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1.  Searching for Hidden, Painful Osteochondral Lesions of the Ankle in Patients with Chronic Lower Limb Pain - Two Case Reports - 
The Korean Journal of Pain  2013;26(2):164-168.
It is easy to overlook osteochondral lesions (OCLs) of the ankle in patients with chronic lower limb pain, such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) or thromboangiitis obliterans (TAO, Buerger's disease). A 57-year-old woman diagnosed with type 1 CRPS, and a 58-year-old man, diagnosed with TAO, complained of tactile and cold allodynia in their lower legs. After neurolytic lumbar sympathethic ganglion block and titration of medications for neuropathic pain, each subject could walk without the aid of crutches. However, they both complained of constant pain on the left ankle during walking. Focal tenderness was noted; subsequent imaging studies revealed OCLs of her talus and his distal tibia, respectively. Immediately after percutaneous osteoplasties, the patients could walk without ankle pain. It is important to consider the presence of a hidden OCL in chronic pain patients that develop weight-bearing pain and complain of localized tenderness on the ankle.
doi:10.3344/kjp.2013.26.2.164
PMCID: PMC3629344  PMID: 23614079
ankle; cementoplasty; complex regional pain syndrome; osteochondritis dissecans; thromboangiitis obliterans
2.  Osteochondritis dissecans of the knee fixed with biodegradable self-reinforced polyglycolide and polylactide rods in 24 patients 
International Orthopaedics  1998;21(6):355-360.
Summary.
Over a period of 7 years (1987 – 1994), 24 cases of osteochondritis dissecans of the knee were treated with self-reinforced polyglycolic acid (SR-PGA) and polylactic acid (SR-PLLA) rods. Rods measuring 1.1 mm, 1.5 mm and 2 mm in diameter, and 20 – 40 mm in length were used in the fixation of the fragment depending on the size of the lesions. There were 23 patients with osteochondritis dessicans in the medial and 1 in the lateral femoral condyle. The average age of the patients was 25 years (range: 16 – 48). Follow-up was for 3.3 years (range: 1 – 7.6). There were 6 lesions in situ, 3 early separations, 11 were partially detached, and there were 4 loose bodies. SR-PGA rods were used in 12 patients, SR-PLLA rods in 11 patients, and both SR-PGA and SR-PLLA rods in 1 patient. The rod in each case was inserted subchondrally and in 9 cases arthroscopically, using a special instrument. In our study, the clinical result was excellent in 13 patients, good in 6, fair in 1 and poor in 4. On radiological assessment the fragment had healed in 19 cases. Synovitis occurred in 1 patient in the SR-PGA group (1/13): the effusion continued for 6 months postoperatively but, after treatment by needle aspiration, there were no symptoms at follow-up 4.2 years later. We conclude that SR-PGA and SR-PLLA rods can be used intra-articularly for the adequate fixation of osteochondritis dissecans.
doi:10.1007/s002640050184
PMCID: PMC3619568  PMID: 9498141
3.  Osteochondral lesion of the talus in a recreational athlete: a case report 
A 23-year-old recreational male athlete presented with intermittent pain of three weeks duration, localized to the left ankle. Pain was aggravated by walking, although his symptoms had not affected the patient’s jogging activity which was performed three times per week. Past history revealed an inversion sprain of the left ankle, sustained fifteen months previously. Examination showed mild swelling anterior to the ankle mortise joint while other tests including range of motion, strength and motion palpation of specific joints of the ankle were noted to be unremarkable. Radiographic findings revealed a defect in the medial aspect of the talus. An orthopaedic referral was made for further evaluation. Tomography revealed a Grade III osteochondral lesion of the talus.
It was determined that follow-up views be taken in three months to demonstrate if the lesion was progressing or healing. Within the three month period, activity modifications and modalities for pain control were indicated. Surgery was considered a reasonable option should conservative measures fail.
The present case illustrates an osteochondral lesion of the talus, a condition which has not previously been reported in the chiropractic literature. A review of the pertinent orthopaedic literature has indicated an average delay of three years in diagnosing the existence of this lesion.
Although considered rare, the diagnostic frequency of the condition appears to be on the rise due to increased awareness and the use of bone and CT scans. The osteochondral lesion of the talus deserves particular consideration by practitioners working with athletes due to its higher incidence within this group. This diagnosis should be considered in patients presenting with chronic ankle pain particularly when a history of an inversion sprain exists.
The purpose of this report is to increase awareness of this condition, and review diagnosis and management strategies.
Images
PMCID: PMC2485432
osteochondral lesion; talus; osteochondritis dissecans; diagnosis; chiropractic; athletic injuries; ankle
4.  Osteochondritis dessicans and subchondral cystic lesions in draft horses: a retrospective study. 
The Canadian Veterinary Journal  1998;39(10):627-633.
The clinical features, radiographic findings, treatment, and outcome in 51 draft horses with osteochondritis dessicans (OCD) or subchondral cystic lesions (SC) are reported. Clydesdale and Percheron were the most commonly affected breeds, and affected animals represented only 5% of the hospital population of draft horses. Horses were most frequently affected in the tibiotarsal joints and 73% (24 of 33 cases) of the horses with tibiotarsal effusion were affected bilaterally. Osteochondritis dessicans of the distal intermediate ridge was the most common lesion found in the tibiotarsal joint. The stifle was also frequently affected; 87% (13 of 15 cases) of horses with femoropatellar OCD only were lame, and lesions were most commonly located on the lateral trochlear ridge. Sixteen cases were managed conservatively, 30 received surgery, and 5 were euthanized. Lameness, effusion, or both clinical signs resolved in more than 50% of surgically treated cases, but clinical signs improved in 30% of conservatively-managed cases.
PMCID: PMC1539460  PMID: 9789673
5.  Therapeutic management of complicated talar extrusion: literature review and case report 
Total extrusion of the talus with interruption of all ligaments (missing talus) is a rare injury. We describe the case of a 27-year-old man who reported total extrusion of the talus after a motorbike accident with interruption of all talar ligaments. In the first repair effort, the articular void left by the talus was filled with antibiotic cement and the wound was closed primarily. Nevertheless, the skin overlying the talar joint displayed necrosis. In order to cover the cutaneous defect, improve local vascularization, and allow reimplantation of the talus, a sural fasciocutaneous island flap was harvested. Subsequently, the original talus was placed and arthrodesis of the subtalar joint was performed. The patient was able to walk bearing full weight without support equipment after 6 months. Several therapeutic options have been suggested in such cases, including replacing the talus, tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis, and pseudoarthrodesis. The rarity and peculiarity of such cases make the establishment of generalized guidelines an arduous task, leaving the choice of treatment to the surgeon, in conformity with each case’s peculiarity. In this case use of the flap may have promoted the vascularization of the reimplanted talus, thus avoiding avascular necrosis and allowing successful reimplantation of the original talus.
doi:10.1007/s10195-011-0129-z
PMCID: PMC3052426  PMID: 21350893
Total talar dislocation; Talar extrusion; Missing talus; Distally-based sural fasciocutaneous flap
6.  Therapeutic management of complicated talar extrusion: literature review and case report 
Total extrusion of the talus with interruption of all ligaments (missing talus) is a rare injury. We describe the case of a 27-year-old man who reported total extrusion of the talus after a motorbike accident with interruption of all talar ligaments. In the first repair effort, the articular void left by the talus was filled with antibiotic cement and the wound was closed primarily. Nevertheless, the skin overlying the talar joint displayed necrosis. In order to cover the cutaneous defect, improve local vascularization, and allow reimplantation of the talus, a sural fasciocutaneous island flap was harvested. Subsequently, the original talus was placed and arthrodesis of the subtalar joint was performed. The patient was able to walk bearing full weight without support equipment after 6 months. Several therapeutic options have been suggested in such cases, including replacing the talus, tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis, and pseudoarthrodesis. The rarity and peculiarity of such cases make the establishment of generalized guidelines an arduous task, leaving the choice of treatment to the surgeon, in conformity with each case’s peculiarity. In this case use of the flap may have promoted the vascularization of the reimplanted talus, thus avoiding avascular necrosis and allowing successful reimplantation of the original talus.
doi:10.1007/s10195-011-0129-z
PMCID: PMC3052426  PMID: 21350893
Total talar dislocation; Talar extrusion; Missing talus; Distally-based sural fasciocutaneous flap
7.  Treatment of deep articular talus lesions by matrix associated autologous chondrocyte implantation—results at five years 
International Orthopaedics  2012;36(11):2279-2285.
Purpose
Treatment of focal full-thickness chondral or osteochondral defects of the talus remains a challenge. The aim of this study was to evaluate the postoperative success and the long-term efficacy of matrix associated autologous chondrocyte implantation in these defects.
Methods
Matrix associated autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI) was applied in 22 consecutive patients (mean age 23.9 years) with full-thickness chondral or osteochondral lesions of the talus. The average defect-size was 1.94 cm² (range 1–6). In case of osteochondritis dissecans (n = 13) an autologous bone graft was performed simultaneously. Follow-ups were routinely scheduled up to 63.5 (±7.4) months, consisting of clinical evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging.
Results
The AOFAS score improved significantly from 70.1 to 87.9/92.6/93.5/95.0/95.5 and 95.3 points at three, six, 12, 24, 36 and 63.5 months, respectively. On a visual analogue scale, pain intensity decreased from 5.7 (±2.6) to 0.9 (±0.8) while subjective function increased from 5.3 (±2.3) to 8.9 (±0.9) at final follow-up (each p < 0.001). The Tegner score rose significantly from 2.4 (±1.2) to 4.7 (±0.6). The MOCART score improved from 62.6 (±19.4) at three months to 83.8 (±9.4) at final follow-up. No significant differences were found between lesions caused by osteochondritis dissecans or trauma and between first- or second-line treatments. For all scores, the most benefit was seen within the first 12 months with stable results afterwards. No major complications were noted.
Conclusions
Matrix associated autologous chondrocyte implantation is capable of significant and stable long-term improvement of pain and functional impairment caused by focal full-thickness chondral and osteochondral talus lesions.
doi:10.1007/s00264-012-1635-1
PMCID: PMC3479272  PMID: 22885840
8.  Fluoroscopy-guided retrograde core drilling and cancellous bone grafting in osteochondral defects of the talus 
International Orthopaedics  2012;36(8):1635-1640.
Purpose
In undetached osteochondral lesions (OCL) of the talus both revitalisation of the subchondral necrosis and cartilage preservation are essential. For these cases, we assess the results of minimally invasive retrograde core drilling and cancellous bone grafting.
Methods
Forty-one osteochondral lesions of the talus (12x grade I, 22x grade II and 7x grade III according to the Pritsch classification, defect sizes 7–14 mm) in 38 patients (mean age 33.2 years) treated by fluoroscopy-guided retrograde core drilling and autologous cancellous bone grafting were evaluated by clinical scores and MRI. The mean follow-up was 29.0 (±13) months.
Results
The AOFAS score increased significantly from 47.3 (±15.3) to 80.8 (±18.6) points. Lesions with intact cartilage (grades I and II) had a tendency to superior results than grade III lesions (83.1 ± 17.3 vs. 69.4 ± 22.2 points, p = 0.07). First-line treatments and open distal tibial growth plates led to significantly better outcomes (each p < 0.05). Age, gender, BMI, time to follow-up, defect localisation or a traumatic origin did not influence the score results. On a visual analogue scale pain intensity reduced from 7.5 (±1.5) to 3.7 (±2.6) while subjective function increased from 4.6 (±2.0) to 8.2 (±2.3) (each p < 0.001). In MRI follow-ups, five of the 41 patients showed a complete bone remodelling. In two cases demarcation was detectable.
Conclusions
The technique reported is a highly effective therapeutic option in OCL of the talus with intact cartilage grades I and II. However, second-line treatments and grade III lesions with cracked cartilage surface can not be generally recommended for this procedure.
doi:10.1007/s00264-012-1530-9
PMCID: PMC3535023  PMID: 22491802
9.  Tertiary osteochondral defect of the talus treated by a novel contoured metal implant 
The primary treatment of most osteochondral defects of the talus is arthroscopic debridement and bone marrow stimulation. There is no optimal treatment for large lesions or for those in which primary treatment has failed. We report a 20-year-old female patient with persistent symptoms after two previous arthroscopic procedures. Computed tomography showed a cystic defect of the medial talar dome, sized 17 × 8 × 8 mm. The patient was treated with a novel contoured metal implant. At 1 and 2 years after surgery, the patient reported considerable reduction in pain and had resumed playing korfball at competitive level.
Level of evidence IV.
doi:10.1007/s00167-011-1465-5
PMCID: PMC3096766  PMID: 21409468
Osteochondral lesions; Bone cyst; Talus; Ankle; Metal implant; Treatment
10.  Palliative therapy of osteochondrosis dessicans in a Duroc boar 
A 2-year-old, 210-kg, Duroc boar manifested with a grade II–III left front lameness. The boar was treated systemically with isolfupredone acetate and a 5-week course of ketoprofen. The lameness resolved and the ketoprofen was discontinued; however, the lameness returned and the boar was euthanized humanely. Postmortem examination was consistent with osteochondrosis dessicans.
PMCID: PMC2147703  PMID: 18320984
11.  Simultaneous Bilateral Fracture Dislocation of the Talus: A Case Report 
Trauma Monthly  2013;18(2):90-94.
Introduction
Fracture - dislocations of the talus are typically due to high energy injuries. Displaced fracture - dislocations of the talus have poor outcomes in general and complications are common. Although talar fracture is common and comprises the second most common tarsal fracture, bilateral fracture - dislocations of the talus are rare. Not many reports regarding the subject can be found in the literature.
Case Presentation
We report a patient with bilateral fracture - dislocations of the talus treated by open reduction and internal fixation. This patient was a 25 year-old man who sustained bilateral fracture - dislocation of the talus due to a motor vehicle accident.
Conclusions
Bilateral talar fracture - dislocation is rare. The surgical approach discussed together with the pathomechanics of this injury can yield good short term results.
doi:10.5812/traumamon.11228
PMCID: PMC3860673  PMID: 24350160
Dislocation; Talus; Fracture Fixation, Internal
12.  Traumatic Osteochondral Injury of the Femoral Head Treated by Mosaicplasty: A Report of Two Cases 
HSS Journal  2010;6(2):228-234.
The increased risk of symptomatic progression towards osteoarthritis after chondral damage has led to the development of multiple treatment options for cartilage repair. These procedures have evolved from arthroscopic lavage and debridement, to marrow stimulation techniques, and more recently, to osteochondral autograft and allograft transplants, and autogenous chondrocyte implantation. The success of mosaicplasty procedures in the knee has led to its application to other surfaces, including the talus, tibial plateau, patella, and humeral capitellum. In this report, we present two cases of a chondral defect to the femoral head after a traumatic hip dislocation, treated with an osteochondral autograft (OATS) from the ipsilateral knee, and the inferior femoral head, respectively, combined with a surgical dislocation of the hip. At greater than 1 year and greater than 5 years of follow-up, MRI studies have demonstrated good autograft incorporation with maintenance of articular surface conformity, and both patients clinically continue to have no pain and full active range of motion of their respective hips. In our opinion, treatment of osteochondral defects in the femoral head surface using a surgical dislocation combined with an OATS procedure is a promising approach, as full exposure of the femoral head can be obtained while preserving its vasculature, thus enabling adequate restoration of the articular cartilage surface.
doi:10.1007/s11420-010-9159-y
PMCID: PMC2926357  PMID: 21886541
hip dislocation; osteochondral autograft transplant; femoral head; osteochondral defect; osteochondral injury; mosaicplasty
13.  Atraumatic Osteochondral Fracture and Osteoarthritis in a Collegiate Volleyball Player: A Case Report 
Journal of Athletic Training  2000;35(1):80-85.
Objective:
To present the case of a collegiate athlete with an atraumatic osteochondral fracture influenced by the presence of osteoarthritis.
Background:
Osteochondral fractures are fairly common occurrences in athletes, although it can be difficult to recognize such an injury in the absence of a traumatic event. Osteoarthritis is 1 condition that can increase an athlete's susceptibility to an atraumatic osteochondral fracture. However, because of the atraumatic nature of the injury, the possibility of an osteochondral fracture may be overlooked.
Differential Diagnosis:
Meniscal damage, osteochondritis dissecans, patellofemoral disorders.
Treatment:
The osteochondral fragment was surgically removed, and fibrous growth was encouraged by drilling and laser smoothing.
Uniqueness:
Osteochondral fractures are usually associated with some type of traumatic mechanism, such as a rotational and compressive force. Also, osteoarthritis is not common in young collegiate athletes. However, this 20-year-old volleyball player had no apparent injury and lacked the usual signs and symptoms (eg, locking, giving way, crepitus, loss of range of motion) associated with an osteochondral fracture. The athlete's susceptibility to an osteochondral fracture was increased by the presence of osteoarthritis.
Conclusions:
The athletic trainer should consider the possibility of an osteochondral fracture in an athlete with persistent effusion and pain in the absence of a traumatic mechanism of injury.
Images
PMCID: PMC1323444  PMID: 16558614
osteochondritis dissecans; knee injury
14.  Meniscoplasty for stable osteochondritis dissecans of the lateral femoral condyle combined with a discoid lateral meniscus: a case report 
Introduction
Osteochondritis dissecans of the lateral femoral condyle is relatively rare, and it is reported to often be combined with a discoid lateral meniscus. Given the potential for healing, conservative management is indicated for stable osteochondritis dissecans in patients who are skeletally immature. However, patients with osteochondritis dissecans of the lateral femoral condyle combined with a discoid lateral meniscus often have persistent symptoms despite conservative management.
Case presentation
We present the case of a seven-year-old Korean girl who had osteochondritis dissecans of the lateral femoral condyle combined with a discoid lateral meniscus, which healed after meniscoplasty for the symptomatic lateral discoid meniscus without surgical intervention for the osteochondritis dissecans. In addition, healing of the osteochondritis dissecans lesion was confirmed by an MRI scan five months after the operation.
Conclusions
Meniscoplasty can be recommended for symptomatic stable juvenile osteochondritis dissecans of the lateral femoral condyle combined with a discoid lateral meniscus when conservative treatment fails.
doi:10.1186/1752-1947-5-434
PMCID: PMC3177932  PMID: 21896174
15.  Weaver syndrome associated with bilateral congenital hip and unilateral subtalar dislocation 
Hippokratia  2010;14(3):212-214.
Background: Weaver syndrome is a congenital paediatric syndrome characterized by mental, respiratory and musculoskeletal manifestations. The coexisting deformities of the skull, the face, fingers and toes are typical. We report a case of a girl with Weaver syndrome associated with rare bilateral congenital dislocation of the hips associated with congenital hypoplastic talus and subtalar dislocation of her ankle joint.
Case Report: A 3-year old girl was admitted in our department with typical manifestations of Weaver syndrome, associated with congenital dislocation of bilateral hips, hypoplastic talus and subtalar dislocation of her right ankle. She was in pain while standing upright and incapable of independent walking. Both hips were treated operatively with open reduction and bilateral iliac osteotomy. Two years afterwards she had an open reduction of her talus and extraarticular arthrodesis of her subtalar joint in her right ankle. Six years postoperatively after the hip operations and four years after the ankle operation the girl is ambulant with a painless independent and unaided walking with a mild limp and full range of movements in all the operated joints.
Conclusions: We suggest that children with Weaver syndrome and disabling musculosceletal deformities, particularly affecting their ability to stand up and walk should be treated early, before bone maturity, in order to achieve the best potential musculoskeletal as well as developmental outcome.
PMCID: PMC2943362  PMID: 20981173
Weaver Syndrome; congenital dislocation; hip; ankle
16.  Arthroscopically-assisted reduction and fixation of an old osteochondral fracture of the lateral femoral condyle 
Summary
Background
Osteochondral fracture (OCF) of the lateral femoral condyle has a low incidence and old OCF is even more rarely seen; it is difficult to differentiate from late osteochondritis dissecans (OCD).
Case Report
In this report, we present the case of a 20-year-old male patient with an old OCF of the lateral femoral condyle. The possible etiology of OCF is discussed, along with its clinical manifestation, diagnosis, and treatment. He underwent arthroscopically-assisted reduction and fixation with cannulated screws. Four months after the surgery, arthroscopy showed good osteochondral healing, and screws were removed. He had achieved good functional recovery by the follow-up visit.
Conclusions
Old OCF should be distinguished from OCD in clinical practice, and osteochondral bodies should be preserved as much as possible. Osteochondral reduction and fixation under arthroscopy was minimal and the clinical effect was good.
doi:10.12659/MSM.883637
PMCID: PMC3560805  PMID: 23235545
osteochondral fracture (OCF); arthroscopy; femoral condyle
17.  Autologous osteochondral plug transplantation for osteochondrosis of the second metatarsal head: a case report 
Introduction
Osteochondrosis of the second or third metatarsal head is a rare condition called Freiberg's disease. To relieve foot pain, conservative treatment with a foot orthosis to reduce weight-bearing and immobilize the foot are recommended. In cases in which such treatments have proved to be ineffective, several surgical treatments have been performed. The appropriate surgical treatment for Freiberg's disease remains controversial.
Case presentation
We describe the case of a 20-year-old Japanese woman with a three-year history of right forefoot pain and no history of trauma. Two years after treatment by autologous osteochondral plug transplantation, she has neither complaints nor symptoms.
Conclusion
Autologous osteochondral plug transplantation represents a potentially successful surgical arthroplastic option in preserving the metatarsophalangeal joint in patients with Freiberg's disease.
doi:10.1186/1752-1947-5-308
PMCID: PMC3224451  PMID: 21752253
18.  Congenital vascular malformations in scintigraphic evaluation 
Summary
Background
Congenital vascular malformations are tumour-like, non-neoplastic lesions caused by disorders of vascular tissue morphogenesis. They are characterised by a normal cell replacement cycle throughout all growth phases and do not undergo spontaneous involution.
Here we present a scintigraphic image of familial congenital vascular malformations in two sisters.
Material/Methods
A 17-years-old young woman with a history of multiple hospitalisations for foci of vascular anomalies appearing progressively in the upper and lower right limbs, chest wall and spleen. A Parkes Weber syndrome was diagnosed based on the clinical picture. Due to the occurrence of new foci of malformations, a whole-body scintigraphic examination was performed.
A 12-years-old girl reported a lump in the right lower limb present for approximately 2 years, which was clinically identified as a vascular lesion in the area of calcaneus and talus. Phleboscintigraphy visualized normal radiomarker outflow from the feet via the deep venous system, also observed in the superficial venous system once the tourniquets were released. In static and whole-body examinations vascular malformations were visualised in the area of the medial cuneiform, navicular and talus bones of the left foot, as well as in the projection of right calcaneus and above the right talocrural joint.
Conclusions
People with undiagnosed disorders related to the presence of vascular malformations should undergo periodic follow-up to identify lesions that may be the cause of potentially serious complications and to assess the results of treatment. Presented scintigraphic methods may be used for both diagnosing and monitoring of disease progression.
doi:10.12659/PJR.889874
PMCID: PMC3927420  PMID: 24567769
congenital vascular malformations; scintigraphy; 99mTc-RBC
19.  Treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus: a systematic review 
The aim of this study was to summarize all eligible studies to compare the effectiveness of treatment strategies for osteochondral defects (OCD) of the talus. Electronic databases from January 1966 to December 2006 were systematically screened. The proportion of the patient population treated successfully was noted, and percentages were calculated. For each treatment strategy, study size weighted success rates were calculated. Fifty-two studies described the results of 65 treatment groups of treatment strategies for OCD of the talus. One randomized clinical trial was identified. Seven studies described the results of non-operative treatment, 4 of excision, 13 of excision and curettage, 18 of excision, curettage and bone marrow stimulation (BMS), 4 of an autogenous bone graft, 2 of transmalleolar drilling (TMD), 9 of osteochondral transplantation (OATS), 4 of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), 3 of retrograde drilling and 1 of fixation. OATS, BMS and ACI scored success rates of 87, 85 and 76%, respectively. Retrograde drilling and fixation scored 88 and 89%, respectively. Together with the newer techniques OATS and ACI, BMS was identified as an effective treatment strategy for OCD of the talus. Because of the relatively high cost of ACI and the knee morbidity seen in OATS, we conclude that BMS is the treatment of choice for primary osteochondral talar lesions. However, due to great diversity in the articles and variability in treatment results, no definitive conclusions can be drawn. Further sufficiently powered, randomized clinical trials with uniform methodology and validated outcome measures should be initiated to compare the outcome of surgical strategies for OCD of the talus.
doi:10.1007/s00167-009-0942-6
PMCID: PMC2809940  PMID: 19859695
Ankle; Osteochondral lesion; Defect; Talus; Systematic review; Arthroscopy
20.  Direction of the oblique medial malleolar osteotomy for exposure of the talus 
Introduction
A medial malleolar osteotomy is often indicated for operative exposure of posteromedial osteochondral defects and fractures of the talus. To obtain a congruent joint surface after refixation, the oblique osteotomy should be directed perpendicularly to the articular surface of the tibia at the intersection between the tibial plafond and medial malleolus. The purpose of this study was to determine this perpendicular direction in relation to the longitudinal tibial axis for use during surgery.
Materials and methods
Using anteroposterior mortise radiographs and coronal computed tomography (CT) scans of 46 ankles (45 patients) with an osteochondral lesion of the talus, two observers independently measured the intersection angle between the tibial plafond and medial malleolus. The bisector of this angle indicated the osteotomy perpendicular to the tibial articular surface. This osteotomy was measured relative to the longitudinal tibial axis on radiographs. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated to assess reliability.
Results
The mean osteotomy was 57.2 ± 3.2° relative to the tibial plafond on radiographs and 56.5 ± 2.8 on CT scans. This osteotomy corresponded to 30.4 ± 3.7° relative to the longitudinal tibial axis. The intraobserver (ICC, 0.90–0.93) and interobserver (ICC, 0.65–0.91) reliability of these measurements were good to excellent.
Conclusion
A medial malleolar osteotomy directed at a mean 30° relative to the tibial axis enters the joint perpendicularly to the tibial cartilage, and will likely result in a congruent joint surface after reduction.
doi:10.1007/s00402-010-1227-8
PMCID: PMC3117279  PMID: 21165631
Medial malleolus; Osteotomy; Ankle; Radiography; Preoperative planning; Surgical approach
21.  Osteochondral Avulsion Fracture of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Femoral Origin in a 10-Year-Old Child: A Case Report 
Journal of Athletic Training  2011;46(4):451-455.
Objective:
To describe the case of a 10-year-old football player who sustained a comminuted osteochondral avulsion fracture of the femoral origin of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) via a low-energy mechanism.
Background:
In children, both purely cartilaginous and osteochondral avulsion fractures have been described; most such ACL avulsions are from the tibial eminence. In the few previous case reports describing femoral osteochondral avulsion fractures, high-energy injury mechanisms were typically responsible and resulted in a single fracture fragment.
Differential Diagnosis:
Femoral osteochondral avulsion fracture at the ACL origin, femoral cartilaginous avulsion fracture at the ACL origin, midsubstance ACL tear, meniscal tear.
Treatment:
Sutures and a button were used to repair the comminuted fragments. Postoperatively, a modified ACL reconstruction rehabilitation program was instituted.
Uniqueness:
Most injuries of this nature in youngsters are caused by a high-energy mechanism of injury, result in an osteochondral avulsion fracture of the tibial eminence, and involve a single fracture fragment.
Conclusions:
Although they occur infrequently, ACL femoral avulsion fractures in children can result from a low-energy injury mechanism. Identifying the mechanism of injury, performing a thorough physical examination, and obtaining appropriate diagnostic studies will enable the correct treatment to be implemented, with the goal of safely returning the athlete to play.
PMCID: PMC3419159  PMID: 21944079
injury mechanisms; knee injuries; pediatric injuries
22.  Contribution of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of talus skip metastases of Ewing's sarcoma of the calcaneus in a child: a case report 
Introduction
Ewing's sarcoma of the calcaneus is rare. About thirty cases with calcaneus involvement have been reported in the literature. Talus skip metastases have rarely been described in the available literature
Case presentation
We report a case of a 14-year-old Moroccan boy, who presented with Ewing's sarcoma of his right calcaneus, diagnosed by swelling of the calcaneus evolving over a year. Radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed an important tumoral process of the calcaneus and talus skip metastases. The diagnosis was confirmed with histology after a biopsy. In spite of amputation and postoperative chemotherapy, our patient died six months later due to secondary respiratory distress after lung metastasis.
Conclusion
Imaging, especially magnetic resonance, is important in the diagnosis of Ewing sarcoma and skeletal skip metastases. Treatment of Ewing's sarcoma consists of chemotherapy, radiation therapy and surgical resection depending on the stage and extent of the disease. With the exception of lesions in the calcaneus, the prognosis for disease-free survival of Ewing's sarcoma of the foot is excellent.
doi:10.1186/1752-1947-5-451
PMCID: PMC3183038  PMID: 21910875
23.  Primary aneurysmal bone cyst of talus 
Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) of the talus is an extremely rare lesion; less than 20 cases have been reported in PubMed till 2012. We report a primary ABC of the talus in a 20-year-old male that was managed by extended intralesional curettage with phenol as an adjuvant and autologous cancellous iliac crest bone grafting. The patient had excellent functional outcome and there was no recurrence at 2 years of follow-up.
PMCID: PMC3703174  PMID: 23853640
Aneurysmal bone cyst; curettage; talus
24.  Establishing proof of concept: Platelet-rich plasma and bone marrow aspirate concentrate may improve cartilage repair following surgical treatment for osteochondral lesions of the talus 
World Journal of Orthopedics  2012;3(7):101-108.
Osteochondral lesions of the talus are common injuries in the athletic patient. They present a challenging clinical problem as cartilage has a poor potential for healing. Current surgical treatments consist of reparative (microfracture) or replacement (autologous osteochondral graft) strategies and demonstrate good clinical outcomes at the short and medium term follow-up. Radiological findings and second-look arthroscopy however, indicate possible poor cartilage repair with evidence of fibrous infill and fissuring of the regenerative tissue following microfracture. Longer-term follow-up echoes these findings as it demonstrates a decline in clinical outcome. The nature of the cartilage repair that occurs for an osteochondral graft to become integrated with the native surround tissue is also of concern. Studies have shown evidence of poor cartilage integration, with chondrocyte death at the periphery of the graft, possibly causing cyst formation due to synovial fluid ingress. Biological adjuncts, in the form of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC), have been investigated with regard to their potential in improving cartilage repair in both in vitro and in vitro settings. The in vitro literature indicates that these biological adjuncts may increase chondrocyte proliferation as well as synthetic capability, while limiting the catabolic effects of an inflammatory joint environment. These findings have been extrapolated to in vitro animal models, with results showing that both PRP and BMAC improve cartilage repair. The basic science literature therefore establishes the proof of concept that biological adjuncts may improve cartilage repair when used in conjunction with reparative and replacement treatment strategies for osteochondral lesions of the talus.
doi:10.5312/wjo.v3.i7.101
PMCID: PMC3399015  PMID: 22816065
Osteochondral lesion; Cartilage repair; Platelet-rich plasma; Bone marrow aspirate concentrate
25.  Giant cell tumor of talus: a case report 
Cases Journal  2009;2:74.
Giant cell tumor of talus is a rare entity. In contrast to GCT of long bones, most cases occur in a younger age group and tend to be multicentric. The authors report a case of GCT in a 19 year old boy which had led to extensive destruction of the talus. In view of the extensive involvement, total talectomy along with tibio – calcaneal arthrodesis was performed. At 6 months of followup, the patient had a painless and well arthrodesed ankle. There was no evidence of recurrence at 18 months of followup.
doi:10.1186/1757-1626-2-74
PMCID: PMC2651116  PMID: 19159463

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