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1.  Detailed investigation of the role of common and low frequency WFS1 variants in type 2 diabetes risk 
Diabetes  2009;59(3):741-746.
OBJECTIVE
WFS1 (Wolfram Syndrome 1) SNPs are associated with risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Here, we aimed to refine this association and investigate the role of low frequency WFS1 variants in T2D risk.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
For fine-mapping, we sequenced WFS1 exons, splice junctions and conserved non-coding sequences in 24 T2D cases and 68 controls, selected tagging SNPs, and genotyped these in 959 UK T2D cases and 1386 controls. The same genomic regions were sequenced in 1235 T2D cases and 1668 controls to compare the frequency of rarer variants between cases and controls.
RESULTS
Of 31 tagging SNPs, the strongest associated was the previously untested 3′ UTR rs1046320 (P=0.008); OR=0.84, P=6.59 × 10−7 on further replication in 3753 cases and 4198 controls. High correlation between rs1046320 and the original strongest SNP (rs10010131) (r2=0.92) meant that we could not differentiate between their effects in our samples. There was no difference in the cumulative frequency of 82 rare (MAF<0.01) non-synonymous variants between T2D cases and controls (P=0.79). Two intermediate frequency (MAF 0.01-0.05) non-synonymous changes also showed no statistical association with T2D.
CONCLUSION
We identified six highly correlated SNPs that show strong and comparable associations with risk of T2D association but further refinement of these associations will require large sample sizes (>100,000), or studies in ethnically diverse populations. Low frequency variants in WFS1 are unlikely to have a large impact on T2D risk in white UK populations, highlighting the complexities of undertaking association studies with low frequency variants identified by re-sequencing.
doi:10.2337/db09-0920
PMCID: PMC2828659  PMID: 20028947
2.  Sequencing PDX1 (insulin promoter factor 1) in 1788 UK individuals found 5% had a low frequency coding variant, but these variants are not associated with Type 2 diabetes 
Diabetic Medicine  2011;28(6):681-684.
Aim
Genome-wide association studies have identified > 30 common variants associated with Type 2 diabetes (> 5% minor allele frequency). These variants have small effects on individual risk and do not account for a large proportion of the heritable component of the disease. Monogenic forms of diabetes are caused by mutations that occur in < 1:2000 individuals and follow strict patterns of inheritance. In contrast, the role of low frequency genetic variants (minor allele frequency 0.1–5%) in Type 2 diabetes is not known. The aim of this study was to assess the role of low frequency PDX1 (also called IPF1) variants in Type 2 diabetes.
Methods
We sequenced the coding and flanking intronic regions of PDX1 in 910 patients with Type 2 diabetes and 878 control subjects.
Results
We identified a total of 26 variants that occurred in 5.3% of individuals, 14 of which occurred once. Only D76N occurred in > 1%. We found no difference in carrier frequency between patients (5.7%) and control subjects (5.0%) (P = 0.46). There were also no differences between patients and control subjects when analyses were limited to subsets of variants. The strongest subset were those variants in the DNA binding domain where all five variants identified were only found in patients (P = 0.06).
Conclusion
Approximately 5% of UK individuals carry a PDX1 variant, but there is no evidence that these variants, either individually or cumulatively, predispose to Type 2 diabetes. Further studies will need to consider strategies to assess the role of multiple variants that occur in < 1 in 1000 individuals.
doi:10.1111/j.1464-5491.2011.03269.x
PMCID: PMC3586655  PMID: 21569088
diabetes; genetics; polygenic; variants
3.  Low-Frequency Variants in HMGA1 Are Not Associated With Type 2 Diabetes Risk 
Diabetes  2012;61(2):524-530.
It has recently been suggested that the low-frequency c.136–14_136–13insC variant in high-mobility group A1 (HMGA1) may strongly contribute to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes risk. In our study, we attempted to confirm that HMGA1 is a novel type 2 diabetes locus in French Caucasians. The gene was sequenced in 368 type 2 diabetic case subjects with a family history of type 2 diabetes and 372 normoglycemic control subjects without a family history of type 2 diabetes. None of the 41 genetic variations identified were associated with type 2 diabetes. The lack of association between the c.136–14_136–13insC variant and type 2 diabetes was confirmed in an independent French group of 4,538 case subjects and 4,015 control subjects and in a large meta-analysis of 16,605 case subjects and 46,179 control subjects. Finally, this variant had no effects on metabolic traits and was not involved in variations of HMGA1 and insulin receptor (INSR) expressions. The c.136–14_136–13insC variant was not associated with type 2 diabetes in individuals of European descent. Our study emphasizes the need to analyze a large number of subjects to reliably assess the association of low-frequency variants with the disease.
doi:10.2337/db11-0728
PMCID: PMC3266400  PMID: 22210315
4.  Functional Variants in MBL2 Are Associated With Type 2 Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes Traits in Pima Indians and the Old Order Amish 
Diabetes  2010;59(8):2080-2085.
OBJECTIVE
MBL2 encodes the mannose-binding lectin, which is a key player in the innate immune system and has recently been found to play a role in insulin resistance and development of type 1 diabetes and gestational diabetes mellitus. To assess the role of MBL2 in diabetes susceptibility, this gene was analyzed in the Pima Indian population, which has a high prevalence of type 2 diabetes.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
Nineteen tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in a population-based sample of 3,501 full-heritage Pima Indians, and selected SNPs were further genotyped in independent samples of Native American (n = 3,723) and Old Order Amish (n = 486) subjects.
RESULTS
Two variants, a promoter SNP (rs11003125) at −550 bp with a risk allele frequency of 0.77 and a Gly54Asp (rs1800450) with a risk allele frequency of 0.83, were associated with type 2 diabetes in the full-heritage Pima Indians (odds ratio 1.30 per copy of the G allele for rs1103125, P = 0.0007, and 1.30 per copy of the glycine allele for rs1800450, P = 0.002, adjusted for age, sex, birth year, and family membership). These associations replicated in an independent Native American sample (1.19, P = 0.04, for rs11003125) and a Caucasian sample, the Old Order Amish (1.51, P = 0.004, for rs1103125 and 2.38, P = 0.003, for rs1800450). Among Pima Indians with normal glucose tolerance, the diabetes risk allele glycine of Gly54Asp was associated with a decreased acute insulin response to an intravenous glucose bolus infusion (P = 0.004, adjusted for age, sex, percent body fat, glucose disposal under physiological insulin stimulation, and family membership).
CONCLUSIONS
Our data suggest that the functional variants in MBL2 contribute to type 2 diabetes susceptibility in both Native Americans and the Old Order Amish.
doi:10.2337/db09-1593
PMCID: PMC2911048  PMID: 20522590
5.  Genetic Risk Assessment of Type 2 Diabetes–Associated Polymorphisms in African Americans 
Diabetes Care  2012;35(2):287-292.
OBJECTIVE
Multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) susceptibility have been identified in predominantly European-derived populations. These SNPs have not been extensively investigated for individual and cumulative effects on T2D risk in African Americans.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
Seventeen index T2D risk variants were genotyped in 2,652 African American case subjects with T2D and 1,393 nondiabetic control subjects. Individual SNPs and cumulative risk allele loads were assessed for association with risk for T2D. Cumulative risk was assessed by counting risk alleles and evaluating the difference in cumulative risk scores between case subjects and control subjects. A second analysis weighted risk scores (ln [OR]) based on previously reported European-derived effect sizes.
RESULTS
Frequencies of risk alleles ranged from 8.6 to 99.9%. Eleven SNPs had ORs >1, and 5 from ADAMTS9, WFS1, CDKAL1, JAZF1, and TCF7L2 trended or had nominally significant evidence of T2D association (P < 0.05). Individuals carried between 13 and 29 risk alleles. Association was observed between T2D and increase in risk allele load (unweighted OR 1.04 [95% CI 1.01–1.08], P = 0.010; weighted 1.06 [1.03–1.10], P = 8.10 × 10−5). When TCF7L2 SNP rs7903146 was included as a covariate, the risk score was no longer associated with T2D in either model (unweighted 1.02 [0.98–1.05], P = 0.33; weighted 1.02 [0.98–1.06], P = 0.40).
CONCLUSIONS
The trend of increase in risk for T2D with increasing risk allele load is similar to observations in European-derived populations; however, these analyses indicate that T2D genetic risk is primarily mediated through the effect of TCF7L2 in African Americans.
doi:10.2337/dc11-0957
PMCID: PMC3263882  PMID: 22275441
6.  Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation in Finnish patients with matrilineal diabetes mellitus 
BMC Research Notes  2012;5:350.
Background
The genetic background of type 2 diabetes is complex involving contribution by both nuclear and mitochondrial genes. There is an excess of maternal inheritance in patients with type 2 diabetes and, furthermore, diabetes is a common symptom in patients with mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Polymorphisms in mtDNA have been reported to act as risk factors in several complex diseases.
Findings
We examined the nucleotide variation in complete mtDNA sequences of 64 Finnish patients with matrilineal diabetes. We used conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis and sequencing to detect sequence variation. We analysed the pathogenic potential of nonsynonymous variants detected in the sequences and examined the role of the m.16189 T>C variant. Controls consisted of non-diabetic subjects ascertained in the same population. The frequency of mtDNA haplogroup V was 3-fold higher in patients with diabetes. Patients harboured many nonsynonymous mtDNA substitutions that were predicted to be possibly or probably damaging. Furthermore, a novel m.13762 T>G in MTND5 leading to p.Ser476Ala and several rare mtDNA variants were found. Haplogroup H1b harbouring m.16189 T > C and m.3010 G > A was found to be more frequent in patients with diabetes than in controls.
Conclusions
Mildly deleterious nonsynonymous mtDNA variants and rare population-specific haplotypes constitute genetic risk factors for maternally inherited diabetes.
doi:10.1186/1756-0500-5-350
PMCID: PMC3434112  PMID: 22780954
Mitochondrial DNA; diabetes; Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups; m.16189 T>C; Maternal inheritance
7.  PPARG, KCNJ11, CDKAL1, CDKN2A-CDKN2B, IDE-KIF11-HHEX, IGF2BP2 and SLC30A8 Are Associated with Type 2 Diabetes in a Chinese Population 
PLoS ONE  2009;4(10):e7643.
Background
Recent advance in genetic studies added the confirmed susceptible loci for type 2 diabetes to eighteen. In this study, we attempt to analyze the independent and joint effect of variants from these loci on type 2 diabetes and clinical phenotypes related to glucose metabolism.
Methods/Principal Findings
Twenty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from fourteen loci were successfully genotyped in 1,849 subjects with type 2 diabetes and 1,785 subjects with normal glucose regulation. We analyzed the allele and genotype distribution between the cases and controls of these SNPs as well as the joint effects of the susceptible loci on type 2 diabetes risk. The associations between SNPs and type 2 diabetes were examined by logistic regression. The associations between SNPs and quantitative traits were examined by linear regression. The discriminative accuracy of the prediction models was assessed by area under the receiver operating characteristic curves. We confirmed the effects of SNPs from PPARG, KCNJ11, CDKAL1, CDKN2A-CDKN2B, IDE-KIF11-HHEX, IGF2BP2 and SLC30A8 on risk for type 2 diabetes, with odds ratios ranging from 1.114 to 1.406 (P value range from 0.0335 to 1.37E-12). But no significant association was detected between SNPs from WFS1, FTO, JAZF1, TSPAN8-LGR5, THADA, ADAMTS9, NOTCH2-ADAM30 and type 2 diabetes. Analyses on the quantitative traits in the control subjects showed that THADA SNP rs7578597 was association with 2-h insulin during oral glucose tolerance tests (P = 0.0005, empirical P = 0.0090). The joint effect analysis of SNPs from eleven loci showed the individual carrying more risk alleles had a significantly higher risk for type 2 diabetes. And the type 2 diabetes patients with more risk allele tended to have earlier diagnostic ages (P = 0.0006).
Conclusions/Significance
The current study confirmed the association between PPARG, KCNJ11, CDKAL1, CDKN2A-CDKN2B, IDE-KIF11-HHEX, IGF2BP2 and SLC30A8 and type 2 diabetes. These type 2 diabetes risk loci contributed to the disease additively.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0007643
PMCID: PMC2763267  PMID: 19862325
8.  Assessing the Combined Impact of 18 Common Genetic Variants of Modest Effect Sizes on Type 2 Diabetes Risk 
Diabetes  2008;57(11):3129-3135.
OBJECTIVES—Genome-wide association studies have dramatically increased the number of common genetic variants that are robustly associated with type 2 diabetes. A possible clinical use of this information is to identify individuals at high risk of developing the disease, so that preventative measures may be more effectively targeted. Here, we assess the ability of 18 confirmed type 2 diabetes variants to differentiate between type 2 diabetic case and control subjects.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—We assessed index single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for the 18 independent loci in 2,598 control subjects and 2,309 case subjects from the Genetics of Diabetes Audit and Research Tayside Study. The discriminatory ability of the combined SNP information was assessed by grouping individuals based on number of risk alleles carried and determining relative odds of type 2 diabetes and by calculating the area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve (AUC).
RESULTS—Individuals carrying more risk alleles had a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. For example, 1.2% of individuals with >24 risk alleles had an odds ratio of 4.2 (95% CI 2.11–8.56) against the 1.8% with 10–12 risk alleles. The AUC (a measure of discriminative accuracy) for these variants was 0.60. The AUC for age, BMI, and sex was 0.78, and adding the genetic risk variants only marginally increased this to 0.80.
CONCLUSIONS—Currently, common risk variants for type 2 diabetes do not provide strong predictive value at a population level. However, the joint effect of risk variants identified subgroups of the population at substantially different risk of disease. Further studies are needed to assess whether individuals with extreme numbers of risk alleles may benefit from genetic testing.
doi:10.2337/db08-0504
PMCID: PMC2570411  PMID: 18591388
9.  How Many Genetic Variants Remain to Be Discovered? 
PLoS ONE  2009;4(12):e7969.
A great majority of genetic markers discovered in recent genome-wide association studies have small effect sizes, and they explain only a small fraction of the genetic contribution to the diseases. How many more variants can we expect to discover and what study sizes are needed? We derive the connection between the cumulative risk of the SNP variants to the latent genetic risk model and heritability of the disease. We determine the sample size required for case-control studies in order to achieve a certain expected number of discoveries in a collection of most significant SNPs. Assuming similar allele frequencies and effect sizes of the currently validated SNPs, complex phenotypes such as type-2 diabetes would need approximately 800 variants to explain its 40% heritability. Much smaller numbers of variants are needed if we assume rare-variants but higher penetrance models. We estimate that up to 50,000 cases and an equal number of controls are needed to discover 800 common low-penetrant variants among the top 5000 SNPs. Under common and rare low-penetrance models, the very large studies required to discover the numerous variants are probably at the limit of practical feasibility. Under rare-variant with medium- to high-penetrance models (odds-ratios between 1.6 and 4.0), studies comparable in size to many existing studies are adequate provided the genotyping technology can interrogate more and rarer variants.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0007969
PMCID: PMC2780697  PMID: 19956539
10.  Birth Weight, Genetic Susceptibility, and Adulthood Risk of Type 2 Diabetes 
Diabetes Care  2012;35(12):2479-2484.
OBJECTIVE
Both stressful intrauterine milieus and genetic susceptibility have been linked to later-life diabetes risk. The current study aims to examine the interaction between low birth weight, a surrogate measure of stressful intrauterine milieus, and genetic susceptibility in relation to risk of type 2 diabetes in adulthood.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
The analysis included two independent, nested case-control studies of 2,591 type 2 diabetic case subjects and 3,052 healthy control subjects. We developed two genotype scores: an obesity genotype score based on 32 BMI-predisposing variants and a diabetes genotype score based on 35 diabetes-predisposing variants.
RESULTS
Obesity genotype scores showed a stronger association with type 2 diabetes risk in individuals with low birth weight. In low–birth weight individuals, the multivariable-adjusted odds ratio (OR) was 2.55 (95% CI 1.34–4.84) by comparing extreme quartiles of the obesity genotype score, while the OR was 1.27 (1.04–1.55) among individuals with birth weight >2.5 kg (P for interaction = 0.017). We did not observe significant interaction between diabetes genotype scores and birth weight with regard to risk of type 2 diabetes. In a comparison of extreme quartiles of the diabetes gene score, the multivariable-adjusted OR was 3.80 (1.76–8.24) among individuals with low birth weight and 2.27 (1.82–2.83) among those with high birth weight (P for interaction = 0.16).
CONCLUSIONS
Our data suggest that low birth weight and genetic susceptibility to obesity may synergistically affect adulthood risk of type 2 diabetes.
doi:10.2337/dc12-0168
PMCID: PMC3507591  PMID: 22923665
11.  The functional "KL-VS" variant of KLOTHO is not associated with type 2 diabetes in 5028 UK Caucasians 
BMC Medical Genetics  2006;7:51.
Background
Klotho has an important role in insulin signalling and the development of ageing-like phenotypes in mice. The common functional "KL-VS" variant in the KLOTHO (KL) gene is associated with longevity in humans but its role in type 2 diabetes is not known. We performed a large case-control and family-based study to test the hypothesis that KL-VS is associated with type 2 diabetes in a UK Caucasian population.
Methods
We genotyped 1793 cases, 1619 controls and 1616 subjects from 509 families for the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) F352V (rs9536314) that defines the KL-VS variant. Allele and genotype frequencies were compared between cases and controls. Family-based analysis was used to test for over- or under-transmission of V352 to affected offspring.
Results
Despite good power to detect odds ratios of 1.2, there were no significant associations between alleles or genotypes and type 2 diabetes (V352 allele: odds ratio = 0.96 (0.84–1.09)). Additional analysis of quantitative trait data in 1177 healthy control subjects showed no association of the variant with fasting insulin, glucose, triglycerides, HDL- or LDL-cholesterol (all P > 0.05). However, the HDL-cholesterol levels observed across the genotype groups showed a similar, but non-significant, pattern to previously reported data.
Conclusion
This is the first large-scale study to examine the association between common functional variation in KL and type 2 diabetes risk. We have found no evidence that the functional KL-VS variant is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes in a large UK Caucasian case-control and family-based study.
doi:10.1186/1471-2350-7-51
PMCID: PMC1534014  PMID: 16753056
12.  Linkage Disequilibrium Mapping of the Replicated Type 2 Diabetes Linkage Signal on Chromosome 1q 
Diabetes  2009;58(7):1704-1709.
OBJECTIVE
Linkage of the chromosome 1q21–25 region to type 2 diabetes has been demonstrated in multiple ethnic groups. We performed common variant fine-mapping across a 23-Mb interval in a multiethnic sample to search for variants responsible for this linkage signal.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
In all, 5,290 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were successfully genotyped in 3,179 type 2 diabetes case and control subjects from eight populations with evidence of 1q linkage. Samples were ascertained using strategies designed to enhance power to detect variants causal for 1q linkage. After imputation, we estimate ∼80% coverage of common variation across the region (r 2 > 0.8, Europeans). Association signals of interest were evaluated through in silico replication and de novo genotyping in ∼8,500 case subjects and 12,400 control subjects.
RESULTS
Association mapping of the 23-Mb region identified two strong signals, both of which were restricted to the subset of European-descent samples. The first mapped to the NOS1AP (CAPON) gene region (lead SNP: rs7538490, odds ratio 1.38 [95% CI 1.21–1.57], P = 1.4 × 10−6, in 999 case subjects and 1,190 control subjects); the second mapped within an extensive region of linkage disequilibrium that includes the ASH1L and PKLR genes (lead SNP: rs11264371, odds ratio 1.48 [1.18–1.76], P = 1.0 × 10−5, under a dominant model). However, there was no evidence for association at either signal on replication, and, across all data (>24,000 subjects), there was no indication that these variants were causally related to type 2 diabetes status.
CONCLUSIONS
Detailed fine-mapping of the 23-Mb region of replicated linkage has failed to identify common variant signals contributing to the observed signal. Future studies should focus on identification of causal alleles of lower frequency and higher penetrance.
doi:10.2337/db09-0081
PMCID: PMC2699860  PMID: 19389826
13.  Prospective Association Between Inflammatory Markers and Progression of Coronary Artery Calcification in Adults With and Without Type 1 Diabetes 
Diabetes Care  2013;36(7):1967-1973.
OBJECTIVE
The role of inflammation in the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in type 1 diabetes is unclear. We examined the association of inflammation and progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC)—a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis—in adults with and without type 1 diabetes.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
A nested case-control study was performed within the prospective cohort of the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI) study. Participants underwent two CAC measurements ∼2.5 years apart. Case subjects (n = 204) were those with significant progression of CAC. Control subjects (n = 258) were frequency-matched to case subjects on diabetes status, sex, age, and baseline CAC status. Inflammatory marker assessments were performed on stored blood samples from baseline. A principal components analysis (PCA) was performed and a composite score derived from that analysis. The composite score was constructed by assigning a value of 1 for each PCA component where at least one of the markers exceeded the 75th percentile (range 0–4). Conditional logistic regression was used for the matching strategy.
RESULTS
The first two components of the PCA were modestly (odds ratio 1.38 [95% CI 1.08–1.77] and 1.27 [1.02–1.59], respectively) associated with CAC progression after adjustment for other risk factors. The composite score was more strongly associated with CAC progression for those with elevated markers in three or four of the principal components compared with those with none.
CONCLUSIONS
Measures of inflammation were associated with progression of CAC in a population of adults with and without type 1 diabetes.
doi:10.2337/dc12-1874
PMCID: PMC3687315  PMID: 23340891
14.  Comprehensive Association Study of Type 2 Diabetes and Related Quantitative Traits With 222 Candidate Genes 
Diabetes  2008;57(11):3136-3144.
OBJECTIVE—Type 2 diabetes is a common complex disorder with environmental and genetic components. We used a candidate gene–based approach to identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variants in 222 candidate genes that influence susceptibility to type 2 diabetes.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—In a case-control study of 1,161 type 2 diabetic subjects and 1,174 control Finns who are normal glucose tolerant, we genotyped 3,531 tagSNPs and annotation-based SNPs and imputed an additional 7,498 SNPs, providing 99.9% coverage of common HapMap variants in the 222 candidate genes. Selected SNPs were genotyped in an additional 1,211 type 2 diabetic case subjects and 1,259 control subjects who are normal glucose tolerant, also from Finland.
RESULTS—Using SNP- and gene-based analysis methods, we replicated previously reported SNP-type 2 diabetes associations in PPARG, KCNJ11, and SLC2A2; identified significant SNPs in genes with previously reported associations (ENPP1 [rs2021966, P = 0.00026] and NRF1 [rs1882095, P = 0.00096]); and implicated novel genes, including RAPGEF1 (rs4740283, P = 0.00013) and TP53 (rs1042522, Arg72Pro, P = 0.00086), in type 2 diabetes susceptibility.
CONCLUSIONS—Our study provides an effective gene-based approach to association study design and analysis. One or more of the newly implicated genes may contribute to type 2 diabetes pathogenesis. Analysis of additional samples will be necessary to determine their effect on susceptibility.
doi:10.2337/db07-1731
PMCID: PMC2570412  PMID: 18678618
15.  Common Variation in the Fat Mass and Obesity-Associated (FTO) Gene Confers Risk of Obesity and Modulates BMI in the Chinese Population 
Diabetes  2008;57(8):2245-2252.
OBJECTIVE— Genetic variants in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene have been linked with obesity and type 2 diabetes in European populations. We aimed to test the role of FTO genetic variants in obesity and type 2 diabetes in the Chinese population.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS— We genotyped 19 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning from the 3′ end of the neighboring RPGRIP1L gene to the 5′ flanking region of the FTO gene. We analyzed their associations with obesity (638 case and 1,610 control subjects), type 2 diabetes (759 case and 784 control subjects), and obesity-related traits in nondiabetic subjects.
RESULTS— Among the 19 SNPs, the rs9939609 A allele was strongly associated with obesity (P = 7.0 × 10−4) and BMI (P = 0.0024) in the Chinese population. The odds ratio for obesity was 2.60 (95% CI 1.24–5.46) (P = 0.011) for the AA genotype and 1.32 (1.05–1.66) (P = 0.018) for the AT genotype compared with the TT genotype. Each additional copy of the rs9936609 A allele was associated with a BMI increase of ∼0.37 kg/m2. The rs9939609 A allele was substantially less common in the Chinese population than in the European population (12.6 vs. 45%). We did not find significant associations of the 19 SNPs with type 2 diabetes or other obesity-related traits.
CONCLUSIONS— Genetic variation in the FTO gene is strongly associated with obesity and BMI in the Chinese population. The risk variant is less common in the Chinese population, but its effect size on BMI is comparable with that in the European population.
doi:10.2337/db08-0377
PMCID: PMC2494679  PMID: 18487448
16.  Genome-Wide Association Scan for Diabetic Nephropathy Susceptibility Genes in Type 1 Diabetes 
Diabetes  2009;58(6):1403-1410.
OBJECTIVE
Despite extensive evidence for genetic susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy, the identification of susceptibility genes and their variants has had limited success. To search for genes that contribute to diabetic nephropathy, a genome-wide association scan was implemented on the Genetics of Kidneys in Diabetes collection.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
We genotyped ∼360,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 820 case subjects (284 with proteinuria and 536 with end-stage renal disease) and 885 control subjects with type 1 diabetes. Confirmation of implicated SNPs was sought in 1,304 participants of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT)/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study, a long-term, prospective investigation of the development of diabetes-associated complications.
RESULTS
A total of 13 SNPs located in four genomic loci were associated with diabetic nephropathy with P < 1 × 10−5. The strongest association was at the FRMD3 (4.1 protein ezrin, radixin, moesin [FERM] domain containing 3) locus (odds ratio [OR] = 1.45, P = 5.0 × 10−7). A strong association was also identified at the CARS (cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase) locus (OR = 1.36, P = 3.1 × 10−6). Associations between both loci and time to onset of diabetic nephropathy were supported in the DCCT/EDIC study (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.33, P = 0.02, and HR = 1.32, P = 0.01, respectively). We demonstratedexpression of both FRMD3 and CARS in human kidney.
CONCLUSIONS
We identified genetic associations for susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy at two novel candidate loci near the FRMD3 and CARS genes. Their identification implicates previously unsuspected pathways in the pathogenesis of this important late complication of type 1 diabetes.
doi:10.2337/db08-1514
PMCID: PMC2682673  PMID: 19252134
17.  Common variants in WFS1 confer risk of type 2 diabetes 
Nature genetics  2007;39(8):951-953.
We studied genes involved in pancreatic β cell function and survival, identifying associations between SNPs in WFS1 and diabetes risk in UK populations that we replicated in an Ashkenazi population and in additional UK studies. In a pooled analysis comprising 9,533 cases and 11,389 controls, SNPs in WFS1 were strongly associated with diabetes risk. Rare mutations in WFS1 cause Wolfram syndrome; using a gene-centric approach, we show that variation in WFS1 also predisposes to common type 2 diabetes.
doi:10.1038/ng2067
PMCID: PMC2672152  PMID: 17603484
18.  The +299(G>A) Resistin Gene Polymorphism and Susceptibility to Type 2 Diabetes in Thais 
The prevalence of type 2 diabetes has been increased in Thais. Resistin is an adipokine that involve in glucose homeostasis and is a candidate gene for type 2 diabetes. We performed a case-control study in representative sample of 200 Thai volunteers, 105 controls and 95 type 2 diabetes subjects. The purposes of the present study were to investigate the association between two SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) in the resistin gene, at positions +299(G>A) and −420(C>G), and biochemical parameters; to determine whether these polymorphisms are linked to increased risk of type 2 diabetes. At position +299(G>A) of the resistin gene, the resistin concentration among type 2 diabetes subjects was significantly higher in GA/AA genotypes (3.40 ng/ml) than the GG genotype (1.99 ng/ml). Resistin gene polymorphism at position +299(G>A) in type 2 diabetes patients was significantly more frequent than in the control group (p = 0.004). Polymorphism at position −420(C>G) showed no significant relationship with type 2 diabetes (p = 0.095). Logistic regression analysis was shown that +299(G>A) gene polymorphism was increased risk factors for type 2 diabetes (p = 0.013). In conclusion, these finding suggest that resistin gene polymorphism at position +299(G>A) has impact on the increased resistin concentrations and may influence susceptibility to type 2 diabetes in Thais.
doi:10.3164/jcbn.08-224
PMCID: PMC2613493  PMID: 19177195
+299(G>A) resistin gene polymorphism; type 2 diabetes
19.  Candidate Gene Association Study of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma in a High-Risk Region in Iran 
Cancer research  2009;69(20):7994-8000.
A region with a high risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in northeast of Iran was identified more than three decades ago. Previous studies suggest that hereditary factors play a role in the high incidence of cancer in the region. Polymorphisms of several genes have been associated with susceptibility to esophageal cancer in various populations, but these have not been studied in Iran. We selected 22 functional variants (and 130 related tagSNPs) from 15 genes which previously have been suggested to be associated with an increased risk of ESCC. We genotyped a primary set of samples from 451 Turkmen (197 cases and 254 controls). Seven of 152 variants were associated with ESCC at the P = 0.05 level; these SNPs were then studied in a validation set of 1668 cases and controls (Turkmen and non-Turkmen) under dominant and recessive models. In the joint sample set, five variants, from five different genes, showed significant associations with ESCC at the P = 0.05 level. For one variant, in ADH1B, the association was strong and was present in both Turkmen and non-Turkmen. The histidine allele at codon 48 of ADH1B gene was associated with a significantly decreased risk of ESCC under a recessive model (OR = 0.41, 95%, CI = 0.19 to 0.49; P = 4×10−4). For four additional variants, an association was present in the Turkmen subgroup, but the statistical significance of these was less compelling than for ADH1B. Two variants showed deleterious effects and two were protective. The G allele of the c.870A>G variant of CCND1 gene was associated with a 1.5-fold increased risk of ESCC under the recessive model (OR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.14 to 2.16, P = 0.02) and the A allele of the rs1625895 variant of TP53 gene was associated with a 1.5-fold increased risk of ESCC under a dominant model (OR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.21 to 4.07, P = 0.005). The C allele of the rs886205 variant of ALDH2 was associated with a decreased risk of ESCC under a recessive model (OR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.34 to 0.87, P = 0.02) and the A allele of the rs7087131 variant of MGMT was associated with a decreased risk of ESCC under the recessive model (OR = 0.26, 95% CI = 0.05 to 0.49, P=0.01). These results confirm that genetic predisposition to ESCC plays a role in high incidence of this cancer among Turkmens who live in northeast of Iran.
doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-09-1149
PMCID: PMC3505030  PMID: 19826048
Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma; Turkmen population; ADH1B; ALDH2; MGMT; TP53; CCND1
20.  Role of PTPRJ genotype in the risk for papillary thyroid carcinoma 
Endocrine-related cancer  2010;17(4):1001-1006.
The strong genetic predisposition to papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) might be due to a combination of low-penetrance susceptibility variants. Thus, the research into gene variants involved in the increase of susceptibility to PTC is a relevant field of investigation. The gene coding for the receptor-type tyrosine phosphatase PTPRJ has been proposed as a cancer susceptibility gene and its role as a tumor suppressor gene is well established in thyroid carcinogenesis. In this study we want to ascertain the role of PTPRJ genotype in the risk for papillary thyroid carcinoma. We performed a case-control study in which we determined the PTPRJ genotype for the non-synonymous Gln276Pro and Asp872Glu polymorphisms by PCR amplification and sequencing. We calculated allele and genotype frequencies for the considered polymorphisms of PTPRJ in a total sample of 299 cases (PTC patients) and 339 controls (healthy subjects) selected from Caucasian populations. We observed a significantly higher frequency of homozygotes for the Asp872 allele in the group of PTC patients than in the control group (OR = 1.61, 95% CI 1.15–2.25, P = 0.0053). We observed a non-significant increased frequency of homozygotes for Gln276Pro polymorphism in PTC cases in two distinct Caucasian populations. Therefore, the results reported here show that the homozygous genotype for Asp872 of PTPRJ is associated with an increased risk to develop papillary thyroid carcinoma.
doi:10.1677/ERC-10-0143
PMCID: PMC3915780  PMID: 20823296
papillary thyroid carcinoma; polymorphisms; protein tyrosine phosphatase; genetic predisposition
21.  Gene-Gene Interactions Lead to Higher Risk for Development of Type 2 Diabetes in an Ashkenazi Jewish Population 
PLoS ONE  2010;5(3):e9903.
Background
Evidence has accumulated that multiple genetic and environmental factors play important roles in determining susceptibility to type 2 diabetes (T2D). Although variants from candidate genes have become prime targets for genetic analysis, few studies have considered their interplay. Our goal was to evaluate interactions among SNPs within genes frequently identified as associated with T2D.
Methods/Principal Findings
Logistic regression was used to study interactions among 4 SNPs, one each from HNF4A[rs1884613], TCF7L2[rs12255372], WFS1[rs10010131], and KCNJ11[rs5219] in a case-control Ashkenazi sample of 974 diabetic subjects and 896 controls. Nonparametric multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) and generalized MDR (GMDR) were used to confirm findings from the logistic regression analysis. HNF4A and WFS1 SNPs were associated with T2D in logistic regression analyses [P<0.0001, P<0.0002, respectively]. Interaction between these SNPs were also strong using parametric or nonparametric methods: the unadjusted odds of being affected with T2D was 3 times greater in subjects with the HNF4A and WFS1 risk alleles than those without either (95% CI = [1.7–5.3]; P≤0.0001). Although the univariate association between the TCF7L2 SNP and T2D was relatively modest [P = 0.02], when paired with the HNF4A SNP, the OR for subjects with risk alleles in both SNPs was 2.4 [95% CI = 1.7–3.4; P≤0.0001]. The KCNJ11 variant reached significance only when paired with either the HNF4A or WFSI SNPs: unadjusted ORs were 2.0 [95% CI = 1.4–2.8; P≤0.0001] and 2.3 [95% CI = 1.2-4.4; P≤0.0001], respectively. MDR and GMDR results were consistent with the parametric findings.
Conclusions
These results provide evidence of strong independent associations between T2D and SNPs in HNF4A and WFS1 and their interaction in our Ashkenazi sample. We also observed an interaction in the nonparametric analysis between the HNF4A and KCNJ11 SNPs (P≤0.001), demonstrating that an independently non-significant variant may interact with another variant resulting in an increased disease risk.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0009903
PMCID: PMC2845632  PMID: 20361036
22.  A case-control analysis of common variants in GIP with type 2 diabetes and related biochemical parameters in a South Indian population 
BMC Medical Genetics  2010;11:118.
Background
Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is one of the incretins, which plays a crucial role in the secretion of insulin upon food stimulus and in the regulation of postprandial glucose level. It also exerts an effect on the synthesis and secretion of lipoprotein lipase, from adipocytes, important for lipid metabolism. The aim of our study was to do a case-control association analysis of common variants in GIP in association with type 2 diabetes and related biochemical parameters.
Method
A total of 2000 subjects which includes 1000 (584M/416F) cases with type 2 diabetes and 1000 (470M/530F) normoglycemic control subjects belonging to Dravidian ethnicity from South India were recruited to assess the effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GIP (rs2291725, rs2291726, rs937301) on type 2 diabetes in a case-control manner. The SNPs were genotyped by using tetra primer amplification refractory mutation system-PCR (ARMS PCR). For statistical analysis, our study population was divided into sub-groups based on gender (male and female). Association analysis was carried out using chi-squared test and the comparison of biochemical parameters among the three genotypes were performed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA).
Result
Initial analysis revealed that, out of the total three SNPs selected for the present study, two SNPs namely rs2291726 and rs937301 were in complete linkage disequilibrium (LD) with each other. Therefore, only two SNPs, rs2291725 and rs2291726, were genotyped for the association studies. No significant difference in the allele frequency and genotype distribution of any of the SNPs in GIP were observed between cases and controls (P > 0.05). Analysis of biochemical parameters among the three genotypes showed a significant association of total cholesterol (P = 0.042) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) with the G allele of the SNP rs2291726 in GIP (P = 0.004), but this was observed only in the case of female subjects. However this association does not remain significant after correction for multiple testing by Bonferroni's inequality method.
Conclusion
No statistically significant association was observed between any of the SNPs analysed and type 2 diabetes in our population. But the analysis of biochemical parameters indicates that the G allele in rs2291726 may be a putative risk allele for increased LDL cholesterol and further studies in other population needs to be carried out for ascertaining its role in cholesterol metabolism and subsequent cardiovascular risk.
doi:10.1186/1471-2350-11-118
PMCID: PMC2920866  PMID: 20673334
23.  Genetic variants at 2q24 are associated with susceptibility to type 2 diabetes 
Human Molecular Genetics  2010;19(13):2706-2715.
To identify type 2 diabetes (T2D) susceptibility loci, we conducted genome-wide association (GWA) scans in nested case–control samples from two prospective cohort studies, including 2591 patients and 3052 controls of European ancestry. Validation was performed in 11 independent GWA studies of 10 870 cases and 73 735 controls. We identified significantly associated variants near RBMS1 and ITGB6 genes at 2q24, best-represented by SNP rs7593730 (combined OR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.86–0.93; P = 3.7 × 10−8). The frequency of the risk-lowering allele T is 0.23. Variants in this region were nominally related to lower fasting glucose and HOMA-IR in the MAGIC consortium (P < 0.05). These data suggest that the 2q24 locus may influence the T2D risk by affecting glucose metabolism and insulin resistance.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddq156
PMCID: PMC2883345  PMID: 20418489
24.  Worldwide population differentiation at disease-associated SNPs 
BMC Medical Genomics  2008;1:22.
Background
Recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies have provided compelling evidence of association between genetic variants and common complex diseases. These studies have made use of cases and controls almost exclusively from populations of European ancestry and little is known about the frequency of risk alleles in other populations. The present study addresses the transferability of disease associations across human populations by examining levels of population differentiation at disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs).
Methods
We genotyped ~1000 individuals from 53 populations worldwide at 25 SNPs which show robust association with 6 complex human diseases (Crohn's disease, type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, coronary artery disease and obesity). Allele frequency differences between populations for these SNPs were measured using Fst. The Fst values for the disease-associated SNPs were compared to Fst values from 2750 random SNPs typed in the same set of individuals.
Results
On average, disease SNPs are not significantly more differentiated between populations than random SNPs in the genome. Risk allele frequencies, however, do show substantial variation across human populations and may contribute to differences in disease prevalence between populations. We demonstrate that, in some cases, risk allele frequency differences are unusually high compared to random SNPs and may be due to the action of local (i.e. geographically-restricted) positive natural selection. Moreover, some risk alleles were absent or fixed in a population, which implies that risk alleles identified in one population do not necessarily account for disease prevalence in all human populations.
Conclusion
Although differences in risk allele frequencies between human populations are not unusually large and are thus likely not due to positive local selection, there is substantial variation in risk allele frequencies between populations which may account for differences in disease prevalence between human populations.
doi:10.1186/1755-8794-1-22
PMCID: PMC2440747  PMID: 18533027
25.  THE REFERENCE HUMAN GENOME DEMONSTRATES HIGH RISK OF TYPE 1 DIABETES AND OTHER DISORDERS 
Personal genome resequencing has provided promising lead to personalized medicine. However, due to the limited samples and the lack of case/control design, current interpretation of personal genome sequences has been mainly focused on the identification and functional annotation of the DNA variants that are different from the reference genome. The reference genome was deduced from a collection of DNAs from anonymous individuals, some of whom might be carriers of disease risk alleles. We queried the reference genome against a large high-quality disease-SNP association database and found 3,556 disease-susceptible variants, including 15 rare variants. We assessed the likelihood ratio for risk for the reference genome on 104 diseases and found high risk for type 1 diabetes (T1D) and hypertension. We further demonstrated that the risk of T1D was significantly higher in the reference genome than those in a healthy patient with a whole human genome sequence. We found that the high T1D risk was mainly driven by a R260W mutation in PTPN22 in the reference genome. Therefore, we recommend that the disease-susceptible variants in the reference genome should be taken into consideration and future genome sequences should be interpreted with curated and predicted disease-susceptible loci to assess personal disease risk.
PMCID: PMC3732491  PMID: 21121051

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