PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-25 (485443)

Clipboard (0)
None

Related Articles

1.  SciMiner: web-based literature mining tool for target identification and functional enrichment analysis 
Bioinformatics  2009;25(6):838-840.
Summary:SciMiner is a web-based literature mining and functional analysis tool that identifies genes and proteins using a context specific analysis of MEDLINE abstracts and full texts. SciMiner accepts a free text query (PubMed Entrez search) or a list of PubMed identifiers as input. SciMiner uses both regular expression patterns and dictionaries of gene symbols and names compiled from multiple sources. Ambiguous acronyms are resolved by a scoring scheme based on the co-occurrence of acronyms and corresponding description terms, which incorporates optional user-defined filters. Functional enrichment analyses are used to identify highly relevant targets (genes and proteins), GO (Gene Ontology) terms, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) terms, pathways and protein–protein interaction networks by comparing identified targets from one search result with those from other searches or to the full HGNC [HUGO (Human Genome Organization) Gene Nomenclature Committee] gene set. The performance of gene/protein name identification was evaluated using the BioCreAtIvE (Critical Assessment of Information Extraction systems in Biology) version 2 (Year 2006) Gene Normalization Task as a gold standard. SciMiner achieved 87.1% recall, 71.3% precision and 75.8% F-measure. SciMiner's literature mining performance coupled with functional enrichment analyses provides an efficient platform for retrieval and summary of rich biological information from corpora of users' interests.
Availability: http://jdrf.neurology.med.umich.edu/SciMiner/. A server version of the SciMiner is also available for download and enables users to utilize their institution's journal subscriptions.
Contact: juhur@umich.edu
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btp049
PMCID: PMC2654801  PMID: 19188191
2.  Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information 
Nucleic Acids Research  2005;34(Database issue):D173-D180.
In addition to maintaining the GenBank(R) nucleic acid sequence database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides analysis and retrieval resources for the data in GenBank and other biological data made available through NCBI's Web site. NCBI resources include Entrez, the Entrez Programming Utilities, MyNCBI, PubMed, PubMed Central, Entrez Gene, the NCBI Taxonomy Browser, BLAST, BLAST Link (BLink), Electronic PCR, OrfFinder, Spidey, Splign, RefSeq, UniGene, HomoloGene, ProtEST, dbMHC, dbSNP, Cancer Chromosomes, Entrez Genomes and related tools, the Map Viewer, Model Maker, Evidence Viewer, Clusters of Orthologous Groups, Retroviral Genotyping Tools, HIV-1, Human Protein Interaction Database, SAGEmap, Gene Expression Omnibus, Entrez Probe, GENSAT, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals, the Molecular Modeling Database, the Conserved Domain Database, the Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool and the PubChem suite of small molecule databases. Augmenting many of the Web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized datasets. All of the resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at: .
doi:10.1093/nar/gkj158
PMCID: PMC1347520  PMID: 16381840
3.  Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information 
Nucleic Acids Research  2006;35(Database issue):D5-D12.
In addition to maintaining the GenBank® nucleic acid sequence database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides analysis and retrieval resources for the data in GenBank and other biological data made available through NCBI's Web site. NCBI resources include Entrez, the Entrez Programming Utilities, My NCBI, PubMed, PubMed Central, Entrez Gene, the NCBI Taxonomy Browser, BLAST, BLAST Link(BLink), Electronic PCR, OrfFinder, Spidey, Splign, RefSeq, UniGene, HomoloGene, ProtEST, dbMHC, dbSNP, Cancer Chromosomes, Entrez Genome, Genome Project and related tools, the Trace and Assembly Archives, the Map Viewer, Model Maker, Evidence Viewer, Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs), Viral Genotyping Tools, Influenza Viral Resources, HIV-1/Human Protein Interaction Database, Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), Entrez Probe, GENSAT, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals (OMIA), the Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB), the Conserved Domain Database (CDD), the Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool (CDART) and the PubChem suite of small molecule databases. Augmenting many of the Web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. These resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at .
doi:10.1093/nar/gkl1031
PMCID: PMC1781113  PMID: 17170002
4.  Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information 
Nucleic Acids Research  2007;36(Database issue):D13-D21.
In addition to maintaining the GenBank(R) nucleic acid sequence database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides analysis and retrieval resources for the data in GenBank and other biological data available through NCBI's web site. NCBI resources include Entrez, the Entrez Programming Utilities, My NCBI, PubMed, PubMed Central, Entrez Gene, the NCBI Taxonomy Browser, BLAST, BLAST Link, Electronic PCR, OrfFinder, Spidey, Splign, RefSeq, UniGene, HomoloGene, ProtEST, dbMHC, dbSNP, Cancer Chromosomes, Entrez Genome, Genome Project and related tools, the Trace, Assembly, and Short Read Archives, the Map Viewer, Model Maker, Evidence Viewer, Clusters of Orthologous Groups, Influenza Viral Resources, HIV-1/Human Protein Interaction Database, Gene Expression Omnibus, Entrez Probe, GENSAT, Database of Genotype and Phenotype, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals, the Molecular Modeling Database, the Conserved Domain Database, the Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool and the PubChem suite of small molecule databases. Augmenting the web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. These resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkm1000
PMCID: PMC2238880  PMID: 18045790
5.  Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information 
Nucleic Acids Research  2008;37(Database issue):D5-D15.
In addition to maintaining the GenBank® nucleic acid sequence database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides analysis and retrieval resources for the data in GenBank and other biological data made available through the NCBI web site. NCBI resources include Entrez, the Entrez Programming Utilities, MyNCBI, PubMed, PubMed Central, Entrez Gene, the NCBI Taxonomy Browser, BLAST, BLAST Link (BLink), Electronic PCR, OrfFinder, Spidey, Splign, RefSeq, UniGene, HomoloGene, ProtEST, dbMHC, dbSNP, Cancer Chromosomes, Entrez Genomes and related tools, the Map Viewer, Model Maker, Evidence Viewer, Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs), Retroviral Genotyping Tools, HIV-1/Human Protein Interaction Database, Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), Entrez Probe, GENSAT, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals (OMIA), the Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB), the Conserved Domain Database (CDD), the Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool (CDART) and the PubChem suite of small molecule databases. Augmenting many of the web applications is custom implementation of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. All of the resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkn741
PMCID: PMC2686545  PMID: 18940862
6.  Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information 
Nucleic Acids Research  2009;38(Database issue):D5-D16.
In addition to maintaining the GenBank® nucleic acid sequence database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides analysis and retrieval resources for the data in GenBank and other biological data made available through the NCBI web site. NCBI resources include Entrez, the Entrez Programming Utilities, MyNCBI, PubMed, PubMed Central, Entrez Gene, the NCBI Taxonomy Browser, BLAST, BLAST Link (BLink), Electronic PCR, OrfFinder, Spidey, Splign, Reference Sequence, UniGene, HomoloGene, ProtEST, dbMHC, dbSNP, Cancer Chromosomes, Entrez Genomes and related tools, the Map Viewer, Model Maker, Evidence Viewer, Trace Archive, Sequence Read Archive, Retroviral Genotyping Tools, HIV-1/Human Protein Interaction Database, Gene Expression Omnibus, Entrez Probe, GENSAT, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals, the Molecular Modeling Database, the Conserved Domain Database, the Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool, Biosystems, Peptidome, Protein Clusters and the PubChem suite of small molecule databases. Augmenting many of the web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. All these resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkp967
PMCID: PMC2808881  PMID: 19910364
7.  Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information 
Nucleic Acids Research  2013;42(D1):D7-D17.
In addition to maintaining the GenBank® nucleic acid sequence database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) provides analysis and retrieval resources for the data in GenBank and other biological data made available through the NCBI Web site. NCBI resources include Entrez, the Entrez Programming Utilities, MyNCBI, PubMed, PubMed Central, PubReader, Gene, the NCBI Taxonomy Browser, BLAST, BLAST Link, Primer-BLAST, COBALT, RefSeq, UniGene, HomoloGene, ProtEST, dbMHC, dbSNP, dbVar, Epigenomics, the Genetic Testing Registry, Genome and related tools, the Map Viewer, Trace Archive, Sequence Read Archive, BioProject, BioSample, ClinVar, MedGen, HIV-1/Human Protein Interaction Database, Gene Expression Omnibus, Probe, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals, the Molecular Modeling Database, the Conserved Domain Database, the Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool, Biosystems, Protein Clusters and the PubChem suite of small molecule databases. Augmenting many of the Web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. All these resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkt1146
PMCID: PMC3965057  PMID: 24259429
8.  Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information 
Nucleic Acids Research  2010;39(Database issue):D38-D51.
In addition to maintaining the GenBank® nucleic acid sequence database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides analysis and retrieval resources for the data in GenBank and other biological data made available through the NCBI Web site. NCBI resources include Entrez, the Entrez Programming Utilities, MyNCBI, PubMed, PubMed Central (PMC), Entrez Gene, the NCBI Taxonomy Browser, BLAST, BLAST Link (BLink), Primer-BLAST, COBALT, Electronic PCR, OrfFinder, Splign, ProSplign, RefSeq, UniGene, HomoloGene, ProtEST, dbMHC, dbSNP, dbVar, Epigenomics, Cancer Chromosomes, Entrez Genomes and related tools, the Map Viewer, Model Maker, Evidence Viewer, Trace Archive, Sequence Read Archive, Retroviral Genotyping Tools, HIV-1/Human Protein Interaction Database, Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), Entrez Probe, GENSAT, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals (OMIA), the Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB), the Conserved Domain Database (CDD), the Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool (CDART), IBIS, Biosystems, Peptidome, OMSSA, Protein Clusters and the PubChem suite of small molecule databases. Augmenting many of the Web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. All of these resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkq1172
PMCID: PMC3013733  PMID: 21097890
9.  Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information 
Nucleic Acids Research  2012;41(D1):D8-D20.
In addition to maintaining the GenBank® nucleic acid sequence database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) provides analysis and retrieval resources for the data in GenBank and other biological data made available through the NCBI web site. NCBI resources include Entrez, the Entrez Programming Utilities, MyNCBI, PubMed, PubMed Central, Gene, the NCBI Taxonomy Browser, BLAST, BLAST Link (BLink), Primer-BLAST, COBALT, Splign, RefSeq, UniGene, HomoloGene, ProtEST, dbMHC, dbSNP, dbVar, Epigenomics, the Genetic Testing Registry, Genome and related tools, the Map Viewer, Model Maker, Evidence Viewer, Trace Archive, Sequence Read Archive, BioProject, BioSample, Retroviral Genotyping Tools, HIV-1/Human Protein Interaction Database, Gene Expression Omnibus, Probe, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals, the Molecular Modeling Database, the Conserved Domain Database, the Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool, Biosystems, Protein Clusters and the PubChem suite of small molecule databases. Augmenting many of the web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. All of these resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page.
doi:10.1093/nar/gks1189
PMCID: PMC3531099  PMID: 23193264
10.  Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology 
Nucleic Acids Research  2003;31(1):28-33.
In addition to maintaining the GenBank(R) nucleic acid sequence database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides data analysis and retrieval resources for the data in GenBank and other biological data made available through NCBI's Web site. NCBI resources include Entrez, PubMed, PubMed Central (PMC), LocusLink, the NCBITaxonomy Browser, BLAST, BLAST Link (BLink), Electronic PCR (e-PCR), Open Reading Frame (ORF) Finder, References Sequence (RefSeq), UniGene, HomoloGene, ProtEST, Database of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (dbSNP), Human/Mouse Homology Map, Cancer Chromosome Aberration Project (CCAP), Entrez Genomes and related tools, the Map Viewer, Model Maker (MM), Evidence Viewer (EV), Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs) database, Retroviral Genotyping Tools, SAGEmap, Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), the Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB), the Conserved Domain Database (CDD), and the Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool (CDART). Augmenting many of the Web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. All of the resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.
PMCID: PMC165480  PMID: 12519941
11.  User centered and ontology based information retrieval system for life sciences 
BMC Bioinformatics  2012;13(Suppl 1):S4.
Background
Because of the increasing number of electronic resources, designing efficient tools to retrieve and exploit them is a major challenge. Some improvements have been offered by semantic Web technologies and applications based on domain ontologies. In life science, for instance, the Gene Ontology is widely exploited in genomic applications and the Medical Subject Headings is the basis of biomedical publications indexation and information retrieval process proposed by PubMed. However current search engines suffer from two main drawbacks: there is limited user interaction with the list of retrieved resources and no explanation for their adequacy to the query is provided. Users may thus be confused by the selection and have no idea on how to adapt their queries so that the results match their expectations.
Results
This paper describes an information retrieval system that relies on domain ontology to widen the set of relevant documents that is retrieved and that uses a graphical rendering of query results to favor user interactions. Semantic proximities between ontology concepts and aggregating models are used to assess documents adequacy with respect to a query. The selection of documents is displayed in a semantic map to provide graphical indications that make explicit to what extent they match the user's query; this man/machine interface favors a more interactive and iterative exploration of data corpus, by facilitating query concepts weighting and visual explanation. We illustrate the benefit of using this information retrieval system on two case studies one of which aiming at collecting human genes related to transcription factors involved in hemopoiesis pathway.
Conclusions
The ontology based information retrieval system described in this paper (OBIRS) is freely available at: http://www.ontotoolkit.mines-ales.fr/ObirsClient/. This environment is a first step towards a user centred application in which the system enlightens relevant information to provide decision help.
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-13-S1-S4
PMCID: PMC3434427  PMID: 22373375
12.  PubCrawler: keeping up comfortably with PubMed and GenBank 
Nucleic Acids Research  2004;32(Web Server issue):W16-W19.
The free PubCrawler web service (http://www.pubcrawler.ie) has been operating for five years and so far has brought literature and sequence updates to over 22 000 users. It provides information on a personalized web page whenever new articles appear in PubMed or when new sequences are found in GenBank that are specific to customized queries. The server also acts as an automatic alerting system by sending out short notifications or emails with the latest updates as soon as they become available. A new output format and more flexibility for the email formatting help PubCrawler cope with increasing challenges arising from browser incompatibilities and mail filters, therefore making it suitable for a wide range of users.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkh453
PMCID: PMC441591  PMID: 15215341
13.  Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information 
Nucleic Acids Research  2011;40(D1):D13-D25.
In addition to maintaining the GenBank® nucleic acid sequence database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides analysis and retrieval resources for the data in GenBank and other biological data made available through the NCBI Website. NCBI resources include Entrez, the Entrez Programming Utilities, MyNCBI, PubMed, PubMed Central (PMC), Gene, the NCBI Taxonomy Browser, BLAST, BLAST Link (BLink), Primer-BLAST, COBALT, Splign, RefSeq, UniGene, HomoloGene, ProtEST, dbMHC, dbSNP, dbVar, Epigenomics, Genome and related tools, the Map Viewer, Model Maker, Evidence Viewer, Trace Archive, Sequence Read Archive, BioProject, BioSample, Retroviral Genotyping Tools, HIV-1/Human Protein Interaction Database, Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), Probe, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals (OMIA), the Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB), the Conserved Domain Database (CDD), the Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool (CDART), Biosystems, Protein Clusters and the PubChem suite of small molecule databases. Augmenting many of the Web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. All of these resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkr1184
PMCID: PMC3245031  PMID: 22140104
14.  Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information: update 
Nucleic Acids Research  2004;32(Database issue):D35-D40.
In addition to maintaining the GenBank(R) nucleic acid sequence database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides data analysis and retrieval resources for the data in GenBank and other biological data made available through NCBI’s website. NCBI resources include Entrez, PubMed, PubMed Central, LocusLink, the NCBI Taxonomy Browser, BLAST, BLAST Link (BLink), Electronic PCR, OrfFinder, Spidey, RefSeq, UniGene, HomoloGene, ProtEST, dbMHC, dbSNP, Cancer Chromosome Aberration Project (CCAP), Entrez Genomes and related tools, the Map Viewer, Model Maker, Evidence Viewer, Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs) database, Retroviral Genotyping Tools, SARS Coronavirus Resource, SAGEmap, Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), the Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB), the Conserved Domain Database (CDD) and the Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool (CDART). Augmenting many of the web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. All of the resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkh073
PMCID: PMC308807  PMID: 14681353
15.  Literature Mapping with PubAtlas — extending PubMed with a ‘BLASTing interface’ * 
PubAtlas (www.pubatlas.org) is a web service and standalone program providing literature maps for the biomedical research literature. It accepts user-defined sets of terms (PubMed queries) as input, and permits ‘BLASTing’ of one set against another: for all terms x and y in these sets, deriving the results of the pairwise intersections x AND y. This all vs. all capability extends PubMed with a literature analysis interface. Correspondingly, the basic form of literature map that PubAtlas provides for exploring associations among sets of terms is an interactive tabular display, in heatmap/microarray format.
PubAtlas supports development of specialized lexica -- hierarchies of controlled terminology that can represent sets of related concepts or a ‘user-defined query language’. PubAtlas also provides historical perspectives on the literature, with temporal query features that highlight historical patterns. Generally, it is a framework for extending the PubMed interface, and an extensible platform for producing interactive literature maps.
PMCID: PMC3041555  PMID: 21347177
16.  BIOSMILE web search: a web application for annotating biomedical entities and relations 
Nucleic Acids Research  2008;36(Web Server issue):W390-W398.
BIOSMILE web search (BWS), a web-based NCBI-PubMed search application, which can analyze articles for selected biomedical verbs and give users relational information, such as subject, object, location, manner, time, etc. After receiving keyword query input, BWS retrieves matching PubMed abstracts and lists them along with snippets by order of relevancy to protein–protein interaction. Users can then select articles for further analysis, and BWS will find and mark up biomedical relations in the text. The analysis results can be viewed in the abstract text or in table form. To date, BWS has been field tested by over 30 biologists and questionnaires have shown that subjects are highly satisfied with its capabilities and usability. BWS is accessible free of charge at http://bioservices.cse.yzu.edu.tw/BWS.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkn319
PMCID: PMC2447743  PMID: 18515840
17.  Plant cis-acting regulatory DNA elements (PLACE) database: 1999. 
Nucleic Acids Research  1999;27(1):297-300.
PLACE (http://www.dna.affrc.go.jp/htdocs/PLACE/) is a database of nucleotide sequence motifs found in plant cis-acting regulatory DNA elements. Motifs were extracted from previously published reports on genes in vascular plants. In addition to the motifs originally reported, their variations in other genes or in other plant species in later reports are also compiled. Documents for each motif in the PLACE database contains, in addition to a motif sequence, a brief definition and description of each motif, and relevant literature with PubMed ID numbers and GenBank accession numbers where available. Users can search their query sequences for cis-elements using the Signal Scan program at our web site. The results will be reported in one of the three forms. Clicking the PLACE accession numbers in the result report will open the pertinent motif document. Clicking the PubMed or GenBank accession number in the document will allow users to access to these databases, and to read the of the literature or the annotation in the DNA database. This report summarizes the present status of this database and available tools.
PMCID: PMC148163  PMID: 9847208
18.  Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information 
Nucleic Acids Research  2001;29(1):11-16.
In addition to maintaining the GenBank® nucleic acid sequence database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides data analysis and retrieval resources that operate on the data in GenBank and a variety of other biological data made available through NCBI’s Web site. NCBI data retrieval resources include Entrez, PubMed, LocusLink and the Taxonomy Browser. Data analysis resources include BLAST, Electronic PCR, OrfFinder, RefSeq, UniGene, HomoloGene, Database of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (dbSNP), Human Genome Sequencing, Human MapViewer, GeneMap’99, Human–Mouse Homology Map, Cancer Chromosome Aberration Project (CCAP), Entrez Genomes, Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs) database, Retroviral Genotyping Tools, Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP), SAGEmap, Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), Online Mendelian Inheri­tance in Man (OMIM), the Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB) and the Conserved Domain Database (CDD). Augmenting many of the Web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. All of the resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.
PMCID: PMC29800  PMID: 11125038
19.  Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information: 2002 update 
Nucleic Acids Research  2002;30(1):13-16.
In addition to maintaining the GenBank nucleic acid sequence database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides data analysis and retrieval resources that operate on the data in GenBank and a variety of other biological data made available through NCBI’s web site. NCBI data retrieval resources include Entrez, PubMed, LocusLink and the Taxonomy Browser. Data analysis resources include BLAST, Electronic PCR, OrfFinder, RefSeq, UniGene, HomoloGene, Database of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (dbSNP), Human Genome Sequencing, Human MapViewer, Human¡VMouse Homology Map, Cancer Chromosome Aberration Project (CCAP), Entrez Genomes, Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs) database, Retroviral Genotyping Tools, SAGEmap, Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), the Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB) and the Conserved Domain Database (CDD). Augmenting many of the web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. All of the resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.
PMCID: PMC99094  PMID: 11752242
20.  A Pitfall in Accessing the Genbank Sequence Literature 
We investigated from a user perspective the implications of the unrelatedness of the Entrez-PubMed SI field and the Entrez-PubMed/Nucleotide links. We used GenBank sequence accession numbers as queries against the Entrez-PubMed interface and the Entrez-Nucleotide interface. We compared the article citations available directly through Entrez-PubMed and indirectly through Entrez-Nucleotide. Our results show that in general only by searching both interfaces can a user access all of the PubMed citations available through Entrez for a given sequence.
PMCID: PMC2244548
21.  GLAD4U: deriving and prioritizing gene lists from PubMed literature 
BMC Genomics  2012;13(Suppl 8):S20.
Background
Answering questions such as "Which genes are related to breast cancer?" usually requires retrieving relevant publications through the PubMed search engine, reading these publications, and creating gene lists. This process is not only time-consuming, but also prone to errors.
Results
We report GLAD4U (Gene List Automatically Derived For You), a new, free web-based gene retrieval and prioritization tool. GLAD4U takes advantage of existing resources of the NCBI to ensure computational efficiency. The quality of gene lists created by GLAD4U for three Gene Ontology (GO) terms and three disease terms was assessed using corresponding "gold standard" lists curated in public databases. For all queries, GLAD4U gene lists showed very high recall but low precision, leading to low F-measure. As a comparison, EBIMed's recall was consistently lower than GLAD4U, but its precision was higher. To present the most relevant genes at the top of a list, we studied two prioritization methods based on publication count and the hypergeometric test, and compared the ranked lists and those generated by EBIMed to the gold standards. Both GLAD4U methods outperformed EBIMed for all queries based on a variety of quality metrics. Moreover, the hypergeometric method allowed for a better performance by thresholding genes with low scores. In addition, manual examination suggests that many false-positives could be explained by the incompleteness of the gold standards. The GLAD4U user interface accepts any valid queries for PubMed, and its output page displays the ranked gene list and information associated with each gene, chronologically-ordered supporting publications, along with a summary of the run and links for file export and functional enrichment and protein interaction network analysis.
Conclusions
GLAD4U has a high overall recall. Although precision is generally low, the prioritization methods successfully rank truly relevant genes at the top of the lists to facilitate efficient browsing. GLAD4U is simple to use, and its interface can be found at: http://bioinfo.vanderbilt.edu/glad4u.
doi:10.1186/1471-2164-13-S8-S20
PMCID: PMC3535723  PMID: 23282288
22.  PubFinder: a tool for improving retrieval rate of relevant PubMed abstracts 
Nucleic Acids Research  2005;33(Web Server issue):W774-W778.
Since it is becoming increasingly laborious to manually extract useful information embedded in the ever-growing volumes of literature, automated intelligent text analysis tools are becoming more and more essential to assist in this task. PubFinder () is a publicly available web tool designed to improve the retrieval rate of scientific abstracts relevant for a specific scientific topic. Only the selection of a representative set of abstracts is required, which are central for a scientific topic. No special knowledge concerning the query-syntax is necessary. Based on the selected abstracts, a list of discriminating words is automatically calculated, which is subsequently used for scoring all defined PubMed abstracts for their probability of belonging to the defined scientific topic. This results in a hit-list of references in the descending order of their likelihood score. The algorithms and procedures implemented in PubFinder facilitate the perpetual task for every scientist of staying up-to-date with current publications dealing with a specific subject in biomedicine.
doi:10.1093/nar/gki429
PMCID: PMC1160190  PMID: 15980583
23.  A Day in the Life of PubMed: Analysis of a Typical Day’s Query Log 
Objective
To characterize PubMed usage over a typical day and compare it to previous studies of user behavior on Web search engines.
Design
We performed a lexical and semantic analysis of 2,689,166 queries issued on PubMed over 24 consecutive hours on a typical day.
Measurements
We measured the number of queries, number of distinct users, queries per user, terms per query, common terms, Boolean operator use, common phrases, result set size, MeSH categories, used semantic measurements to group queries into sessions, and studied the addition and removal of terms from consecutive queries to gauge search strategies.
Results
The size of the result sets from a sample of queries showed a bimodal distribution, with peaks at approximately 3 and 100 results, suggesting that a large group of queries was tightly focused and another was broad. Like Web search engine sessions, most PubMed sessions consisted of a single query. However, PubMed queries contained more terms.
Conclusion
PubMed’s usage profile should be considered when educating users, building user interfaces, and developing future biomedical information retrieval systems.
doi:10.1197/jamia.M2191
PMCID: PMC2213463  PMID: 17213501
24.  Context-Specific Protein Network Miner – An Online System for Exploring Context-Specific Protein Interaction Networks from the Literature 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(4):e34480.
Background
Protein interaction networks (PINs) specific within a particular context contain crucial information regarding many cellular biological processes. For example, PINs may include information on the type and directionality of interaction (e.g. phosphorylation), location of interaction (i.e. tissues, cells), and related diseases. Currently, very few tools are capable of deriving context-specific PINs for conducting exploratory analysis.
Results
We developed a literature-based online system, Context-specific Protein Network Miner (CPNM), which derives context-specific PINs in real-time from the PubMed database based on a set of user-input keywords and enhanced PubMed query system. CPNM reports enriched information on protein interactions (with type and directionality), their network topology with summary statistics (e.g. most densely connected proteins in the network; most densely connected protein-pairs; and proteins connected by most inbound/outbound links) that can be explored via a user-friendly interface. Some of the novel features of the CPNM system include PIN generation, ontology-based PubMed query enhancement, real-time, user-queried, up-to-date PubMed document processing, and prediction of PIN directionality.
Conclusions
CPNM provides a tool for biologists to explore PINs. It is freely accessible at http://www.biotextminer.com/CPNM/.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0034480
PMCID: PMC3321019  PMID: 22493694
25.  GenDrux: A biomedical literature search system to identify gene expression-based drug sensitivity in breast cancer 
Background
This paper describes the development of a web-based tool, GenDrux, which extracts and presents (over the Internet) information related to the disease-gene-drug nexus. This information is archived from the relevant biomedical literature using automated methods. GenDrux is designed to alleviate the difficulties of manually processing the vast biomedical literature to identify disease-gene-drug relationships. GenDrux will evolve with the literature without additional algorithmic modifications.
Results
GenDrux, a pilot system, is developed in the domain of breast cancer and can be accessed at http://www.microarray.uab.edu/drug_gene.pl. GenDrux can be queried based on drug, gene and/or disease name. From over 8,000 relevant abstracts from the biomedical literature related to breast cancer, we have archived a corpus of more than 4,000 articles that depict gene expression-drug activity relationships for breast cancer and related cancers. The archiving process has been automated.
Conclusions
The successful development, implementation, and evaluation of this and similar systems when created may provide clinicians with a tool for literature management, clinical decision making, thus setting the platform for personalized therapy in the future.
doi:10.1186/1472-6947-11-28
PMCID: PMC3116456  PMID: 21545721

Results 1-25 (485443)