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1.  Therapeutic management of complicated talar extrusion: literature review and case report 
Total extrusion of the talus with interruption of all ligaments (missing talus) is a rare injury. We describe the case of a 27-year-old man who reported total extrusion of the talus after a motorbike accident with interruption of all talar ligaments. In the first repair effort, the articular void left by the talus was filled with antibiotic cement and the wound was closed primarily. Nevertheless, the skin overlying the talar joint displayed necrosis. In order to cover the cutaneous defect, improve local vascularization, and allow reimplantation of the talus, a sural fasciocutaneous island flap was harvested. Subsequently, the original talus was placed and arthrodesis of the subtalar joint was performed. The patient was able to walk bearing full weight without support equipment after 6 months. Several therapeutic options have been suggested in such cases, including replacing the talus, tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis, and pseudoarthrodesis. The rarity and peculiarity of such cases make the establishment of generalized guidelines an arduous task, leaving the choice of treatment to the surgeon, in conformity with each case’s peculiarity. In this case use of the flap may have promoted the vascularization of the reimplanted talus, thus avoiding avascular necrosis and allowing successful reimplantation of the original talus.
doi:10.1007/s10195-011-0129-z
PMCID: PMC3052426  PMID: 21350893
Total talar dislocation; Talar extrusion; Missing talus; Distally-based sural fasciocutaneous flap
2.  Tibiotalar arthrodesis for injuries of the talus 
Indian Journal of Orthopaedics  2008;42(1):87-90.
Background:
Fracture-dislocation of the talus is one of the most severe injuries of the ankle. Opinion varies widely as to the proper treatment of this injury. Since Blair's original description of the tibiotalar fusion in 1943, there is little mention in the literature of his method. The present study reports the results of tibiotalar arthrodesis with modification in Blair's technique.
Materials and Methods:
Eleven cases of modified Blair's tibiotalar arthrodesis were retrospectively studied. The average age was 32.4 years (range, 26-51 years). Six patients had posttraumatic avascular necrosis; five had neglected fracture-dislocation of the talus.
Results:
The mean followup is 8 years (range 3-12 years). Tibiotalar fusion was achieved in all the ankles at an average of 20.5 weeks (range 16-28 weeks). Nine cases having 15°-20° tibiopedal motion had excellent results and two ankles having 10°-15° of tibiopedal motion had good result.
Conclusion:
We achieved good long term results with tibiotalar arthrodesis with modification in Blair technique. The principal modification in the present study is retention of the talar body while performing arthrodesis with anterior sliding graft. The retention of the talar body provides intraoperative stability and in the long term, the retained talar body shares the load transmitted to the anterior and middle subtalar joints thus resulting in improved hind foot function and gait.
doi:10.4103/0019-5413.38588
PMCID: PMC2759590  PMID: 19823662
Anterior tibial sliding graft; arthrodesis; avascular necrosis of talus
3.  An uncommon treatment of totally extruded and lost talus: a case report 
Introduction
Total extrusion and loss of the talus is a rare injury with a wide choice of appropriate treatment, but rarely resulting in a fully functional recovery. We report on an uncommon case, both for the severity of the injury and for the uncommon treatment due to the patient’s rejection of secondary surgery.
Case presentation
We treated a 16-year-old Caucasian man with the most extreme variant of a totally extruded and lost talus, accompanied with complex injury of the soft tissues of the ankle and foot. The treatment included urgent microvascular foot reimplantation, microvascular muscle free flap transfer, and temporary fixation. This kind of injury should typically be treated by tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis. However, this was not performed, as after the successful early stages of the treatment he strongly objected to another surgery due to his fully functional status and the successful therapeutic results of our early treatment.
Conclusions
The injury described in this case study would ordinarily be treated by amputation, but due to the well-executed treatment in the early stages after the injury, the outcome was satisfying. Surprisingly and against our expectations, the late results of the treatment were successful even without arthrodesis. He is now 37 years old and has a functional foot 21 years after the injury.
doi:10.1186/1752-1947-8-322
PMCID: PMC4196463  PMID: 25266945
Extruded talus; Reimplantation; Microsurgical free flap transfer; Arthrodesis
4.  A new approach to the treatment of congenital vertical talus 
Congenital vertical talus is an uncommon foot deformity that is present at birth and results in a rigid flatfoot deformity. Left untreated the deformity can result in pain and disability. Though the exact etiology of vertical talus is unknown, an increasing number of cases have been shown to have a genetic cause. Approximately 50% of all cases of vertical talus are associated with other neuromuscular abnormalities or known genetic syndromes. The remaining 50% of cases were once thought to be idiopathic in nature. However, there is increasing evidence that many of these cases are related to single gene defects. Most patients with vertical talus have been treated with major reconstructive surgeries that are fraught with complications such as wound necrosis, talar necrosis, undercorrection of the deformity, stiffness of the ankle and subtalar joint, and the eventual need for multiple operative procedures. Recently, a new approach to vertical talus that consists of serial casting and minimal surgery has resulted in excellent correction in the short-term. Longer follow-up will be necessary to ensure maintenance of correction with this new technique. A less invasive approach to the correction of vertical talus may provide more favorable long-term outcomes than more extensive surgery as has been shown to be true for clubfoot outcomes.
doi:10.1007/s11832-007-0037-1
PMCID: PMC2656724  PMID: 19308490
Congenital vertical talus; Flatfoot; Treatment; Genetics; Etiology
5.  Delayed surgical treatment for neglected or mal-reduced talar fractures 
International Orthopaedics  2005;29(5):326-329.
From 1993 to 2002, we treated nine patients for neglected or mal-reduced talar fractures. Average patient age was 39 (20–64) years and average follow-up 53 months. The time interval between injury and index operation ranged from 4 weeks to 4 years. Surgical procedures included open reduction with or without bone grafting in six cases, open reduction combined with ankle fusion in one case, talar neck osteotomy in one case, and talar neck osteotomy combined with subtalar fusion in one case. All cases had solid bone union. One patient developed avascular necrosis of the talus needing subsequent ankle arthrodesis. In six patients, adjacent hindfoot arthrosis occurred. The overall AOFAS ankle–hindfoot score was in average 77.4. We conclude that in neglected and mal-reduced talar fractures, surgical treatment can lead to a favourable outcome if the hindfoot joints are not arthritic.
doi:10.1007/s00264-005-0675-1
PMCID: PMC3456640  PMID: 16094539
6.  Closed subtalar dislocation with non-displaced fractures of talus and navicular: a case report and review of the literature 
Cases Journal  2009;2:8793.
Closed subtalar dislocations associated with talus and navicular fractures are rare injuries. We report on a case of a 43-year-old builder man with medial subtalar dislocation that was further complicated by minimally displaced talar and navicular fractures. Successful closed reduction under general anesthesia was followed by non-weight bearing and ankle immobilization with a below-knee cast for 6 ;weeks. At 3 years post-injury, the subtalar joint was stable, the foot and ankle mobility was in normal limits and the patient could still work as a builder. However, he complained for occasionally mild pain due to the development of post-traumatic arthritis in subtalar and ankle joints. Our search in literature revealed that conservative treatment of all the successfully reduced and minimally displaced subtalar fracture-dislocations has given superior results compared to surgical management. However, even in cases with no or slight fracture displacement, avascular necrosis of the talus or arthritis of the surrounding joints can compromise the final functional outcome.
doi:10.4076/1757-1626-2-8793
PMCID: PMC2769472  PMID: 19918402
7.  Completely extruded talus without soft tissue attachments 
Clinics and Practice  2011;1(1):e12.
A completely extruded talus without any remaining soft tissue attachments is extremely rare. The present report describes treatment of a 45-year-old man who sustained a completely extruded talus injury following a rock-climbing fall. Upon admission, the extruded talus was deep-frozen in our bone bank. The open ankle joint underwent massive wound debridement and irrigation for 3 days. Four days later we performed a primary subtalar fusion between the extruded talus and the calcaneus, anticipating revascularization from the calcaneus. However, aseptic loosening and osteolysis developed around the screw and talus. At 12 months post-trauma we performed a tibiocalcaneal ankle fusion with a femoral head allograft to fill the talar defect. Follow-up at 24 months post-trauma showed the patient had midfoot motion, tibio-talar-calcaneal fusion, and was able partake in 4-hour physical activity twice per week.
doi:10.4081/cp.2011.e12
PMCID: PMC3981216  PMID: 24765266
completely extruded talus; primary subtalar fusion; osteolysis.
8.  A Pediatric Comminuted Talar Fracture Treated by Minimal K-Wire Fixation Without Using a Tourniquet 
The Iowa Orthopaedic Journal  2014;34:175-180.
Background
Pediatric comminuted talar fractures are reported to be rare, and treatment options such as minimal internal K-wire fixation without using a tourniquet to prevent avascular necrosis have not previously been investigated.
Case Description
We report a case of a comminuted talar body and a non-displaced neck fracture with dislocation of the tibiotalar, talonavicular and subtalar joints with bimalleolar epiphyseal fractures in an 11-year-old boy due to a fall from height. We present radiological findings, the surgical procedure and clinical outcomes of minimal internal K-wire fixation without using a tourniquet.
Literature Review
Avascular necrosis rates are reported to be between 0 % and 66 % after fractures of the neck of the talus and the talar body in children. The likelihood of developing avascular necrosis increases with the severity of the fracture.
Clinical Relevance
To avoid avascular necrosis in a comminuted talar fracture accompanied by tibiotalar, talonavicular, subtalar dislocations and bimalleolar epiphyseal fractures, a minimal internal K-wire fixation without the use of a tourniquet was performed. The outcome was evaluated by the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society score (AOFAS). A score of 90 (excellent) was found at the end of the second year of follow up. Radiology revealed preservation of the joint with no evidence of avascular necrosis, and clinical findings revealed a favorable functional outcome after two years.
Level of Evidence
4
PMCID: PMC4127733  PMID: 25328479
talus; fracture healing; tourniquets; avascular; necrosis
9.  Treatment of displaced talar neck fractures using delayed procedures of plate fixation through dual approaches 
International Orthopaedics  2013;38(1):149-154.
Purpose
Treatment of talar neck fractures is challenging. Various surgical approaches and fixation methods have been documented. Clinical outcomes are often dissatisfying due to inadequate reduction and fixation with high rates of complications. Obtaining satisfactory clinical outcomes with minimum complications remains a hard task for orthopaedic surgeons.
Methods
In the period from May 2007 to September 2010, a total of 31 cases with closed displaced talar neck fractures were treated surgically in our department. Injuries were classified according to the Hawkins classification modified by Canale and Kelly. Under general anaesthesia with sufficient muscle relaxation, urgent closed reduction was initiated once the patients were admitted; if the procedure failed, open reduction and provisional stabilisation with Kirschner wires through an anteromedial approach with tibiometatarsal external fixation were performed. When the soft tissue had recovered, definitive fixation was performed with plate and screws through dual approaches. The final follow-up examination included radiological analysis, clinical evaluation and functional outcomes which were carried out according to the Ankle-Hindfoot Scale of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS), patient satisfaction and SF-36.
Results
Twenty-eight patients were followed up for an average of 25 months (range 18–50 months) after the injury. Only two patients had soft tissue complications, and recovery was satisfactory with conservative treatment. All of the fractures healed anatomically without malunion and nonunion, and the average union time was 14 weeks (range 12–24 weeks). Post-traumatic arthritis developed in ten cases, while six patients suffered from avascular necrosis of the talus. Secondary procedures included three cases of subtalar arthrodesis, one case of ankle arthrodesis and one case of total ankle replacement. The mean AOFAS hindfoot score was 78 (range 65–91). According to the SF-36, the average score of the physical component summary was 68 (range 59–81), and the average score of the mental component summary was 74 (range 63–85).
Conclusions
Talar neck fractures are associated with a high incidence of long-term disability and complications. Urgent reduction of the fracture-dislocation and delayed plate fixation through a dual approach when the soft tissue has recovered may minimise the complications and provide good clinical outcomes.
doi:10.1007/s00264-013-2164-2
PMCID: PMC3890131  PMID: 24297608
Ankle; Talar neck fracture; Dual approaches; Internal fixation
10.  Total Talar Extrusion without Soft Tissue Attachments 
Clinics in Orthopedic Surgery  2014;6(2):236-241.
Total talar extrusion without a soft tissue attachment is an extremely rare injury and is rarely reported. Appropriate treatment remains controversial. We describe the long-term outcomes of two patients who had complete talar extrusion without remaining soft tissue attachment treated with arthrodesis. Both of our patients had complications such as infection and progressive osteolysis. We suggest reimplantation of the extruded talus after thorough debridement as soon as possible as a reasonable option unless the talus is contaminated or missing, because an open wound may arise from inside to outside.
doi:10.4055/cios.2014.6.2.236
PMCID: PMC4040387  PMID: 24900908
Talus; Extrusion; Missing talus; Arthrodesis
11.  Paediatric talus fracture 
BMJ Case Reports  2012;2012:bcr1020115028.
Paediatric talus fractures are rare injuries resulting from axial loading of the talus against the anterior tibia with the foot in dorsiflexion. Skeletally immature bone is less brittle, with higher elastic resistance than adult bone, thus the paediatric talus can sustain higher forces before fractures occur. However, displaced paediatric talus fractures and those associated with high-energy trauma have been associated with complications including avascular necrosis, arthrosis, delayed union, neurapraxia and the need for revision surgery. The authors present the rare case of a talar neck fracture in a skeletally immature young girl, initially missed on radiological review. However, clinical suspicion on the part of the emergency physician, repeat examination and further radiographic imaging revealed this rare paediatric injury.
doi:10.1136/bcr.10.2011.5028
PMCID: PMC3351635  PMID: 22605852
12.  Closed total talus dislocation without fracture: a case report 
Cases Journal  2009;2:9132.
Total dislocation of the talus from all of its joints is a rare injury specially when the talus and malleoli are not fractured and frequently it is as a result of a high-energy trauma. It usually leads to degenerative changes in neighboring joints and frequently avascular necrosis is a predictable outcome. We present a case of total talus dislocation because of a high-energy trauma in association with other major fractures resulting from a fall from height, but no fracture could be detected in the talus and any of malleols. Closed reduction was unsuccessful and we performed open reduction. At 6 month post operation follow-up, the talus didn't show subluxation and avascular necrosis could not be detected.
doi:10.1186/1757-1626-2-9132
PMCID: PMC2803929  PMID: 20062649
13.  Corrective arthrodeses and osteotomies for post-traumatic hindfoot malalignment: indications, techniques, results 
International Orthopaedics  2013;37(9):1707-1717.
Hindfoot malunions after fractures of the talus and calcaneus lead to severe disability and pain. Corrective osteotomies and arthrodeses aim at functional rehabilitation and reduction of pain resulting from post-traumatic arthritis, eccentric loading and impingement due to hindfoot malunion. Preoperative analysis should include the three-dimensional outline of the malunion, the presence of post-traumatic arthritis, non-union, or infection, the extent of any avascular necrosis or comorbidities. In properly selected, compliant patients with intact cartilage cover little or no, AVN, and adequate bone quality, a corrective joint-preserving osteotomy with secondary internal fixation may be carried out. In the majority of cases, realignment is augmented by arthrodesis for post-traumatic arthritis. Fusion is restricted to the affected joint(s) to minimise loss of function. Correction of the malunion is achieved by asymmetric joint resection, distraction and structural bone grafting with corrective osteotomies for severe axial malalignment. Bone grafting is also needed after resection of a fibrous non-union, sclerotic or necrotic bone. Numerous clinical studies have shown substantial functional improvement and high subjective satisfaction rates from pain reduction after corrective osteotomies and fusions for post-traumatic hindfoot malalignment. This article reviews the indications, techniques and results of corrective surgery after talar and calcaneal malunions and nonunions based on an easy-to-use classification.
doi:10.1007/s00264-013-2021-3
PMCID: PMC3764287  PMID: 23912266
Hindfoot malalignment; Post-traumatic arthritis; Corrective arthrodesis; Osteotomies
14.  The effect of osseous ankle configuration on chronic ankle instability 
Background
Chronic ankle instability (CAI) is a common orthopaedic entity in sport. Although other risk factors have been studied extensively, little is known about how it is influenced by the osseous joint configuration.
Aim
To study the effect of osseous ankle configuration on CAI.
Design
Case–control study, level III.
Setting
Radiological examination with measurement of lateral x rays by an independent radiologist using a digital DICOM/PACS system.
Patients
A group of 52 patients who had had at least three recurrent sprains was compared with an age‐matched and sex‐matched control group of 52 healthy subjects.
Main outcome measures
The radius of the talar surface, the tibial coverage of the talus (tibiotalar sector) and the height of the talar body were measured.
Results
The talar radius was found to be larger in patients with CAI (21.2 (2.4) mm) than in controls (17.7 (1.9) mm; p<0.001, power >95%). The tibiotalar sector, representing the tibial coverage of the talus, was smaller in patients with CAI (80° (5.1°)) than in controls (88.4° (7.2°); p<0.001, power >95%). No significant difference was observed in the height of the talar body between patients with CAI (28.8 (2.6) mm) and controls (27.5 (4.0) mm; p = 0.055).
Conclusion
CAI is associated with an unstable osseous joint configuration characterised by a larger radius of the talus and a smaller tibiotalar sector. There is evidence that a higher talus might also play some part, particularly in women.
doi:10.1136/bjsm.2006.032672
PMCID: PMC2465368  PMID: 17261556
15.  Weaver syndrome associated with bilateral congenital hip and unilateral subtalar dislocation 
Hippokratia  2010;14(3):212-214.
Background: Weaver syndrome is a congenital paediatric syndrome characterized by mental, respiratory and musculoskeletal manifestations. The coexisting deformities of the skull, the face, fingers and toes are typical. We report a case of a girl with Weaver syndrome associated with rare bilateral congenital dislocation of the hips associated with congenital hypoplastic talus and subtalar dislocation of her ankle joint.
Case Report: A 3-year old girl was admitted in our department with typical manifestations of Weaver syndrome, associated with congenital dislocation of bilateral hips, hypoplastic talus and subtalar dislocation of her right ankle. She was in pain while standing upright and incapable of independent walking. Both hips were treated operatively with open reduction and bilateral iliac osteotomy. Two years afterwards she had an open reduction of her talus and extraarticular arthrodesis of her subtalar joint in her right ankle. Six years postoperatively after the hip operations and four years after the ankle operation the girl is ambulant with a painless independent and unaided walking with a mild limp and full range of movements in all the operated joints.
Conclusions: We suggest that children with Weaver syndrome and disabling musculosceletal deformities, particularly affecting their ability to stand up and walk should be treated early, before bone maturity, in order to achieve the best potential musculoskeletal as well as developmental outcome.
PMCID: PMC2943362  PMID: 20981173
Weaver Syndrome; congenital dislocation; hip; ankle
16.  Nonoperative treatment of closed total talus dislocation without fracture: A case report and literature review 
Complete dislocation of the talus not accompanied by a fracture is a very rare injury. Most cases reported are open talus dislocations; closed dislocations are rarely seen. The functional prognosis is poor due to osteonecrosis of the talus which develops in the majority of cases.
We present a case of lateral dislocation of the left talus in a 29-year-old road accident victim, but no fracture could be detected in the talus and any of malleolus. Reduction of dislocation had been performed in emergency by external manipulation. At 1-year follow-up, the right ankle was pain free and stable. Motion was satisfactory: 15° dorsal flexion, 30° plantar flexion; the talus didn't show subluxation and avascular necrosis could not be detected.
doi:10.1016/j.jcot.2014.05.010
PMCID: PMC4223801
Talus; Dislocation; Closed; Nonoperative treatment
17.  Unusual ankle fracture: A case report and literature review 
Fractures of the talus are uncommon, and talar body fractures in the sagittal plane are still rarer. The aim of its treatment is urgent anatomic reduction to restore congruency of the ankle and to reduce the risk of avascular necrosis by preserving any remaining blood supply. We report the case of a body talar fracture in sagittal plane associated with fracture of the medial malleolus in a young adult; the mechanism of the fracture was plantar hyperflexion, internal rotation and axial compression. We perform an open reduction and stabilization with two screws for the talus and screw the medial malleolus. At 14 months following the injury patient had good range of movement with little pain. The mechanism is discussed along with a literature review.
doi:10.1016/j.jcot.2014.05.003
PMCID: PMC4085359
Talar body; Sagittal fracture; Medial malleolus; Screw
18.  Long-term follow-up after surgical treatment of talar fractures 
International Orthopaedics  2009;35(1):93-99.
Displaced talar neck and body fractures are rare and serious injuries with important outcomes. The aim of our study was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of these fractures after operative treatment in our centre between 1993 and 2005. Displaced talar fractures have a high rate of long-term complications. This was a retrospective study concerning 20 patients with an average follow-up of 7.5 years. The final follow-up examination included determination of the AHS score (ankle–hindfoot scale) from the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS), range of motion evaluation and radiological analysis. Mean age at the time of trauma was 38.8 years. This study comprised ten talar neck fractures and ten talar body fractures. We always used a single surgical approach and obtained anatomical reduction in 30% of the whole series of both groups. Four early complications were noted in four patients (20%). We noted no skin complications and the rate of consolidation was 100%. Four patients (20%) developed avascular necrosis of the talus, and at final follow-up seven patients (35%) had undergone secondary surgery. Radiographic analysis showed an osteoarthritis rate of 94% and a malunion rate of 59%. The mean AOFAS score was 66.9/100 and range of motion was systematically decreased. Contrary to undisplaced talar fractures, displaced talar fractures are a therapeutic challenge with many early or late complications. The outcome often revealed stiffness and osteoarthritis.
doi:10.1007/s00264-009-0930-y
PMCID: PMC3014484  PMID: 20033158
19.  Congenital vertical talus: Treatment by reverse ponseti technique 
Indian Journal of Orthopaedics  2008;42(3):347-350.
Background:
The surgery for idiopathic congenital vertical talus (CVT) can lead to stiffness, wound complications and under or over correction. There are sporadic literature on costing with mixed results. We describe our early experience of reverse ponseti technique.
Materials and methods:
Four cases (four feet) of idiopathic congenital vertical talus (CVT) which presented one month after birth were treated by serial manipulation and casting, tendoachilles tenotomy and percutaneous pinning of talonavicular joint. An average of 5.2 (range - four to six) plaster cast applications were required to correct the forefoot deformity. Once the talus and navicular were aligned based on the radiographic talus-first metatarsal axis, percutaneous fixation of the talo-navicular joint with a Kirschner wire, and percutaneous tendoachilles tenotomy under anesthesia was performed following which a cast was applied with the foot in slight dorsiflexion.
Results:
The mean follow-up period for the four cases was 8.5 months (6-12 months). At the end of the treatment all feet were supple and plantigrade but still using ankle foot orthosis (AFO). The mean talocalcaneal angle was 70 degrees before treatment and this reduced to 31 degrees after casting. The mean talar axis first metatasal base angle (TAMBA) angle was 60° before casting and this improved to 10.5°.
Conclusion:
Although our follow-up period is small, we would recommend early casting for idiopathic CVT along the same lines as the Ponseti technique for clubfoot except that the forces applied are in reverse direction. This early casting method can prevent extensive surgery in the future, however, a close vigil is required to detect any early relapse.
doi:10.4103/0019-5413.41860
PMCID: PMC2739479  PMID: 19753164
Casting; congenital vertical talus; conservative treatment
20.  Primary outcomes of the congenital vertical talus correction using the Dobbs method of serial casting and limited surgery 
Introduction
The traditional treatment for congenital vertical talus, which involves serial casting and extensive soft-tissue releases, has been associated with severe stiffness and other complications in adolescents and adults. Our hypothesis is that favorable results will be obtained using the Dobbs method of serial manipulation, casting, and limited surgery for vertical talus correction, even in older children and syndromic cases. Therefore, the present study aimed at evaluating the Dobbs method in such cases.
Materials and methods
We treated 15 feet of 10 patients (aged from 1 month to 9 years) using manipulation and serial casting or the reverse Ponseti method followed by percutaneous Achilles tenotomy and limited open reduction of the talonavicular joint. All patients were evaluated both clinically and radiologically in a mean follow-up period of 2 years.
Results
After 2 years, all patients had plantigrade and flexible feet with good radiographic correction. The mean talocalcaneal angle before (70.5° ± 10.5) and after (31° ± 5.2) treatment and the talar axis metatarsal base angle before (60° ± 11.4) and after (15° ± 6.7) treatment were significantly improved (P < 0.001).
Discussion
Recent research has shown that manipulation and serial casting followed by limited surgery (Dobbs method) was successful in treating idiopathic congenital vertical talus. Our results also showed that this method resulted in an excellent outcome in both idiopathic and syndromic congenital vertical talus, even in older children.
doi:10.1007/s11832-012-0433-z
PMCID: PMC3425696  PMID: 23904897
Congenital vertical talus; Casting; Conservative treatment
21.  Active ankle motion may result in changes to the talofibular interval in individuals with chronic ankle instability and ankle sprain copers: a preliminary study 
Introduction:
Alterations in talocrural joint arthrokinematics related to repositioning of the talus or fibula following ankle sprain have been reported in radiological and clinical studies. It is unclear if these changes can result from normal active ankle motion. The study objective was to determine if active movement created changes in the sagittal plane talofibular interval in ankles with a history of lateral ankle sprain and instability.
Methods:
Three subject groups [control (n = 17), ankle sprain copers (n = 20), and chronic ankle instability (n = 20)] underwent ultrasound imaging of the anterolateral ankle gutter to identify the lateral malleolus and talus over three trials. Between trials, subjects actively plantar and dorsiflexed the ankle three times. The sagittal plane talofibular interval was assessed by measuring the anteroposterior distance (mm) between the lateral malleolus and talus from an ultrasound image. Between group and trial differences were analyzed with repeated measures analysis of variance and post-hoc t-tests.
Results:
Fifty-seven subjects participated. A significant group-by-trial interaction was observed (F4,108 = 3.5; P = 0.009). The talofibular interval was increased in both copers [2.4±3.6 mm; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.73–4.1; P = 0.007] and chronic ankle instability (4.1±4.6 mm; 95% CI: 1.9–6.2; P = 0.001) at trial 3 while no changes were observed in control ankle talar position (0.06±2.8mm; 95% CI: −1.5–1.4; P = 0.93).
Discussion:
The talofibular interval increased only in subjects with a history of lateral ankle sprain with large clinical effect sizes observed. These findings suggest that an alteration in the position of the talus or fibula occurred with non-weight bearing sagittal plane motion. These findings may have diagnostic and therapeutic implications for manual therapists.
doi:10.1179/2042618612Y.0000000022
PMCID: PMC3744845  PMID: 24421623
Arthrokinematics; Instability; Talocrural; Ultrasound
22.  Skeletal Muscle Abnormalities and Genetic Factors Related to Vertical Talus 
Background/rationale
Congenital vertical talus is a fixed dorsal dislocation of the talonavicular joint and fixed equinus contracture of the hindfoot, causing a rigid deformity recognizable at birth. The etiology and epidemiology of this condition are largely unknown, but some evidence suggests it relates to aberrations of skeletal muscle. Identifying the tissue abnormalities and genetic causes responsible for vertical talus has the potential to lead to improved treatment and preventive strategies.
Questions/purposes
We therefore (1) determined whether skeletal muscle abnormalities are present in patients with vertical talus and (2) identified associated congenital anomalies and genetic abnormalities in these patients.
Methods
We identified associated congenital anomalies and genetic abnormalities present in 61 patients affected with vertical talus. We obtained abductor hallucis muscle biopsy specimens from the affected limbs of 11 of the 61 patients and compared the histopathologic characteristics with those of age-matched control subjects.
Results
All muscle biopsy specimens (n = 11) had abnormalities compared with those from control subjects including combinations of abnormal variation in muscle fiber size (n = 7), type I muscle fiber smallness (n = 6), and abnormal fiber type predominance (n = 5). Isolated vertical talus occurred in 23 of the 61 patients (38%), whereas the remaining 38 patients had associated nervous system, musculoskeletal system, and/or genetic and genomic abnormalities. Ten of the 61 patients (16%) had vertical talus in one foot and clubfoot in the other. Chromosomal abnormalities, all complete or partial trisomies, were identified in three patients with vertical talus who had additional congenital abnormalities.
Conclusions
Vertical talus is a heterogeneous birth defect resulting from many diverse etiologies. Abnormal skeletal muscle biopsies are common in patients with vertical talus although it is unclear whether this is primary or secondary to the joint deformity. Associated anomalies are present in 62% of all cases.
doi:10.1007/s11999-010-1475-5
PMCID: PMC3048242  PMID: 20645034
23.  Fluoroscopy-guided retrograde core drilling and cancellous bone grafting in osteochondral defects of the talus 
International Orthopaedics  2012;36(8):1635-1640.
Purpose
In undetached osteochondral lesions (OCL) of the talus both revitalisation of the subchondral necrosis and cartilage preservation are essential. For these cases, we assess the results of minimally invasive retrograde core drilling and cancellous bone grafting.
Methods
Forty-one osteochondral lesions of the talus (12x grade I, 22x grade II and 7x grade III according to the Pritsch classification, defect sizes 7–14 mm) in 38 patients (mean age 33.2 years) treated by fluoroscopy-guided retrograde core drilling and autologous cancellous bone grafting were evaluated by clinical scores and MRI. The mean follow-up was 29.0 (±13) months.
Results
The AOFAS score increased significantly from 47.3 (±15.3) to 80.8 (±18.6) points. Lesions with intact cartilage (grades I and II) had a tendency to superior results than grade III lesions (83.1 ± 17.3 vs. 69.4 ± 22.2 points, p = 0.07). First-line treatments and open distal tibial growth plates led to significantly better outcomes (each p < 0.05). Age, gender, BMI, time to follow-up, defect localisation or a traumatic origin did not influence the score results. On a visual analogue scale pain intensity reduced from 7.5 (±1.5) to 3.7 (±2.6) while subjective function increased from 4.6 (±2.0) to 8.2 (±2.3) (each p < 0.001). In MRI follow-ups, five of the 41 patients showed a complete bone remodelling. In two cases demarcation was detectable.
Conclusions
The technique reported is a highly effective therapeutic option in OCL of the talus with intact cartilage grades I and II. However, second-line treatments and grade III lesions with cracked cartilage surface can not be generally recommended for this procedure.
doi:10.1007/s00264-012-1530-9
PMCID: PMC3535023  PMID: 22491802
24.  The use of a retrograde fixed-angle intramedullary nail for tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis after severe loss of the talus 
Tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis may be the only means of obtaining a painless and stable limb when there is loss of the talus. We present the early results of a prospective study on tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis using a latest-generation retrograde intramedullary nail. In the period 2006–2007, nine patients underwent tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis with retrograde intramedullary nailing. Five of these patients had infection-related loss of the talus. SF-36, AOFAS ankle-hindfoot, and Mazur Ankle Arthrodesis scores were obtained pre-fusion, and at 6 weeks, 6 months and 1 year post-fusion. The patients were also followed up clinically and radiologically. Previous surgical procedures, chronic musculoskeletal problems and other comorbidities, and complications were recorded and analyzed. All patients were available for initial follow-up and were subjectively satisfied with their outcomes. Solid fusion was achieved and fully confirmed in nine cases. One subject died 8 weeks postoperatively of a pulmonary embolism. One patient had recurrent infection. At 1 year, only one patient still needed NSAIDs regularly for pain relief. The AOFAS score improved significantly (P = 0.012) from 32.1 pre-fusion to 71.5 points at 1 year as did the Mazur score, which rose by 31.2 to 72.5 points at 1 year (P = 0.012). The SF-36 score improved significantly in the domains physical functioning, role limitations due to physical problems, bodily pain, vitality, social functioning and mental health, as did the Physical Component Summary Score. Retrograde intramedullary nailing for tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis can produce a good outcome. However, in the presence of infection, patient selection for intramedullary procedures must be carefully considered on a case-by-case basis.
doi:10.1007/s11751-009-0067-y
PMCID: PMC2746277  PMID: 19756949
Talectomy; Tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis; Retrograde; Intramedullary nail; Ankle arthrodisis; Hindfoot
25.  The use of a retrograde fixed-angle intramedullary nail for tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis after severe loss of the talus 
Tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis may be the only means of obtaining a painless and stable limb when there is loss of the talus. We present the early results of a prospective study on tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis using a latest-generation retrograde intramedullary nail. In the period 2006–2007, nine patients underwent tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis with retrograde intramedullary nailing. Five of these patients had infection-related loss of the talus. SF-36, AOFAS ankle-hindfoot, and Mazur Ankle Arthrodesis scores were obtained pre-fusion, and at 6 weeks, 6 months and 1 year post-fusion. The patients were also followed up clinically and radiologically. Previous surgical procedures, chronic musculoskeletal problems and other comorbidities, and complications were recorded and analyzed. All patients were available for initial follow-up and were subjectively satisfied with their outcomes. Solid fusion was achieved and fully confirmed in nine cases. One subject died 8 weeks postoperatively of a pulmonary embolism. One patient had recurrent infection. At 1 year, only one patient still needed NSAIDs regularly for pain relief. The AOFAS score improved significantly (P = 0.012) from 32.1 pre-fusion to 71.5 points at 1 year as did the Mazur score, which rose by 31.2 to 72.5 points at 1 year (P = 0.012). The SF-36 score improved significantly in the domains physical functioning, role limitations due to physical problems, bodily pain, vitality, social functioning and mental health, as did the Physical Component Summary Score. Retrograde intramedullary nailing for tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis can produce a good outcome. However, in the presence of infection, patient selection for intramedullary procedures must be carefully considered on a case-by-case basis.
doi:10.1007/s11751-009-0067-y
PMCID: PMC2746277  PMID: 19756949
Talectomy; Tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis; Retrograde; Intramedullary nail; Ankle arthrodisis; Hindfoot

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