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1.  OA01. 37. Clinical evaluation of rasayana effect of ashwagandhadi lehya in apparently healthy elderly persons 
Ancient Science of Life  2012;32(Suppl 1):S37.
Purpose:
This study has been conducted on 50 apparently healthy elderly persons by treating them with Ashwagandhadi Lehya to assess the efficacy and safety of the drug on various health parameters.
Method:
50 patients of age between 50 -75 years were registered from the O.P.D. of N.I.A., Jaipur in this study out of which total 42 patients completed treatment. Ashwagandhadi Lehya was given in the dose of 10 gm BD After meals with Luke warm milk for 84 days. Diet restrictions according to Pathya -Apathya were advised.
Result:
This formulation provided statistically highly significant relief in chief complaints like dizziness, constipation, abnormal sleep, loss of appetite, fatigue, generalized weakness, sense of well being and in mental aspect depression, physical and psychological health also. The drug was effective to improve Hb%, change in serum creatinine, unconjugated bilirubin, serum cholesterol and LDL levels significantly.
Conclusion:
A number of Medhya Rasayana Dravyas present in formulation have very good anti oxidant, anabolic, adaptogenic, anti stress and anti depressant property that improves the mental and physical health of the aged person.
PMCID: PMC3800915
2.  Development of a RP-HPLC Method for Analysis of Triphala Curna and its Applicability to Test Variations in Triphala Curna Preparations 
A sensitive, rapid, reverse phase HPLC method is reported for analysis of Triphala Curna using gallic acid, chebulagic acid and chebulinic acid as markers. Validation data for the method has been provided. Unlike methods of recovery testing adopted for synthetic chemicals, a modified approach has been presented here for a formulation like Triphala Curna having three myrobalans in its composition. Data has been provided to demonstrate applicability of the method developed to assess the variation in the Triphala Curna preparations.
doi:10.4103/0250-474X.57286
PMCID: PMC2865809  PMID: 20502543
Triphala Curna (TC); gallic acid; chebulagic acid; chebulinic acid; myrobalans
3.  STUDIES ON THE STANDARDISATION OF CURNAS PART – II TALIZADYA CURNA 
Ancient Science of Life  1991;11(1-2):46-49.
Talisadya churna was prepared by pounding the individual ingredients in mortar and pestle and mixie. The Curna prepared by pounding the ingredients in mortar and pestle showed higher exhaustive extraction in hexane and solubility in alcohol. The Curna prepared by grinding the ingredients in mixie showed less acid insoluble content, high volatile matter, water soluble matter, and exhaustive extraction in chloroform. Thin layer silica gel chromatography and test of organic functional groups did not show any difference in the Tulisadya curna prepared by either method.
PMCID: PMC3336572  PMID: 22556560
4.  EFFECT OF CONTAINER ON AYURVEDIC DRUGS – A SELECT STUDY 
Ancient Science of Life  2004;24(1):11-21.
Effect of packing material on the stability of four Ayurvedic drugs viz., Hingvatsaka Curna, Brahmi ghrta, Dasamula Kvatha Curna and Ajamodarka have been studied by distributing the drugs in different containers by observing the physical and biological changes. The study revealed that Hingvatsaka Curna keeps well for at least 6 month, Ajamodarka is stable for minimum period of six months when stored in glass bottle exposed to light. Dasamula K vatha Curna showed the presence of insects at the completion of three months. In the second month itself Brahmi ghrta becomes rancid on storing in glass and amber colored bottles.
PMCID: PMC3330913  PMID: 22557145
Container effect; Hingvatsaka Curna; Brahmi ghrta; Dasamula Kvatha Curna; Ajamodarka
5.  PHARMACOGNOSTICAL INVESTIGATIONS ON TRIPHALA CHURNAM 
Ancient Science of Life  2007;26(3):40-44.
Pharmacognostical and preliminary phytochemical studies of Triphala churnam were carried out. The churnam of triphala consists of equal quantities of deseeded fruits of Terminalia chebula, Terminalia bellerica and Emblica officinalis. Triphala is exclusively used in more than 200 drug formulations in Indian system of Medicine. The present study involved the pharmacognostical evaluation of Triphala, in which morphological and powder microscopical characters were established. In addition, physico-chemical parameters such as ash values viz, total ash (10.21± 0.42), acid insoluble ash (2.54 ± 0.06), water-soluble ash (5.46±0.24) and sulphated ash (13.12 ± 0.63), extractive values viz, alcohol soluble extractive (11.20±0.18)) and water-soluble extractive (52.56±2.04), fluorescent analysis and microchmical tests were determined. The preliminary phytochemical study revealed the presence of carbohydrates, reducing sugar and tannins in aqueous extract and carbohydrates, flavonoids and tannins in alcoholic extract. This standardization would be very much helpful for the identification of Triphala churnam to differentiate from other powdered sources.
PMCID: PMC3330880  PMID: 22557240
6.  PA01.04. Clinical study of shvadmstradi kwatha in the management of mutra ashmari (urinary calculi) 
Ancient Science of Life  2013;32(Suppl 2):S45.
Purpose:
Renal calculi are the second most common disease of the urinary tract. Ashmari is a disease in which there is formation of stone, resulting into severe pain as given by enemy. It occurs commonly in the Mutravahasrotas. The symptoms like pain abdomen, burning Micturation, heamturia. Objectives of the present study were to get a solution to Mutra Ashmari by evaluating the efficacy of Shvadmstradi Kvatha.
Method:
30 patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria of Mutra Ashmari were randomly selected from the opd and ipd of S.D.M College of Ayurveda & hospital, Hassan. Shvadmstradi Kvatha was given with 50ml bd before food for 21 days follow up was done for the period of 2 months. Clinical sign and symptoms were given on the basis of self formulated scoring scale. The result having p value less than <0.05 were considered as statistically significant in this study.
Result:
Overall effect of therapies after the course of treatment showed based on signs & symptoms. Pain abdomen 83.95 %, frequency of micturition 43.28 %, burning micturition 100 %, haematuria 100 % no of calculi 30.0 %, size of calculus 49.91%, descent of calculi 44.77%.
Conclusion:
Shvadmstradi Kvatha has significant effect in the management of Mutra Ashmari. Reduction in clinical symptoms was appreciated after internally administration of medicine which is proved statistically significant.
doi:10.4103/0257-7941.123860
PMCID: PMC4147516
7.  Effects of Ayurvedic treatment on 100 patients of chronic renal failure (other than diabetic nephropathy) 
Ayu  2011;32(4):483-486.
Chronic renal failure (CRF) refers to an irreversible deterioration in renal function, which develops over a period of years. This initially manifests only as a biochemical abnormality. CRF is considered when glomerular filtration rate (GFR) falls below 30 ml/min. The conventional approach of management includes dialysis and renal transplantation, which are not affordable by Indian population mainly due to economic reasons. Therefore, exploration of a safe and alternative therapy is needed, which proves to be helpful in reducing the requirement of dialysis and in postponing the renal transplantation. A clinical study of 100 patients of CRF was conducted at OPD and IPD of PD Patel Ayurved Hospital, Nadiad. They were given Niruha basti of Punarnavadi kvatha daily with oral medicaments including Goksuradi guggulu, Rasayana churna, and Varunadi kvatha for 1 month period. The patients of CRF, having diabetic nephropathy as a cause, were excluded since a separate study for diabetic nephropathy is being conducted. Results were analyzed statistically using the “t” test. The symptoms and signs, serum creatinine, blood urea, urine albumin level were reduced, which were found to be statistically highly significant on “t” test.
doi:10.4103/0974-8520.96120
PMCID: PMC3361922  PMID: 22661841
Ayurveda; chronic renal failure; Niruha basti
8.  Quantification of Gallic Acidin Fruits of Three Medicinal Plants 
Triphala is a traditional herbal formulation consisting of dried fruits originating from three medicinal plants, namely Terminalia chebula, Terminalia bellerica and Phyllanthus emblica. It is used in folk medicine for the treatment of headaches, dyspepsia and leucorrhoea. There are some reports regarding Triphala’s pharmacological effects including its anti-cancer, radioprotective, hypocholesterolaemic, hepatoprotective and anti-oxidant activities. The most important components of these plants are the tannins and gallic acid which they contain. Gallic acid being a compound with tannin structure existing in the Triphala fruit. In this research, the gallic acid content contained in the three plants constituting Triphala was determined. Plant fruits were purchased from available Iranian markets. Milled and powdered fruits from each plant were extracted with 70% acetone and subjected to a reaction with rhodanine reagent in the process forming a colored complex. The complex’s absorbance was measured at 520 nm and the amount of gallic acid was determined using its calibration curve. According to the results, the highest amount of gallic acid was observed in Phyllanthus embelica (1.79-2.18%) and the lowest amount was found in Terminalia chebula (0.28-0.80%). Moreover, differences between plant samples from different markets places were found to be statistically significant (p < 0.05). These differences can possibly be due to the source of plant preparation, storage condition and period of Triphala storage. In general, the rhodanine assay is a simple, rapid and reproducible method for the standardization of Triphala as gallic acid.
PMCID: PMC3828909  PMID: 24250348
Triphala; Terminalia chebula; Terminalia bellerica; Phyllanthus emblica; Gallic acid; Rhodanine assay
9.  A CLINICAL STUDY ON THE MANAGEMENT OF DEPRESSIVE NEUROSIS WITH RASAYANA - VAJIKARNA DRUGS 
Ancient Science of Life  1983;2(4):220-226.
In view of the potential anti-anxiety and anti–depressant activity of the Rasayana Vajikarna drugs, a combined Rasayana Vajikarna schedule has been clinically tried in a series of patients of Depression Neurosis. The tratment consisted of a dose of Asvagandha Curna at bed time and a dose of Kapikacchu Curna at morning continued for 8 weeks. The treatment showed significant clinical recovery in these cases in the form of a notable reduction in the level of clinical anxiety and depression.
PMCID: PMC3336761  PMID: 22556986
10.  Brahmarasayana protects against Ethyl methanesulfonate or Methyl methanesulfonate induced chromosomal aberrations in mouse bone marrow cells 
Background
Ayurveda, the traditional Indian system of medicine has given great emphasis to the promotion of health. Rasayana is one of the eight branches of Ayurveda which refers to rejuvenant therapy. It has been reported that rasayanas have immuno-modulatory, antioxidant and antitumor functions, however, the genotoxic potential and modulation of DNA repair of many rasayanas have not been evaluated.
Methods
The present study assessed the role of Brahmarasayana (BR) on Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-and Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced genotoxicity and DNA repair in in vivo mouse test system. The mice were orally fed with BR (5 g or 8 mg / day) for two months and 24 h later EMS or MMS was given intraperitoneally. The genotoxicity was analyzed by chromosomal aberrations, sperm count, and sperm abnormalities.
Results
The results have revealed that BR did not induce significant chromosomal aberrations when compared to that of the control animals (p >0.05). On the other hand, the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations induced by EMS (240 mg / kg body weight) or MMS (125 mg / kg body weight) were significantly higher (p<0.05) to that of the control group. The treatment of BR for 60 days and single dose of EMS or MMS on day 61, resulted in significant (p <0.05) reduction in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in comparison to EMS or MMS treatment alone, indicating a protective effect of BR. Constitutive base excision repair capacity was also increased in BR treated animals.
Conclusion
The effect of BR, as it relates to antioxidant activity was not evident in liver tissue however rasayana treatment was observed to increase constitutive DNA base excision repair and reduce clastogenicity. Whilst, the molecular mechanisms of such repair need further exploration, this is the first report to demonstrate these effects and provides further evidence for the role of brahmarasayana in the possible improvement of quality of life.
doi:10.1186/1472-6882-12-113
PMCID: PMC3457898  PMID: 22853637
DNA damage and repair; Anti clastogenicity; Rasayana
11.  Scientific evaluation of some Ayurvedic preparations for correction of iron deficiency and anemia 
A number of preparations are available in Ayurved for treatment of anemia and iron deficiency. This study was designed to evaluate efficacy of some of them. Six most commonly used Ayurvedic iron containing preparations (Navayasa Curna, Punarnavadi Mandura, Dhatri Lauha, Pradarantaka Lauha, Sarva-Juara-Hara Lauha and Vrihat Yakrdari Lauha) were given in a dose of 250 mg b.d. for 30 days to six groups of iron deficient anemic patients; each group consisting of 20 patients. A control group was given Allopathic preparation—Irex-12, (containing—ferrous fumarate, vitamin C, folic acid and vitamin B12); 1 capsule daily for 30 days for comparison. All hematological and iron parameters were determined before and after completion of treatment. The results showed that there was statistically significant rise (p<0.001) in all of them—Hb, PCV, TRBC, MCV, MCH, MCHC and plasma iron, percent saturation and plasma ferritin. Total iron binding capacity decreased significantly (p<0.001). The response of most of Ayurvedic preparations was better than Allopathic preparation and there was no side effect as observed with iron salts The Hb regeneration rate was 0.10 g/dl/day for Allopathic preparation; while it was above this value for all Ayurvedic preparations exceptPradarantaka Lauha which was least effective.Sarva-Juara-Hara Lauha was the drug of choice as Hb regeneration with it was highest 0.16 g/dl/day. Upon analysis of Ayurvedic drugs, these results were found to be consistent and correlated with iron content of the preparation.
doi:10.1007/BF02913329
PMCID: PMC3453821  PMID: 23105698
Ayurvedic preparations; Iron deficiency; Anemia; Hematological parameters; Iron parameters
12.  A Collaborative Epidemiological Investigation into the Criminal Fake Artesunate Trade in South East Asia  
PLoS Medicine  2008;5(2):e32.
Background
Since 1998 the serious public health problem in South East Asia of counterfeit artesunate, containing no or subtherapeutic amounts of the active antimalarial ingredient, has led to deaths from untreated malaria, reduced confidence in this vital drug, large economic losses for the legitimate manufacturers, and concerns that artemisinin resistance might be engendered.
Methods and Findings
With evidence of a deteriorating situation, a group of police, criminal analysts, chemists, palynologists, and health workers collaborated to determine the source of these counterfeits under the auspices of the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL) and the Western Pacific World Health Organization Regional Office. A total of 391 samples of genuine and counterfeit artesunate collected in Vietnam (75), Cambodia (48), Lao PDR (115), Myanmar (Burma) (137) and the Thai/Myanmar border (16), were available for analysis. Sixteen different fake hologram types were identified. High-performance liquid chromatography and/or mass spectrometry confirmed that all specimens thought to be counterfeit (195/391, 49.9%) on the basis of packaging contained no or small quantities of artesunate (up to 12 mg per tablet as opposed to ∼ 50 mg per genuine tablet). Chemical analysis demonstrated a wide diversity of wrong active ingredients, including banned pharmaceuticals, such as metamizole, and safrole, a carcinogen, and raw material for manufacture of methylenedioxymethamphetamine (‘ecstasy'). Evidence from chemical, mineralogical, biological, and packaging analysis suggested that at least some of the counterfeits were manufactured in southeast People's Republic of China. This evidence prompted the Chinese Government to act quickly against the criminal traders with arrests and seizures.
Conclusions
An international multi-disciplinary group obtained evidence that some of the counterfeit artesunate was manufactured in China, and this prompted a criminal investigation. International cross-disciplinary collaborations may be appropriate in the investigation of other serious counterfeit medicine public health problems elsewhere, but strengthening of international collaborations and forensic and drug regulatory authority capacity will be required.
Paul Newton and colleagues' international, collaborative study found evidence that counterfeit artesunate was being manufactured in China, which prompted a criminal investigation.
Editors' Summary
Background
Malaria is one of the world's largest public health problems, causing around 500 million cases of illness and at least one million deaths per year (the estimates vary widely). The most serious form of malaria is caused by the parasite Plasmodium falciparum, which has become resistant to multiple drugs that had previously been the cornerstones of antimalarial regimens. One group of drugs for treating malaria, the artemisinin therapies including artesunate, are based upon a Chinese herb called qinghaosu; these have now become vital to the treatment of P. falciparum malaria. But counterfeit artesunate, containing none or too little (“subtherapeutic levels”) of the active ingredient, is a growing problem especially in South and East Asia. Fake artesunate is devastating for malaria control: it causes avoidable death, reduces confidence in the drug, and takes away profit from legitimate manufacturers. Of major concern also is the potential for subtherapeutic counterfeit artesunate to fuel the parasite's resistance to the artemisinin group of drugs.
Previous estimates have suggested that between 33% and 53% of artesunate tablets in mainland South East Asia are counterfeit. In this paper the authors report on an unprecedented international collaboration and criminal investigation that attempted to quantify and source counterfeit artesunate among some of the most malarious countries in Asia.
Why Was This Study Done?
Previous reports have identified the problem of fake artesunate, but as of yet there have been few reports on the potential solutions. Concerned health workers and scientists, the regional World Health Organization (WHO) office and the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL) got together to discuss what could be done in May 2005 when it became clear the counterfeit artesunate situation was worsening in the Greater Mekong Sub-Region of South East Asia (comprising Cambodia, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, and Yunnan Province in the People's Republic of China). Their subsequent investigation combined the goals and methods of a range of concerned parties—police, scientists, and health workers—to identify the source of counterfeit artesunate in South East Asia and to supply the evidence to help arrest and prosecute the perpetrators.
What Did the Researchers Do and Find?
The researchers conducted forensic analyses of samples of genuine and counterfeit artesunate. They selected these samples from larger surveys and investigations that had been conducted in the region beginning in the year 2000. Genuine samples were supplied by a manufacturer to provide a comparator. The authors examined the physical appearance of the packages and subjected the tablets to a wide range of chemical and biological tests that allowed an analysis of the components contained in the tablets.
When comparing the collected packages and tablets against the genuine samples, the researchers found considerable diversity of fake artesunate in SE Asia. Sixteen different fake hologram types (the stickers contained on packages meant to identify them as genuine) were found. Chemical analysis revealed that all tablets thought to be fake contained no or very small quantities of artesunate. Other ingredients found in the artesunate counterfeit tablets included paracetamol, antibiotics, older antimalarial drugs, and a range of minerals, and there were a variety of gases surrounding the tablets inside the packaging. Biological analyses of pollen grains inside the packaging suggested that the packages originated in the parts of South East Asia along the Chinese border.
What Do these Findings Mean?
The results were crucial in helping the authorities establish the origin of the fake artesunate. For example, the authors identified two regional clusters where the counterfeit tablets appeared to be coming from, thus flagging a potential manufacturing site or distribution network. The presence of wrong active pharmaceutical ingredients (such as the older antimalarial drugs) suggested the counterfeiters had access to a variety of active pharmaceutical ingredients. The presence of safrole, a precursor to the illicit drug ecstasy, suggested the counterfeits may be coming from factories that manufacture ecstasy. And the identification of minerals indigenous to certain regions also helped identify the counterfeits' origin. The researchers concluded that at least some of the counterfeit artesunate was coming from southern China. The Secretary General of INTERPOL presented the findings to the Chinese government, which then carried out a criminal investigation and arrested individuals alleged to have produced and distributed the counterfeit artesunate.
The collaboration between police, public health workers and scientists on combating fake artesunate is unique, and provides a model for others to follow. However, the authors note that substantial capacity in forensic analysis and the infrastructure to support collaborations between these different disciplines are needed.
Additional Information.
Please access these Web sites via the online version of this summary at http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.0050032.
The World Health Organization in 2006 created IMPACT—International Medical Products Anti-Counterfeiting Taskforce—with the aim of forging international collaboration to seek global solutions to this global challenge and in raising awareness of the dangers of counterfeit medical products. The task force membership includes international organizations, nongovernmental organizations, enforcement agencies, pharmaceutical manufacturers' associations, and drug and regulatory authorities. IMPACT's Web site notes that trade in counterfeit medicines is widespread and affects both developed and developing countries but is more prevalent in countries that have weak drug regulatory systems, poor supply of basic medicines, unregulated markets, high drug prices and/or significant price differentials. IMPACT holds international conferences and maintains a rapid alert system for counterfeit drugs.
The drug industry's anticounterfeit organization, Pharmaceutical Security Institute, works to develop improved systems to identify the extent of the counterfeiting problem and to assist in coordinating international inquiries. Its membership includes 21 large pharmaceutical companies.
The Web site of David Pizzanelli, a world expert on security holography, contains a PowerPoint presentation co-authored by Paul Newton that illustrates the different types of fake holograms found on fake artesunate packages, and their implications for artemisinin resistance (http://www.pizzanelli.co.uk/content/artesunate.html).
doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.0050032
PMCID: PMC2235893  PMID: 18271620
13.  Triphala inhibits both in vitro and in vivo xenograft growth of pancreatic tumor cells by inducing apoptosis 
BMC Cancer  2008;8:294.
Background
Triphala is commonly used in Ayurvedic medicine to treat variety of diseases; however its mechanism of action remains unexplored. This study elucidates the molecular mechanism of Triphala against human pancreatic cancer in the cellular and in vivo model.
Methods
Growth-inhibitory effects of Triphala were evaluated in Capan-2, BxPC-3 and HPDE-6 cells by Sulphoradamine-B assay. Apoptosis was determined by cell death assay and western blotting. Triphala was administered orally to nude mice implanted with Capan-2 xenograft. Tumors were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and western blotting.
Results
Exposure of Capan-2 cells to the aqueous extract of Triphala for 24 h resulted in the significant decrease in the survival of cells in a dose-dependent manner with an IC50 of about 50 μg/ml. Triphala-mediated reduced cell survival correlated with induction of apoptosis, which was associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Triphala-induced apoptosis was linked with phosphorylation of p53 at Ser-15 and ERK at Thr-202/Tyr-204 in Capan-2 cells. Above mentioned effects were significantly blocked when the cells were pretreated with an antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC), suggesting the involvement of ROS generation. Pretreatment of cells with pifithrin-α or U0126, specific inhibitors of p53 or MEK-1/2, significantly attenuated Triphala-induced apoptosis. Moreover, NAC or U0126 pretreatment significantly attenuated Triphala-induced p53 transcriptional activity. Similarly, Triphala induced apoptosis in another pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC-3 by activating ERK. On the other hand, Triphala failed to induce apoptosis or activate ERK or p53 in normal human pancreatic ductal epithelial (HPDE-6) cells. Further, oral administration of 50 mg/kg or 100 mg/kg Triphala in PBS, 5 days/week significantly suppressed the growth of Capan-2 pancreatic tumor-xenograft. Reduced tumor-growth in Triphala fed mice was due to increased apoptosis in the tumors cells, which was associated with increased activation of p53 and ERK.
Conclusion
Our preclinical studies demonstrate that Triphala is effective in inhibiting the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells in both cellular and in vivo model. Our data also suggests that the growth inhibitory effects of Triphala is mediated by the activation of ERK and p53 and shows potential for the treatment and/or prevention of human pancreatic cancer.
doi:10.1186/1471-2407-8-294
PMCID: PMC2576337  PMID: 18847491
14.  A randomized clinical trial to evaluate and compare the efficacy of triphala mouthwash with 0.2% chlorhexidine in hospitalized patients with periodontal diseases 
Purpose
Triphala is a combination of three medicinal plants, extensively used in Ayurveda since ancient times. Triphala mouthwash is used in the treatment of periodontal diseases because of its antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy of triphala mouthwash with 0.2% chlorhexidine in hospitalized periodontal disease patients.
Methods
In this double-blind, randomized, multicenter clinical trial, 120 patients were equally divided into three groups. Patients in group A were advised to rinse their mouths with 10 mL of distilled water, group B with 0.2% chlorhexidine, and group C with triphala mouthwash for 1 minute twice daily for two weeks. The plaque index (PI) and the gingival index (GI) were recorded on the first and the fifteenth day.
Results
There was no significant difference when the efficacy of triphala was compared with 0.2% chlorhexidine in hospitalized patients with periodontal disease. However, a statistically significant difference was observed in PI and GI when both group B and group C were compared with group A and also within groups B and C, after 15 days (P<0.05).
Conclusions
The triphala mouthwash (herbal) is an effective antiplaque agent like 0.2% chlorhexidine. It is significantly useful in reducing plaque accumulation and gingival inflammation, thereby controlling periodontal diseases in every patient. It is also cost effective, easily available, and well tolerable with no reported side effects.
Graphical Abstract
doi:10.5051/jpis.2014.44.3.134
PMCID: PMC4050230  PMID: 24921057
Chlorhexidine; Gingivitis; Periodontitis; Triphala
15.  Studies on Brahma rasayana in male swiss albino mice: Chromosomal aberrations and sperm abnormalities 
Ayurveda, the Indian holistic healthcare system encompasses traditional medicines with a principle of creating harmony and maintaining balance within the natural rhythms of the body. Rasayana is one of the branches of Ayurveda frequently used as rejuvenant therapy to overcome many discomforts and prevent diseases. It has been reported that rasayanas have immunomodulatory, antioxidant and antitumor functions. However, the genotoxic potential of many rasayanas remains to be evaluated. The present study was undertaken to assess the role of Brahma rasayana(BR) on genotoxicity in vivo in a mouse test system. The older mice (9 months) were orally fed with rasayana for 8 weeks. The treated groups showed no signs of dose-dependent toxicity at the dosage levels tested. The body weight loss/gain and feed consumption were unaffected at tested doses. Furthermore, sperm abnormalities and chromosomal aberrations were insignificant in the treatment group when compared to controls. However, there was a marginal increase in sperm count in the BR treated animals. These findings clearly indicate that there are no observed adverse genotoxic effects elicited by BR in experimental animals such as mice.
doi:10.4103/0975-9476.59826
PMCID: PMC3149391  PMID: 21829300
Aging; Brahma rasayana; chromosomal aberrations; genotoxicity; sperm abnormalities
16.  Significant Increase in Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes and Natural Killer Cells by Triphala: A Clinical Phase I Study 
Background. Searching for drugs or herbal formulations to improve the immunity of HIV/AIDS positive people is an important issue for researchers in this field. Triphala, a Thai herbal formulation, is reported to have immunomodulatory effects in mice. However, it has not yet been investigated for immunostimulatory and side effects in healthy human volunteers. Objective. To evaluate the immunostimulatory and side effects of Triphala in a clinical phase I study. Materials and Methods. All volunteers took Triphala, 3 capsules per day for 2 weeks. Complete physical examination, routine laboratory analysis, and immunological studies were performed before ingestion and after initial meeting for 4 consecutive weeks. Results. We found that Triphala demonstrated significant immunostimulatory effects on cytotoxic T cells (CD3−CD8+) and natural killer cells (CD16+CD56+). Both of them increased significantly when compared with those of the control samples. However, no significant change in cytokine secretion was detected. All volunteers were healthy and showed no adverse effects throughout the duration of the study. Conclusion. Triphala has significant immunostimulatory effects on cellular immune response, especially cytotoxic T cells and natural killer cells. Increases in the absolute number of these cells may provide a novel adjuvant therapy for HIV/AIDS positive people in terms of immunological improvement.
doi:10.1155/2012/239856
PMCID: PMC3519011  PMID: 23243435
17.  Pomegranate Juice Enhances Healthy Lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster: An Exploratory Study 
Exploring innovative ways to ensure healthy aging of populations is a pre-requisite to contain rising healthcare costs. Scientific research into the principles and practices of traditional medicines can provide new insights and simple solutions to lead a healthy life. Rasayana is a dedicated branch of Ayurveda (an Indian medicine) that deals with methods to increase vitality and delay aging through the use of diet, herbal supplements, and other lifestyle practices. The life-span and health-span enhancing actions of the fruits of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.), a well-known Rasayana, were tested on Drosophila melanogaster (fruitfly) model. Supplementation of standard corn meal with 10% (v/v) pomegranate juice (PJ) extended the life-span of male and female flies by 18 and 8%, respectively. When male and female flies were mixed and reared together, there was 19% increase in the longevity of PJ fed flies, as assessed by MSD, the median survival day (24.8). MSD for control and resveratrol (RV) groups was at 20.8 and 23.1 days, respectively. A two-fold enhancement in fecundity, improved resistance to oxidative stress (H2O2 and paraquat induced) and to Candida albicans infection were observed in PJ fed flies. Further, the flies in the PJ fed group were physically active over an extended period of time, as assessed by the climbing assay. PJ thus outperformed both control and RV groups in the life-span and health-span parameters tested. This study provides the scope to explore the potential of PJ as a nutraceutical to improve health span and lifespan in human beings.
doi:10.3389/fpubh.2014.00245
PMCID: PMC4267107  PMID: 25566518
pomegranate; anti-aging; rasayana; ayurveda; Drosophila
18.  Urushiol-induced contact dermatitis caused during Shodhana (purificatory measures) of Bhallataka (Semecarpus anacardium Linn.) fruit 
Ayu  2012;33(2):270-273.
Bhallataka (Semecarpus anacardium Linn.; Ancardiaceae) is mentioned under Upavisha group in Ayurvedic classics and it is described as a poisonous medicinal plant in Drugs and Cosmetics Act (India), 1940. Fruit of Bhallataka is used either as a single drug or as an ingredient in many compound formulations of Indian systems of medicine to cure many diseases. Tarry oil present in the pericarp of the fruit causes blisters on contact. The major constituent of the tarry oil is anacardic acid and bhilawanol, a mixture of 3-n-pentadec(en)yl catechols. Bhilawanol A and B are known as Urushiols, and also, anacardic acid is closely related to Urushiol. Urushiol-induced contact dermatitis is the medical name given to allergic rashes produced by the oil Urushiol. This paper deals with five case reports of contact dermatitis caused during different stages of Shodhana (purificatory measures) of Bhallataka fruit due to improper handling of the utensils and disposal of media used in Shodhana procedure and their Ayurvedic management. To combat these clinical conditions, the affected persons were advised external application with pounded Nimba (Azadirachta indica A. Juss.) leaves on the affected parts and internal administration of Sarivadyasava 30 ml thrice daily after food and Triphala Churna 5 g before food twice daily. Reduction of itching and burning sensation was observed after topical application.
doi:10.4103/0974-8520.105250
PMCID: PMC3611655  PMID: 23559802
Bhallataka; bhilawanol; blisters; dermatitis; Semecarpus anacardium Linn.; urushiol
19.  Exploring of Antimicrobial Activity of Triphala Mashi—an Ayurvedic Formulation 
Triphala Mashi is an ayurvedic formulation that was prepared in our lab. Aqueous and alcoholic extracts of both Triphala and Triphala Mashi were used, to evaluate antimicrobial activity. Comparative phytochemical profile of Triphala and Triphala Mashi was done by preliminary phytochemical screening, total phenolic content and thin layer chromatography (TLC). Antimicrobial activity includes isolation of pathogens from clinical samples, its characterization, testing its multiple drug resistance against standard antibiotics and antimicrobial activity of aqueous and alcoholic extracts of both Triphala and Triphala Mashi against these organisms by using agar gel diffusion method. Triphala Mashi containing phenolic compounds, tannins exhibited comparable antimicrobial activity in relation to Triphala against all the microorganisms tested. It inhibits the dose-dependent growth of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In conclusion, it appears that Triphala Mashi has non-specific antimicrobial activity.
doi:10.1093/ecam/nem002
PMCID: PMC2249739  PMID: 18317557
antimicrobial activity; clinical sample and Tannin; Triphala; Triphala Mashi
20.  Validated Modified Lycopodium Spore Method Development for Standardisation of Ingredients of an Ayurvedic Powdered Formulation Shatavaryadi Churna 
Validated modified lycopodium spore method has been developed for simple and rapid quantification of herbal powdered drugs. Lycopodium spore method was performed on ingredients of Shatavaryadi churna, an ayurvedic formulation used as immunomodulator, galactagogue, aphrodisiac and rejuvenator. Estimation of diagnostic characters of each ingredient of Shatavaryadi churna individually was carried out. Microscopic determination, counting of identifying number, measurement of area, length and breadth of identifying characters were performed using Leica DMLS-2 microscope. The method was validated for intraday precision, linearity, specificity, repeatability, accuracy and system suitability, respectively. The method is simple, precise, sensitive, and accurate, and can be used for routine standardisation of raw materials of herbal drugs. This method gives the ratio of individual ingredients in the powdered drug so that any adulteration of genuine drug with its adulterant can be found out. The method shows very good linearity value between 0.988–0.999 for number of identifying character and area of identifying character. Percentage purity of the sample drug can be determined by using the linear equation of standard genuine drug.
PMCID: PMC3847376  PMID: 24311861
Shatavaryadi Churna; Lycopodium spore; Ayurvedic formulation; Leica microscope; Standardisation
21.  A clinical study of Haritaki and Saindhava Lavana in Kaphaja Kasa with special reference to Samyoga Guna 
Ayu  2011;32(3):357-360.
In clinical practice, Guna which are to be with Bhisak are mainly the Paradi Gunas which can also be called as Miscellaneous Gunas. As rightly quoted by Acarya Caraka, for getting success in the treatment Paradi Gunas are the best. The Sutra quotes “Sidhyupaya Cikitsayam” which means that Cikitsa i. e. Dhatusamya will be done mainly with the help of Paradi Gunas. Thus in this study an attempt was made to know the comparative effect of Haritaki and Saindhava lavana alone and Samyukta effect in Kaphaja Kasa. Three groups were made for proper evaluation of the therapy. In Group-A Haritaki Tablet 2 gm/ twice a day (500 mg tablet × 4), In Group-B Saindava Lavana Curna 2 gm/ twice a day and in Group-C Haritaki + Saindhava lavana Tablet 4 gm/twice a day (500 mg tablet × 8) was given. Results were assessed after 7 days with the help of a specially prepared proforma. The hematological, Urine and Stool investigations were carried out. In subjective and objective criterias, significant results were found in Group-C as compared to Group-A and Group-B. Based on the results, it can be concluded that the combined (Samyoga) effect of Haritaki and Saindhava lavana is much efficient than the single drug therapy.
doi:10.4103/0974-8520.93914
PMCID: PMC3326882  PMID: 22736910
Guna; Haritaki; Paradi Guna; Saindhava lavana; Samyoga
22.  A Graph-based Approach to Auditing RxNorm 
Journal of biomedical informatics  2009;42(3):558-570.
Objectives
RxNorm is a standardized nomenclature for clinical drug entities developed by the National Library of Medicine. In this paper, we audit relations in RxNorm for consistency and completeness through the systematic analysis of the graph of its concepts and relationships.
Methods
The representation of multi-ingredient drugs is normalized in order to make it compatible with that of single-ingredient drugs. All meaningful paths between two nodes in the type graph are computed and instantiated. Alternate paths are automatically compared and manually inspected in case of inconsistency.
Results
The 115 meaningful paths identified in the type graph can be grouped into 28 groups with respect to start and end nodes. Of the 19 groups of alternate paths (i.e., with two or more paths) between the start and end nodes, 9 (47%) exhibit inconsistencies. Overall, 28 (24%) of the 115 paths are inconsistent with other alternate paths. A total of 348 inconsistencies were identified in the April 2008 version of RxNorm and reported to the RxNorm team, of which 215 (62%) had been corrected in the January 2009 version of RxNorm.
Conclusion
The inconsistencies identified involve missing nodes (93), missing links (17), extraneous links (237) and one case of mix-up between two ingredients. Our auditing method proved effective in identifying a limited number of errors that had defeated the quality assurance mechanisms currently in place in the RxNorm production system. Some recommendations for the development of RxNorm are provided.
doi:10.1016/j.jbi.2009.04.004
PMCID: PMC2722378  PMID: 19394440
Biomedical terminologies; Auditing methods; RxNorm; Quality assurance; Graphs
23.  Evaluation of free-radical quenching properties of standard Ayurvedic formulation Vayasthapana Rasayana 
Background
Cellular damage induced by free-radicals like Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species (ROS and RNS) has been implicated in several disorders and diseases, including ageing. Hence naturally occurring anti-oxidant rich-herbs play a vital role in combating these conditions. The present study was carried out to investigate the in vitro free-radical quenching capacity of a known Ayurvedic poly-herbal formulation called Vayasthapana Rasayana.
Methods
Methanol extracts of Vayasthapana Rasayana formulation (VRF) were studied for in vitro total antioxidant activity along with phenolic content and reducing power. In vitro assays like DPPH, FRAP, ABTS scavenging to evaluate radical quenching potential were performed.
Results
The formulation has shown 94% at 0.1 mg/ml DPPH free-radical scavenging activity as against 84% at 0.1 mg/ml for standard ascorbic acid (IC50 value 5.51 μg/ml for VRF and 39 μg/ml for standard). It has a significant higher ferric reducing potential also (OD 0.87 at 700 nm & 0.21 at 0.1 mg/ml for VRF and standard, respectively). The total phenolic content (gallic acid equivalent) of the VRF is 8.3 mg per g of dry mass. Total antioxidant capacity of the formulation, estimated by FRAP was 1150 ± 5 μM Fe(II)/g dry mass. ABTS radical scavenging activity of VRF was 69.55 ± 0.21% at 100 μg/ml concentration with a IC50 value of 69.87 μg/ml as against 9% and 95% by ascorbic acid and Trolox (at 70.452 μg/ml and 0.250 μg/ml concentrations, respectively).
Conclusion
In Indian traditional Ayurvedic system, use of VRF is in regular practice for mainly combating age-related disorders and diseases as many of the components of the Rasayana are known for their free-radical scavenging activity. This study has validated the potential use of VRF as an anti-oxidant to fight age-related problems.
doi:10.1186/1472-6882-11-38
PMCID: PMC3123254  PMID: 21569386
24.  Enhancement of basolateral amygdaloid neuronal dendritic arborization following Bacopa monniera extract treatment in adult rats 
Clinics  2011;66(4):663-671.
OBJECTIVE:
In the ancient Indian system of medicine, Ayurveda, Bacopa monniera is classified as Medhya rasayana, which includes medicinal plants that rejuvenate intellect and memory. Here, we investigated the effect of a standardized extract of Bacopa monniera on the dendritic morphology of neurons in the basolateral amygdala, a region that is concerned with learning and memory.
METHODS:
The present study was conducted on 2½-month-old Wistar rats. The rats were divided into 2-, 4- and 6-week treatment groups. Rats in each of these groups were further divided into 20 mg/kg, 40 mg/kg and 80 mg/kg dose groups (n  =  8 for each dose). After the treatment period, treated rats and age-matched control rats were subjected to spatial learning (T-maze) and passive avoidance tests. Subsequently, these rats were killed by decapitation, the brains were removed, and the amygdaloid neurons were impregnated with silver nitrate (Golgi staining). Basolateral amygdaloid neurons were traced using camera lucida, and dendritic branching points (a measure of dendritic arborization) and dendritic intersections (a measure of dendritic length) were quantified. These data were compared with the data from the age-matched control rats.
RESULTS:
The results showed an improvement in spatial learning performance and enhanced memory retention in rats treated with Bacopa monniera extract. Furthermore, a significant increase in dendritic length and the number of dendritic branching points was observed along the length of the dendrites of the basolateral amygdaloid neurons of rats treated with 40 mg/kg and 80 mg/kg of Bacopa monniera (BM) for longer periods of time (i.e., 4 and 6 weeks).
CONCLUSION:
We conclude that constituents present in Bacopa monniera extract have neuronal dendritic growth-stimulating properties.
doi:10.1590/S1807-59322011000400023
PMCID: PMC3093798  PMID: 21655763
Bacopa monniera; spatial learning; passive avoidance; amygdaloid neurons; dendritic arborization; memory
25.  Standardization of a Traditional Polyherbo-Mineral Formulation-Brahmi Vati 
The present study deals with standardization of an in-house standard preparation and three marketed samples of Brahmi vati, which is a traditional medicine known to be effective in mental disorders, convulsions, weak memory, high fever and hysteria. Preparation and standardization have been done by following modern scientific quality control procedures for raw material and the finished products. The scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis showed the reduction of metals and minerals (particle size range 2–5 µm) which indicates the proper preparation of bhasmas, the important ingredient of Brahmi vati. Findings of EDX analysis of all samples of Brahmi vati suggested the absence of Gold, an important constituent of Brahmi vati in two marketed samples. All the samples of Brahmi vati were subjected to quantitative estimation of Bacoside A (marker compound) by HPTLC technique. Extraction of the samples was done in methanol and the chromatograms were developed in Butanol: Glacial acetic acid: water (4.5:0.5:5 v/v) and detected at 225nm. The regression analysis of calibration plots of Bacoside A exhibited linear relationship in the concentration range of 50–300 ng, while the % recovery was found to be 96.06% w/w, thus proving the accuracy and precision of the analysis. The Bacoside A content in the in-house preparation was found to be higher than that of the commercial samples. The proposed HPTLC method was found to be rapid, simple and accurate for quantitative estimation of Bacoside A in different formulations. The results of this study could be used as a model data in the standardization of Brahmi vati.
PMCID: PMC3777576  PMID: 24146464
Brahmi vati(BV); Standardization; EDX; HPTLC; Bacoside-A

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