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1.  Genetic markers of bone and joint health and physical capability in older adults: the HALCyon programme 
Bone  2013;52(1):278-285.
Background
Good bone and joint health is essential for the physical tasks of daily living and poorer indicators of physical capability in older adults have been associated with increased mortality rates. Genetic variants of indicators of bone and joint health may be associated with measures of physical capability.
Methods
As part of the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course (HALCyon) programme, men and women aged between 52 and 90 + years from six UK cohorts were genotyped for a polymorphism associated with serum calcium (rs1801725, CASR), two polymorphisms associated with bone mineral density (BMD) (rs2941740, ESR1 and rs9594759, RANKL) and one associated with osteoarthritis risk rs3815148 (COG5). Meta-analysis was used to pool within-study effects of the associations between each of the polymorphisms and measures of physical capability: grip strength, timed walk or get up and go, chair rises and standing balance.
Results
Few important associations were observed among the several tests. We found that carriers of the serum calcium-raising allele had poorer grip strength compared with non-carriers (pooled p = 0.05, n = 11,239) after adjusting for age and sex. Inconsistent results were observed for the two variants associated with BMD and we found no evidence for an association between rs3815148 (COG5) and any of the physical capability measures.
Conclusion
Our findings suggest elevated serum calcium levels may lead to lower grip strength, though this requires further replication. Our results do not provide evidence for a substantial influence of these variants in ESR1, RANKL and COG5 on physical capability in older adults.
Highlights
► We examined associations between bone-related genotypes and physical capability. ► We conducted a meta-analysis on 12,836 middle-age adults. ► We found CASR may be associated with grip strength. ► No substantial support for specific bone mineral density variants and physical capability.
doi:10.1016/j.bone.2012.10.004
PMCID: PMC3526776  PMID: 23072920
BMD, bone mineral density; OA, osteoarthritis; BMI, body mass index; SNP, single nucleotide polymorphism; CaPS, Caerphilly Prospective Study; ELSA, English Longitudinal Study of Ageing; HAS, Hertfordshire Ageing Study; HCS, Hertfordshire Cohort Study; LBC1921, The Lothian Birth Cohort 1921; NSHD, National Survey of Health and Development; HWE, Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium; WHR, waist–hip ratio; GWAS, genome-wide association studies; Aging; Grip strength; Calcium; Bone mineral density; Osteoarthritis
2.  Associations between APOE and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol genotypes and cognitive and physical capability: the HALCyon programme 
Age  2014;36(4):9673.
The APOE ε2/3/4 genotype has been associated with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and Alzheimer disease. However, evidence for associations with measures of cognitive performance in adults without dementia has been mixed, as it is for physical performance. Associations may also be evident in other genotypes implicated in LDL-C levels. As part of the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course (HALCyon) collaborative research programme, genotypic information was obtained for APOE ε2/3/4, rs515135 (APOB), rs2228671 (LDLR) and rs629301 (SORT1) from eight cohorts of adults aged between 44 and 90 + years. We investigated associations with four measures of cognitive (word recall, phonemic fluency, semantic fluency and search speed) and physical capability (grip strength, get up and go/walk speed, timed chair rises and ability to balance) using meta-analyses. Overall, little evidence for associations between any of the genotypes and measures of cognitive capability was observed (e.g. pooled beta for APOE ε4 effect on semantic fluency z score = −0.02; 95 % CI = −0.05 to 0.02; p value = 0.3; n = 18,796). However, there was borderline evidence within studies that negative effects of APOE ε4 on nonverbal ability measures become more apparent with age. Few genotypic associations were observed with physical capability measures. The findings from our large investigation of middle-aged to older adults in the general population suggest that effects of APOE on cognitive capability are at most modest and are domain- and age-specific, while APOE has little influence on physical capability. In addition, other LDL-C-related genotypes have little impact on these traits.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11357-014-9673-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1007/s11357-014-9673-9
PMCID: PMC4150901  PMID: 25073452
Ageing; Apolipoprotein E; Cognition; Single nucleotide polymorphism
3.  Associations between a Polymorphism in the Pleiotropic GCKR and Age-Related Phenotypes: The HALCyon Programme 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(7):e70045.
Background
The glucokinase regulatory protein encoded by GCKR plays an important role in glucose metabolism and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1260326 (P446L) in the gene has been associated with several age-related biomarkers, including triglycerides, glucose, insulin and apolipoproteins. However, associations between SNPs in the gene and other ageing phenotypes such as cognitive and physical capability have not been reported.
Methods
As part of the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course (HALCyon) collaborative research programme, men and women from five UK cohorts aged between 44 and 90+ years were genotyped for rs1260326. Meta-analysis was used to pool within-study genotypic associations between the SNP and several age-related phenotypes, including body mass index (BMI), blood lipid levels, lung function, and cognitive and physical capability.
Results
We confirm the associations between the minor allele of the SNP and higher triglycerides and lower glucose levels. We also observed a triglyceride-independent association between the minor allele and lower BMI (pooled beta on z-score = −0.04, p-value = 0.0001, n = 16,251). Furthermore, there was some evidence for gene-environment interactions, including physical activity attenuating the effects on triglycerides. However, no associations were observed with measures of cognitive and physical capability.
Conclusion
Findings from middle-aged to older adults confirm associations between rs1260326 GCKR and triglycerides and glucose, suggest possible gene-environment interactions, but do not provide evidence that its relevance extends to cognitive and physical capability.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0070045
PMCID: PMC3720952  PMID: 23894584
4.  Absence of association of a SNP in the TERT-CLPTM1L locus with age-related phenotypes in a large multi-cohort study: the HALCyon program 
Aging cell  2011;10(3):520-532.
Summary
Background
Several age-related traits are associated with shorter telomeres, the structures that cap the end of linear chromosomes. A common polymorphism near the telomere maintenance gene TERT has been associated with several cancers, but relationships with other ageing traits such as physical capability have not been reported.
Methods
As part of the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course (HALCyon) collaborative research programme, men and women aged between 44 and 90 years from 9 UK cohorts were genotyped for the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs401681. We then investigated relationships between the SNP and 30 age-related phenotypes, including cognitive and physical capability, blood lipid levels and lung function, pooling within-study genotypic effects in meta-analyses.
Results
No significant associations were found between the SNP and any of the cognitive performance tests (e.g. pooled beta per T allele for word recall z-score=0.02, 95% CI: -0.01- 0.04, p-value=0.12, n=18,737), physical performance tests (e.g. pooled beta for grip strength=-0.02, 95% CI:-0.045- 0.006, p-value=0.14, n=11,711), blood pressure, lung function or blood test measures. Similarly, no differences in observations were found when considering follow-up measures of cognitive or physical performance after adjusting for its measure at an earlier assessment.
Conclusion
The lack of associations between SNP rs401681 and a wide range of age-related phenotypes investigated in this large multi-cohort study suggests that whilst this SNP may be associated with cancer, it is not an important contributor to other markers of ageing.
doi:10.1111/j.1474-9726.2011.00687.x
PMCID: PMC3094481  PMID: 21332924
Aging; ageing; middle-aged; telomere; cognition; physical
5.  Absence of association of a single-nucleotide polymorphism in the TERT-CLPTM1L locus with age-related phenotypes in a large multicohort study: the HALCyon programme 
Aging Cell  2011;10(3):520-532.
Several age-related traits are associated with shorter telomeres, the structures that cap the end of linear chromosomes. A common polymorphism near the telomere maintenance gene TERT has been associated with several cancers, but relationships with other aging traits such as physical capability have not been reported. As part of the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course (HALCyon) collaborative research programme, men and women aged between 44 and 90 years from nine UK cohorts were genotyped for the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs401681. We then investigated relationships between the SNP and 30 age-related phenotypes, including cognitive and physical capability, blood lipid levels and lung function, pooling within-study genotypic effects in meta-analyses. No significant associations were found between the SNP and any of the cognitive performance tests (e.g. pooled beta per T allele for word recall z-score = 0.02, 95% CI: −0.01 to 0.04, P-value = 0.12, n = 18 737), physical performance tests (e.g. pooled beta for grip strength = −0.02, 95% CI: −0.045 to 0.006, P-value = 0.14, n = 11 711), blood pressure, lung function or blood test measures. Similarly, no differences in observations were found when considering follow-up measures of cognitive or physical performance after adjusting for its measure at an earlier assessment. The lack of associations between SNP rs401681 and a wide range of age-related phenotypes investigated in this large multicohort study suggests that while this SNP may be associated with cancer, it is not an important contributor to other markers of aging.
doi:10.1111/j.1474-9726.2011.00687.x
PMCID: PMC3094481  PMID: 21332924
aging; cognition; middle-aged; physical; telomere
6.  Body Mass Index, Muscle Strength and Physical Performance in Older Adults from Eight Cohort Studies: The HALCyon Programme 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(2):e56483.
Objective
To investigate the associations of body mass index (BMI) and grip strength with objective measures of physical performance (chair rise time, walking speed and balance) including an assessment of sex differences and non-linearity.
Methods
Cross-sectional data from eight UK cohort studies (total N = 16 444) participating in the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course (HALCyon) research programme, ranging in age from 50 to 90+ years at the time of physical capability assessment, were used. Regression models were fitted within each study and meta-analysis methods used to pool regression coefficients across studies and to assess the extent of heterogeneity between studies.
Results
Higher BMI was associated with poorer performance on chair rise (N = 10 773), walking speed (N = 9 761) and standing balance (N = 13 921) tests. Higher BMI was associated with stronger grip strength in men only. Stronger grip strength was associated with better performance on all tests with a tendency for the associations to be stronger in women than men; for example, walking speed was higher by 0.43 cm/s (0.14, 0.71) more per kg in women than men. Both BMI and grip strength remained independently related with performance after mutual adjustment, but there was no evidence of effect modification. Both BMI and grip strength exhibited non-linear relations with performance; those in the lowest fifth of grip strength and highest fifth of BMI having particularly poor performance. Findings were similar when waist circumference was examined in place of BMI.
Conclusion
Older men and women with weak muscle strength and high BMI have considerably poorer performance than others and associations were observed even in the youngest cohort (age 53). Although causality cannot be inferred from observational cross-sectional studies, our findings suggest the likely benefit of early assessment and interventions to reduce fat mass and improve muscle strength in the prevention of future functional limitations.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0056483
PMCID: PMC3577921  PMID: 23437142
7.  Age and Gender Differences in Physical Capability Levels from Mid-Life Onwards: The Harmonisation and Meta-Analysis of Data from Eight UK Cohort Studies 
PLoS ONE  2011;6(11):e27899.
Using data from eight UK cohorts participating in the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course (HALCyon) research programme, with ages at physical capability assessment ranging from 50 to 90+ years, we harmonised data on objective measures of physical capability (i.e. grip strength, chair rising ability, walking speed, timed get up and go, and standing balance performance) and investigated the cross-sectional age and gender differences in these measures. Levels of physical capability were generally lower in study participants of older ages, and men performed better than women (for example, results from meta-analyses (N = 14,213 (5 studies)), found that men had 12.62 kg (11.34, 13.90) higher grip strength than women after adjustment for age and body size), although for walking speed, this gender difference was attenuated after adjustment for body size. There was also evidence that the gender difference in grip strength diminished with increasing age,whereas the gender difference in walking speed widened (p<0.01 for interactions between age and gender in both cases). This study highlights not only the presence of age and gender differences in objective measures of physical capability but provides a demonstration that harmonisation of data from several large cohort studies is possible. These harmonised data are now being used within HALCyon to understand the lifetime social and biological determinants of physical capability and its changes with age.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0027899
PMCID: PMC3218057  PMID: 22114723
8.  Recreational physical activity modifies the association between a common GH1 polymorphism and colorectal cancer risk 
Growth hormone may be associated with the development of colorectal cancer directly and/or indirectly via increased serum level of IGF-I. Regular physical activity can decrease insulin-resistance and modulates IGF-I production. A common polymorphism in the GH1 gene, rs2665802, was previously shown to be associated with lower IGF-I levels and decreased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. We investigated the association of this polymorphism and physical activity with colorectal cancer risk in a case-control study.
Methods
The analysis includes 3041 (1402 cases and 1639 controls) participants in the Molecular Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer study, a population-based case-control study in Northern Israel. Analysis was carried out separately in two sets. The first set included 1248 subjects (625 cases, 623 controls), and the second validation set consisted of 1793 subjects (777 cases, 1016 controls).
Results
No association was found between the studied polymorphism and CRC risk. However, evaluation of gene-environment interactions revealed an interaction between leisure time physical activity and the GH1 polymorphism, which was consistent in both sets(p-interaction=0.005). The genotype AA was associated with decreased risk of CRC among individuals who did not engage in any such activity; OR=0.76(0.52–0.98), whereas the same genotype was marginally associated with increased risk among individuals who reported physical activity; OR=1.38(0.98–1.94).
Conclusions
We found that the A allele of the rs2665802 polymorphism is associated with reduced risk of CRC only among physically inactive individuals, indicating an interaction between physical activity and the GH/IGF-I system. A replication of the observed findings and further investigation of the underlying mechanism is warranted.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-08-0062
PMCID: PMC2665206  PMID: 19064544
9.  ACTN3 genotype, athletic status and lifecourse physical capability: meta-analysis of the published literature and findings from nine studies 
Human mutation  2011;32(9):1008-1018.
The ACTN3 R577X (rs1815739) genotype has been associated with athletic status and muscle phenotypes, though not consistently. Our objective was to conduct a meta-analysis of the published literature on athletic status and investigate its associations with physical capability in several new population-based studies. Relevant data were extracted from studies in the literature, comparing genotype frequencies between controls and sprint/power and endurance athletes. For lifecourse physical capability, data were used from two studies of adolescents and seven studies in the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course (HALCyon) collaborative research programme, involving individuals aged between 53 and 90+ years. We found evidence from the published literature to support the hypothesis that in Europeans the RR genotype is more common among sprint/power athletes compared with their controls. There is currently no evidence that the X allele is advantageous to endurance athleticism. We found no association between R577X and grip strength (p-value=0.09, n=7672 in males; p-value=0.90, n=7839 in females), standing balance, timed get up and go or chair rises in our studies of physical capability. The ACTN3 R577X genotype is associated with sprint/power athletic status in Europeans, but does not appear to be associated with objective measures of physical capability in the general population.
doi:10.1002/humu.21526
PMCID: PMC3174315  PMID: 21542061
ACTN3; Actinin-3; athlete; aging; SNP; grip strength
10.  Genetic Variants Influencing Biomarkers of Nutrition Are Not Associated with Cognitive Capability in Middle-Aged and Older Adults123 
The Journal of Nutrition  2013;143(5):606-612.
Several investigations have observed positive associations between good nutritional status, as indicated by micronutrients, and cognitive measures; however, these associations may not be causal. Genetic polymorphisms that affect nutritional biomarkers may be useful for providing evidence for associations between micronutrients and cognitive measures. As part of the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course (HALCyon) program, men and women aged between 44 and 90 y from 6 UK cohorts were genotyped for polymorphisms associated with circulating concentrations of iron [rs4820268 transmembrane protease, serine 6 (TMPRSS6) and rs1800562 hemochromatosis (HFE)], vitamin B-12 [(rs492602 fucosyltransferase 2 (FUT2)], vitamin D ([rs2282679 group-specific component (GC)] and β-carotene ([rs6564851 beta-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase 1 (BCMO1)]. Meta-analysis was used to pool within-study effects of the associations between these polymorphisms and the following measures of cognitive capability: word recall, phonemic fluency, semantic fluency, and search speed. Among the several statistical tests conducted, we found little evidence for associations. We found the minor allele of rs1800562 was associated with poorer word recall scores [pooled β on Z-score for carriers vs. noncarriers: −0.05 (95% CI: −0.09, −0.004); P = 0.03, n = 14,105] and poorer word recall scores for the vitamin D–raising allele of rs2282679 [pooled β per T allele: −0.03 (95% CI: −0.05, −0.003); P = 0.03, n = 16,527]. However, there was no evidence for other associations. Our findings provide little evidence to support associations between these genotypes and cognitive capability in older adults. Further investigations are required to elucidate whether the previous positive associations from observational studies between circulating measures of these micronutrients and cognitive performance are due to confounding and reverse causality.
doi:10.3945/jn.112.171520
PMCID: PMC3738233  PMID: 23468552
11.  A polymorphism near IGF1 is associated with body composition and muscle function in women from the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study 
Previous studies have reported associations of polymorphisms in the IGF1 gene with phenotypes of body composition (BC). The purpose of this study was to identify phenotypes of BC and physical function that were associated with the IGF1 promoter polymorphism (rs35767, −C1245T). Subjects from the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study, white males and females (n = 925/836) and black males and females (533/705) aged 70–79 years were genotyped for the polymorphism. Phenotypes of muscle size and function, bone mineral density, and BC were analyzed for associations with this polymorphism. To validate and compare these findings, a cohort of young (mean age = 24.6, SD = 5.9) white men and women (n = 173/296) with similar phenotypic measurements were genotyped. An association with BC was identified in elderly females when significant covariates (physical activity, age, smoking status, body mass index) were included. White women with C/C genotype had 3% more trunk fat and 2% more total fat than those with C/T (P < 0.05). Black women with C/C genotype had 3% less total lean mass and 3% less muscle mass than their T/T counterparts (P < 0.05). Associations were identified with muscle strength in white women (P < 0.01) that were in agreement with the C/C genotype having lower muscle function. Thus, in an elderly population but not a young population, a polymorphism in the IGF1 gene may be predictive of differences in body composition, primarily in black females.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00421-010-1500-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1007/s00421-010-1500-0
PMCID: PMC2928925  PMID: 20490824
IGF1; Muscle; Body composition; Bone mineral density; Elderly; SNP
12.  Body size, IGF and growth hormone polymorphisms, and colorectal adenomas and hyperplastic polyps 
Objective
We examined the risk of colorectal polyps in relation to body size factors and candidate polymorphisms in selected genes of insulin-like growth factor (IGF1) (rs5742612), IGF1 receptor (IGF1R) (rs2229765), IGF binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) (rs2854746) and growth hormone (GH1) (rs2665802).
Design
Cases with colorectal adenomas (n=519), hyperplastic polyps (n=691), or both lesions (n=227), and controls (n=772), aged 20–74 years, were recruited from patients who underwent colonoscopy between December 2004 – September 2007 at a large integrated-health plan in Washington state. Subjects participated in a 45-minute telephone interview to ascertain body size and physical activity, and provided a buccal DNA sample for genetic analysis. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using multivariable polytomous regression.
Results
Compared to those of normal weight, higher body mass index (BMI) was associated with elevated risk of colorectal adenomas (OR=1.7, 95% CI 1.2–2.3 BMI≥30 kg/m2, p-trend=0.002) and both lesions (OR=2.2, 95% CI 1.4–3.2 BMI≥30 kg/m2, p-trend=0.003), but there was no relationship with hyperplastic polyps. Obesity at age 18 and a weight gain of ≥21 kg since age 18 were also significantly associated with an increased risk of colorectal adenomas and both lesions, but not hyperplastic polyps. There was a reduced risk of colorectal adenomas (OR=0.6, 95% CI 0.4–0.9) and hyperplastic polyps (OR=0.7, 95% CI 0.5–0.9) associated with the homozygous variant genotype for GH1. Few meaningful results were evident for the other polymorphisms.
Conclusions
There is an increased risk of colorectal adenomas and presence of both adenomas and hyperplastic polyps in relation to increasing body size. Some genetic variation in GH1 might contribute to a reduced risk of colorectal adenomas and hyperplastic polyps.
doi:10.1016/j.ghir.2010.04.001
PMCID: PMC2918710  PMID: 20580999
hyperplastic polyps; colorectal adenomas; insulin-like growth factor (IGF); growth hormone (GH1); body mass index
13.  Genetic and Dietary Determinants of Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF)-1 and IGF Binding Protein (BP)-3 Levels among Chinese Women 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(10):e108934.
Background
Higher insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 and lower IGF binding protein (BP)-3 levels have been associated with higher commoncancer risk, including breast cancer. Dietary factors, genetic polymorphisms, and the combination of both may influence circulating IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 serum concentrations.
Methods
From September 2011 to July 2012, we collected demographic, reproductive and dietary data on 143 women (≥40 years). We genotyped IGF-1 rs1520220 and IGFBP-3 rs2854744 and measured circulating IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels in serum. Covariance analyses were used to estimate the associations of serum levels of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3, and the molar ratio of IGF-1to IGFBP-3 with IGF-1 rs1520220 and IGFBP-3 rs2854744 genotypes. We subsequently assessed the combined influence of genetics and diet (daily intake of protein, fat and soy isoflavones) on IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels.
Results
Among women aged less than 50 years, circulating IGF-1 serum levels were significantly lower for those with CC genotype for IGF-1 rs1520220 than levels for those with the GC or GG genotypes (in recessive model: P = 0.007).In gene-diet analyses among these women, we found carrying CC genotype for IGF-1 rs1520220 and high soy isoflavone intake tend to be associated with lower circulating IGF-1 levels synthetically (P = 0.002). Women with GG or GC genotypes for IGF-1 rs1520220 and with low intake of soy isoflavones had the highest levels of circulating IGF-1 (geometric mean [95% CI]: 195 [37, 1021] µg/L). Comparatively, women with both the CC genotype and high soy intake had the lowest levels of circulating IGF-1 (geometric mean [95% CI]: 120 [38,378] µg/L).
Conclusions
IGF-1 serum levels are significantly lower among women with the CC genotype for IGF-1-rs1520220. High soy isoflavone intake may interact with carrying CC genotype for IGF-1-rs1520220 to lower women's serum IGF-1 levels more.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0108934
PMCID: PMC4186782  PMID: 25285521
14.  ACTN3 Genotype, Athletic Status, and Life Course Physical Capability: Meta-Analysis of the Published Literature and Findings from Nine Studies 
Human Mutation  2011;32(9):1008-1018.
The ACTN3 R577X (rs1815739) genotype has been associated with athletic status and muscle phenotypes, although not consistently. Our objective was to conduct a meta-analysis of the published literature on athletic status and investigate its associations with physical capability in several new population-based studies. Relevant data were extracted from studies in the literature, comparing genotype frequencies between controls and sprint/power and endurance athletes. For life course physical capability, data were used from two studies of adolescents and seven studies in the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course (HALCyon) collaborative research program, involving individuals aged between 53 and 90+ years. We found evidence from the published literature to support the hypothesis that in Europeans the RR genotype is more common among sprint/power athletes compared with their controls. There is currently no evidence that the X allele is advantageous to endurance athleticism. We found no association between R577X and grip strength (P = 0.09, n = 7,672 in males; P = 0.90, n = 7,839 in females), standing balance, timed get up and go, or chair rises in our studies of physical capability. The ACTN3 R577X genotype is associated with sprint/power athletic status in Europeans, but does not appear to be associated with objective measures of physical capability in the general population. Hum Mutat 32:1–11, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
doi:10.1002/humu.21526
PMCID: PMC3174315  PMID: 21542061
ACTN3; Actinin-3; athlete; aging; SNP; grip strength
15.  Associations of Insulin and Insulin-Like Growth Factors with Physical Performance in Old Age in the Boyd Orr and Caerphilly Studies 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(1):e30096.
Objective
Insulin and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system regulate growth and are involved in determining muscle mass, strength and body composition. We hypothesised that IGF-I and IGF-II are associated with improved, and insulin with worse, physical performance in old age.
Methods
Physical performance was measured using the get-up and go timed walk and flamingo balance test at 63–86 years. We examined prospective associations of insulin, IGF-I, IGF-II and IGFBP-3 with physical performance in the UK-based Caerphilly Prospective Study (CaPS; n = 739 men); and cross-sectional insulin, IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 in the Boyd Orr cohort (n = 182 men, 223 women).
Results
In confounder-adjusted models, there was some evidence in CaPS that a standard deviation (SD) increase in IGF-I was associated with 1.5% faster get-up and go test times (95% CI: −0.2%, 3.2%; p = 0.08), but little association with poor balance, 19 years later. Coefficients in Boyd Orr were in the same direction as CaPS, but consistent with chance. Higher levels of insulin were weakly associated with worse physical performance (CaPS and Boyd Orr combined: get-up and go time = 1.3% slower per SD log-transformed insulin; 95% CI: 0.0%, 2.7%; p = 0.07; OR poor balance 1.13; 95% CI; 0.98, 1.29; p = 0.08), although associations were attenuated after controlling for body mass index (BMI) and co-morbidities. In Boyd Orr, a one SD increase in IGFBP-2 was associated with 2.6% slower get-up and go times (95% CI: 0.4%, 4.8% slower; p = 0.02), but this was only seen when controlling for BMI and co-morbidities. There was no consistent evidence of associations of IGF-II, or IGFBP-3 with physical performance.
Conclusions
There was some evidence that high IGF-I and low insulin levels in middle-age were associated with improved physical performance in old age, but estimates were imprecise. Larger cohorts are required to confirm or refute the findings.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0030096
PMCID: PMC3254635  PMID: 22253890
16.  A comprehensive analysis of common IGF1, IGFBP1 and IGFBP3 genetic variation with prospective IGF-I and IGFBP-3 blood levels and prostate cancer risk among Caucasians† 
Human Molecular Genetics  2010;19(15):3089-3101.
The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) pathway has been implicated in prostate development and carcinogenesis. We conducted a comprehensive analysis, utilizing a resequencing and tagging single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) approach, between common genetic variation in the IGF1, IGF binding protein (BP) 1, and IGFBP3 genes with IGF-I and IGFBP-3 blood levels, and prostate cancer (PCa) risk, among Caucasians in the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium. We genotyped 14 IGF1 SNPs and 16 IGFBP1/IGFBP3 SNPs to capture common [minor allele frequency (MAF) ≥ 5%] variation among Caucasians. For each SNP, we assessed the geometric mean difference in IGF blood levels (N = 5684) across genotypes and the association with PCa risk (6012 PCa cases/6641 controls). We present two-sided statistical tests and correct for multiple comparisons. A non-synonymous IGFBP3 SNP in exon 1, rs2854746 (Gly32Ala), was associated with IGFBP-3 blood levels (Padj = 8.8 × 10−43) after adjusting for the previously established IGFBP3 promoter polymorphism A-202C (rs2854744); IGFBP-3 blood levels were 6.3% higher for each minor allele. For IGF1 SNP rs4764695, the risk estimates among heterozygotes was 1.01 (99% CI: 0.90–1.14) and 1.20 (99% CI: 1.06–1.37) for variant homozygotes with overall PCa risk. The corrected allelic P-value was 8.7 × 10−3. IGF-I levels were significantly associated with PCa risk (Ptrend = 0.02) with a 21% increase of PCa risk when compared with the highest quartile to the lowest quartile. We have identified SNPs significantly associated with IGFBP-3 blood levels, but none of these alter PCa risk; however, a novel IGF1 SNP, not associated with IGF-I blood levels, shows preliminary evidence for association with PCa risk among Caucasians.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddq210
PMCID: PMC2901143  PMID: 20484221
17.  Are Elevated Levels of IGF-1 Caused by Coronary Arteriesoclerosis?: Molecular and Clinical Analysis 
The Protein Journal  2010;29(8):538-544.
The importance of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in coronary artery disease (CAD) due to wide range of its biological effects and its therapeutic potential, has already been described. Our aim was to evaluate possible influence of IGF-1 serum level changes on coronary atherosclerosis. In case of existence of such association our further aim was to verify and explain this phenomenon by examination of promoter P1 of IGF-1gene and receptor gene for IGF-1. The study was performed in 101 consecutive patients undergo for routine coronary angiography. Quantitative and qualitative assessment of coronary atherosclerosis was performed respectively by estimation of the number of culprit lesions in coronary arteries and by Gensini score calculation. IGF-1, IGFBP3 and plasma lipoproteins were measured in all patients. In addition, we evaluated DNA from 101 patients, isolated from blood cells, which was amplified by using PCR with sophisticated primers for P1 promoter of IGF-1 gene and IGF-1 receptor gene, then analyzed utilizing SSCP technique and automatically sequenced. We observed significant increase of serum IGF-1 levels in patients with “3 vessel disease” and with high score in Gensini scale when compared to those without any narrowing lesions in coronary arteries and 0 Gensini score (in group with 3 vessel disease 215.0 ± 71.3 versuss 176.7 ± 34.2 ng/ml p = 0.04 and with high Gensini score 231.4 ± 59.3 versus 181.0 ± 37.8 ng/ml p = 0.01).We found different genotypes for five P1 promoter polymorphisms of IGF-1 gene (RS35767, RS5742612, RS228837, RS11829693, RS17879774). There were no significant associations between the observed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and coronary atherosclerosis nor with levels of circulating IGF-1. We found no structural polymorphism in receptor gene for IGF-1 nor in its extracellular domain(exon 2–4) nor in internal domain (exon 16–21). The effect of increased IGF-1 serum level in our study was probably independent from structural polymorphism in promoter P1 for IGF-1 or in receptor gene for IGF-1.
doi:10.1007/s10930-010-9288-7
PMCID: PMC2992669  PMID: 21046444
IGF-1; Promoter P1 polymorphism; Growth hormones; CAD
18.  The Association between IGF-1 Polymorphisms, IGF-1 Serum Levels, and Cognitive Functions in Healthy Adults: The Amsterdam Growth and Health Longitudinal Study 
Several studies have demonstrated an association between polymorphisms in the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) gene and IGF-1 serum levels. IGF-1 levels have been associated with cognitive functioning in older persons and growth hormone deficient patients. The present study investigates whether IGF-1 polymorphisms, IGF-1 levels, and cognition are interconnected in healthy adults. Data of 277 participants (mean age: 42.4 years) of the Amsterdam Growth and Health Longitudinal Study on IGF-1 promoter polymorphisms, IGF-1 serum level, spatial working memory (SWM), paired associate learning (PAL), and IQ tests were analyzed. (M)ANOVAs were applied to confirm the associations between IGF-1 polymorphisms and IGF-1 levels and between IGF-1 levels and cognition. Three groups were distinguished based on specific IGF-1 polymorphism alleles: a homozygote 192 bp/192 bp genotype, a heterozygote 192 bp/x genotype, and a noncarrier x/x genotype. Although different IGF-1 levels were found for the three genotypes, performance on all cognitive tasks and IQ measures was similar. Despite the associations between IGF-1 polymorphisms and IGF-1 levels, no association was found between cognition and IGF-1 levels. It seems that IGF-1 does not play a role in the cognitive performance of healthy middle-aged adults. Possible, IGF-1 fulfills a more developmental and protective role in cognition which becomes apparent during childhood, old-age, or disease.
doi:10.1155/2014/181327
PMCID: PMC4120488  PMID: 25114679
19.  IGF-I and IGFBP-3 polymorphisms in relation to circulating levels among African American and Caucasian women 
Circulating insulin-like growth factor-one (IGF-I) and IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) levels have been associated with common diseases. Although family-based studies suggest that genetic variation contributes to circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels, analyses of associations with multiple IGF-I and IGFBP-3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been limited, especially among African Americans. We evaluated 30 IGF-I and 15 IGFBP-3 SNPs and estimated diplotypes in association with plasma IGF-I and IGFBP-3 among 984 premenopausal African American and Caucasian women. In both races, IGFBP-3 rs2854746 (Ala32Gly) was positively associated with plasma IGFBP-3 (CC versus GG mean difference among Caucasians = 631 ng/ml, 95% confidence interval: 398, 864; African Americans = 897 ng/ml, 95% confidence interval: 656, 1138), and IGFBP-3 diplotypes with the rs2854746 GG genotype had lower mean IGFBP-3 levels than referent diplotypes with the CG genotype, while IGFBP-3 diplotypes with the CC genotype had higher mean IGFBP-3 levels. IGFBP-3 rs2854744 (−202 A/C) was in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs2854746 in Caucasians only, but was associated with plasma IGFBP-3 in both races. Eight additional IGFBP-3 SNPs were associated with 5% or greater differences in mean IGFBP-3 levels, with generally consistent associations between races. Twelve IGF-I SNPs were associated with 10% or greater differences in mean IGF-I levels, but associations were generally discordant between races. Diplotype associations with plasma IGF-I did not parallel IGF-I SNP associations. Our study supports that common IGFBP-3 SNPs, especially rs2854746, influence plasma IGFBP-3 levels among African Americans and Caucasians, but provides less evidence that IGF-I SNPs affect plasma IGF-I levels.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-08-0856
PMCID: PMC2896274  PMID: 19240240
insulin-like growth factor I; insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3; genetic polymorphisms; women; African Americans
20.  Associations between Genetic Polymorphisms of Insulin-like Growth Factor Axis Genes and Risk for Age-Related Macular Degeneration 
This paper provides the first epidemiological evidence that IGF axis genes may be involved in the pathogenesis of advanced AMD and that IGF1R may predispose obese people to higher risk.
Purpose.
To investigate whether insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis genes, together with a novel dietary risk factor, the dietary glycemic index (dGI), and body mass index (BMI) affect the risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD).
Methods.
This case–control study involved 962 subjects originally recruited through the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) Genetic Repository. After those with missing covariates or invalid calorie intake (n = 23), diabetes (n = 59), and non-Caucasian race (n = 16) were excluded, 864 participants were used, including 209 AREDS category 1 participants (control group), 354 category 2 or 3 participants (drusen group), and 301 category 4 participants (advanced AMD group). A total of 25 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected from IGF-1 (n = 9), IGF-2 (n = 1), IGF binding protein 1 (IGFBP1; n = 3), IGFBP3 (n = 3), acid-labile subunit of IGFBP (IGFALS; n = 2), IGF1 receptor (IGF1R; n = 4), and IGF2R (n = 3) were genotyped. SNP-AMD associations were measured with genotype, allele χ2 tests and Armitage's trend test. Odds ratios (OR), 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and SNP-exposure interactions were evaluated by multivariate logistic regression.
Results.
One SNP (rs2872060) in IGF1R revealed a significant association with advanced AMD (P-allele = 0.0009, P-trend = 0.0008; the significance level was set at 0.05/25 = 0.002 for multiple comparisons). The risk allele (G) in the heterozygous and homozygous states (OR, 1.67 and 2.93; 95% CI, 1.03–2.71 and 1.60–5.36, respectively) suggests susceptibility and an additive effect on AMD risk. Further stratification analysis remained significant for both neovascularization (OR, 1.49 and 2.61; 95% CI, 0.90–2.48 and 1.39–4.90, respectively) and geographic atrophy (OR, 2.57 and 4.52; 95% CI, 0.99–6.71 and 1.49–13.74, respectively). The G allele interaction analysis with BMI was significant for neovascularization (P = 0.042) but not for geographic atrophy (P = 0.47). No significant interaction was found with dGI.
Conclusions.
These data suggest a role of IGF1R on the risk for advanced AMD in this group of subjects.
doi:10.1167/iovs.11-7782
PMCID: PMC3231967  PMID: 22058336
21.  A Fasting Insulin–Raising Allele at IGF1 Locus Is Associated with Circulating Levels of IGF-1 and Insulin Sensitivity 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(12):e85483.
Background
A meta-analysis of genome-wide data reported the discovery of the rs35767 polymorphism near IGF1 with genome-wide significant association with fasting insulin levels. However, it is unclear whether the effects of this polymorphism on fasting insulin are mediated by a reduced insulin sensitivity or impaired insulin clearance. We investigated the effects of the rs35767 polymorphism on circulating IGF-1 levels, insulin sensitivity, and insulin clearance.
Methodology/Principal Findings
Two samples of adult nondiabetic white Europeans were studied. In sample 1 (n=569), IGF-1 levels were lower in GG genotype carriers compared with A allele carriers (190±77 vs. 218±97 ng/ml, respectively; P=0.007 after adjusting for age, gender, and BMI). Insulin sensitivity assessed by euglycaemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp was lower in GG genotype carriers compared with A allele carriers (8.9±4.1 vs. 10.1±5.1 mg x Kg-1 free fat mass x min-1, respectively; P=0.03 after adjusting for age, gender, and BMI). The rs35767 polymorphism did not show significant association with insulin clearance. In sample 2 (n=859), IGF-1 levels were lower in GG genotype carriers compared with A allele carriers (155±60 vs. 164±63 ng/ml, respectively; P=0.02 after adjusting for age, gender, and BMI). Insulin sensitivity, as estimated by the HOMA index, was lower in GG genotype carriers compared with A allele carriers (2.8±2.2 vs. 2.5±1.3, respectively; P=0.03 after adjusting for age, gender, and BMI).
Conclusion/Significance
The rs35767 polymorphism near IGF1 was associated with circulating IGF-1 levels, and insulin sensitivity with carriers of the GG genotype exhibiting lower IGF-1 concentrations and insulin sensitivity as compared with subjects carrying the A allele.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0085483
PMCID: PMC3877361  PMID: 24392014
22.  IGF1, IGFBP1 and IGFBP3 genes and mammographic density: The Multiethnic Cohort 
Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) has mitogenic properties and stimulates cell growth. In this analysis, we investigated the relation between common genetic variation in IGF1, IGFBP1, and IGFBP3 and mammographic density among 819 women of Hawaiian, European and Japanese ancestry from the Multiethnic Cohort Study. Mammographic density was assessed using a quantitative computer-assisted method. Previously identified tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for IGF1 (26 tag SNPs) and IGFBP1/IGFBP3 (22 tag SNPs) were genotyped among the 819 women. Mixed models were conducted to evaluate the associations between genetic variation and mammographic density. Two SNPs were borderline statistical significantly associated with mammographic density; rs35539615 on IGFBP1 (p=0.05) and rs2453839 on IGFBP3 (p=0.01). Rs35767on IGF1 (p=0.03) was also associated with mammographic density, although in opposite direction of what was expected from previous findings with IGF-I levels. The majority of SNPs were, however, not associated with mammographic density. Analyses stratified by ethnicity showed similar results as the overall analyses for IGF1 and IGFBP1. However, for four SNPs in the IGFBP3 gene, the minor allele was associated with lower mammographic density in Japanese Americans and higher mammographic density in Caucasians. Given the large number of SNPs tested and the few borderline significant results, we only found weak evidence that genetic variations in IGFBP1 or IGFBP3 may be related to mammographic density. Ethnicity may modify these relations.
doi:10.1002/ijc.25142
PMCID: PMC2925500  PMID: 20039319
Breast cancer; Mammographic density; Multiethnic cohort; SNP; IGF-I
23.  The polymorphism of Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is related to osteoporosis and bone mineral density in postmenopausal population 
Objective: It has been shown that Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) may be related with bone mineral density (BMD) or osteoporosis. But there are few evidences on the role of genetic variation of IGF-1 on the BMD or osteoporosis. We observed the relationship between polymorphisms of IGF-1(rs35767, rs2288377 and rs5742612) with osteoporosis and BMD in the postmenopausal female population in our study.
Methods: A total of 216 postmenopausal women with a primary diagnosis of osteoporosis and 220 normal healthy women were included in the study. Genomic DNA of IGF-1 rs35767, rs2288377 and rs5742612 was extracted from the whole blood using QIAamp blood DNA mini kits (QIAGEN, Hilden, Germany) according to the methods recommended by the manufacturer.
Results: We found that T allele of rs35767 had higher increased risk of osteoporosis (OR=1.34, 95%CI=1.0-1.81). Those carrying T allele of rs35767 had a significant lower BMD at L1–L4 vertebrae, femoral neck, total hip and trochanter when compared with those carrying C allele (P < 0.05). In addition, the BMD of L1–L4 vertebrae, femoral neck, total hip and trochanter decreased by 2.09%, 3.74%, 3.52% and 2.54% in women carrying T alleles compared with those carrying C alleles.
Conclusion: Our study suggests that polymorphism in IGF-I rs35767 was significantly associated with BMD and osteoporosis in postmenopausal female population, and polymorphism of rs35767 could be a marker for lower BMD and risk of osteoporosis.
doi:10.12669/pjms.301.4264
PMCID: PMC3955557  PMID: 24639846
Bone mineral density; Insulin-like growth factor-I; Osteoporosis; Polymorphism
24.  Genetic Variation and Circulating Levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 in Relation to Risk of Proliferative Benign Breast Disease 
Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and its major binding protein IGFBP-3 have been implicated in breast carcinogenesis. We examined the associations between genetic variants and circulating levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 with proliferative benign breast disease (BBD), a marker of increased breast cancer risk, in the Nurses’ Health Study II (NHSII). Participants were 359 pathology-confirmed proliferative BBD cases and 359 matched controls. Circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels were measured in blood samples collected between 1996 and 1999. Thirty single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in IGF-I, IGFBP-1, and IGFBP-3 genes were selected using a haplotype tagging approach and genotyped in cases and controls. Circulating IGF-I levels were not associated with proliferative BBD risk. Higher circulating IGFBP-3 levels were significantly associated with increased risk of proliferative BBD (highest vs. lowest quartile odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (CI)), 1.70 (1.06–2.72); p-trend = 0.03). The minor alleles of two IGFBP-3 SNPs were associated with lower proliferative BBD risk (homozygous variant vs. homozygous wild-type OR (95% CI): rs3110697: 0.6 (0.4–0.9), p-trend = 0.02; rs2132570: 0.2 (0.1–0.6), p-trend = 0.02). Three other IGFBP-3 SNPs (rs2854744, rs2960436, and rs2854746) were significantly associated with circulating IGFBP-3 levels (p < 0.01). Although these SNPs were not significantly associated with proliferative BBD risk, there was suggestive evidence that the alleles associated with higher circulating IGFBP-3 levels were also associated with higher risk of proliferative BBD. These results suggest that genetic variants and circulating levels of IGFBP-3 may play a role in the early stage of breast carcinogenesis.
doi:10.1002/ijc.24674
PMCID: PMC2783930  PMID: 19551864
IGF-I; IGFBP-3; Circulating levels; Genetic Variation; Proliferative BBD
25.  A polymorphism in the insulin-like growth factor 1 gene is associated with postpartum resumption of ovarian cyclicity in Holstein-Friesian cows under grazing conditions 
Background
Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) gene is considered as a promising candidate for the identification of polymorphisms affecting cattle performance. The objectives of the current study were to determine the association of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) IGF-1/SnaBI with fertility, milk production and body condition traits in Holstein-Friesian dairy cows under grazing conditions.
Methods
Seventy multiparous cows from a commercial herd were genotyped for the SNP IGF-1/SnaBI. Fertility measures evaluated were: interval to commencement of luteal activity (CLA), calving to first service (CFS) and calving to conception (CC) intervals. Milk production and body condition score were also evaluated. The study period extended from 3 wk before calving to the fourth month of lactation.
Results and discussion
Frequencies of the SNP IGF-1/SnaBI alleles A and B were 0.59 and 0.41, respectively. Genotype frequencies were 0.31, 0.54 and 0.14 for AA, AB and BB, respectively. Cows with the AA genotype presented an early CLA and were more likely to resume ovarian cyclicity in the early postpartum than AB and BB ones. No effect of the SNP IGF-1/SnaBI genotype was evidenced on body condition change over the experimental period, suggesting that energy balance is not responsible for the outcome of postpartum ovarian resumption in this study. Traditional fertility measures were not affected by the SNP IGF-1/SnaBI.
Conclusion
To our knowledge this is the first report describing an association of the SNP IGF-1/SnaBI with an endocrine fertility measure like CLA in cattle. Results herein remark the important role of the IGF-1gene in the fertility of dairy cows on early lactation and make the SNP IGF-1/SnaBI an interesting candidate marker for genetic improvement of fertility in dairy cattle.
doi:10.1186/1751-0147-55-11
PMCID: PMC3599257  PMID: 23409757
IGF-1; Polymorphism; Commencement of luteal activity; Cattle

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