osteopenia, and normal groups according to the diagnostic criteria of osteoporosis proposed by World Health Organization (WHO). The bone mineral density (BMD) values of lumbar vertebrae and left hips were determined by QDR-2000 dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Blood samples were tested for plasma biochemical indicators including testosterone, estradiol, calcitonin, osteocalcin, and procollagen type I amino-terminal propeptide by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase by spectrophotometric method, and the content of nitric oxide by Griess method. Genome DNA was extracted from whole blood, and G894T polymorphism of eNOS gene was analyzed by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method and 27 bp-VNTR polymorphism of eNOS gene was genotyped by PCR method. Then the relationships between genotypes and biochemical indicators, genotypes and osteoporosis, and haplotypes and osteoporosis were analyzed. Results: The average BMD values of the femoral neck, ward’s triangle and lumbar vertebrae 1~4 (L1~L4) in the subjects with T/T genotype in eNOS G894T locus were significantly higher than those in the subjects with G/T and G/G genotypes (P<0.05). The average BMD of the femoral neck in the subjects with a/a genotype of eNOS 27 bp-VNTR locus was evidently higher than that in the subjects with b/b genotype (P<0.05). The plasma testosterone and osteocalcin concentrations in the subjects of eNOS G894T G/T genotype were evidently higher than those in the subjects of other genotypes (P<0.05); the plasma estradiol concentration in the subjects of eNOS 27 bp-VNTR a/a genotype was obviously higher than that in the subjects of b/b genotype (P<0.01). eNOS G/G homozygous frequencies in osteoporosis women, osteopenia women, and normal women were 85.37%, 76.38%, and 83.87%, respectively (P>0.05). 0% osteoporosis woman, 0.79% osteopenia women, and 3.23% normal women were eNOS a/a homozygous (P<0.05). The frequencies of eNOS 27 bp-VNTR a allele were 5.33% in the osteoporosis group, 10.24% in the osteopenia group, and 16.13% in the normal group (P<0.05, odds ratio (OR)=0.29, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.11~0.77), suggesting that a/a genotype and a allele might have protective effects on osteoporosis. The haplotype analysis showed that G-b was 87.7% (214/244) in the osteoporosis group (P<0.05, OR=2.48, 95% CI=1.18~5.18). G-a was 5.3% (13/244) in the osteoporosis group (P<0.05, OR=0.29, 95% CI=0.11~0.77). G-b was a risk factor for osteoporosis, and G-a a protective factor. Conclusion: eNOS G894T G/T genotype influenced the plasma testosterone and osteocalcin concentrations, and T/T genotype influenced BMD. eNOS 27 bp-VNTR a/a genotype increased plasma estradiol concentration to have a protective effect on osteoporosis.
doi:10.1631/jzus.B0920137
PMCID: PMC2722703  PMID: 19650200
Postmenopausal women; Osteoporosis; Endothelial nitric oxide synthase; Gene polymorphisms; Bone mineral density
17.  Increased Levels of Circulating Advanced Glycation End-Products in Menopausal Women with Osteoporosis 
Background: Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) can accumulate in organs and tissues during ageing and diabetes. Increased levels of AGEs are found in the bone tissue of patients with osteoporosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate circulating AGEs in patients with osteoporosis.
Methods: We evaluated plasma AGEs, osteoporosis-related biomarkers, and bone mass in 82 menopausal women with osteoporosis or osteopenia, 16 young women with osteopenia, and 43 healthy women without osteoporosis or osteopenia.
Results: Higher levels of serum AGEs were found in the osteoporosis or osteopenia group compared to healthy women (P < 0.0001). A negative correlation was observed between serum AGEs and lumbar spine bone density (BMD of lumbar spine, r = -0.249, P = 0.028; T-score of lumbar spine, r = -0.261, P = 0.021). Women with a increased level of serum AGEs (> 8.12 U/mL) had a 5.34-fold risk of osteopenia regarding lumbar spine T-score and a 3.31-fold risk of osteopenia regarding the hip T-score.
Conclusion: Serum AGEs could be used to monitor the severity and progression of osteoporosis. An increased serum level of AGEs was associated with impaired bone formation and was a risk factor for the development of osteoporosis. Targeting AGEs may represent a novel therapeutic approach for primary or secondary osteoporosis.
doi:10.7150/ijms.8172
PMCID: PMC3970097  PMID: 24688308
Advanced glycation end-products; Osteopenia; Osteoporosis; Biomarker; Osteopontin.
18.  What Is the Utility of Distal Forearm DXA in Primary Hyperparathyroidism? 
The Oncologist  2012;17(3):322-325.
The frequency with which the distal forearm T score based on dual x-ray absorptiometry scan was the worst T score in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism was examined, and whether or not this T score alone could lead to higher rate of diagnosis of osteopenia or osteoporosis was evaluated.
Background.
Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) leads to increased bone turnover, low bone mineral density, and increased fracture risk. These effects are, however, preferentially seen in the distal forearm, which is rich in cortical bone. This study aimed to determine how frequently the distal forearm T score was the worst T score and if this T score alone led to higher rate of diagnosis of osteopenia or osteoporosis.
Materials and Methods.
We retrospectively reviewed a prospective database of 300 patients undergoing parathyroidectomy at our institution between November 2000 and January 2009. The bone mineral density of the lumbar spine, total proximal femurs, and distal third of the nondominant radius was measured by dual x-ray absorptiometry. Data on bone density are reported as T scores.
Results.
The mean T scores were −1.30 ± 0.2 in the distal forearm, −1.0 ± 0.1 in the total proximal femurs, and −0.9 ± 0.1 in the spine. The distal forearm T score was the worst bone mineral density T score in 39% of patients. This T score alone led to an upstaging in diagnosis to osteopenia or osteoporosis in 9.4% of patients.
Conclusion.
In patients with PHPT, the worst T score is commonly found in the distal forearm. This T score can identify additional patients with a diagnosis of osteopenia or osteoporosis. Distal forearm bone mineral density should, therefore, be assessed in all patients who have a diagnosis of PHPT.
doi:10.1634/theoncologist.2011-0285
PMCID: PMC3316917  PMID: 22258698
Primary hyperparathyroidism; Osteoporosis; Forearm; Dual x-ray absorptiometry
19.  How reliable is a radiological report in osteoporosis in diagnosing low bone density? 
The Ulster Medical Journal  2003;72(1):34-37.
Patients are often referred to osteoporosis clinics with a radiological diagnosis of osteoporosis. Previous studies attempting to ascertain risk of osteoporosis from radiographs have been conflicting. The aim of our study was to determine how reliable spinal radiographs were at detecting low bone density compared with Dual Energy X ray Absorptiometry (DXA). We retrospectively measured the Bone Mineral Density (BMD) at the spine in 130 patients with a radiological diagnosis of osteopenia or osteoporosis in the absence of vertebral fractures. They were compared with a group of 119 age and sex matched patients with one or more low trauma vertebral fractures. There was a statistically significant difference in the mean BMD between these two groups. 12.7%, of the x-ray group with osteopenia reported, had a normal bone density, 49.2% had osteopenia (T-score -1 to -2.5) and 38.1% had osteoporosis (T-score <-2.5). Of those with a radiological report of osteoporosis, 12.8% had a normal bone density, 44.7% had osteopenia and 42.6% had osteoporosis. We conclude that a radiological report of low bone density is a strong predictor of osteopenia or osteoporosis by BMD measurement.
PMCID: PMC2475391  PMID: 12868701
20.  Simultaneous screening for osteoporosis at CT colonography 
Journal of Bone and Mineral Research  2011;26(9):2194-2203.
Purpose
To evaluate the utility of lumbar spine attenuation measurement for bone mineral density (BMD) assessment at screening CT colonography (CTC), using central dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) as the reference standard.
Material and Methods
252 adults (240 women, 12 men; mean age, 58.9 years) underwent CTC screening and central DXA BMD measurement within 2 months (mean interval, 25.0 days). The lowest DXA T-score between the spine and hip served as the reference standard, with low BMD defined per WHO as osteoporosis (DXA T-score ≤-2.5) or osteopenia (DXA T-score between −1.0 and −2.4). Both phantomless QCT and simple non-angled ROI MDCT attenuation measurements were applied to T12-L5 levels. Ability to predict osteoporosis and low BMD (osteoporosis or osteopenia) by DXA was assessed.
Results
A BMD cut-off of 90 mg/cc at phantomless QCT yielded 100% sensitivity for osteoporosis (29/29) and specificity of 63.8% (143/224); 87.2% (96/110) below this threshold had low BMD and 49.6% (69/139) above this threshold had normal BMD at DXA. At L1, a trabecular ROI attenuation cut-off of 160 HU was 100% sensitive for osteoporosis (29/29), with a specificity of 46.4% (104/224); 83.9% (125/149) below this threshold had low BMD and 57.5% (59/103) above had normal BMD at DXA. ROI performance was similar at all individual T12-L5 levels. At ROC analysis, AUC for osteoporosis was 0.888 for phantomless QCT (95% CI: 0.780–0.946) and ranged from 0.825–0.853 using trabecular ROIs at single lumbar levels (0.864 [0.752–0.930] at multivariate analysis). Supine-prone reproducibility was better with simple ROI method compared with QCT.
Conclusion
Both phantomless QCT and simple ROI attenuation measurements of the lumbar spine are effective for BMD screening at CTC, with high sensitivity for osteoporosis as defined by the DXA T-score.
doi:10.1002/jbmr.428
PMCID: PMC3304444  PMID: 21590738
Osteoporosis; Screening; Bone mineral density; Computed tomography; CT colonography
21.  Gender Difference in Bone Loss and Vascular Calcification Associated with Age 
Korean Circulation Journal  2013;43(7):453-461.
Background and Objectives
It is widely known that both bone loss and vascular calcification are age-related processes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between coronary artery calcium (CAC) score or bone mineral density (BMD) with age and whether there is a gender difference factoring in the two conditions among healthy subjects.
Subjects and Methods
Between March 2009 and August 2011, participants included 1727 subjects (mean age: 55±10 years, M : F=914 : 813) with routine health check-ups. After being categorized into three groups (normal, osteopenia, and osteoporosis) according to the World Health Organization (WHO) diagnostic classification, we estimated BMD by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and CAC score by dual-source CT (DSCT).
Results
There was a significant gender difference among the risk factors, including total-lumbar spine (1.213±0.176 g/cm2 : 1.087±0.168 g/cm2, p<0.001) and femur (1.024±0.131 g/cm2 : 0.910±0.127 g/cm2, p<0.001) in BMD by DEXA, and CAC score (68±227 : 27±116, p<0.001) in coronary artery calcification by DSCT. Age in male [odds ratio (OR): 1.138 {95% confidence interval (CI): 1.088-1.190}, p<0.001] and menopause in female subjects {OR: 12.370 (95% CI: 3.120-49.047), p<0.001} were, respectively, independently associated with osteopenia.
Conclusion
Although our results do not demonstrate a direct association between CAC score and BMD in both genders, there is a gender difference of CAC score in normal and osteopenia groups according to the WHO diagnostic classification. Additionally, we suggest that more specific therapeutic strategies be considered during any early bone loss period, especially in female subjects.
doi:10.4070/kcj.2013.43.7.453
PMCID: PMC3744732  PMID: 23964291
Gender; Osteoporosis; Coronary vessels; Calcium; Bone density
22.  Prevalence of osteoporosis and osteopenia among African Americans with early rheumatoid arthritis: the impact of ethnic-specific normative data. 
PURPOSE: To examine the prevalence of osteopenia and/or osteoporosis among African Americans with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to assess the effect of using race/ethnicity-specific normative data. METHODS: Bone mineral density (BMD) of the hip and spine was assessed in African Americans with early RA. To examine the impact of using different normative data on disease classification, we calculated two sets of T scores, the first using sex-matched reference data from Caucasians and the second using data from African Americans. Osteoporosis was defined as a BMD at either site > or =2.5 SD below the young adult mean. Osteopenia was defined as a BMD > or =1 SD and <2.5 SD below this mean. RESULTS: Using Caucasian referent data, 33% (n=48) of patients had osteopenia or worse (n=48, 32.9%) and 5% (n=8) were osteoporotic. With the use of African-American normative data, 55% (n=94) were osteopenic or worse, and 16% (n=27) were osteoporotic. CONCLUSION: African Americans with RA are at risk of osteopenia and/or osteoporosis. Different diagnostic classifications may occur in this population based solely on the normative data used for assessing fracture risk. These results underscore the need for a standardized approach in defining osteopenia and osteoporosis in African Americans.
PMCID: PMC1364462  PMID: 16173331
23.  Prevalence of Osteoporosis and Osteopenia among African Americans with Early Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Impact of Ethnic-Specific Normative Data 
Purpose: To examine the prevalence of osteopenia and/or osteoporosis among African Americans with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to assess the effect of using race/ethnicity-specific normative data.
Methods: Bone mineral density (BMD) of the hip and spine was assessed in African Americans with early RA. To examine the impact of using different normative data on disease classification, we calculated two sets of T scores, the first using sex-matched reference data from Caucasians and the second using data from African Americans. Osteoporosis was defined as a BMD at either site ≥2.5 SD below the young adult mean. Osteopenia was defined as a BMD ≥1 SD and <2.5 SD below this mean.
Results: Using Caucasian referent data, 33% (n=48) of patients had osteopenia or worse (n=48, 32.9%) and 5% (n=8) were osteoporotic. With the use of African-American normative data, 55% (n=94) were osteopenic or worse, and 16% (n=27) were osteoporotic.
Conclusion: African Americans with RA are at risk of osteopenia and/or osteoporosis. Different diagnostic classifications may occur in this population based solely on the normative data used for assessing fracture risk. These results underscore the need for a standardized approach in defining osteopenia and osteoporosis in African Americans.
PMCID: PMC1364462  PMID: 16173331
osteoporosis; osteopenia; African Americans; DXA; rheumatoid arthritis
24.  Muscle-Bone Interactions Across age in Men 
This study examined the relationship of muscular strength and lean tissue with age-related patterns in bone mineral density (BMD) in men 20-81 years of age. Subjects were assigned to one of three age groups, Young Men (YM), (n = 25, 20-39 yrs), Middle-aged Men (MM) (n = 24, 40-59 yrs), and Older Men (OM) (n = 23, 60-81 yrs). Isotonic and isokinetic strength was assessed for the quadriceps and hamstrings muscle groups. DXA (Lunar DPX-IQ) was used to measure spine, hip, and total body BMD and body composition. OM had significantly lower (p < 0.05) total lean body mass (LBM) than MM and lower leg lean mass (LM) than YM and MM. OM had significantly lower (p < 0.01) BMD than YM and MM at the femoral neck and total hip sites and a higher proportion of OM were osteopenic and osteoporotic at the total hip site. Isotonic and isokinetic strength for both muscle groups was positively related (p < 0.05) with the hip BMD sites (r = 0.38-.67). Leg LM also was positively related to hip BMD (r = 0.37-.58). Multiple Regression analyses determined that age and lean mass (LBM or leg LM) were significant predictors (p < 0.05) of femoral neck, and total hip BMD, while lean mass (LBM or leg LM) was a significant predictor (p < 0.05) of BMD at the spine and trochanter sites. Isotonic and isokinetic leg strength variables were significant predictors (p < 0.05) of the total body, total hip and trochanter BMD. In conclusion, leg strength, leg LM, and total LBM were significant predictors of BMD in men, independent of age. These findings emphasize the importance of maintaining lean body mass for the bone health of aging men.
Key PointsOsteoporosis is an important health problem for men.Bone mineral density for the hip was lower in older men compared to their younger and middle-age counterparts. There were age group differences in the prevalence of osteopenia and osteoporosis for the total hip BMD site.Muscular strength and bone-free lean body mass were significant predictors of hip BMD, independent of age, thus reinforcing the importance of contractile forces on skeletal health.Maintenance of muscle mass and strength should be encouraged in aging men for the reduction of osteoporosis risk.
PMCID: PMC3818673  PMID: 24198680
Lean body mass; osteopenia; osteoporosis; muscle strength; bone density
25.  Normative data of bone Mineral Density in healthy population of Tehran, Iran: A Cross sectional study 
Background
Osteoporosis is a major problem and is a hidden epidemic disease in the world. Early diagnosis by measurement of Bone Mineral Density (BMD) and treatment can prevent and reduce disease complications, especially fractures. As there is no comprehensive study in Iran, this study designed to assess BMD discrepancy in 20–69 yr Tehran population as well as prevalence of osteoporosis and osteopenia.
Methods
553 people (34% men, 66%women) from 50 Blocks in Tehran randomly selected. The assessment of BMD in spine and femur region performed through DXA method. All subjects clinically examined and their BMIs determined.
Results
The average spinal BMD score in men were more than in women. The peak bone mass of spine bone both in men and women occurred during 20–29 yr and reduction began from the age of 40. At the age of 60 to 69, loose of bone density was 19.6% in lumbar spine and 18.5% in femur of women and also 7.9% in lumbar spine and 14.6% in femur of men. Prevalence of osteoporosis in this age group in lumbar spine and femur was 32.4% and 5.9% in women and 9.4% and 3.1% in men respectively.
Conclusion
In all age groups, peak bone mass was lower than European or American population, whereas the rate of bone loss was as much as the some population and actually this process justifies the prevalence of osteoporosis and osteopenia in Tehran population.
doi:10.1186/1471-2474-6-38
PMCID: PMC1180448  PMID: 15992408

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