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1.  Analysis of multiple compound–protein interactions reveals novel bioactive molecules 
The authors use machine learning of compound-protein interactions to explore drug polypharmacology and to efficiently identify bioactive ligands, including novel scaffold-hopping compounds for two pharmaceutically important protein families: G-protein coupled receptors and protein kinases.
We have demonstrated that machine learning of multiple compound–protein interactions is useful for efficient ligand screening and for assessing drug polypharmacology.This approach successfully identified novel scaffold-hopping compounds for two pharmaceutically important protein families: G-protein-coupled receptors and protein kinases.These bioactive compounds were not detected by existing computational ligand-screening methods in comparative studies.The results of this study indicate that data derived from chemical genomics can be highly useful for exploring chemical space, and this systems biology perspective could accelerate drug discovery processes.
The discovery of novel bioactive molecules advances our systems-level understanding of biological processes and is crucial for innovation in drug development. Perturbations of biological systems by chemical probes provide broader applications not only for analysis of complex systems but also for intentional manipulations of these systems. Nevertheless, the lack of well-characterized chemical modulators has limited their use. Recently, chemical genomics has emerged as a promising area of research applicable to the exploration of novel bioactive molecules, and researchers are currently striving toward the identification of all possible ligands for all target protein families (Wang et al, 2009). Chemical genomics studies have shown that patterns of compound–protein interactions (CPIs) are too diverse to be understood as simple one-to-one events. There is an urgent need to develop appropriate data mining methods for characterizing and visualizing the full complexity of interactions between chemical space and biological systems. However, no existing screening approach has so far succeeded in identifying novel bioactive compounds using multiple interactions among compounds and target proteins.
High-throughput screening (HTS) and computational screening have greatly aided in the identification of early lead compounds for drug discovery. However, the large number of assays required for HTS to identify drugs that target multiple proteins render this process very costly and time-consuming. Therefore, interest in using in silico strategies for screening has increased. The most common computational approaches, ligand-based virtual screening (LBVS) and structure-based virtual screening (SBVS; Oprea and Matter, 2004; Muegge and Oloff, 2006; McInnes, 2007; Figure 1A), have been used for practical drug development. LBVS aims to identify molecules that are very similar to known active molecules and generally has difficulty identifying compounds with novel structural scaffolds that differ from reference molecules. The other popular strategy, SBVS, is constrained by the number of three-dimensional crystallographic structures available. To circumvent these limitations, we have shown that a new computational screening strategy, chemical genomics-based virtual screening (CGBVS), has the potential to identify novel, scaffold-hopping compounds and assess their polypharmacology by using a machine-learning method to recognize conserved molecular patterns in comprehensive CPI data sets.
The CGBVS strategy used in this study was made up of five steps: CPI data collection, descriptor calculation, representation of interaction vectors, predictive model construction using training data sets, and predictions from test data (Figure 1A). Importantly, step 1, the construction of a data set of chemical structures and protein sequences for known CPIs, did not require the three-dimensional protein structures needed for SBVS. In step 2, compound structures and protein sequences were converted into numerical descriptors. These descriptors were used to construct chemical or biological spaces in which decreasing distance between vectors corresponded to increasing similarity of compound structures or protein sequences. In step 3, we represented multiple CPI patterns by concatenating these chemical and protein descriptors. Using these interaction vectors, we could quantify the similarity of molecular interactions for compound–protein pairs, despite the fact that the ligand and protein similarity maps differed substantially. In step 4, concatenated vectors for CPI pairs (positive samples) and non-interacting pairs (negative samples) were input into an established machine-learning method. In the final step, the classifier constructed using training sets was applied to test data.
To evaluate the predictive value of CGBVS, we first compared its performance with that of LBVS by fivefold cross-validation. CGBVS performed with considerably higher accuracy (91.9%) than did LBVS (84.4%; Figure 1B). We next compared CGBVS and SBVS in a retrospective virtual screening based on the human β2-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2). Figure 1C shows that CGBVS provided higher hit rates than did SBVS. These results suggest that CGBVS is more successful than conventional approaches for prediction of CPIs.
We then evaluated the ability of the CGBVS method to predict the polypharmacology of ADRB2 by attempting to identify novel ADRB2 ligands from a group of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands. We ranked the prediction scores for the interactions of 826 reported GPCR ligands with ADRB2 and then analyzed the 50 highest-ranked compounds in greater detail. Of 21 commercially available compounds, 11 showed ADRB2-binding activity and were not previously reported to be ADRB2 ligands. These compounds included ligands not only for aminergic receptors but also for neuropeptide Y-type 1 receptors (NPY1R), which have low protein homology to ADRB2. Most ligands we identified were not detected by LBVS and SBVS, which suggests that only CGBVS could identify this unexpected cross-reaction for a ligand developed as a target to a peptidergic receptor.
The true value of CGBVS in drug discovery must be tested by assessing whether this method can identify scaffold-hopping lead compounds from a set of compounds that is structurally more diverse. To assess this ability, we analyzed 11 500 commercially available compounds to predict compounds likely to bind to two GPCRs and two protein kinases. Functional assays revealed that nine ADRB2 ligands, three NPY1R ligands, five epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors, and two cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) inhibitors were concentrated in the top-ranked compounds (hit rate=30, 15, 25, and 10%, respectively). We also evaluated the extent of scaffold hopping achieved in the identification of these novel ligands. One ADRB2 ligand, two NPY1R ligands, and one CDK2 inhibitor exhibited scaffold hopping (Figure 4), indicating that CGBVS can use this characteristic to rationally predict novel lead compounds, a crucial and very difficult step in drug discovery. This feature of CGBVS is critically different from existing predictive methods, such as LBVS, which depend on similarities between test and reference ligands, and focus on a single protein or highly homologous proteins. In particular, CGBVS is useful for targets with undefined ligands because this method can use CPIs with target proteins that exhibit lower levels of homology.
In summary, we have demonstrated that data mining of multiple CPIs is of great practical value for exploration of chemical space. As a predictive model, CGBVS could provide an important step in the discovery of such multi-target drugs by identifying the group of proteins targeted by a particular ligand, leading to innovation in pharmaceutical research.
The discovery of novel bioactive molecules advances our systems-level understanding of biological processes and is crucial for innovation in drug development. For this purpose, the emerging field of chemical genomics is currently focused on accumulating large assay data sets describing compound–protein interactions (CPIs). Although new target proteins for known drugs have recently been identified through mining of CPI databases, using these resources to identify novel ligands remains unexplored. Herein, we demonstrate that machine learning of multiple CPIs can not only assess drug polypharmacology but can also efficiently identify novel bioactive scaffold-hopping compounds. Through a machine-learning technique that uses multiple CPIs, we have successfully identified novel lead compounds for two pharmaceutically important protein families, G-protein-coupled receptors and protein kinases. These novel compounds were not identified by existing computational ligand-screening methods in comparative studies. The results of this study indicate that data derived from chemical genomics can be highly useful for exploring chemical space, and this systems biology perspective could accelerate drug discovery processes.
doi:10.1038/msb.2011.5
PMCID: PMC3094066  PMID: 21364574
chemical genomics; data mining; drug discovery; ligand screening; systems chemical biology
2.  Integrative genome-scale metabolic analysis of Vibrio vulnificus for drug targeting and discovery 
Chromosome 1 of Vibrio vulnificus tends to contain larger portion of essential or housekeeping genes on the basis of the genomic analysis and gene knockout experiments performed in this study, while its chromosome 2 seems to have originated and evolved from a plasmid.The genome-scale metabolic network model of V. vulnificus was reconstructed based on databases and literature, and was used to identify 193 essential metabolites.Five essential metabolites finally selected after the filtering process are 2-amino-4-hydroxy-6-hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropteridine (AHHMP), D-glutamate (DGLU), 2,3-dihydrodipicolinate (DHDP), 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DX5P), and 4-aminobenzoate (PABA), which were predicted to be essential in V. vulnificus, absent in human, and are consumed by multiple reactions.Chemical analogs of the five essential metabolites were screened and a hit compound showing the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 2 μg/ml and the minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) of 4 μg/ml against V. vulnificus was identified.
Discovering new antimicrobial targets and consequently new antimicrobials is important as drug resistance of pathogenic microorganisms is becoming an increasingly serious problem in human healthcare management (Fischbach and Walsh, 2009). There clearly exists a gap between genomic studies and drug discovery as the accumulation of knowledge on pathogens at genome level has not successfully transformed into the development of effective drugs (Mills, 2006; Payne et al, 2007). In this study, we dissected the genome of a microbial pathogen in detail, and subsequently developed a systems biological strategy of employing genome-scale metabolic modeling and simulation together with metabolite essentiality analysis for effective drug targeting and discovery. This strategy was used for identifying new drug targets in an opportunistic pathogen Vibrio vulnificus CMCP6 as a model.
V. vulnificus is a Gram-negative halophilic bacterium that is found in estuarine waters, brackish ponds, or coastal areas, and its Biotype 1 is an opportunistic human pathogen that can attack immune-compromised patients, and causes primary septicemia, necrotized wound infections, and gastroenteritis. We previously found that many metabolic genes were specifically induced in vivo, suggesting that specific metabolic pathways are essential for in vivo survival and virulence of this pathogen (Kim et al, 2003; Lee et al, 2007). These results motivated us to carry out systems biological analysis of the genome and the metabolic network for new drug target discovery.
V. vulnificus CMCP6 has two chromosomes. We first re-sequenced genomic regions assembled in low quality and low depth, and subsequently re-annotated the whole genome of V. vulnificus. Horizontal gene transfer was suspected to be responsible for the diversification of each chromosome of V. vulnificus, and the presence of metabolic genes was more biased to chromosome 1 than chromosome 2. Further studies on V. vulnificus genome revealed that chromosome 2 is more prone to diversification for better adaptation to the environment than its chromosome 1, while chromosome 1 tends to expand their genetic repertoire while maintaining the core genes at a constant level.
Next, a genome-scale metabolic network VvuMBEL943 was reconstructed based on literature, databases and experiments for systematic studies on the metabolism of this pathogen and prediction of drug targets. The VvuMBEL943 model is composed of 943 reactions and 765 metabolites, and covers 673 genes. The model was validated by comparing its simulated cell growth phenotype obtained by constraints-based flux analysis with the V. vulnificus-specific experimental data previously reported in the literature. In this study, constraints-based flux analysis is an optimization-based simulation method that calculates intracellular fluxes under the specific genetic and environmental condition (Kim et al, 2008). As a result, 17 growth phenotypes were correctly predicted out of 18 cases, which demonstrate the validity of VvuMBEL943.
The main objective of constructing VvuMBEL943 in this study is to predict potential drug targets by system-wide analysis of the metabolic network for the effective treatment of V. vulnificus. To achieve this goal, a set of drug target candidates was predicted by taking a metabolite-centric approach. Metabolite essentiality analysis is a concept recently introduced for the study of cellular robustness to complement conventional reaction or gene-centric approach (Kim et al, 2007b). Metabolite essentiality analysis observes changes in flux distribution by removing each metabolite from the in silico metabolic network. Hence, metabolite essentiality predicts essential metabolites whose absence causes cell death. By selecting essential metabolites, it is possible to directly screen only their structural analogs, which substantially reduces the number of chemical compounds to screen from the chemical compound library. As a result of implementing this approach, 193 metabolites were initially identified to be essential to the cell. These essential metabolites were then further filtered based on the predetermined criteria, mainly organism specificity and multiple connectivity associated with each metabolite, in order to reduce the number of initial target candidates towards identifying the most effective ones.
Five essential metabolites finally selected are 2-amino-4-hydroxy-6-hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropteridine (AHHMP), D-glutamate (DGLU), 2,3-dihydrodipicolinate (DHDP), 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DX5P), and 4-aminobenzoate (PABA). Enzymes that consume these essential metabolites were experimentally verified to be essential, which indeed demonstrates the essentiality of these five metabolites. On the basis of the structural information of these five essential metabolites, whole-cell screening assay was performed using their analogs for possible antibacterial discovery. We screened 352 chemical analogs of the essential metabolites selected from the chemical compound library, and found a hit compound 24837, which shows the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 2 μg/ml and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) of 4 μg/ml, showing good antibacterial activity without further structural modification. Although this study demonstrates a proof-of-concept, the approaches and their rationale taken here should serve as a general strategy for discovering novel antibiotics and drugs based on systems-level analysis of metabolic networks.
Although the genomes of many microbial pathogens have been studied to help identify effective drug targets and novel drugs, such efforts have not yet reached full fruition. In this study, we report a systems biological approach that efficiently utilizes genomic information for drug targeting and discovery, and apply this approach to the opportunistic pathogen Vibrio vulnificus CMCP6. First, we partially re-sequenced and fully re-annotated the V. vulnificus CMCP6 genome, and accordingly reconstructed its genome-scale metabolic network, VvuMBEL943. The validated network model was employed to systematically predict drug targets using the concept of metabolite essentiality, along with additional filtering criteria. Target genes encoding enzymes that interact with the five essential metabolites finally selected were experimentally validated. These five essential metabolites are critical to the survival of the cell, and hence were used to guide the cost-effective selection of chemical analogs, which were then screened for antimicrobial activity in a whole-cell assay. This approach is expected to help fill the existing gap between genomics and drug discovery.
doi:10.1038/msb.2010.115
PMCID: PMC3049409  PMID: 21245845
drug discovery; drug targeting; genome analysis; metabolic network; Vibrio vulnificus
3.  Identification of G-Quadruplex Inducers Usinga Simple, Inexpensiveand Rapid High Throughput Assay, and TheirInhibition of Human Telomerase 
Telomeres are protein and DNA complexes located atchromosome ends. Telomeric DNA is composed of a double stranded region of repetitive DNA followed by single-stranded 3' extension of aG-rich sequence. Single-stranded G-rich sequencescan fold into G-quadruplex structures,and molecules that stabilize G-quadruplexes are known to inhibit the enzyme telomerase and disrupt telomere maintenance. Because telomere maintenance is required for proliferation of cancer cells, G-quadruplex stabilizers have become attractive prospects for anticancer drug discovery.However, telomere-targeting G-quadruplex ligands have yet to enter the clinic owing in part to poor pharmacokinetics and target selectivity. Increasing the pharmacophore diversity of G-quadruplex and specifically telomeric-DNA targeting agents should assist in overcoming these shortcomings. In this work, we report the identification and validation ofligands that bind telomeric DNA and induce G-quadruplex formationusing the NCI Diversity Set I, providing validation of anextremely simple, rapid and high-throughput screen using FRET technology. Hits from the screen were validated by examining telomerase inhibition and G-quadruplex inductionusing CD spectroscopy and DNA polymerase stop assays. We show that two known DNA binding molecules, ellipticine derivativeNSC 176327 (apyridocarbazole) and NSC 305831 (an antiparasitic hetero-cyclediamidine referred to as furamidine and DB75),are selective induceG-quadruplex formation in the human telomeric sequence and bind telomeric DNA quadruplexes in the absence of stabilizing monovalent cations with molar ratios(molecule: DNA)of 4:1and 1.5:1, respectively.
doi:10.2174/1874104501206010020
PMCID: PMC3502892  PMID: 23173022
Ellipticine; furamidine; G-quadruplex; telomerase; telomere
4.  PDTD: a web-accessible protein database for drug target identification 
BMC Bioinformatics  2008;9:104.
Background
Target identification is important for modern drug discovery. With the advances in the development of molecular docking, potential binding proteins may be discovered by docking a small molecule to a repository of proteins with three-dimensional (3D) structures. To complete this task, a reverse docking program and a drug target database with 3D structures are necessary. To this end, we have developed a web server tool, TarFisDock (Target Fishing Docking) , which has been used widely by others. Recently, we have constructed a protein target database, Potential Drug Target Database (PDTD), and have integrated PDTD with TarFisDock. This combination aims to assist target identification and validation.
Description
PDTD is a web-accessible protein database for in silico target identification. It currently contains >1100 protein entries with 3D structures presented in the Protein Data Bank. The data are extracted from the literatures and several online databases such as TTD, DrugBank and Thomson Pharma. The database covers diverse information of >830 known or potential drug targets, including protein and active sites structures in both PDB and mol2 formats, related diseases, biological functions as well as associated regulating (signaling) pathways. Each target is categorized by both nosology and biochemical function. PDTD supports keyword search function, such as PDB ID, target name, and disease name. Data set generated by PDTD can be viewed with the plug-in of molecular visualization tools and also can be downloaded freely. Remarkably, PDTD is specially designed for target identification. In conjunction with TarFisDock, PDTD can be used to identify binding proteins for small molecules. The results can be downloaded in the form of mol2 file with the binding pose of the probe compound and a list of potential binding targets according to their ranking scores.
Conclusion
PDTD serves as a comprehensive and unique repository of drug targets. Integrated with TarFisDock, PDTD is a useful resource to identify binding proteins for active compounds or existing drugs. Its potential applications include in silico drug target identification, virtual screening, and the discovery of the secondary effects of an old drug (i.e. new pharmacological usage) or an existing target (i.e. new pharmacological or toxic relevance), thus it may be a valuable platform for the pharmaceutical researchers. PDTD is available online at .
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-9-104
PMCID: PMC2265675  PMID: 18282303
5.  PharmMapper server: a web server for potential drug target identification using pharmacophore mapping approach 
Nucleic Acids Research  2010;38(Web Server issue):W609-W614.
In silico drug target identification, which includes many distinct algorithms for finding disease genes and proteins, is the first step in the drug discovery pipeline. When the 3D structures of the targets are available, the problem of target identification is usually converted to finding the best interaction mode between the potential target candidates and small molecule probes. Pharmacophore, which is the spatial arrangement of features essential for a molecule to interact with a specific target receptor, is an alternative method for achieving this goal apart from molecular docking method. PharmMapper server is a freely accessed web server designed to identify potential target candidates for the given small molecules (drugs, natural products or other newly discovered compounds with unidentified binding targets) using pharmacophore mapping approach. PharmMapper hosts a large, in-house repertoire of pharmacophore database (namely PharmTargetDB) annotated from all the targets information in TargetBank, BindingDB, DrugBank and potential drug target database, including over 7000 receptor-based pharmacophore models (covering over 1500 drug targets information). PharmMapper automatically finds the best mapping poses of the query molecule against all the pharmacophore models in PharmTargetDB and lists the top N best-fitted hits with appropriate target annotations, as well as respective molecule’s aligned poses are presented. Benefited from the highly efficient and robust triangle hashing mapping method, PharmMapper bears high throughput ability and only costs 1 h averagely to screen the whole PharmTargetDB. The protocol was successful in finding the proper targets among the top 300 pharmacophore candidates in the retrospective benchmarking test of tamoxifen. PharmMapper is available at http://59.78.96.61/pharmmapper.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkq300
PMCID: PMC2896160  PMID: 20430828
6.  Exploring the Trypanosoma brucei Hsp83 Potential as a Target for Structure Guided Drug Design 
Human African trypanosomiasis is a neglected parasitic disease that is fatal if untreated. The current drugs available to eliminate the causative agent Trypanosoma brucei have multiple liabilities, including toxicity, increasing problems due to treatment failure and limited efficacy. There are two approaches to discover novel antimicrobial drugs - whole-cell screening and target-based discovery. In the latter case, there is a need to identify and validate novel drug targets in Trypanosoma parasites. The heat shock proteins (Hsp), while best known as cancer targets with a number of drug candidates in clinical development, are a family of emerging targets for infectious diseases. In this paper, we report the exploration of T. brucei Hsp83 – a homolog of human Hsp90 – as a drug target using multiple biophysical and biochemical techniques. Our approach included the characterization of the chemical sensitivity of the parasitic chaperone against a library of known Hsp90 inhibitors by means of differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF). Several compounds identified by this screening procedure were further studied using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and X-ray crystallography, as well as tested in parasite growth inhibitions assays. These experiments led us to the identification of a benzamide derivative compound capable of interacting with TbHsp83 more strongly than with its human homologs and structural rationalization of this selectivity. The results highlight the opportunities created by subtle structural differences to develop new series of compounds to selectively target the Trypanosoma brucei chaperone and effectively kill the sleeping sickness parasite.
Author Summary
Sleeping sickness, or human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), is a deadly neglected disease for which new therapeutic options are badly needed. Current drugs have several liabilities including toxicity and route of administration limiting their efficacy to combat the disease. Our study aimed at validating a potential new drug target against Trypanosoma brucei, its heat shock protein 83 (Hsp83). The chaperone was screened against a repurposed library composed of inhibitors against the human Hsp90. The compounds were assayed in their ability to bind the T. brucei protein and to kill the parasite. Our work has identified selective and high-affinity chemical compounds targeting the parasitic Hsp83. Additionally, structural studies were conducted to explore the observed selectivity of selected inhibitors. Our work has validated T. brucei Hsp83 as a potential target for future drug discovery campaigns. It has also shown the strength of repurposing chemical libraries developed against human proteins, emphasizing the possibility to piggyback current and past drug discovery efforts for other diseases in the search for new drugs against neglected tropical diseases.
doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0002492
PMCID: PMC3798429  PMID: 24147171
7.  Fragment-Based Optimization of Small Molecule CXCL12 Inhibitors for Antagonizing the CXCL12/CXCR4 Interaction 
Current topics in medicinal chemistry  2012;12(24):2727-2740.
The chemokine CXCL12 and its G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) CXCR4 are high-priority clinical targets because of their involvement in metastatic cancers (also implicated in autoimmune disease and cardiovascular disease). Because chemokines interact with two distinct sites to bind and activate their receptors, both the GPCRs and chemokines are potential targets for small molecule inhibition. A number of chemokines have been validated as targets for drug development, but virtually all drug discovery efforts focus on the GPCRs. However, all CXCR4 receptor antagonists with the exception of MSX-122 have failed in clinical trials due to unmanageable toxicities, emphasizing the need for alternative strategies to interfere with CXCL12/CXCR4-guided metastatic homing. Although targeting the relatively featureless surface of CXCL12 was presumed to be challenging, focusing efforts at the sulfotyrosine (sY) binding pockets proved successful for procuring initial hits. Using a hybrid structure-based in silico/NMR screening strategy, we recently identified a ligand that occludes the receptor recognition site. From this initial hit, we designed a small fragment library containing only nine tetrazole derivatives using a fragment-based and bioisostere approach to target the sY binding sites of CXCL12. Compound binding modes and affinities were studied by 2D NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, molecular docking and cell-based functional assays. Our results demonstrate that the sY binding sites are conducive to the development of high affinity inhibitors with better ligand efficiency (LE) than typical protein-protein interaction inhibitors (LE ≤ 0.24). Our novel tetrazole-based fragment 18 was identified to bind the sY21 site with a Kd of 24 μM (LE = 0.30). Optimization of 18 yielded compound 25 which specifically inhibits CXCL12-induced migration with an improvement in potency over the initial hit 9. The fragment from this library that exhibited the highest affinity and ligand efficiency (11: Kd = 13 μM, LE = 0.33) may serve as a starting point for development of inhibitors targeting the sY12 site.
PMCID: PMC3839847  PMID: 23368099
Chemokines; CXCL12/CXCR4 inhibitors; protein-protein interaction; metastasis; fragment-based and structure-guided drug design
8.  IspE Inhibitors Identified by a Combination of In Silico and In Vitro High-Throughput Screening 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(4):e35792.
CDP-ME kinase (IspE) contributes to the non-mevalonate or deoxy-xylulose phosphate (DOXP) pathway for isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis found in many species of bacteria and apicomplexan parasites. IspE has been shown to be essential by genetic methods and since it is absent from humans it constitutes a promising target for antimicrobial drug development. Using in silico screening directed against the substrate binding site and in vitro high-throughput screening directed against both, the substrate and co-factor binding sites, non-substrate-like IspE inhibitors have been discovered and structure-activity relationships were derived. The best inhibitors in each series have high ligand efficiencies and favourable physico-chemical properties rendering them promising starting points for drug discovery. Putative binding modes of the ligands were suggested which are consistent with established structure-activity relationships. The applied screening methods were complementary in discovering hit compounds, and a comparison of both approaches highlights their strengths and weaknesses. It is noteworthy that compounds identified by virtual screening methods provided the controls for the biochemical screens.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0035792
PMCID: PMC3340893  PMID: 22563402
9.  Specific recognition and stabilization of monomeric and multimeric G-quadruplexes by cationic porphyrin TMPipEOPP under molecular crowding conditions 
Nucleic Acids Research  2013;41(7):4324-4335.
Ligands targeting telomeric G-quadruplexs are considered good candidates for anticancer drugs. However, current studies on G-quadruplex ligands focus exclusively on the interactions of ligands and monomeric G-quadruplexes under dilute conditions. Living cells are crowded with biomacromolecules, and the ∼200-nucleotide G-rich single-stranded overhang of human telomeric DNA has the potential to fold into multimeric G-quadruplex structures containing several G-quadruplex units. Studies on interactions between ligands and multimeric G-quadruplexes under molecular crowding conditions could provide a new route for screening specific telomeric G-quadruplex-targeting ligands. Herein, TMPipEOPP, a cationic porphyrin derivative designed by us, was demonstrated as a promising multimeric telomeric G-quadruplex ligand under molecular crowding conditions. It could highly specifically recognize G-quadruplexes. It could also promote the formation of G-quadruplexes and stabilize them. Detailed studies showed that TMPipEOPP interacted with monomeric G-quadruplexes in sandwich-like end-stacking mode of quadruplex/TMPipEOPP/quadruplex and interacted with multimeric human telomeric G-quadruplexes by intercalating into the pocket between two adjacent G-quadruplex units. The pocket size greatly affected TMPipEOPP binding. A larger pocket was advantageous for the intercalation of TMPipEOPP. This work provides new insights into the ligand-binding properties of multimeric G-quadruplexes under molecular crowding conditions and introduces a new route for screening anticancer drugs targeting telomeric G-quadruplexes.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkt103
PMCID: PMC3627595  PMID: 23430152
10.  Integrating Statistical Predictions and Experimental Verifications for Enhancing Protein-Chemical Interaction Predictions in Virtual Screening 
PLoS Computational Biology  2009;5(6):e1000397.
Predictions of interactions between target proteins and potential leads are of great benefit in the drug discovery process. We present a comprehensively applicable statistical prediction method for interactions between any proteins and chemical compounds, which requires only protein sequence data and chemical structure data and utilizes the statistical learning method of support vector machines. In order to realize reasonable comprehensive predictions which can involve many false positives, we propose two approaches for reduction of false positives: (i) efficient use of multiple statistical prediction models in the framework of two-layer SVM and (ii) reasonable design of the negative data to construct statistical prediction models. In two-layer SVM, outputs produced by the first-layer SVM models, which are constructed with different negative samples and reflect different aspects of classifications, are utilized as inputs to the second-layer SVM. In order to design negative data which produce fewer false positive predictions, we iteratively construct SVM models or classification boundaries from positive and tentative negative samples and select additional negative sample candidates according to pre-determined rules. Moreover, in order to fully utilize the advantages of statistical learning methods, we propose a strategy to effectively feedback experimental results to computational predictions with consideration of biological effects of interest. We show the usefulness of our approach in predicting potential ligands binding to human androgen receptors from more than 19 million chemical compounds and verifying these predictions by in vitro binding. Moreover, we utilize this experimental validation as feedback to enhance subsequent computational predictions, and experimentally validate these predictions again. This efficient procedure of the iteration of the in silico prediction and in vitro or in vivo experimental verifications with the sufficient feedback enabled us to identify novel ligand candidates which were distant from known ligands in the chemical space.
Author Summary
This work describes a statistical method that identifies chemical compounds binding to a target protein given the sequence of the target or distinguishes proteins to which a small molecule binds given the chemical structure of the molecule. As our method can be utilized for virtual screening that seeks for lead compounds in drug discovery, we showed the usefulness of our method in its application to the comprehensive prediction of ligands binding to human androgen receptors and in vitro experimental verification of its predictions. In contrast to most previous virtual screening studies which predict chemical compounds of interest mainly with 3D structure-based methods and experimentally verify them, we proposed a strategy to effectively feedback experimental results for subsequent predictions and applied the strategy to the second predictions followed by the second experimental verification. This feedback strategy makes full use of statistical learning methods and, in practical terms, gave a ligand candidate of interest that structurally differs from known drugs. We hope that this paper will encourage reevaluation of statistical learning methods in virtual screening and that the utilization of statistical methods with efficient feedback strategies will contribute to the acceleration of drug discovery.
doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000397
PMCID: PMC2685987  PMID: 19503826
11.  Small molecule correctors of F508del-CFTR discovered by structure-based virtual screening 
Folding correctors of F508del-CFTR were discovered by in silico structure-based screening utilizing homology models of CFTR. The intracellular segment of CFTR was modeled and three cavities were identified at inter-domain interfaces: (1) Interface between the two Nucleotide Binding Domains (NBDs); (2) Interface between NBD1 and Intracellular Loop (ICL) 4, in the region of the F508 deletion; (3) multi-domain interface between NBD1:2:ICL1:2:4. We hypothesized that compounds binding at these interfaces may improve the stability of the protein, potentially affecting the folding yield or surface stability. In silico structure-based screening was performed at the putative binding-sites and a total of 496 candidate compounds from all three sites were tested in functional assays. A total of 15 compounds, representing diverse chemotypes, were identified as F508del folding correctors. This corresponds to a 3% hit rate, ∼tenfold higher than hit rates obtained in corresponding high-throughput screening campaigns. The same binding sites also yielded potentiators and, most notably, compounds with a dual corrector-potentiator activity (dual-acting). Compounds harboring both activity types may prove to be better leads for the development of CF therapeutics than either pure correctors or pure potentiators. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of structure-based discovery of CFTR modulators.
doi:10.1007/s10822-010-9390-0
PMCID: PMC4010227  PMID: 20976528
Cystic fibrosis; CFTR; Structure-based virtual screening; Correctors; Potentiators; Modulators; F508; Docking; Homology modeling; YFP; Ussing chamber; Chemical chaperones; Pharmacological chaperones
12.  Hierarchical virtual screening for the discovery of new molecular scaffolds in antibacterial hit identification 
One of the initial steps of modern drug discovery is the identification of small organic molecules able to inhibit a target macromolecule of therapeutic interest. A small proportion of these hits are further developed into lead compounds, which in turn may ultimately lead to a marketed drug. A commonly used screening protocol used for this task is high-throughput screening (HTS). However, the performance of HTS against antibacterial targets has generally been unsatisfactory, with high costs and low rates of hit identification. Here, we present a novel computational methodology that is able to identify a high proportion of structurally diverse inhibitors by searching unusually large molecular databases in a time-, cost- and resource-efficient manner. This virtual screening methodology was tested prospectively on two versions of an antibacterial target (type II dehydroquinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Streptomyces coelicolor), for which HTS has not provided satisfactory results and consequently practically all known inhibitors are derivatives of the same core scaffold. Overall, our protocols identified 100 new inhibitors, with calculated Ki ranging from 4 to 250 μM (confirmed hit rates are 60% and 62% against each version of the target). Most importantly, over 50 new active molecular scaffolds were discovered that underscore the benefits that a wide application of prospectively validated in silico screening tools is likely to bring to antibacterial hit identification.
doi:10.1098/rsif.2012.0569
PMCID: PMC3481598  PMID: 22933186
virtual screening; antibacterial hit identification; chemoinformatics; bioinformatics; machine learning; high-throughput screening
13.  Development and experimental test of support vector machines virtual screening method for searching Src inhibitors from large compound libraries 
Background
Src plays various roles in tumour progression, invasion, metastasis, angiogenesis and survival. It is one of the multiple targets of multi-target kinase inhibitors in clinical uses and trials for the treatment of leukemia and other cancers. These successes and appearances of drug resistance in some patients have raised significant interest and efforts in discovering new Src inhibitors. Various in-silico methods have been used in some of these efforts. It is desirable to explore additional in-silico methods, particularly those capable of searching large compound libraries at high yields and reduced false-hit rates.
Results
We evaluated support vector machines (SVM) as virtual screening tools for searching Src inhibitors from large compound libraries. SVM trained and tested by 1,703 inhibitors and 63,318 putative non-inhibitors correctly identified 93.53%~ 95.01% inhibitors and 99.81%~ 99.90% non-inhibitors in 5-fold cross validation studies. SVM trained by 1,703 inhibitors reported before 2011 and 63,318 putative non-inhibitors correctly identified 70.45% of the 44 inhibitors reported since 2011, and predicted as inhibitors 44,843 (0.33%) of 13.56M PubChem, 1,496 (0.89%) of 168 K MDDR, and 719 (7.73%) of 9,305 MDDR compounds similar to the known inhibitors.
Conclusions
SVM showed comparable yield and reduced false hit rates in searching large compound libraries compared to the similarity-based and other machine-learning VS methods developed from the same set of training compounds and molecular descriptors. We tested three virtual hits of the same novel scaffold from in-house chemical libraries not reported as Src inhibitor, one of which showed moderate activity. SVM may be potentially explored for searching Src inhibitors from large compound libraries at low false-hit rates.
doi:10.1186/1752-153X-6-139
PMCID: PMC3538513  PMID: 23173901
Src; c-src; Computer aided drug design; Kinase inhibitor; Virtual screening; Support vector machine
14.  Structure-based Drug Design: From Nucleic Acid to Membrane Protein Targets 
The in silico methods for drug discovery are becoming increasingly powerful and useful. That, in combination with increasing computer processor power, in our case using a novel distributed computing grid, has enabled us to greatly enhance our virtual screening efforts. Herein we review some of these efforts using both receptor and ligand-based virtual screening, with the goal of finding new anticancer agents. In particular, nucleic acids are a neglected set of targets, especially the different morphologies of duplex, triplex, and quadruplex DNA, many of which have increasing biological relevance. We also review examples of molecular modeling to understand receptors and using virtual screening against G-protein coupled receptor membrane proteins.
doi:10.1016/j.yexmp.2009.01.011
PMCID: PMC3143464  PMID: 19454265
Virtual screening; drug discovery; membrane protein; G-protein coupled receptor; telomere; quadruplex; DNA
15.  Finding and Characterizing the Complexes of Drug Like Molecules with Quadruplex DNA: Combined Use of an Enhanced Hydroxyl Radical Cleavage Protocol and NMR 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(4):e96218.
Structural information on the complexes of drug like molecules with quadruplex DNAs can aid the development of therapeutics and research tools that selectively target specific quadruplex DNAs. Screening can identify candidate molecules that require additional evaluation. An enhanced hydroxyl radical cleavage protocol is demonstrated that can efficiently provide structural information on the complexes of the candidate molecules with quadruplex DNA. NMR methods have been used to offer additional structural information about the complexes as well as validate the results of the hydroxyl radical approach. This multi-step protocol has been demonstrated on complexes of the chair type quadruplex formed by the thrombin binding aptamer, d(GGTTGGTGTGGTTGG). The hydroxyl radical results indicate that NSC 176319, Cain’s quinolinium that was found by screening, exhibits selective binding to the two TT loops. The NMR results are consistent with selective disruption of the hydrogen bonding between T4 and T13 as well as unstacking of these residues from the bottom quartet. Thus, the combination of screening, hydroxyl radical footprinting and NMR can find new molecules that selectively bind to quadruplex DNAs as well as provide structural information about their complexes.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0096218
PMCID: PMC3999192  PMID: 24763734
16.  An integrative in silico approach for discovering candidates for drug-targetable protein-protein interactions in interactome data 
BMC Pharmacology  2007;7:10.
Background
Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are challenging but attractive targets for small chemical drugs. Whole PPIs, called the 'interactome', have been emerged in several organisms, including human, based on the recent development of high-throughput screening (HTS) technologies. Individual PPIs have been targeted by small drug-like chemicals (SDCs), however, interactome data have not been fully utilized for exploring drug targets due to the lack of comprehensive methodology for utilizing these data. Here we propose an integrative in silico approach for discovering candidates for drug-targetable PPIs in interactome data.
Results
Our novel in silico screening system comprises three independent assessment procedures: i) detection of protein domains responsible for PPIs, ii) finding SDC-binding pockets on protein surfaces, and iii) evaluating similarities in the assignment of Gene Ontology (GO) terms between specific partner proteins. We discovered six candidates for drug-targetable PPIs by applying our in silico approach to original human PPI data composed of 770 binary interactions produced by our HTS yeast two-hybrid (HTS-Y2H) assays. Among them, we further examined two candidates, RXRA/NRIP1 and CDK2/CDKN1A, with respect to their biological roles, PPI network around each candidate, and tertiary structures of the interacting domains.
Conclusion
An integrative in silico approach for discovering candidates for drug-targetable PPIs was applied to original human PPIs data. The system excludes false positive interactions and selects reliable PPIs as drug targets. Its effectiveness was demonstrated by the discovery of the six promising candidate target PPIs. Inhibition or stabilization of the two interactions may have potential therapeutic effects against human diseases.
doi:10.1186/1471-2210-7-10
PMCID: PMC2045083  PMID: 17705877
17.  “One Ring to Bind Them All”—Part II: Identification of Promising G-Quadruplex Ligands by Screening of Cyclophane-Type Macrocycles 
Journal of Nucleic Acids  2010;2010:460561.
A collection of 26 polyammonium cyclophane-type macrocycles with a large structural diversity has been screened for G-quadruplex recognition. A two-step selection procedure based on the FRET-melting assay was carried out enabling identification of macrocycles of high affinity (ΔT1/2 up to 30°C) and high selectivity for the human telomeric G-quadruplex. The four selected hits possess sophisticated architectures, more particularly the presence of a pendant side-arm as well as the existence of a particular topological arrangement appear to be strong determinants of quadruplex binding. These compounds are thus likely to create multiple contacts with the target that may be at the origin of their high selectivity, thereby suggesting that this class of macrocycles offers unique advantages for targeting G-quadruplex-DNA.
doi:10.4061/2010/460561
PMCID: PMC2915812  PMID: 20725622
18.  Heterocyclic Dications as a New Class of Telomeric G-Quadruplex Targeting Agents 
Current pharmaceutical design  2012;18(14):1934-1947.
Small molecules that can induce and stabilize G-quadruplex DNA structures represent a novel approach for anti-cancer and anti-parasitic therapy and extensive efforts have been directed towards discovering lead compounds that are capable of stabilizing quadruplexes. The purpose of this study is to explore conformational modifications in a series of heterocyclic dications to discover structural motifs that can selectively bind and stabilize specific G-quadruplexes, such as those present in the human telomere. The G-quadruplex has various potential recognition sites for small molecules; however, the primary interaction site of most of these ligands is the terminal tetrads. Similar to duplex-DNA groove recognition, quadruplex groove recognition by small molecules offers the potential for enhanced selectivity that can be developed into a viable therapeutic strategy. The compounds investigated were selected based on preliminary studies with DB832, a bifuryl-phenyl diamidine with a unique telomere interaction. This compound provides a paradigm that can help in understanding the optimum compound-DNA interactions that lead to quadruplex groove recognition. DNA recognition by the DB832 derivatives was investigated by biophysical experiments such as thermal melting, circular dichroism, mass spectrometry and NMR. Biological studies were also performed to complement the biophysical data. The results suggest a complex binding mechanism which involves the recognition of grooves for some ligands as well as stacking at the terminal tetrads of the human telomeric G-quadruplex for most of the ligands. These molecules represent an excellent starting point for further SAR analysis for diverse modes of quadruplex recognition and subsequent structure optimization for drug development.
PMCID: PMC3865530  PMID: 22380518
Heterocyclic dications; Telomere; Telomerase; G-quadruplex; Circular dichroism; Nuclear magnetic resonance; Groove binding; Dimer
19.  Flexibility of the P-loop of Pim-1 kinase: observation of a novel conformation induced by interaction with an inhibitor 
The structures of Pim1 kinase in complex with in silico screening hits and several subsequently optimized inhibitors, are reported.
The serine/threonine kinase Pim-1 is emerging as a promising target for cancer therapeutics. Much attention has recently been focused on identifying potential Pim-1 inhibitor candidates for the treatment of haematopoietic malignancies. The outcome of a rational drug-design project has recently been reported [Nakano et al. (2012 ▶), J. Med. Chem. 55, 5151–5156]. The report described the process of optimization of the structure–activity relationship and detailed from a medicinal chemistry perspective the development of a low-potency and nonselective compound initially identified from in silico screening into a potent, selective and metabolically stable Pim-1 inhibitor. Here, the structures of the initial in silico hits are reported and the noteworthy features of the Pim-1 complex structures are described. A particular focus was placed on the rearrangement of the glycine-rich P-loop region that was observed for one of the initial compounds, (Z)-7-(azepan-1-ylmethyl)-2-[(1H-indol-3-­yl)methylidene]-6-hydroxy-1-benzofuran-3(2H)-one (compound 1), and was also found in all further derivatives. This novel P-loop conformation, which appears to be stabilized by an additional interaction with the β3 strand located above the binding site, is not usually observed in Pim-1 structures.
doi:10.1107/S1744309112027108
PMCID: PMC3412761  PMID: 22869110
Pim-1; kinases; inhibitors
20.  Pathway-based Screening Strategy for Multitarget Inhibitors of Diverse Proteins in Metabolic Pathways 
PLoS Computational Biology  2013;9(7):e1003127.
Many virtual screening methods have been developed for identifying single-target inhibitors based on the strategy of “one–disease, one–target, one–drug”. The hit rates of these methods are often low because they cannot capture the features that play key roles in the biological functions of the target protein. Furthermore, single-target inhibitors are often susceptible to drug resistance and are ineffective for complex diseases such as cancers. Therefore, a new strategy is required for enriching the hit rate and identifying multitarget inhibitors. To address these issues, we propose the pathway-based screening strategy (called PathSiMMap) to derive binding mechanisms for increasing the hit rate and discovering multitarget inhibitors using site-moiety maps. This strategy simultaneously screens multiple target proteins in the same pathway; these proteins bind intermediates with common substructures. These proteins possess similar conserved binding environments (pathway anchors) when the product of one protein is the substrate of the next protein in the pathway despite their low sequence identity and structure similarity. We successfully discovered two multitarget inhibitors with IC50 of <10 µM for shikimate dehydrogenase and shikimate kinase in the shikimate pathway of Helicobacter pylori. Furthermore, we found two selective inhibitors (IC50 of <10 µM) for shikimate dehydrogenase using the specific anchors derived by our method. Our experimental results reveal that this strategy can enhance the hit rates and the pathway anchors are highly conserved and important for biological functions. We believe that our strategy provides a great value for elucidating protein binding mechanisms and discovering multitarget inhibitors.
Author Summary
Many drug development strategies focus on designing inhibitors for single targets. These inhibitors often lose potency owing to mutations in the protein binding sites and are ineffective for complex diseases. Multitarget inhibitors can decrease probability of drug resistance and enhance the therapeutic efficiency; however, identifying them is still a challenge because targets often have low sequence and structure similarities in their binding sites. Here we propose a pathway-based screening strategy that simultaneously screens proteins in a metabolic pathway for discovering multitarget inhibitors. Because these proteins interact with similar metabolites and modify them step-by-step, the proteins share similarities in binding sites. We developed pathway site-moiety maps that present the conserved binding environments of the proteins without relying on the sequence or structure alignment. Compounds that bind these conserved binding environments are often multitarget inhibitors. We applied this strategy to the shikimate pathway of Helicobacter pylori, and discovered two multitarget inhibitors (IC50<10 µM) for shikimate dehydrogenase and shikimate kinase. In addition, we found two selective inhibitors based on specific binding environments for shikimate dehydrogenase. Thus the pathway-based screening strategy is useful for identifying multitarget inhibitors and elucidating protein-ligand binding mechanisms and has the potential to be applied to human diseases.
doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003127
PMCID: PMC3701698  PMID: 23861662
21.  Predicting New Indications for Approved Drugs Using a Proteo-Chemometric Method 
Journal of medicinal chemistry  2012;55(15):6832-6848.
The most effective way to move from target identification to the clinic is to identify already approved drugs with the potential for activating or inhibiting unintended targets (repurposing or repositioning). This is usually achieved by high throughput chemical screening, transcriptome matching or simple in silico ligand docking. We now describe a novel rapid computational proteo-chemometric method called “Train, Match, Fit, Streamline” (TMFS) to map new drug-target interaction space and predict new uses. The TMFS method combines shape, topology and chemical signatures, including docking score and functional contact points of the ligand, to predict potential drug-target interactions with remarkable accuracy. Using the TMFS method, we performed extensive molecular fit computations on 3,671 FDA approved drugs across 2,335 human protein crystal structures. The TMFS method predicts drug-target associations with 91% accuracy for the majority of drugs. Over 58% of the known best ligands for each target were correctly predicted as top ranked, followed by 66%, 76%, 84% and 91% for agents ranked in the top 10, 20, 30 and 40, respectively, out of all 3,671 drugs. Drugs ranked in the top 1–40, that have not been experimentally validated for a particular target now become candidates for repositioning. Furthermore, we used the TMFS method to discover that mebendazole, an anti-parasitic with recently discovered and unexpected anti-cancer properties, has the structural potential to inhibit VEGFR2. We confirmed experimentally that mebendazole inhibits VEGFR2 kinase activity as well as angiogenesis at doses comparable with its known effects on hookworm. TMFS also predicted, and was confirmed with surface plasmon resonance, that dimethyl celecoxib and the anti-inflammatory agent celecoxib can bind cadherin-11, an adhesion molecule important in rheumatoid arthritis and poor prognosis malignancies for which no targeted therapies exist. We anticipate that expanding our TMFS method to the >27,000 clinically active agents available worldwide across all targets will be most useful in the repositioning of existing drugs for new therapeutic targets.
doi:10.1021/jm300576q
PMCID: PMC3419493  PMID: 22780961
22.  Combinatorial Computational Approaches to Identify Tetracycline Derivatives as Flavivirus Inhibitors 
PLoS ONE  2007;2(5):e428.
Limited structural information of drug targets, cellular toxicity possessed by lead compounds, and large amounts of potential leads are the major issues facing the design-oriented approach of discovering new leads. In an attempt to tackle these issues, we have developed a process of virtual screening based on the observation that conformational rearrangements of the dengue virus envelope protein are essential for the mediation of viral entry into host cells via membrane fusion. Screening was based solely on the structural information of the Dengue virus envelope protein and was focused on a target site that is presumably important for the conformational rearrangements necessary for viral entry. To circumvent the issue of lead compound toxicity, we performed screening based on molecular docking using structural databases of medical compounds. To enhance the identification of hits, we further categorized and selected candidates according to their novel structural characteristics. Finally, the selected candidates were subjected to a biological validation assay to assess inhibition of Dengue virus propagation in mammalian host cells using a plaque formation assay. Among the 10 compounds examined, rolitetracycline and doxycycline significantly inhibited plaque formation, demonstrating their inhibitory effect on dengue virus propagation. Both compounds were tetracycline derivatives with IC50s estimated to be 67.1 µM and 55.6 µM, respectively. Their docked conformations displayed common hydrophobic interactions with critical residues that affected membrane fusion during viral entry. These interactions will therefore position the tetracyclic ring moieties of both inhibitors to bind firmly to the target and, subsequently, disrupt conformational rearrangement and block viral entry. This process can be applied to other drug targets in which conformational rearrangement is critical to function.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0000428
PMCID: PMC1855430  PMID: 17502914
23.  Structure-based virtual screening of small-molecule antagonists of platelet integrin αIIbβ3 that do not prime the receptor to bind ligand 
Integrin αIIbβ3 has emerged as an important therapeutic target for thrombotic vascular diseases owing to its pivotal role in mediating platelet aggregation through interaction with adhesive ligands. In the search for effective anti-thrombotic agents that can be administered orally without inducing the high-affinity ligand binding state, we recently discovered via high-throughput screening of 33,264 compounds a novel, αIIbβ3-selective inhibitor (RUC-1) of adenosine-5′-diphosphate (ADP) -induced platelet aggregation that exhibits a different chemical scaffold and mode of binding with respect to classical Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-mimicking αIIbβ3 antagonists. Most importantly, RUC-1 and its higher-affinity derivative, RUC-2, do not induce major conformational changes in the protein β3 subunit or prime the receptor to bind ligand. To identify additional αIIbβ3-selective chemotypes that inhibit platelet aggregation through similar mechanisms, we screened in silico over 2.5 million commercially available, ‘lead-like’ small molecules based on complementarity to the predicted binding mode of RUC-2 into the RUC-1-αIIbβ3 crystal structure. This first reported structure-based virtual screening application to the αIIbβ3 integrin led to the identification of 2 αIIbβ3-selective antagonists out of 4 tested, which compares favorably with the 0.003 % “hit rate” of our previous high-throughput chemical screening study. The newly identified compounds, like RUC-1 and RUC-2, showed specificity for αIIbβ3 compared to αVβ3 and did not prime the receptor to bind ligand. They thus may hold promise as αIIbβ3 antagonist therapeutic scaffolds.
doi:10.1007/s10822-012-9594-6
PMCID: PMC3496400  PMID: 22893377
Integrins; Virtual screening; Anti-thrombotic agents; Platelet aggregation; Small molecules
24.  Exploration of Virtual Candidates for Human HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors Using Pharmacophore Modeling and Molecular Dynamics Simulations 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(12):e83496.
3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) is a rate-controlling enzyme in the mevalonate pathway which involved in biosynthesis of cholesterol and other isoprenoids. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonate and is regarded as a drug target to treat hypercholesterolemia. In this study, ten qualitative pharmacophore models were generated based on chemical features in active inhibitors of HMGR. The generated models were validated using a test set. In a validation process, the best hypothesis was selected based on the statistical parameters and used for virtual screening of chemical databases to find novel lead candidates. The screened compounds were sorted by applying drug-like properties. The compounds that satisfied all drug-like properties were used for molecular docking study to identify their binding conformations at active site of HMGR. The final hit compounds were selected based on docking score and binding orientation. The HMGR structures in complex with the hit compounds were subjected to 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations to refine the binding orientation as well as to check the stability of the hits. After simulation, binding modes including hydrogen bonding patterns and molecular interactions with the active site residues were analyzed. In conclusion, four hit compounds with new structural scaffold were suggested as novel and potent HMGR inhibitors.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0083496
PMCID: PMC3875450  PMID: 24386216
25.  AMMOS: Automated Molecular Mechanics Optimization tool for in silico Screening 
BMC Bioinformatics  2008;9:438.
Background
Virtual or in silico ligand screening combined with other computational methods is one of the most promising methods to search for new lead compounds, thereby greatly assisting the drug discovery process. Despite considerable progresses made in virtual screening methodologies, available computer programs do not easily address problems such as: structural optimization of compounds in a screening library, receptor flexibility/induced-fit, and accurate prediction of protein-ligand interactions. It has been shown that structural optimization of chemical compounds and that post-docking optimization in multi-step structure-based virtual screening approaches help to further improve the overall efficiency of the methods. To address some of these points, we developed the program AMMOS for refining both, the 3D structures of the small molecules present in chemical libraries and the predicted receptor-ligand complexes through allowing partial to full atom flexibility through molecular mechanics optimization.
Results
The program AMMOS carries out an automatic procedure that allows for the structural refinement of compound collections and energy minimization of protein-ligand complexes using the open source program AMMP. The performance of our package was evaluated by comparing the structures of small chemical entities minimized by AMMOS with those minimized with the Tripos and MMFF94s force fields. Next, AMMOS was used for full flexible minimization of protein-ligands complexes obtained from a mutli-step virtual screening. Enrichment studies of the selected pre-docked complexes containing 60% of the initially added inhibitors were carried out with or without final AMMOS minimization on two protein targets having different binding pocket properties. AMMOS was able to improve the enrichment after the pre-docking stage with 40 to 60% of the initially added active compounds found in the top 3% to 5% of the entire compound collection.
Conclusion
The open source AMMOS program can be helpful in a broad range of in silico drug design studies such as optimization of small molecules or energy minimization of pre-docked protein-ligand complexes. Our enrichment study suggests that AMMOS, designed to minimize a large number of ligands pre-docked in a protein target, can successfully be applied in a final post-processing step and that it can take into account some receptor flexibility within the binding site area.
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-9-438
PMCID: PMC2588602  PMID: 18925937

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