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1.  Meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine: a new conjugate vaccine against invasive meningococcal disease 
Invasive meningococcal disease is a serious infection that occurs worldwide. It is caused by Neisseria meningitidis, of which six serogroups (A, B, C, W-135, X, and Y) are responsible for most infections. The case fatality rate of meningococcal disease remains high and can lead to significant sequelae. Vaccination remains the best strategy to prevent meningococcal disease. Polysaccharide vaccines were initially introduced in the late 1960s but their limitations (poor immunogenicity in infants and toddlers and hyporesponsiveness after repeated doses) have led to the development and use of meningococcal conjugate vaccines, which overcome these limitations. Two quadrivalent conjugated meningococcal vaccines – MenACWY-DT (Menactra®) and MenACWY-CRM197 (Menveo®) – using diphtheria toxoid or a mutant protein, respectively, as carrier proteins have already been licensed in the US. Recently, a quadrivalent meningococcal vaccine conjugated to tetanus toxoid (MenACWY-TT; Nimenrix®) was approved for use in Europe in 2012. The immunogenicity of MenACWY-TT, its reactogenicity and safety profile, as well as its coadministration with other vaccines are discussed in this review. Clinical trials showed that MenACWY-TT was immunogenic in children above the age of 12 months, adolescents, and adults, and has an acceptable reactogenicity and safety profile. Its coadministration with several other vaccines that are commonly used in children, adolescents, and adults did not affect the immunogenicity of MenACWY-TT or the coadministered vaccine, nor did it affect its reactogenicity and safety. Other studies are now ongoing in order to determine the immunogenicity, reactogenicity, and safety of MenACWY-TT in infants from the age of 6 weeks.
doi:10.2147/IDR.S36243
PMCID: PMC3979687  PMID: 24729718
coadministration; immunogenicity; meningococcal conjugate vaccine; reactogenicity and safety
2.  Immunogenicity and Safety of a Multicomponent Meningococcal Serogroup B Vaccine and a Quadrivalent Meningococcal CRM197 Conjugate Vaccine against Serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y in Adults Who Are at Increased Risk for Occupational Exposure to Meningococcal Isolates▿  
Laboratory staff who work with meningococcal isolates are at increased risk for developing invasive disease relative to the general population. This was the first study of laboratory workers who received both a conjugate vaccine against meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y (Men ACWY-CRM, Menveo) and an investigational multicomponent vaccine against serogroup B containing factor H binding protein, neisserial adhesin A, Neisseria heparin binding antigen, and New Zealand strain outer membrane vesicles (4CMenB). Healthy adults (18 to 50 years of age) received three doses of 4CMenB at baseline, 2 months, and 6 months followed by a single dose of MenACWY-CRM 1 month later. Immunogenicity was assessed via serum bactericidal assay using human complement (hSBA) at 1 month postvaccination; solicited reactogenicity and adverse events were monitored. Fifty-four participants enrolled. Bactericidal immune responses were evident after each dose of 4CMenB, as assessed by hSBA geometric mean titers and percentages of subjects with hSBA titers of ≥4 against the test strains or a 4-fold rise in titer over baseline. At 1 month postvaccination, most MenACWY-CRM recipients had hSBA titers of ≥8 against serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y. Few participants discontinued due to an adverse event or vaccine reaction. Rates of solicited reactions were lower after MenACWY-CRM than after 4CMenB administration. Sequential administration of 4CMenB and MenACWY-CRM provided robust evidence of an immune response against serogroups A, B, C, W-135, and Y in laboratory workers routinely exposed to meningococcal isolates.
doi:10.1128/CVI.00304-10
PMCID: PMC3067382  PMID: 21177912
3.  Immunogenicity and Safety of a Quadrivalent Meningococcal Serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y Tetanus Toxoid Conjugate Vaccine (MenACWY-TT) Administered to Adults Aged 56 Years and Older: Results of an Open-Label, Randomized, Controlled Trial 
Drugs & Aging  2013;30(5):309-319.
Background
The burden of invasive meningococcal disease is substantial in older adults in whom the case fatality rate is high. Travelers to regions with high rates of meningococcal disease, such as Hajj pilgrims, are at increased risk of meningococcal infection, and disease transmission from travelers to their close contacts has been documented. In younger individuals, meningococcal conjugate vaccines offer advantages over polysaccharide vaccines in terms of duration of protection and boostability, and induction of herd immune effects through reductions in nasopharyngeal carriage of meningococci. To date, few data are available evaluating meningococcal conjugate vaccine use in adults >55 years of age.
Objective
To evaluate the immunogenicity and safety of quadrivalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y vaccine with all serogroups conjugated to tetanus toxoid (MenACWY-TT, Nimenrix™, GlaxoSmithKline, Belgium) and a licensed quadrivalent polysaccharide vaccine (MenPS, Mencevax™ GlaxoSmithKline, Belgium) in adults >55 years of age.
Methods
This was a phase IIIb, open-label, randomized (3:1), controlled study conducted at one study center in Lebanon. A total of 400 healthy adults between 56 and 103 years of age without previous MenPS or tetanus toxoid vaccination within the previous 5 years or meningococcal conjugate vaccination at any time previously were included. They received a single-dose vaccination with MenACWY-TT or MenPS with blood sampling before and 1 month after vaccination. The main outcome measures were serum bactericidal activity (rabbit complement source: rSBA) vaccine response (VR) rate [rSBA titer of ≥1:32 in initially seronegative subjects (rSBA titer <1:8); ≥4-fold increase in subjects with pre-vaccination rSBA titers between 1:8 and 1:128, and ≥2-fold increase in subjects with pre-vaccination rSBA titers ≥1:128]. The percentages of subjects with rSBA titers ≥1:8 and ≥1:128 and rSBA geometric mean titers (GMTs) were assessed. Solicited adverse events were recorded for 4 days following vaccination, and all other adverse events, including the incidence of new onset chronic diseases, were recorded for 31 days after vaccination.
Results
One month after a single dose of MenACWY-TT, the rSBA VR rate in the MenACWY-TT group was 76.6 % for serogroup A, 80.3 % for serogroup C, 77.5 % for serogroup W-135 and 81.9 % for serogroup Y. VR rates in the MenPS group were 91.7, 84.8, 87.1 and 89.1 %, respectively. One month after vaccination, ≥93.2 % of subjects in the MenACWY-TT group and ≥93.9 % in the MenPS group had rSBA titers ≥1:128. In each group, GMTs increased by ≥13-fold for each serogroup. rSBA VR and GMTs tended to be lower in subjects who were over 65 years compared to 56–65 years of age. Only 6.3 % of MenACWY-TT recipients had anti-TT ≥0.1 IU/ml prior to vaccination, increasing to 28.1 % post-vaccination. The rSBA GMTs were 1.9- to 4-fold higher in anti-TT responders. Each local and general solicited symptom was reported by no more than 3.0 % of subjects in either group. No serious adverse events were considered vaccine related.
Conclusion
In adults 56 years of age and older, MenACWY-TT was immunogenic, with a vaccine response rate ≥76 % and with ≥93 % of subjects achieving rSBA titers ≥1:128 against all four serogroups after a single dose. MenACWY-TT induced low anti-TT concentrations in this population, which deserves further study.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s40266-013-0065-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1007/s40266-013-0065-0
PMCID: PMC3634976  PMID: 23494214
4.  Immunogenicity and safety of the quadrivalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) in 2–10-year-old children: results of an open, randomised, controlled study 
European Journal of Pediatrics  2013;172(5):601-612.
In Europe, the introduction of monovalent meningococcal serogroup C (MenC) conjugate vaccines has resulted in a significant decline in MenC invasive disease. However, given the potential for strain evolution and increasing travel to areas of high endemicity, protection against additional serogroups is needed. In this study, the immunogenicity, measured by a serum bactericidal activity assay using rabbit complement (rSBA), and the safety of a quadrivalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) were compared to that of a licensed monovalent MenC conjugate vaccine (MenC-CRM197) in children 2–10 years of age. Children were randomised (3:1) to receive a single dose of either MenACWY-TT or MenC-CRM197. Non-inferiority of the immunogenicity of MenACWY-TT versus MenC-CRM197 in terms of rSBA-MenC vaccine response was demonstrated. Exploratory analyses suggested that rSBA-MenC geometric mean titres adjusted for pre-vaccination titres were lower in children vaccinated with MenACWY-TT compared to MenC-CRM197. Nevertheless, at 1 month post-vaccination, ≥99.3 % of the children who received MenACWY-TT had rSBA titres ≥1:128 for each of the four vaccine serogroups, which is the more conservative correlate of protection. The reactogenicity and safety profile of MenACWY-TT was clinically acceptable and no serious adverse events considered related to vaccination were reported throughout the study. Conclusion: When administered to European school-age children, MenACWY-TT has a clinically acceptable safety profile and, when compared with MenC-CRM197, the potential to broaden protection against meningococcal disease caused by serogroups A, W-135 and Y while maintaining protection against MenC. This study has been registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00674583.
doi:10.1007/s00431-012-1924-0
PMCID: PMC3631514  PMID: 23307281
Quadrivalent meningococcal vaccine; Conjugate vaccine; Tetanus toxoid; Child; Bactericidal activity; Randomised trial
5.  Randomized trial to assess the immunogenicity, safety and antibody persistence up to three years after a single dose of a tetravalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine in toddlers 
Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics  2012;8(12):1892-1903.
Effective vaccines offering broad protection to toddlers, who are at high risk for invasive meningococcal disease, are needed. Here, the immunogenicity, safety and antibody persistence of the tetravalent meningococcal ACWY tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) were evaluated in toddlers. Healthy participants aged 12 to 23 mo (n = 304) were randomized (3:1) to receive one dose of MenACWY-TT or a monovalent meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine (MenC-CRM197). Serum bactericidal activity was evaluated with assays using rabbit (rSBA) and human (hSBA) complement up to three years post-vaccination. MenACWY-TT was demonstrated to be non-inferior to MenC-CRM197 in terms of immunogenicity to serogroup C, and the pre-specified immunogenicity criteria for serogroups A, W-135 and Y were met. Exploratory analyses suggested that rSBA geometric mean titers (GMTs), hSBA GMTs and proportions of toddlers with rSBA titers ≥ 1:128 and hSBA titers ≥ 1:4 and ≥ 1:8 were higher for all serogroups at one month post-vaccination with MenACWY-TT compared with MenC-CRM197. At three years post-vaccination, at least 90.8% and 73.6% of MenACWY-TT recipients retained rSBA titers ≥ 1:8 for all serogroups and hSBA titers ≥ 1:4 for serogroups C, W-135 and Y, respectively, but the percentages of toddlers with hSBA titers ≥ 1:4 for serogroup A decreased to 21.8%. In both groups, grade 3 adverse events were infrequently reported and no serious adverse events were considered causally related to vaccination. These results suggest that one single dose of MenACWY-TT induces a robust and persistent immune response and has an acceptable safety profile in toddlers. This study has been registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00427908.
doi:10.4161/hv.22166
PMCID: PMC3656082  PMID: 23032159
tetravalent meningococcal vaccine; conjugate vaccine; toddler; bactericidal activity; persistence; safety
6.  Meningococcal Polysaccharide A O-Acetylation Levels Do Not Impact the Immunogenicity of the Quadrivalent Meningococcal Tetanus Toxoid Conjugate Vaccine: Results from a Randomized, Controlled Phase III Study of Healthy Adults Aged 18 to 25 Years 
Clinical and Vaccine Immunology : CVI  2013;20(10):1499-1507.
In this study, we compared the immunogenicities of two lots of meningococcal ACWY-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) that differed in serogroup A polysaccharide (PS) O-acetylation levels and evaluated their immunogenicities and safety in comparison to a licensed ACWY polysaccharide vaccine (Men-PS). In this phase III, partially blinded, controlled study, 1,170 healthy subjects aged 18 to 25 years were randomized (1:1:1) to receive one dose of MenACWY-TT lot A (ACWY-A) (68% O-acetylation), MenACWY-TT lot B (ACWY-B) (92% O-acetylation), or Men-PS (82% O-acetylation). Immunogenicity was evaluated in terms of serum bactericidal activity using rabbit complement (i.e., rabbit serum bactericidal activity [rSBA]). Solicited symptoms, unsolicited adverse events (AEs), and serious AEs (SAEs) were recorded. The immunogenicities, in terms of rSBA geometric mean titers, were comparable for both lots of MenACWY-TT. The vaccine response rates across the serogroups were 79.1 to 97.0% in the two ACWY groups and 73.7 to 94.1% in the Men-PS group. All subjects achieved rSBA titers of ≥1:8 for all serogroups. All subjects in the two ACWY groups and 99.5 to 100% in the Men-PS group achieved rSBA titers of ≥1:128. Pain was the most common solicited local symptom and was reported more frequently in the ACWY group (53.9 to 54.7%) than in the Men-PS group (36.8%). The most common solicited general symptoms were fatigue and headache, which were reported by 28.6 to 30.3% and 26.9 to 31.0% of subjects, respectively. Two subjects reported SAEs; one SAE was considered to be related to vaccination (blighted ovum; ACWY-B group). The level of serogroup A PS O-acetylation did not affect vaccine immunogenicity. MenACWY-TT (lot A) was not inferior to Men-PS in terms of vaccine response and was well tolerated.
doi:10.1128/CVI.00162-13
PMCID: PMC3807210  PMID: 23885033
7.  Immune response, antibody persistence, and safety of a single dose of the quadrivalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine in adolescents and adults: results of an open, randomised, controlled study 
BMC Infectious Diseases  2013;13:116.
Background
The best strategy to protect individuals against meningococcal disease is to immunize against multiple serogroups. Immunogenicity, antibody persistence, and safety of the EU-licensed meningococcal ACWY-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) were evaluated in healthy participants aged 11–55 years from the Philippines and Saudi Arabia.
Methods
In this phase IIb, open, controlled study, 500 participants were randomised (3:1) to receive one dose of MenACWY-TT or a licensed meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine (Men-PS). Functional antibody responses against meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y were assessed by a serum bactericidal antibody assay using rabbit complement (rSBA) at Month 0, Month 1, Year 1, Year 2, and Year 3. Vaccine response was defined as an rSBA titre ≥32 at Month 1 in participants who were seronegative (rSBA titre <8) pre-vaccination and as at least a four-fold increase in titre in participants who were seropositive pre-vaccination. Solicited symptoms were recorded up to Day 4, safety outcomes up to Month 6, and serious adverse events related to vaccination up to Year 3.
Results
Pre-specified criteria for non-inferiority of MenACWY-TT versus Men-PS were met in terms of rSBA vaccine response and incidence of grade 3 general symptoms. At Month 1, 82.7%–96.3% of MenACWY-TT and 69.7%–91.7% in Men-PS recipients had a vaccine response for each serogroup. At Year 3, ≥99.1% and ≥92.9% of MenACWY-TT recipients retained rSBA titres ≥8 and ≥128, respectively, as compared to ≥86.7% and ≥80.0% in the Men-PS group. Both vaccines had a clinically acceptable safety profile, although injection site redness and swelling were more frequent in MenACWY-TT recipients.
Conclusions
These results suggest that MenACWY-TT could protect adolescents and adults against meningococcal disease up to three years post-vaccination.
Trial registration
This study is registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/NCT00356369.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-13-116
PMCID: PMC3599520  PMID: 23510357
Quadrivalent meningococcal vaccine; Conjugate vaccine; Bactericidal activity; Persistence; Safety; The Philippines; Saudi Arabia
8.  Randomized Trial on the Safety, Tolerability, and Immunogenicity of MenACWY-CRM, an Investigational Quadrivalent Meningococcal Glycoconjugate Vaccine, Administered Concomitantly with a Combined Tetanus, Reduced Diphtheria, and Acellular Pertussis Vaccine in Adolescents and Young Adults▿ †  
This study evaluated the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of an investigational quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine, MenACWY-CRM, when administered concomitantly with a combined tetanus, reduced diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine, in subjects aged 11 to 25 years. Subjects received either MenACWY-CRM and Tdap, MenACWY-CRM and saline placebo, or Tdap and saline placebo. No significant increase in reactogenicity and no clinically significant vaccine-related adverse events (AEs) occurred when MenACWY-CRM and Tdap were administered concomitantly. Similar immunogenic responses to diphtheria, tetanus, and meningococcal (serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y) antigens were observed, regardless of concomitant vaccine administration. Antipertussis antibody responses were comparable between vaccine groups for filamentous hemagglutinin and were slightly lower, although not clinically significantly, for pertussis toxoid and pertactin when the two vaccines were administered concomitantly. These results indicate that the investigational MenACWY-CRM vaccine is well tolerated and immunogenic and that it can be coadministered with Tdap to adolescents and young adults.
doi:10.1128/CVI.00436-09
PMCID: PMC2849330  PMID: 20164251
9.  A randomized study to assess the immunogenicity, antibody persistence and safety of a tetravalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine in children aged 2–10 years 
Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics  2012;8(12):1882-1891.
Incidence of meningococcal diseases is high in children, and effective vaccines are needed for this age group. In this phase II, open, controlled study, 309 children aged 2–10 y from Finland were randomized (3:1) into two parallel groups to receive one dose of meningococcal ACWY-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (ACWY-TT group; n = 231) or a licensed meningococcal ACWY polysaccharide vaccine (Men-PS group; n = 78). Serum bactericidal activity using rabbit complement (rSBA) was evaluated up to three years post-vaccination. Exploratory comparisons suggested that rSBA vaccine response rates and geometric mean titers (GMTs) for each serogroup at one month post-vaccination and rSBA GMTs for serogroups A, W-135 and Y up to three years post-vaccination were higher in the ACWY-TT compared with Men-PS group, but did not detect any difference between groups in terms of rSBA-MenC GMTs at three years post-vaccination; this is explained by the higher proportion of children from the Men-PS group who were excluded because they were re-vaccinated with a monovalent meningococcal serogroup C vaccine due to loss of protective antibody levels against this serogroup. Although there was a higher incidence of local reactogenicity in the ACWY-TT group, general and unsolicited symptoms reporting rates were comparable in both groups. This study showed that MenACWY-TT was immunogenic with a clinically acceptable safety profile in children aged 2–10 y. MenACWY-TT induced higher functional antibody titers for all serogroups, which persisted longer for serogroups A, W-135 and Y, than the MenACWY polysaccharide vaccine. This study has been registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00427908.
doi:10.4161/hv.22165
PMCID: PMC3656081  PMID: 23032168
tetravalent meningococcal vaccine; conjugate vaccine; polysaccharide vaccine; bactericidal activity; child; safety; immunogenicity; persistence
10.  Correlation between serum bactericidal activity against Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y measured using human versus rabbit serum as the complement source. 
Vaccine  2011;30(1):29-34.
The surrogate of protection against invasive meningococcal disease is the presence of serum bactericidal activity (SBA) at a titer ≥4 in an assay using human serum as the complement source (hSBA). However, for various practical and logistical reasons, many meningococcal vaccines in use today were licensed based on a modified SBA assay that used baby rabbit serum as the complement source (rSBA). To assess the strength of correlation between the two assay systems for serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y, we analyzed a subset of samples from adolescent subjects enrolled in a Phase II study of Novartis’ MenACWY-CRM conjugate vaccine vs. an ACWY polysaccharide vaccine; samples were analyzed in parallel using hSBA and rSBA. We compared geometric mean titers (GMTs), calculated Pearson correlation coefficients between paired hSBA and rSBA results, and calculated sensitivity/specificity and likelihood ratios for an rSBA ≥8 or ≥128 for classifying hSBA ≥4, taking hSBA as the ‘gold standard’. Correlations between hSBA and rSBA ranged from 0.46 to 0.78 for serogroup C, but were weaker for serogroups A, W-135 and Y (range -0.15 to 0.57). In post vaccination samples, nearly all subjects had rSBA titers ≥8, though up to 15% remained seronegative by hSBA. In post vaccination settings, rSBA titers at ≥8 or ≥128 was highly sensitive for an hSBA titer ≥4, but non-specific. In conclusion, results generated by rSBA did not accurately classify serostatus according to hSBA for serogroups A, W-135 and Y.
doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2011.10.068
PMCID: PMC3906633  PMID: 22075087
Meningococcal vaccine; bactericidal assay; correlation; rabbit; human; serum
11.  Critical appraisal of a quadrivalent CRM197 conjugate vaccine against meningococcal serogroups A, C W-135 and Y (Menveo®) in the context of treatment and prevention of invasive disease 
Worldwide, invasive meningococcal disease affects about 500,000 people annually. Case fatality in developed countries averages 10%, and higher rates are reported in less prosperous regions. According to the World Health Organization, the most important pathogenic serogroups are A, B, C, W-135, X, and Y. Clinical features of invasive meningococcal disease make diagnosis and management difficult. Antibiotic measures are recommended for prophylaxis after exposure and for treatment of invasive meningococcal disease cases; however, resistant strains may be emerging. Vaccines are generally regarded as the best preventative measure for invasive meningococcal disease. Polysaccharide vaccines against serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y using protein conjugation technology have clear advantages over older plain polysaccharide formulations without a protein component. The first quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-D) was licensed in the US in 2005. More recently, MenACWY-CRM (Menveo®) was licensed in Europe, the US, the Middle East, and Latin America. MenACWY-CRM uses cross-reactive material 197, a nontoxic mutant of diphtheria toxin, as the carrier protein. MenACWY-CRM offers robust immunogenicity in all age groups, with a tolerability profile similar to that of a plain polysaccharide vaccine. Given its potential for protecting persons from infancy to old age, MenACWY-CRM offers the opportunity to protect broad populations against invasive meningococcal disease. The most optimal strategy for use of the vaccine has to be assessed country by country on the basis of local epidemiology, individual health care systems, and need.
doi:10.2147/IDR.S12716
PMCID: PMC3163984  PMID: 21904459
invasive meningococcal disease; quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine; Neisseria meningitidis
12.  Persistence of immune responses after a single dose of Novartis meningococcal serogroup A, C, W-135 and Y CRM-197 conjugate vaccine (Menveo®) or Menactra® among healthy adolescents 
Human Vaccines  2010;6(11):881-887.
The persistence of human bactericidal activity (hSBA) responses in adolescents was assessed 22 months after vaccination with one dose of Menveo® (MenACWY-CRM; Novartis) or Menactra® (MCV4) (sanofi pasteur). The proportion of subjects with hSBA titers ≥8 was significantly higher among recipients of MenACWY-CRM than MCV4 for serogroups A, W-135 and Y.
doi:10.4161/hv.6.11.12849
PMCID: PMC3060384  PMID: 21339701
meningococcal disease; CRM-197; Menveo; Menactra; conjugate vaccine; neisseria meningitidis
13.  Antibody persistence and immune memory 15 months after priming with an investigational tetravalent meningococcal tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) in toddlers and young children 
The present extension study, conducted in children originally vaccinated at 12–14 mo or 3–5 y of age, assessed antibody persistence and immune memory induced by an investigational tetravalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT). In the original study, participants were randomized to receive one dose of MenACWY-TT or licensed age-appropriate meningococcal control vaccines. Fifteen months post-vaccination, all participants underwent serum sampling to evaluate antibody persistence and participants previously vaccinated as toddlers received a polysaccharide challenge to assess immune memory development.
 
Exploratory comparisons showed that (1) All children and ≥ 92.3% of the toddlers maintained serum bactericidal (rSBA) titers ≥ 1:8 at 15 mo post MenACWY-TT vaccination; statistically significantly higher rSBA geometric mean titers (GMTs) were observed compared with control vaccines. (2) At one month after polysaccharide challenge, all toddlers primed with MenACWY-TT or with the monovalent serogroup C conjugate vaccine had rSBA titers ≥ 1:8 and ≥ 1:128 for serogroup C and similar rSBA-GMTs; rSBA-GMTs for serogroups A, W-135 and Y were statistically significantly higher in toddlers primed with MenACWY-TT compared with the control vaccine. Thus, a single dose of MenACWY-TT induced persisting antibodies in toddlers and children and immune memory in toddlers.
This study has been registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00126984.
doi:10.4161/hv.20229
PMCID: PMC3495722  PMID: 22485049
children; immune memory; meningococcal vaccine; persistence; tetanus toxoid; toddlers
14.  The immunogenicity and safety of an investigational meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (ACWY-TT) compared with a licensed meningococcal tetravalent polysaccharide vaccine 
Immunogenicity and safety of ACWY-TT compared with licensed ACWY polysaccharide vaccine (MenPS) in healthy adults, and lot-to-lot consistency of three ACWY-TT lots were evaluated in a phase 3, open, controlled study. Adults aged 18–55 y were randomized to receive ACWY-TT (one of three lots) or MenPS. Serum bactericidal antibodies (rSBA) were measured pre- and 1 mo post-vaccination. Adverse events (AEs) were assessed 4 d (solicited symptoms) and 31 d (unsolicited symptoms) post-vaccination. Serious AEs were reported up to 6 mo after vaccination. The number of vaccinated subjects was 1247 (ACWY-TT, n = 935; MenPS, n = 312). ACWY-TT lot-to-lot consistency and non-inferiority of ACWY-TT as compared with MenPS groups were demonstrated according to pre-specified criteria. The percentages of subjects with a vaccine response (VR = rSBA titer ≥ 1:32 in initially seronegative; ≥ 4-fold increase in initially seropositive) to ACWY-TT vs. MenPS were 80.1%/69.8% (serogroup A), 91.5%/ 92.0% (C), 90.2%/85.5% (W-135), 87.0%/78.8% (Y). Exploratory analyses showed that for serogroups A, W-135 and Y, VR rates and GMTs were significantly higher for ACWY-TT compared with MenPS. For each serogroup, ≥ 98.0% of subjects had rSBA titers ≥ 1:128. Grade 3 solicited AEs were reported in ≤ 1.6% of subjects in any group. The immunogenicity of ACWY-TT vaccine was non-inferior to MenPS for all four serogroups in adults, with significantly higher VR rates to serogroups A, W-135 and Y and an acceptable safety profile. Consistency of 3 ACWY-TT production lots was demonstrated. These data suggest that, if licensed, ACWY-TT conjugate vaccine may be used for protection against invasive meningococcal disease in healthy adults.
 
This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov NCT00453986
doi:10.4161/hv.20211
PMCID: PMC3495723  PMID: 22485050
ACWY-TT vaccine; Neisseria meningitidis; adult; bactericidal activity; conjugate vaccine; immunogenicity; safety; tetravalent meningococcal vaccine; vaccine
15.  Meningococcal Serogroup A, C, W135 and Y Conjugated Vaccine: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis in the Netherlands 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(5):e65036.
Background
In 2002, vaccination with a serogroup C meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenC) was introduced in the Netherlands for all children aged 14 months. Despite its success, herd immunity may wane over time. Recently, a serogroup A,C,W135,Y meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY) was licensed for use in subjects of 12 months of age and above.
Objectives
To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of meningococcal vaccination at 14 months and an additional vaccination at the age of 12 years, both with the MenACWY vaccine.
Methods
A decision analysis cohort model, with 185,000 Dutch newborns, was used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of different immunization strategies. For strategies including a vaccination at 12 years of age, an additional cohort with adolescents aged 12 years was followed. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was estimated for the current disease incidence and for a scenario when herd immunity is lost.
Results
Vaccination with MenACWY at 14 months is cost-saving. Vaccinating with MenACWY at 14 months and at 12 years would prevent 7 additional cases of meningococcal serogroup A,C,W135,Y disease in the birth cohort and adolescent cohort followed for 99 years compared to the current vaccine schedule of a single vaccination with MenC at 14 months. With the current incidence, this strategy resulted in an ICER of €635,334 per quality adjusted life year. When serogroup C disease incidence returns to pre-vaccination levels due to a loss of vaccine-induced herd-immunity, vaccination with MenACWY at 14 months and at 12 years would be cost-saving.
Conclusions
Routine vaccination with MenACWY is cost-saving. With the current epidemiology, a booster-dose with MenACWY is not likely cost-effective. When herd immunity is lost, a booster-dose has the potential of being cost-effective. A dynamic model should be developed for more precise estimation of the cost-effectiveness of the prevention of disappearance of herd immunity.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0065036
PMCID: PMC3669019  PMID: 23741448
16.  Combined Conjugate Vaccines: Enhanced Immunogenicity with the N19 Polyepitope as a Carrier Protein  
Infection and Immunity  2005;73(9):5835-5841.
The N19 polyepitope, consisting of a sequential string of universal human CD4+-T-cell epitopes, was tested as a carrier protein in a formulation of combined glycoconjugate vaccines containing the capsular polysaccharides (PSs) of Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y. Good antibody responses to all four polysaccharides were induced by one single immunization of mice with N19-based conjugates. Two immunizations with N19 conjugates elicited anti-MenACWY antibody titers comparable to those induced after three doses of glycoconjugates containing CRM197 as carrier protein. Compared to cross-reacting material (CRM)-based constructs, lower amounts of N19-MenACWY conjugates still induced high bactericidal titers to all four PSs. Moreover, N19-MenACWY-conjugated constructs induced faster and higher antibody avidity maturation against meningococcal C PS than CRM-based conjugates. Very importantly, N19-specific antibodies did not cross-react with the parent protein from which N19 epitopes were derived, e.g., tetanus toxoid and influenza virus hemagglutinin. Finally, T helper epitopes of the N19 carrier protein were effectively generated both in vivo (after immunization with the N19 itself) and in vitro (after restimulation of epitope-specific spleen cells). Taken together, these data show that the N19 polyepitope represents a strong and valid option for the generation of improved or new combined glycoconjugate vaccines.
doi:10.1128/IAI.73.9.5835-5841.2005
PMCID: PMC1231108  PMID: 16113302
17.  Meningococcal Group C and W135 Immunological Hyporesponsiveness in African Toddlers▿ 
A phase II clinical study was conducted in African toddlers (aged 12 to 23 months), with subjects receiving either investigational meningococcal group A conjugate (PsA-TT), meningococcal ACWY polysaccharide (PsACWY), or Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib-TT) vaccine. Ten months following vaccination, the 3 study groups were further randomized to receive a dose of PsA-TT, a 1/5 dose of PsACWY, or a dose of Hib-TT vaccine. Group A serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) results have been reported previously, with PsA-TT demonstrating superior immunogenicity versus PsACWY vaccine. Immunogenicity for serogroups W135 and C was assessed by SBA assay to investigate the impact of multiple doses in this age group. Blood samples were taken prior to vaccination, 28 days and 40 weeks post-primary vaccination, and 7 and 28 days post-booster vaccination with a 1/5 dose of PsACWY. Subjects who had previously received a full dose of PsACWY had W135 SBA geometric mean titers (GMTs) of 26.1 and 4.4 at 7 and 28 days post-booster vaccination with a 1/5 PsACWY dose, respectively, whereas the W135 SBA GMTs of naïve subjects at these time points following vaccination with a 1/5 dose of PsACWY were 861.1 and 14.6, respectively. Similar differences were observed for serogroup C, with SBA GMTs of 99 and 5.9 at 7 and 28 days post-booster vaccination with a 1/5 dose of PsACWY, respectively, for naïve subjects, compared to 4.1 and 3.2 for previously vaccinated subjects. Immunologic hyporesponsiveness for groups C and W135 was observed following a full dose of PsACWY vaccine at 12 to 23 months of age and a 1/5 dose of PsACWY 10 months later compared to the case for PsACWY-naïve subjects receiving a 1/5 dose of PsACWY vaccine.
doi:10.1128/CVI.05020-11
PMCID: PMC3165211  PMID: 21752951
18.  The investigational meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (ACWY-TT) and the seasonal influenza virus vaccine are immunogenic and well-tolerated when co-administered in adults 
Co-administration of meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y conjugate vaccine (ACWY-TT) with seasonal influenza vaccine was investigated in a subset of adults enrolled in a larger study evaluating lot-to-lot consistency of ACWY-TT and non-inferiority to licensed tetravalent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine (MenPS). Subjects in this sub-study were randomized (3:1:1) to receive ACWY-TT alone (ACWY-TT group) or with seasonal influenza vaccine (Coad), or licensed MenPS alone. Serum bactericidal antibodies (rSBA) and serum haemagglutination-inhibition (HI) antibody titers were measured pre- and 1 mo post-vaccination. Non-inferiority of the Coad group compared with ACWY-TT group was demonstrated in terms of rSBA geometric mean antibody titers (GMTs) to serogroups A, W-135 and Y. For serogroup C the pre-defined non-inferiority limit was marginally exceeded. Post-vaccination rSBA GMTs were significantly higher (exploratory analysis) in the Coad group compared with the MenPS group for serogroups A, W-135, and Y and were similar to the MenPS group for serogroup C. Overall, > 97% of subjects achieved rSBA titers ≥ 1:128 for all serogroups. The Coad group met all criteria defined by the Committee on Human Medicinal Products (CHMP) for seroprotection, seroconversion and seroconversion factor for HI antibodies for all three influenza strains. Grade 3 solicited local/general symptoms were reported by ≤ 1.9% of subjects in any group. These data support the co-administration of ACWY-TT with seasonal influenza vaccine when protection is needed against both diseases.
 
This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov NCT00453986
doi:10.4161/hv.20212
PMCID: PMC3495724  PMID: 22485048
ACWY vaccine; Neisseria meningitidis; adult; co-administration; immunogenicity; influenza vaccine; polysaccharide vaccine; vaccine
19.  Conjugate Meningococcal Vaccines Development: GSK Biologicals Experience 
Meningococcal diseases are serious threats to global health, and new vaccines specifically tailored to meet the age-related needs of various geographical areas are required. This paper focuses on the meningococcal conjugate vaccines developed by GSK Biologicals. Two combined conjugate vaccines were developed to help protect infants and young children in countries where the incidence of meningococcal serogroup C or serogroup C and Y disease is important: Hib-MenC-TT vaccine, which offers protection against Haemophilus influenzae type b and Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C diseases, is approved in several countries; and Hib-MenCY-TT vaccine, which adds N. meningitidis serogroup Y antigen, is currently in the final stages of development. Additionally, a tetravalent conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) designed to help protect against four meningococcal serogroups is presently being evaluated for global use in all age groups. All of these vaccines were shown to be highly immunogenic and to have clinically acceptable safety profiles.
doi:10.4061/2011/846756
PMCID: PMC3170757  PMID: 21991444
20.  Serological Basis for Use of Meningococcal Serogroup C Conjugate Vaccines in the United Kingdom: Reevaluation of Correlates of Protection 
Infection and Immunity  2001;69(3):1568-1573.
The antibody data supporting the use of meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MCC) vaccines in the United Kingdom were generated by serum bactericidal assay (SBA) using rabbit complement (rSBA). This may give higher titers than those obtained with human complement (hSBA), for which the “gold standard” correlate of protection for meningococcal C disease is a titer of ≥4. Comparison of rSBA and hSBA titers in sera from unvaccinated adults with an rSBA titer of ≥8 showed that for 93% (27 of 29) the titer was ≥4 by hSBA, confirming natural protection. Furthermore, sera from MCC vaccinees showed that an rSBA titer of <8 or ≥128 discriminated susceptibility and protection well (85% with rSBA titers of <8 had hSBA titers of <4, and 99% with rSBA titers of ≥128 had hSBA titers of ≥4). However, discrimination was poor in the rSBA titer range 8 to 64, with only 60% having hSBA titers of ≥4. In such cases we propose that protection can be assumed if there is a fourfold rise in titer between pre- and postvaccination sera or if there is a characteristic booster response to a polysaccharide challenge dose with, if available, evidence of antibody avidity maturation or an hSBA titer of result ≥4. Applying these criteria to toddlers, 10 to 40% of whom had titers in the range 8 to 64 after a single dose of MCC vaccine, showed that 94% had a fourfold rise in titer, including 98% of those in the titer range 8 to 64. In addition, of those with titers of <128 post-MCC vaccination, 90% had titers of ≥128 after a 10-μg polysaccharide booster dose, compared with only 7% of unprimed age-matched toddlers given a full 50-μg dose. Furthermore, the increase in geometric mean avidity index pre- and postbooster was independent of post-primary MCC titer. These results indicated that the majority of toddlers with an rSBA titer between 8 and 64, and some of those with an hSBA result of <4, have mounted a protective immune response with the induction of immunological memory.
doi:10.1128/IAI.69.3.1568-1573.2001
PMCID: PMC98057  PMID: 11179328
21.  Persistence of antibodies in laboratory staff immunized with quadrivalent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine 
Background
Occupational exposure to live meningococci can potentially cause invasive meningococcal disease in laboratory staff. While, until recently, immunization with quadrivalent polysaccharide vaccine represented one cornerstone of protection, data on long-term persistence of antibodies in adults remain scarce.
Methods
We analyzed the relationship of antibody levels and time following quadrivalent polysaccharide vaccination (Mencevax® ACWY, GlaxoSmithKline) in a cross-sectional sample of 20 laboratory workers vaccinated at ages between 16.4 to 40.7 years from Germany. Sera were obtained 0.4 to 158.5 (median 35.3) months after vaccination. At the time of sampling, laboratory workers had been regularly exposed to meningococci for periods between 3.2 to 163.8 (median 41.2) months. Serum bactericidal assay (SBA) with rabbit complement and a microsphere-based flow analysis method were used to determine bactericidal titers and concentrations of IgG, respectively, against serogroups A, C, W135, and Y. Decay of antibodies was modeled using linear regression. Protective levels were defined as SBA titers ≥ 8.
Results
Half-lives of SBA titers against serogroups A, C, W135, and Y were estimated at 27.4, 21.9, 18.8, and 28.0 months, respectively. Average durations of protection were estimated at 183.9, 182.0, 114.6, and 216.4 months, respectively. Inter-individual variation was high; using lower margins of 95% prediction intervals, minimal durations of protection against serogroups A, C, W135 and Y were estimated at 33.5, 24.6, 0.0, and 55.1 months, respectively. The proportion of staff with protective SBA titers against W135 (65.0%) was significantly lower than proportions protected against A (95.0%), C (94.7%), and Y (95.0%). Consistently, geometric mean titer (97.0) and geometric mean concentration of IgG (2.1 μg/ml) was lowest against serogroup W135. SBA titers in a subset of individuals with incomplete protection rose to ≥ 128 (≥ 8 fold) after reimmunization with a quadrivalent glycoconjugate vaccine.
Conclusions
The average duration of protection following immunization with a quadrivalent polysaccharide vaccine in adults was ≥ 115 months regardless of serogroup. A substantial proportion (approximately 23% according to our decay model) of adult vaccinees may not retain protection against serogroup W135 for five years, the time suggested for reimmunization.
doi:10.1186/1745-6673-8-4
PMCID: PMC3599363  PMID: 23510399
Vaccination; Meningococcal infections; Biohazards; Meningococcal polysaccharide caccine
22.  Meningococcal glycoconjugate vaccines 
Human Vaccines  2011;7(2):170-182.
Neisseria meningitidis is a major cause of invasive bacterial infections worldwide. For this reason, efforts to control the disease have been directed at optimizing meningococcal vaccines and implementing appropriate vaccination policies. In the past, plain polysaccharide vaccines containing purified capsular polysaccharides A, C, Y and W135 were developed, but failed to protect infants, who are at greatest risk.
Experience with the conjugate Haemophilus vaccine suggested that this approach might well empower meningococcal vaccines. Thus, a very efficacious vaccine against serogroup C Neisseria meningitidis was optimized and has been widely used in developed nations since 1999.
On the basis of epidemiological changes in the circulation of pathogenic serogroups in the United States, a quadrivalent conjugate vaccine against A, C, Y and W135 serogroups (Menactra™) has been developed and was approved by the US FDA (Food and Drug Administration) in 2005. Recently, another tetravalent conjugate meningococcal vaccine (Menveo™) has been licensed and made available in the United States of America and in the European Union.
Finally, in response to large epidemics caused by serogroup A meningococcus in Africa, a new, safe, immunogenic and affordable vaccine has been developed.
This review highlights the evolution of conjugate meningococcal vaccines in general and discusses how this kind of vaccine can contribute to preventing meningococcal disease.
doi:10.4161/hv.7.2.13717
PMCID: PMC3166476  PMID: 21178398
meningococcus; Neisseria meningitidis; glycoconjugate vaccines; meningococcal disease; immunity; vaccination
23.  Validation of Serological Correlate of Protection for Meningococcal C Conjugate Vaccine by Using Efficacy Estimates from Postlicensure Surveillance in England 
Meningococcal C conjugate (MCC) vaccines were licensed on the basis of serological correlates of protection without efficacy data. The original correlate of protection was established by using a serum bactericidal antibody assay (SBA) with human complement (hSBA), with titers ≥4 predicting protection. However, the antibody data supporting licensure were largely generated by SBA with rabbit complement (rSBA), which gives higher titers than hSBA. While rSBA titers ≥128 reliably predict protection, as measured by hSBA, sera with rSBA titers in the range of 8 to 64 may not have hSBA titers ≥4. For rSBA titers in this equivocal range, a fourfold rise pre- to postvaccination with the MCC vaccine and/or a characteristic booster response to a polysaccharide challenge was proposed as a correlate of protection. To validate this proposed rSBA correlate, age-specific efficacy estimates for MCC vaccines obtained from postlicensure surveillance in England were compared with the efficacy predicted by the percentage of individuals in these age groups with rSBA titers above different cutoffs at 4 weeks and at 7 to 9 months after vaccination with the MCC vaccine. The average time since vaccination in the cohorts in whom efficacy was measured ranged from 8 to 10 months. The rSBA cutoff of ≥128 was shown to significantly underestimate efficacy, with rSBA cutoffs of ≥4 or ≥8 at 4 weeks postvaccination with the MCC vaccine being the most consistent with observed efficacy. When the levels obtained 7 to 9 months postvaccination with the MCC vaccine were used, all rSBA cutoffs significantly underestimated efficacy, suggesting that continuing protection is less dependent on the SBA level at the time of exposure but is more reliant on immunologic memory.
doi:10.1128/CDLI.10.5.780-786.2003
PMCID: PMC193909  PMID: 12965904
24.  Mutant Native Outer Membrane Vesicles Combined with a Serogroup A Polysaccharide Conjugate Vaccine for Prevention of Meningococcal Epidemics in Africa 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(6):e66536.
Background
The meningococcal serogroup A (MenA) polysaccharide conjugate vaccine used in Sub-Saharan Africa does not prevent disease caused by MenW or MenX strains, which also cause epidemics in the region. We investigated the vaccine-potential of native outer membrane vesicles with over-expressed factor H-binding protein (NOMV-fHbp), which targeted antigens in African meningococcal strains, and was combined with a MenA polysaccharide conjugate vaccine.
Methodology/Principal Findings
The NOMV-fHbp vaccine was prepared from a mutant African MenW strain with PorA P1.5,2, attenuated endotoxin (ΔLpxL1), deleted capsular genes, and over-expressed fHbp in variant group 1. The NOMV-fHbp was adsorbed with Al(OH)3 and used to reconstitute a lyophilized MenA conjugate vaccine, which normally is reconstituted with liquid MenC, Y and W conjugates in a meningococcal quadrivalent conjugate vaccine (MCV4-CRM, Novartis). Mice immunized with the NOMV-fHbp vaccine alone developed serum bactericidal (human complement) activity against 13 of 15 African MenA strains tested; 10 of 10 African MenX strains, 7 of 7 African MenW strains, and 6 of 6 genetically diverse MenB strains with fHbp variant group 1 (including 1 strain from The Gambia). The combination NOMV-fHbp/MenA conjugate vaccine elicited high serum bactericidal titers against the two MenA strains tested that were resistant to bactericidal antibodies elicited by the NOMV-fHbp alone; the combination elicited higher titers against the MenA and MenW strains than those elicited by a control MCV4-CRM vaccine (P<0.05); and high titers against MenX and MenB strains. For most strains, the titers elicited by a control NOMV-fHbp knock out vaccine were <1∶10 except when the strain PorA matched the vaccine (titers >1∶000).
Conclusion/Significance
The NOMV-fHbp/MenA conjugate vaccine provided similar or higher coverage against MenA and MenW strains than a quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine, and extended protection against MenX strains responsible for epidemics in Africa, and MenB strains with fHbp in variant group 1.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0066536
PMCID: PMC3689835  PMID: 23805230
25.  A new meningococcal conjugate vaccine: What should physicians know and do? 
Paediatrics & Child Health  2009;14(8):515-517.
A quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine for serogroups A, C, Y and W135 (MCV4 [Menactra, sanofi pasteur, Canada]) was introduced in Canada in 2007 for persons two years of age or older. MCV4 adds three serogroups to the meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine, which has been used for several years. The rates of invasive meningococcal serogroup C infection have decreased over the past decade, attributable to the meningococcal C conjugate vaccine. However, the incidence of infection caused by serogroups A, B, Y and W135 have not changed substantially. MCV4 induces the production of protective antibodies to serogroups A, C, Y and W135 in adults and children older than two years of age. Serious adverse events from MCV4 are low. In view of the effectiveness of the meningococcal C conjugate vaccine for young infants and the historic high number of meningococcal serogroup C infections in Canada, physicians should encourage and promote publicly funded immunization programs for infants starting at two months of age. MCV4 should also be given to children aged two years who are at increased risk for meningococcal infection. MCV4 may also be considered for HIV-positive children two years of age or older. All adolescents should be offered a booster dose with MCV4 or a meningococcal C conjugate vaccine at approximately 12 years of age. Both vaccines are generally safe and well tolerated.
PMCID: PMC2780966  PMID: 20885803
Canada; MCV4; Meningococcal infection; Meningococcal vaccine

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