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1.  From desk to bed: Computational simulations provide indication for rheumatoid arthritis clinical trials 
BMC Systems Biology  2013;7:10.
Background
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is among the most common human systemic autoimmune diseases, affecting approximately 1% of the population worldwide. To date, there is no cure for the disease and current treatments show undesirable side effects. As the disease affects a growing number of individuals, and during their working age, the gathering of all information able to improve therapies -by understanding their and the disease mechanisms of action- represents an important area of research, benefiting not only patients but also societies. In this direction, network analysis methods have been used in previous work to further our understanding of this complex disease, leading to the identification of CRKL as a potential drug target for treatment of RA. Here, we use computational methods to expand on this work, testing the hypothesis in silico.
Results
Analysis of the CRKL network -available at http://www.picb.ac.cn/ClinicalGenomicNTW/software.html- allows for investigation of the potential effect of perturbing genes of interest. Within the group of genes that are significantly affected by simulated perturbation of CRKL, we are lead to further investigate the importance of PXN. Our results allow us to (1) refine the hypothesis on CRKL as a novel drug target (2) indicate potential causes of side effects in on-going trials and (3) importantly, provide recommendations with impact on on-going clinical studies.
Conclusions
Based on a virtual network that collects and connects a large number of the molecules known to be involved in a disease, one can simulate the effects of controlling molecules, allowing for the observation of how this affects the rest of the network. This is important to mimic the effect of a drug, but also to be aware of -and possibly control- its side effects. Using this approach in RA research we have been able to contribute to the field by suggesting molecules to be targeted in new therapies and more importantly, to warrant efficacy, to hypothesise novel recommendations on existing drugs currently under test.
doi:10.1186/1752-0509-7-10
PMCID: PMC3653749  PMID: 23339423
Rheumatoid arthritis; Tyrosine kynase; Simulation modelling; BioLayout express
2.  An S-System Parameter Estimation Method (SPEM) for Biological Networks 
Journal of Computational Biology  2012;19(2):175-187.
Abstract
Advances in experimental biology, coupled with advances in computational power, bring new challenges to the interdisciplinary field of computational biology. One such broad challenge lies in the reverse engineering of gene networks, and goes from determining the structure of static networks, to reconstructing the dynamics of interactions from time series data. Here, we focus our attention on the latter area, and in particular, on parameterizing a dynamic network of oriented interactions between genes. By basing the parameterizing approach on a known power-law relationship model between connected genes (S-system), we are able to account for non-linearity in the network, without compromising the ability to analyze network characteristics. In this article, we introduce the S-System Parameter Estimation Method (SPEM). SPEM, a freely available R software package (http://www.picb.ac.cn/ClinicalGenomicNTW/temp3.html), takes gene expression data in time series and returns the network of interactions as a set of differential equations. The methods, which are presented and tested here, are shown to provide accurate results not only on synthetic data, but more importantly on real and therefore noisy by nature, biological data. In summary, SPEM shows high sensitivity and positive predicted values, as well as free availability and expansibility (because based on open source software). We expect these characteristics to make it a useful and broadly applicable software in the challenging reconstruction of dynamic gene networks.
doi:10.1089/cmb.2011.0269
PMCID: PMC3272242  PMID: 22300319
algorithms; biochemical networks; computational molecular biology; gene networks; graphs and networks; statistics
3.  Functional Dissection of Regulatory Models Using Gene Expression Data of Deletion Mutants 
PLoS Genetics  2013;9(9):e1003757.
Genome-wide gene expression profiles accumulate at an alarming rate, how to integrate these expression profiles generated by different laboratories to reverse engineer the cellular regulatory network has been a major challenge. To automatically infer gene regulatory pathways from genome-wide mRNA expression profiles before and after genetic perturbations, we introduced a new Bayesian network algorithm: Deletion Mutant Bayesian Network (DM_BN). We applied DM_BN to the expression profiles of 544 yeast single or double deletion mutants of transcription factors, chromatin remodeling machinery components, protein kinases and phosphatases in S. cerevisiae. The network inferred by this method identified causal regulatory and non-causal concurrent interactions among these regulators (genetically perturbed genes) that are strongly supported by the experimental evidence, and generated many new testable hypotheses. Compared to networks reconstructed by routine similarity measures or by alternative Bayesian network algorithms, the network inferred by DM_BN excels in both precision and recall. To facilitate its application in other systems, we packaged the algorithm into a user-friendly analysis tool that can be downloaded at http://www.picb.ac.cn/hanlab/DM_BN.html.
Author Summary
The complex functions of a living cell are carried out through hierarchically organized regulatory pathways composed of complex interactions between regulators themselves and between regulators and their targets. Here we developed a Bayesian network inference algorithm, Deletion Mutant Bayesian Network (DM_BN) to reverse engineer the yeast regulatory network based on the hypothesis that components of the same protein complexes or the same regulatory pathways share common target genes. We used this approach to analyze expression profiles of 544 single or double deletion mutants of transcription factors, chromatin remodeling machinery components, protein kinases and phosphatases in S. cerevisiae. The Bayesian network inferred by this method identified causal regulatory relationships and non-causal concurrent interactions among these regulators in different cellular processes, strongly supported by the experimental evidence and generated many testable hypotheses. Compared to networks reconstructed by routine similarity measures or by alternative Bayesian network algorithms, the network inferred by DM_BN excels in both precision and recall. To facilitate its application in other systems, we packaged the algorithm into a user-friendly analysis tool that can be downloaded at http://www.picb.ac.cn/hanlab/DM_BN.html.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1003757
PMCID: PMC3764135  PMID: 24039601
4.  A comprehensive molecular interaction map for Hepatitis B virus and drug designing of a novel inhibitor for Hepatitis B X protein 
Bioinformation  2011;7(1):9-14.
Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a leading source of liver diseases such as hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we use computation methods in order to improve our understanding of the complex interactions that occur between molecules related to Hepatitis B virus (HBV). Due to the complexity of the disease and the numerous molecular players involved, we devised a method to construct a systemic network of interactions of the processes ongoing in patients affected by HBV. The network is based on high-throughput data, refined semi-automatically with carefully curated literature-based information. We find that some nodes in the network that prove to be topologically important, in particular HBx is also known to be important target protein used for the treatment of HBV. Therefore, HBx protein is the preferential choice for inhibition to stop the proteolytic processing. Hence, the 3D structure of HBx protein was downloaded from PDB. Ligands for the active site were designed using LIGBUILDER. The HBx protein's active site was explored to find out the critical interactions pattern for inhibitor binding using molecular docking methodology using AUTODOCK Vina. It should be noted that these predicted data should be validated using suitable assays for further consideration.
PMCID: PMC3163926  PMID: 21904432
Hepatitis B virus; HBx protein; PathVisio; Molecular-interaction map; Virtual screening; Docking; Inhibitor
5.  25th Annual Computational Neuroscience Meeting: CNS-2016 
Sharpee, Tatyana O. | Destexhe, Alain | Kawato, Mitsuo | Sekulić, Vladislav | Skinner, Frances K. | Wójcik, Daniel K. | Chintaluri, Chaitanya | Cserpán, Dorottya | Somogyvári, Zoltán | Kim, Jae Kyoung | Kilpatrick, Zachary P. | Bennett, Matthew R. | Josić, Kresimir | Elices, Irene | Arroyo, David | Levi, Rafael | Rodriguez, Francisco B. | Varona, Pablo | Hwang, Eunjin | Kim, Bowon | Han, Hio-Been | Kim, Tae | McKenna, James T. | Brown, Ritchie E. | McCarley, Robert W. | Choi, Jee Hyun | Rankin, James | Popp, Pamela Osborn | Rinzel, John | Tabas, Alejandro | Rupp, André | Balaguer-Ballester, Emili | Maturana, Matias I. | Grayden, David B. | Cloherty, Shaun L. | Kameneva, Tatiana | Ibbotson, Michael R. | Meffin, Hamish | Koren, Veronika | Lochmann, Timm | Dragoi, Valentin | Obermayer, Klaus | Psarrou, Maria | Schilstra, Maria | Davey, Neil | Torben-Nielsen, Benjamin | Steuber, Volker | Ju, Huiwen | Yu, Jiao | Hines, Michael L. | Chen, Liang | Yu, Yuguo | Kim, Jimin | Leahy, Will | Shlizerman, Eli | Birgiolas, Justas | Gerkin, Richard C. | Crook, Sharon M. | Viriyopase, Atthaphon | Memmesheimer, Raoul-Martin | Gielen, Stan | Dabaghian, Yuri | DeVito, Justin | Perotti, Luca | Kim, Anmo J. | Fenk, Lisa M. | Cheng, Cheng | Maimon, Gaby | Zhao, Chang | Widmer, Yves | Sprecher, Simon | Senn, Walter | Halnes, Geir | Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo | Keller, Daniel | Pettersen, Klas H. | Andreassen, Ole A. | Einevoll, Gaute T. | Yamada, Yasunori | Steyn-Ross, Moira L. | Alistair Steyn-Ross, D. | Mejias, Jorge F. | Murray, John D. | Kennedy, Henry | Wang, Xiao-Jing | Kruscha, Alexandra | Grewe, Jan | Benda, Jan | Lindner, Benjamin | Badel, Laurent | Ohta, Kazumi | Tsuchimoto, Yoshiko | Kazama, Hokto | Kahng, B. | Tam, Nicoladie D. | Pollonini, Luca | Zouridakis, George | Soh, Jaehyun | Kim, DaeEun | Yoo, Minsu | Palmer, S. E. | Culmone, Viviana | Bojak, Ingo | Ferrario, Andrea | Merrison-Hort, Robert | Borisyuk, Roman | Kim, Chang Sub | Tezuka, Taro | Joo, Pangyu | Rho, Young-Ah | Burton, Shawn D. | Bard Ermentrout, G. | Jeong, Jaeseung | Urban, Nathaniel N. | Marsalek, Petr | Kim, Hoon-Hee | Moon, Seok-hyun | Lee, Do-won | Lee, Sung-beom | Lee, Ji-yong | Molkov, Yaroslav I. | Hamade, Khaldoun | Teka, Wondimu | Barnett, William H. | Kim, Taegyo | Markin, Sergey | Rybak, Ilya A. | Forro, Csaba | Dermutz, Harald | Demkó, László | Vörös, János | Babichev, Andrey | Huang, Haiping | Verduzco-Flores, Sergio | Dos Santos, Filipa | Andras, Peter | Metzner, Christoph | Schweikard, Achim | Zurowski, Bartosz | Roach, James P. | Sander, Leonard M. | Zochowski, Michal R. | Skilling, Quinton M. | Ognjanovski, Nicolette | Aton, Sara J. | Zochowski, Michal | Wang, Sheng-Jun | Ouyang, Guang | Guang, Jing | Zhang, Mingsha | Michael Wong, K. Y. | Zhou, Changsong | Robinson, Peter A. | Sanz-Leon, Paula | Drysdale, Peter M. | Fung, Felix | Abeysuriya, Romesh G. | Rennie, Chris J. | Zhao, Xuelong | Choe, Yoonsuck | Yang, Huei-Fang | Mi, Yuanyuan | Lin, Xiaohan | Wu, Si | Liedtke, Joscha | Schottdorf, Manuel | Wolf, Fred | Yamamura, Yoriko | Wickens, Jeffery R. | Rumbell, Timothy | Ramsey, Julia | Reyes, Amy | Draguljić, Danel | Hof, Patrick R. | Luebke, Jennifer | Weaver, Christina M. | He, Hu | Yang, Xu | Ma, Hailin | Xu, Zhiheng | Wang, Yuzhe | Baek, Kwangyeol | Morris, Laurel S. | Kundu, Prantik | Voon, Valerie | Agnes, Everton J. | Vogels, Tim P. | Podlaski, William F. | Giese, Martin | Kuravi, Pradeep | Vogels, Rufin | Seeholzer, Alexander | Podlaski, William | Ranjan, Rajnish | Vogels, Tim | Torres, Joaquin J. | Baroni, Fabiano | Latorre, Roberto | Gips, Bart | Lowet, Eric | Roberts, Mark J. | de Weerd, Peter | Jensen, Ole | van der Eerden, Jan | Goodarzinick, Abdorreza | Niry, Mohammad D. | Valizadeh, Alireza | Pariz, Aref | Parsi, Shervin S. | Warburton, Julia M. | Marucci, Lucia | Tamagnini, Francesco | Brown, Jon | Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira | Kleberg, Florence I. | Triesch, Jochen | Moezzi, Bahar | Iannella, Nicolangelo | Schaworonkow, Natalie | Plogmacher, Lukas | Goldsworthy, Mitchell R. | Hordacre, Brenton | McDonnell, Mark D. | Ridding, Michael C. | Zapotocky, Martin | Smit, Daniel | Fouquet, Coralie | Trembleau, Alain | Dasgupta, Sakyasingha | Nishikawa, Isao | Aihara, Kazuyuki | Toyoizumi, Taro | Robb, Daniel T. | Mellen, Nick | Toporikova, Natalia | Tang, Rongxiang | Tang, Yi-Yuan | Liang, Guangsheng | Kiser, Seth A. | Howard, James H. | Goncharenko, Julia | Voronenko, Sergej O. | Ahamed, Tosif | Stephens, Greg | Yger, Pierre | Lefebvre, Baptiste | Spampinato, Giulia Lia Beatrice | Esposito, Elric | et Olivier Marre, Marcel Stimberg | Choi, Hansol | Song, Min-Ho | Chung, SueYeon | Lee, Dan D. | Sompolinsky, Haim | Phillips, Ryan S. | Smith, Jeffrey | Chatzikalymniou, Alexandra Pierri | Ferguson, Katie | Alex Cayco Gajic, N. | Clopath, Claudia | Angus Silver, R. | Gleeson, Padraig | Marin, Boris | Sadeh, Sadra | Quintana, Adrian | Cantarelli, Matteo | Dura-Bernal, Salvador | Lytton, William W. | Davison, Andrew | Li, Luozheng | Zhang, Wenhao | Wang, Dahui | Song, Youngjo | Park, Sol | Choi, Ilhwan | Shin, Hee-sup | Choi, Hannah | Pasupathy, Anitha | Shea-Brown, Eric | Huh, Dongsung | Sejnowski, Terrence J. | Vogt, Simon M. | Kumar, Arvind | Schmidt, Robert | Van Wert, Stephen | Schiff, Steven J. | Veale, Richard | Scheutz, Matthias | Lee, Sang Wan | Gallinaro, Júlia | Rotter, Stefan | Rubchinsky, Leonid L. | Cheung, Chung Ching | Ratnadurai-Giridharan, Shivakeshavan | Shomali, Safura Rashid | Ahmadabadi, Majid Nili | Shimazaki, Hideaki | Nader Rasuli, S. | Zhao, Xiaochen | Rasch, Malte J. | Wilting, Jens | Priesemann, Viola | Levina, Anna | Rudelt, Lucas | Lizier, Joseph T. | Spinney, Richard E. | Rubinov, Mikail | Wibral, Michael | Bak, Ji Hyun | Pillow, Jonathan | Zaho, Yuan | Park, Il Memming | Kang, Jiyoung | Park, Hae-Jeong | Jang, Jaeson | Paik, Se-Bum | Choi, Woochul | Lee, Changju | Song, Min | Lee, Hyeonsu | Park, Youngjin | Yilmaz, Ergin | Baysal, Veli | Ozer, Mahmut | Saska, Daniel | Nowotny, Thomas | Chan, Ho Ka | Diamond, Alan | Herrmann, Christoph S. | Murray, Micah M. | Ionta, Silvio | Hutt, Axel | Lefebvre, Jérémie | Weidel, Philipp | Duarte, Renato | Morrison, Abigail | Lee, Jung H. | Iyer, Ramakrishnan | Mihalas, Stefan | Koch, Christof | Petrovici, Mihai A. | Leng, Luziwei | Breitwieser, Oliver | Stöckel, David | Bytschok, Ilja | Martel, Roman | Bill, Johannes | Schemmel, Johannes | Meier, Karlheinz | Esler, Timothy B. | Burkitt, Anthony N. | Kerr, Robert R. | Tahayori, Bahman | Nolte, Max | Reimann, Michael W. | Muller, Eilif | Markram, Henry | Parziale, Antonio | Senatore, Rosa | Marcelli, Angelo | Skiker, K. | Maouene, M. | Neymotin, Samuel A. | Seidenstein, Alexandra | Lakatos, Peter | Sanger, Terence D. | Menzies, Rosemary J. | McLauchlan, Campbell | van Albada, Sacha J. | Kedziora, David J. | Neymotin, Samuel | Kerr, Cliff C. | Suter, Benjamin A. | Shepherd, Gordon M. G. | Ryu, Juhyoung | Lee, Sang-Hun | Lee, Joonwon | Lee, Hyang Jung | Lim, Daeseob | Wang, Jisung | Lee, Heonsoo | Jung, Nam | Anh Quang, Le | Maeng, Seung Eun | Lee, Tae Ho | Lee, Jae Woo | Park, Chang-hyun | Ahn, Sora | Moon, Jangsup | Choi, Yun Seo | Kim, Juhee | Jun, Sang Beom | Lee, Seungjun | Lee, Hyang Woon | Jo, Sumin | Jun, Eunji | Yu, Suin | Goetze, Felix | Lai, Pik-Yin | Kim, Seonghyun | Kwag, Jeehyun | Jang, Hyun Jae | Filipović, Marko | Reig, Ramon | Aertsen, Ad | Silberberg, Gilad | Bachmann, Claudia | Buttler, Simone | Jacobs, Heidi | Dillen, Kim | Fink, Gereon R. | Kukolja, Juraj | Kepple, Daniel | Giaffar, Hamza | Rinberg, Dima | Shea, Steven | Koulakov, Alex | Bahuguna, Jyotika | Tetzlaff, Tom | Kotaleski, Jeanette Hellgren | Kunze, Tim | Peterson, Andre | Knösche, Thomas | Kim, Minjung | Kim, Hojeong | Park, Ji Sung | Yeon, Ji Won | Kim, Sung-Phil | Kang, Jae-Hwan | Lee, Chungho | Spiegler, Andreas | Petkoski, Spase | Palva, Matias J. | Jirsa, Viktor K. | Saggio, Maria L. | Siep, Silvan F. | Stacey, William C. | Bernar, Christophe | Choung, Oh-hyeon | Jeong, Yong | Lee, Yong-il | Kim, Su Hyun | Jeong, Mir | Lee, Jeungmin | Kwon, Jaehyung | Kralik, Jerald D. | Jahng, Jaehwan | Hwang, Dong-Uk | Kwon, Jae-Hyung | Park, Sang-Min | Kim, Seongkyun | Kim, Hyoungkyu | Kim, Pyeong Soo | Yoon, Sangsup | Lim, Sewoong | Park, Choongseok | Miller, Thomas | Clements, Katie | Ahn, Sungwoo | Ji, Eoon Hye | Issa, Fadi A. | Baek, JeongHun | Oba, Shigeyuki | Yoshimoto, Junichiro | Doya, Kenji | Ishii, Shin | Mosqueiro, Thiago S. | Strube-Bloss, Martin F. | Smith, Brian | Huerta, Ramon | Hadrava, Michal | Hlinka, Jaroslav | Bos, Hannah | Helias, Moritz | Welzig, Charles M. | Harper, Zachary J. | Kim, Won Sup | Shin, In-Seob | Baek, Hyeon-Man | Han, Seung Kee | Richter, René | Vitay, Julien | Beuth, Frederick | Hamker, Fred H. | Toppin, Kelly | Guo, Yixin | Graham, Bruce P. | Kale, Penelope J. | Gollo, Leonardo L. | Stern, Merav | Abbott, L. F. | Fedorov, Leonid A. | Giese, Martin A. | Ardestani, Mohammad Hovaidi | Faraji, Mohammad Javad | Preuschoff, Kerstin | Gerstner, Wulfram | van Gendt, Margriet J. | Briaire, Jeroen J. | Kalkman, Randy K. | Frijns, Johan H. M. | Lee, Won Hee | Frangou, Sophia | Fulcher, Ben D. | Tran, Patricia H. P. | Fornito, Alex | Gliske, Stephen V. | Lim, Eugene | Holman, Katherine A. | Fink, Christian G. | Kim, Jinseop S. | Mu, Shang | Briggman, Kevin L. | Sebastian Seung, H. | Wegener, Detlef | Bohnenkamp, Lisa | Ernst, Udo A. | Devor, Anna | Dale, Anders M. | Lines, Glenn T. | Edwards, Andy | Tveito, Aslak | Hagen, Espen | Senk, Johanna | Diesmann, Markus | Schmidt, Maximilian | Bakker, Rembrandt | Shen, Kelly | Bezgin, Gleb | Hilgetag, Claus-Christian | van Albada, Sacha Jennifer | Sun, Haoqi | Sourina, Olga | Huang, Guang-Bin | Klanner, Felix | Denk, Cornelia | Glomb, Katharina | Ponce-Alvarez, Adrián | Gilson, Matthieu | Ritter, Petra | Deco, Gustavo | Witek, Maria A. G. | Clarke, Eric F. | Hansen, Mads | Wallentin, Mikkel | Kringelbach, Morten L. | Vuust, Peter | Klingbeil, Guido | De Schutter, Erik | Chen, Weiliang | Zang, Yunliang | Hong, Sungho | Takashima, Akira | Zamora, Criseida | Gallimore, Andrew R. | Goldschmidt, Dennis | Manoonpong, Poramate | Karoly, Philippa J. | Freestone, Dean R. | Soundry, Daniel | Kuhlmann, Levin | Paninski, Liam | Cook, Mark | Lee, Jaejin | Fishman, Yonatan I. | Cohen, Yale E. | Roberts, James A. | Cocchi, Luca | Sweeney, Yann | Lee, Soohyun | Jung, Woo-Sung | Kim, Youngsoo | Jung, Younginha | Song, Yoon-Kyu | Chavane, Frédéric | Soman, Karthik | Muralidharan, Vignesh | Srinivasa Chakravarthy, V. | Shivkumar, Sabyasachi | Mandali, Alekhya | Pragathi Priyadharsini, B. | Mehta, Hima | Davey, Catherine E. | Brinkman, Braden A. W. | Kekona, Tyler | Rieke, Fred | Buice, Michael | De Pittà, Maurizio | Berry, Hugues | Brunel, Nicolas | Breakspear, Michael | Marsat, Gary | Drew, Jordan | Chapman, Phillip D. | Daly, Kevin C. | Bradle, Samual P. | Seo, Sat Byul | Su, Jianzhong | Kavalali, Ege T. | Blackwell, Justin | Shiau, LieJune | Buhry, Laure | Basnayake, Kanishka | Lee, Sue-Hyun | Levy, Brandon A. | Baker, Chris I. | Leleu, Timothée | Philips, Ryan T. | Chhabria, Karishma
BMC Neuroscience  2016;17(Suppl 1):54.
Table of contents
A1 Functional advantages of cell-type heterogeneity in neural circuits
Tatyana O. Sharpee
A2 Mesoscopic modeling of propagating waves in visual cortex
Alain Destexhe
A3 Dynamics and biomarkers of mental disorders
Mitsuo Kawato
F1 Precise recruitment of spiking output at theta frequencies requires dendritic h-channels in multi-compartment models of oriens-lacunosum/moleculare hippocampal interneurons
Vladislav Sekulić, Frances K. Skinner
F2 Kernel methods in reconstruction of current sources from extracellular potentials for single cells and the whole brains
Daniel K. Wójcik, Chaitanya Chintaluri, Dorottya Cserpán, Zoltán Somogyvári
F3 The synchronized periods depend on intracellular transcriptional repression mechanisms in circadian clocks.
Jae Kyoung Kim, Zachary P. Kilpatrick, Matthew R. Bennett, Kresimir Josić
O1 Assessing irregularity and coordination of spiking-bursting rhythms in central pattern generators
Irene Elices, David Arroyo, Rafael Levi, Francisco B. Rodriguez, Pablo Varona
O2 Regulation of top-down processing by cortically-projecting parvalbumin positive neurons in basal forebrain
Eunjin Hwang, Bowon Kim, Hio-Been Han, Tae Kim, James T. McKenna, Ritchie E. Brown, Robert W. McCarley, Jee Hyun Choi
O3 Modeling auditory stream segregation, build-up and bistability
James Rankin, Pamela Osborn Popp, John Rinzel
O4 Strong competition between tonotopic neural ensembles explains pitch-related dynamics of auditory cortex evoked fields
Alejandro Tabas, André Rupp, Emili Balaguer-Ballester
O5 A simple model of retinal response to multi-electrode stimulation
Matias I. Maturana, David B. Grayden, Shaun L. Cloherty, Tatiana Kameneva, Michael R. Ibbotson, Hamish Meffin
O6 Noise correlations in V4 area correlate with behavioral performance in visual discrimination task
Veronika Koren, Timm Lochmann, Valentin Dragoi, Klaus Obermayer
O7 Input-location dependent gain modulation in cerebellar nucleus neurons
Maria Psarrou, Maria Schilstra, Neil Davey, Benjamin Torben-Nielsen, Volker Steuber
O8 Analytic solution of cable energy function for cortical axons and dendrites
Huiwen Ju, Jiao Yu, Michael L. Hines, Liang Chen, Yuguo Yu
O9 C. elegans interactome: interactive visualization of Caenorhabditis elegans worm neuronal network
Jimin Kim, Will Leahy, Eli Shlizerman
O10 Is the model any good? Objective criteria for computational neuroscience model selection
Justas Birgiolas, Richard C. Gerkin, Sharon M. Crook
O11 Cooperation and competition of gamma oscillation mechanisms
Atthaphon Viriyopase, Raoul-Martin Memmesheimer, Stan Gielen
O12 A discrete structure of the brain waves
Yuri Dabaghian, Justin DeVito, Luca Perotti
O13 Direction-specific silencing of the Drosophila gaze stabilization system
Anmo J. Kim, Lisa M. Fenk, Cheng Lyu, Gaby Maimon
O14 What does the fruit fly think about values? A model of olfactory associative learning
Chang Zhao, Yves Widmer, Simon Sprecher,Walter Senn
O15 Effects of ionic diffusion on power spectra of local field potentials (LFP)
Geir Halnes, Tuomo Mäki-Marttunen, Daniel Keller, Klas H. Pettersen,Ole A. Andreassen, Gaute T. Einevoll
O16 Large-scale cortical models towards understanding relationship between brain structure abnormalities and cognitive deficits
Yasunori Yamada
O17 Spatial coarse-graining the brain: origin of minicolumns
Moira L. Steyn-Ross, D. Alistair Steyn-Ross
O18 Modeling large-scale cortical networks with laminar structure
Jorge F. Mejias, John D. Murray, Henry Kennedy, Xiao-Jing Wang
O19 Information filtering by partial synchronous spikes in a neural population
Alexandra Kruscha, Jan Grewe, Jan Benda, Benjamin Lindner
O20 Decoding context-dependent olfactory valence in Drosophila
Laurent Badel, Kazumi Ohta, Yoshiko Tsuchimoto, Hokto Kazama
P1 Neural network as a scale-free network: the role of a hub
B. Kahng
P2 Hemodynamic responses to emotions and decisions using near-infrared spectroscopy optical imaging
Nicoladie D. Tam
P3 Phase space analysis of hemodynamic responses to intentional movement directions using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) optical imaging technique
Nicoladie D.Tam, Luca Pollonini, George Zouridakis
P4 Modeling jamming avoidance of weakly electric fish
Jaehyun Soh, DaeEun Kim
P5 Synergy and redundancy of retinal ganglion cells in prediction
Minsu Yoo, S. E. Palmer
P6 A neural field model with a third dimension representing cortical depth
Viviana Culmone, Ingo Bojak
P7 Network analysis of a probabilistic connectivity model of the Xenopus tadpole spinal cord
Andrea Ferrario, Robert Merrison-Hort, Roman Borisyuk
P8 The recognition dynamics in the brain
Chang Sub Kim
P9 Multivariate spike train analysis using a positive definite kernel
Taro Tezuka
P10 Synchronization of burst periods may govern slow brain dynamics during general anesthesia
Pangyu Joo
P11 The ionic basis of heterogeneity affects stochastic synchrony
Young-Ah Rho, Shawn D. Burton, G. Bard Ermentrout, Jaeseung Jeong, Nathaniel N. Urban
P12 Circular statistics of noise in spike trains with a periodic component
Petr Marsalek
P14 Representations of directions in EEG-BCI using Gaussian readouts
Hoon-Hee Kim, Seok-hyun Moon, Do-won Lee, Sung-beom Lee, Ji-yong Lee, Jaeseung Jeong
P15 Action selection and reinforcement learning in basal ganglia during reaching movements
Yaroslav I. Molkov, Khaldoun Hamade, Wondimu Teka, William H. Barnett, Taegyo Kim, Sergey Markin, Ilya A. Rybak
P17 Axon guidance: modeling axonal growth in T-Junction assay
Csaba Forro, Harald Dermutz, László Demkó, János Vörös
P19 Transient cell assembly networks encode persistent spatial memories
Yuri Dabaghian, Andrey Babichev
P20 Theory of population coupling and applications to describe high order correlations in large populations of interacting neurons
Haiping Huang
P21 Design of biologically-realistic simulations for motor control
Sergio Verduzco-Flores
P22 Towards understanding the functional impact of the behavioural variability of neurons
Filipa Dos Santos, Peter Andras
P23 Different oscillatory dynamics underlying gamma entrainment deficits in schizophrenia
Christoph Metzner, Achim Schweikard, Bartosz Zurowski
P24 Memory recall and spike frequency adaptation
James P. Roach, Leonard M. Sander, Michal R. Zochowski
P25 Stability of neural networks and memory consolidation preferentially occur near criticality
Quinton M. Skilling, Nicolette Ognjanovski, Sara J. Aton, Michal Zochowski
P26 Stochastic Oscillation in Self-Organized Critical States of Small Systems: Sensitive Resting State in Neural Systems
Sheng-Jun Wang, Guang Ouyang, Jing Guang, Mingsha Zhang, K. Y. Michael Wong, Changsong Zhou
P27 Neurofield: a C++ library for fast simulation of 2D neural field models
Peter A. Robinson, Paula Sanz-Leon, Peter M. Drysdale, Felix Fung, Romesh G. Abeysuriya, Chris J. Rennie, Xuelong Zhao
P28 Action-based grounding: Beyond encoding/decoding in neural code
Yoonsuck Choe, Huei-Fang Yang
P29 Neural computation in a dynamical system with multiple time scales
Yuanyuan Mi, Xiaohan Lin, Si Wu
P30 Maximum entropy models for 3D layouts of orientation selectivity
Joscha Liedtke, Manuel Schottdorf, Fred Wolf
P31 A behavioral assay for probing computations underlying curiosity in rodents
Yoriko Yamamura, Jeffery R. Wickens
P32 Using statistical sampling to balance error function contributions to optimization of conductance-based models
Timothy Rumbell, Julia Ramsey, Amy Reyes, Danel Draguljić, Patrick R. Hof, Jennifer Luebke, Christina M. Weaver
P33 Exploration and implementation of a self-growing and self-organizing neuron network building algorithm
Hu He, Xu Yang, Hailin Ma, Zhiheng Xu, Yuzhe Wang
P34 Disrupted resting state brain network in obese subjects: a data-driven graph theory analysis
Kwangyeol Baek, Laurel S. Morris, Prantik Kundu, Valerie Voon
P35 Dynamics of cooperative excitatory and inhibitory plasticity
Everton J. Agnes, Tim P. Vogels
P36 Frequency-dependent oscillatory signal gating in feed-forward networks of integrate-and-fire neurons
William F. Podlaski, Tim P. Vogels
P37 Phenomenological neural model for adaptation of neurons in area IT
Martin Giese, Pradeep Kuravi, Rufin Vogels
P38 ICGenealogy: towards a common topology of neuronal ion channel function and genealogy in model and experiment
Alexander Seeholzer, William Podlaski, Rajnish Ranjan, Tim Vogels
P39 Temporal input discrimination from the interaction between dynamic synapses and neural subthreshold oscillations
Joaquin J. Torres, Fabiano Baroni, Roberto Latorre, Pablo Varona
P40 Different roles for transient and sustained activity during active visual processing
Bart Gips, Eric Lowet, Mark J. Roberts, Peter de Weerd, Ole Jensen, Jan van der Eerden
P41 Scale-free functional networks of 2D Ising model are highly robust against structural defects: neuroscience implications
Abdorreza Goodarzinick, Mohammad D. Niry, Alireza Valizadeh
P42 High frequency neuron can facilitate propagation of signal in neural networks
Aref Pariz, Shervin S. Parsi, Alireza Valizadeh
P43 Investigating the effect of Alzheimer’s disease related amyloidopathy on gamma oscillations in the CA1 region of the hippocampus
Julia M. Warburton, Lucia Marucci, Francesco Tamagnini, Jon Brown, Krasimira Tsaneva-Atanasova
P44 Long-tailed distributions of inhibitory and excitatory weights in a balanced network with eSTDP and iSTDP
Florence I. Kleberg, Jochen Triesch
P45 Simulation of EMG recording from hand muscle due to TMS of motor cortex
Bahar Moezzi, Nicolangelo Iannella, Natalie Schaworonkow, Lukas Plogmacher, Mitchell R. Goldsworthy, Brenton Hordacre, Mark D. McDonnell, Michael C. Ridding, Jochen Triesch
P46 Structure and dynamics of axon network formed in primary cell culture
Martin Zapotocky, Daniel Smit, Coralie Fouquet, Alain Trembleau
P47 Efficient signal processing and sampling in random networks that generate variability
Sakyasingha Dasgupta, Isao Nishikawa, Kazuyuki Aihara, Taro Toyoizumi
P48 Modeling the effect of riluzole on bursting in respiratory neural networks
Daniel T. Robb, Nick Mellen, Natalia Toporikova
P49 Mapping relaxation training using effective connectivity analysis
Rongxiang Tang, Yi-Yuan Tang
P50 Modeling neuron oscillation of implicit sequence learning
Guangsheng Liang, Seth A. Kiser, James H. Howard, Jr., Yi-Yuan Tang
P51 The role of cerebellar short-term synaptic plasticity in the pathology and medication of downbeat nystagmus
Julia Goncharenko, Neil Davey, Maria Schilstra, Volker Steuber
P52 Nonlinear response of noisy neurons
Sergej O. Voronenko, Benjamin Lindner
P53 Behavioral embedding suggests multiple chaotic dimensions underlie C. elegans locomotion
Tosif Ahamed, Greg Stephens
P54 Fast and scalable spike sorting for large and dense multi-electrodes recordings
Pierre Yger, Baptiste Lefebvre, Giulia Lia Beatrice Spampinato, Elric Esposito, Marcel Stimberg et Olivier Marre
P55 Sufficient sampling rates for fast hand motion tracking
Hansol Choi, Min-Ho Song
P56 Linear readout of object manifolds
SueYeon Chung, Dan D. Lee, Haim Sompolinsky
P57 Differentiating models of intrinsic bursting and rhythm generation of the respiratory pre-Bötzinger complex using phase response curves
Ryan S. Phillips, Jeffrey Smith
P58 The effect of inhibitory cell network interactions during theta rhythms on extracellular field potentials in CA1 hippocampus
Alexandra Pierri Chatzikalymniou, Katie Ferguson, Frances K. Skinner
P59 Expansion recoding through sparse sampling in the cerebellar input layer speeds learning
N. Alex Cayco Gajic, Claudia Clopath, R. Angus Silver
P60 A set of curated cortical models at multiple scales on Open Source Brain
Padraig Gleeson, Boris Marin, Sadra Sadeh, Adrian Quintana, Matteo Cantarelli, Salvador Dura-Bernal, William W. Lytton, Andrew Davison, R. Angus Silver
P61 A synaptic story of dynamical information encoding in neural adaptation
Luozheng Li, Wenhao Zhang, Yuanyuan Mi, Dahui Wang, Si Wu
P62 Physical modeling of rule-observant rodent behavior
Youngjo Song, Sol Park, Ilhwan Choi, Jaeseung Jeong, Hee-sup Shin
P64 Predictive coding in area V4 and prefrontal cortex explains dynamic discrimination of partially occluded shapes
Hannah Choi, Anitha Pasupathy, Eric Shea-Brown
P65 Stability of FORCE learning on spiking and rate-based networks
Dongsung Huh, Terrence J. Sejnowski
P66 Stabilising STDP in striatal neurons for reliable fast state recognition in noisy environments
Simon M. Vogt, Arvind Kumar, Robert Schmidt
P67 Electrodiffusion in one- and two-compartment neuron models for characterizing cellular effects of electrical stimulation
Stephen Van Wert, Steven J. Schiff
P68 STDP improves speech recognition capabilities in spiking recurrent circuits parameterized via differential evolution Markov Chain Monte Carlo
Richard Veale, Matthias Scheutz
P69 Bidirectional transformation between dominant cortical neural activities and phase difference distributions
Sang Wan Lee
P70 Maturation of sensory networks through homeostatic structural plasticity
Júlia Gallinaro, Stefan Rotter
P71 Corticothalamic dynamics: structure, number of solutions and stability of steady-state solutions in the space of synaptic couplings
Paula Sanz-Leon, Peter A. Robinson
P72 Optogenetic versus electrical stimulation of the parkinsonian basal ganglia. Computational study
Leonid L. Rubchinsky, Chung Ching Cheung, Shivakeshavan Ratnadurai-Giridharan
P73 Exact spike-timing distribution reveals higher-order interactions of neurons
Safura Rashid Shomali, Majid Nili Ahmadabadi, Hideaki Shimazaki, S. Nader Rasuli
P74 Neural mechanism of visual perceptual learning using a multi-layered neural network
Xiaochen Zhao, Malte J. Rasch
P75 Inferring collective spiking dynamics from mostly unobserved systems
Jens Wilting, Viola Priesemann
P76 How to infer distributions in the brain from subsampled observations
Anna Levina, Viola Priesemann
P77 Influences of embedding and estimation strategies on the inferred memory of single spiking neurons
Lucas Rudelt, Joseph T. Lizier, Viola Priesemann
P78 A nearest-neighbours based estimator for transfer entropy between spike trains
Joseph T. Lizier, Richard E. Spinney, Mikail Rubinov, Michael Wibral, Viola Priesemann
P79 Active learning of psychometric functions with multinomial logistic models
Ji Hyun Bak, Jonathan Pillow
P81 Inferring low-dimensional network dynamics with variational latent Gaussian process
Yuan Zaho, Il Memming Park
P82 Computational investigation of energy landscapes in the resting state subcortical brain network
Jiyoung Kang, Hae-Jeong Park
P83 Local repulsive interaction between retinal ganglion cells can generate a consistent spatial periodicity of orientation map
Jaeson Jang, Se-Bum Paik
P84 Phase duration of bistable perception reveals intrinsic time scale of perceptual decision under noisy condition
Woochul Choi, Se-Bum Paik
P85 Feedforward convergence between retina and primary visual cortex can determine the structure of orientation map
Changju Lee, Jaeson Jang, Se-Bum Paik
P86 Computational method classifying neural network activity patterns for imaging data
Min Song, Hyeonsu Lee, Se-Bum Paik
P87 Symmetry of spike-timing-dependent-plasticity kernels regulates volatility of memory
Youngjin Park, Woochul Choi, Se-Bum Paik
P88 Effects of time-periodic coupling strength on the first-spike latency dynamics of a scale-free network of stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neurons
Ergin Yilmaz, Veli Baysal, Mahmut Ozer
P89 Spectral properties of spiking responses in V1 and V4 change within the trial and are highly relevant for behavioral performance
Veronika Koren, Klaus Obermayer
P90 Methods for building accurate models of individual neurons
Daniel Saska, Thomas Nowotny
P91 A full size mathematical model of the early olfactory system of honeybees
Ho Ka Chan, Alan Diamond, Thomas Nowotny
P92 Stimulation-induced tuning of ongoing oscillations in spiking neural networks
Christoph S. Herrmann, Micah M. Murray, Silvio Ionta, Axel Hutt, Jérémie Lefebvre
P93 Decision-specific sequences of neural activity in balanced random networks driven by structured sensory input
Philipp Weidel, Renato Duarte, Abigail Morrison
P94 Modulation of tuning induced by abrupt reduction of SST cell activity
Jung H. Lee, Ramakrishnan Iyer, Stefan Mihalas
P95 The functional role of VIP cell activation during locomotion
Jung H. Lee, Ramakrishnan Iyer, Christof Koch, Stefan Mihalas
P96 Stochastic inference with spiking neural networks
Mihai A. Petrovici, Luziwei Leng, Oliver Breitwieser, David Stöckel, Ilja Bytschok, Roman Martel, Johannes Bill, Johannes Schemmel, Karlheinz Meier
P97 Modeling orientation-selective electrical stimulation with retinal prostheses
Timothy B. Esler, Anthony N. Burkitt, David B. Grayden, Robert R. Kerr, Bahman Tahayori, Hamish Meffin
P98 Ion channel noise can explain firing correlation in auditory nerves
Bahar Moezzi, Nicolangelo Iannella, Mark D. McDonnell
P99 Limits of temporal encoding of thalamocortical inputs in a neocortical microcircuit
Max Nolte, Michael W. Reimann, Eilif Muller, Henry Markram
P100 On the representation of arm reaching movements: a computational model
Antonio Parziale, Rosa Senatore, Angelo Marcelli
P101 A computational model for investigating the role of cerebellum in acquisition and retention of motor behavior
Rosa Senatore, Antonio Parziale, Angelo Marcelli
P102 The emergence of semantic categories from a large-scale brain network of semantic knowledge
K. Skiker, M. Maouene
P103 Multiscale modeling of M1 multitarget pharmacotherapy for dystonia
Samuel A. Neymotin, Salvador Dura-Bernal, Alexandra Seidenstein, Peter Lakatos, Terence D. Sanger, William W. Lytton
P104 Effect of network size on computational capacity
Salvador Dura-Bernal, Rosemary J. Menzies, Campbell McLauchlan, Sacha J. van Albada, David J. Kedziora, Samuel Neymotin, William W. Lytton, Cliff C. Kerr
P105 NetPyNE: a Python package for NEURON to facilitate development and parallel simulation of biological neuronal networks
Salvador Dura-Bernal, Benjamin A. Suter, Samuel A. Neymotin, Cliff C. Kerr, Adrian Quintana, Padraig Gleeson, Gordon M. G. Shepherd, William W. Lytton
P107 Inter-areal and inter-regional inhomogeneity in co-axial anisotropy of Cortical Point Spread in human visual areas
Juhyoung Ryu, Sang-Hun Lee
P108 Two bayesian quanta of uncertainty explain the temporal dynamics of cortical activity in the non-sensory areas during bistable perception
Joonwon Lee, Sang-Hun Lee
P109 Optimal and suboptimal integration of sensory and value information in perceptual decision making
Hyang Jung Lee, Sang-Hun Lee
P110 A Bayesian algorithm for phoneme Perception and its neural implementation
Daeseob Lim, Sang-Hun Lee
P111 Complexity of EEG signals is reduced during unconsciousness induced by ketamine and propofol
Jisung Wang, Heonsoo Lee
P112 Self-organized criticality of neural avalanche in a neural model on complex networks
Nam Jung, Le Anh Quang, Seung Eun Maeng, Tae Ho Lee, Jae Woo Lee
P113 Dynamic alterations in connection topology of the hippocampal network during ictal-like epileptiform activity in an in vitro rat model
Chang-hyun Park, Sora Ahn, Jangsup Moon, Yun Seo Choi, Juhee Kim, Sang Beom Jun, Seungjun Lee, Hyang Woon Lee
P114 Computational model to replicate seizure suppression effect by electrical stimulation
Sora Ahn, Sumin Jo, Eunji Jun, Suin Yu, Hyang Woon Lee, Sang Beom Jun, Seungjun Lee
P115 Identifying excitatory and inhibitory synapses in neuronal networks from spike trains using sorted local transfer entropy
Felix Goetze, Pik-Yin Lai
P116 Neural network model for obstacle avoidance based on neuromorphic computational model of boundary vector cell and head direction cell
Seonghyun Kim, Jeehyun Kwag
P117 Dynamic gating of spike pattern propagation by Hebbian and anti-Hebbian spike timing-dependent plasticity in excitatory feedforward network model
Hyun Jae Jang, Jeehyun Kwag
P118 Inferring characteristics of input correlations of cells exhibiting up-down state transitions in the rat striatum
Marko Filipović, Ramon Reig, Ad Aertsen, Gilad Silberberg, Arvind Kumar
P119 Graph properties of the functional connected brain under the influence of Alzheimer’s disease
Claudia Bachmann, Simone Buttler, Heidi Jacobs, Kim Dillen, Gereon R. Fink, Juraj Kukolja, Abigail Morrison
P120 Learning sparse representations in the olfactory bulb
Daniel Kepple, Hamza Giaffar, Dima Rinberg, Steven Shea, Alex Koulakov
P121 Functional classification of homologous basal-ganglia networks
Jyotika Bahuguna,Tom Tetzlaff, Abigail Morrison, Arvind Kumar, Jeanette Hellgren Kotaleski
P122 Short term memory based on multistability
Tim Kunze, Andre Peterson, Thomas Knösche
P123 A physiologically plausible, computationally efficient model and simulation software for mammalian motor units
Minjung Kim, Hojeong Kim
P125 Decoding laser-induced somatosensory information from EEG
Ji Sung Park, Ji Won Yeon, Sung-Phil Kim
P126 Phase synchronization of alpha activity for EEG-based personal authentication
Jae-Hwan Kang, Chungho Lee, Sung-Phil Kim
P129 Investigating phase-lags in sEEG data using spatially distributed time delays in a large-scale brain network model
Andreas Spiegler, Spase Petkoski, Matias J. Palva, Viktor K. Jirsa
P130 Epileptic seizures in the unfolding of a codimension-3 singularity
Maria L. Saggio, Silvan F. Siep, Andreas Spiegler, William C. Stacey, Christophe Bernard, Viktor K. Jirsa
P131 Incremental dimensional exploratory reasoning under multi-dimensional environment
Oh-hyeon Choung, Yong Jeong
P132 A low-cost model of eye movements and memory in personal visual cognition
Yong-il Lee, Jaeseung Jeong
P133 Complex network analysis of structural connectome of autism spectrum disorder patients
Su Hyun Kim, Mir Jeong, Jaeseung Jeong
P134 Cognitive motives and the neural correlates underlying human social information transmission, gossip
Jeungmin Lee, Jaehyung Kwon, Jerald D. Kralik, Jaeseung Jeong
P135 EEG hyperscanning detects neural oscillation for the social interaction during the economic decision-making
Jaehwan Jahng, Dong-Uk Hwang, Jaeseung Jeong
P136 Detecting purchase decision based on hyperfrontality of the EEG
Jae-Hyung Kwon, Sang-Min Park, Jaeseung Jeong
P137 Vulnerability-based critical neurons, synapses, and pathways in the Caenorhabditis elegans connectome
Seongkyun Kim, Hyoungkyu Kim, Jerald D. Kralik, Jaeseung Jeong
P138 Motif analysis reveals functionally asymmetrical neurons in C. elegans
Pyeong Soo Kim, Seongkyun Kim, Hyoungkyu Kim, Jaeseung Jeong
P139 Computational approach to preference-based serial decision dynamics: do temporal discounting and working memory affect it?
Sangsup Yoon, Jaehyung Kwon, Sewoong Lim, Jaeseung Jeong
P141 Social stress induced neural network reconfiguration affects decision making and learning in zebrafish
Choongseok Park, Thomas Miller, Katie Clements, Sungwoo Ahn, Eoon Hye Ji, Fadi A. Issa
P142 Descriptive, generative, and hybrid approaches for neural connectivity inference from neural activity data
JeongHun Baek, Shigeyuki Oba, Junichiro Yoshimoto, Kenji Doya, Shin Ishii
P145 Divergent-convergent synaptic connectivities accelerate coding in multilayered sensory systems
Thiago S. Mosqueiro, Martin F. Strube-Bloss, Brian Smith, Ramon Huerta
P146 Swinging networks
Michal Hadrava, Jaroslav Hlinka
P147 Inferring dynamically relevant motifs from oscillatory stimuli: challenges, pitfalls, and solutions
Hannah Bos, Moritz Helias
P148 Spatiotemporal mapping of brain network dynamics during cognitive tasks using magnetoencephalography and deep learning
Charles M. Welzig, Zachary J. Harper
P149 Multiscale complexity analysis for the segmentation of MRI images
Won Sup Kim, In-Seob Shin, Hyeon-Man Baek, Seung Kee Han
P150 A neuro-computational model of emotional attention
René Richter, Julien Vitay, Frederick Beuth, Fred H. Hamker
P151 Multi-site delayed feedback stimulation in parkinsonian networks
Kelly Toppin, Yixin Guo
P152 Bistability in Hodgkin–Huxley-type equations
Tatiana Kameneva, Hamish Meffin, Anthony N. Burkitt, David B. Grayden
P153 Phase changes in postsynaptic spiking due to synaptic connectivity and short term plasticity: mathematical analysis of frequency dependency
Mark D. McDonnell, Bruce P. Graham
P154 Quantifying resilience patterns in brain networks: the importance of directionality
Penelope J. Kale, Leonardo L. Gollo
P155 Dynamics of rate-model networks with separate excitatory and inhibitory populations
Merav Stern, L. F. Abbott
P156 A model for multi-stable dynamics in action recognition modulated by integration of silhouette and shading cues
Leonid A. Fedorov, Martin A. Giese
P157 Spiking model for the interaction between action recognition and action execution
Mohammad Hovaidi Ardestani, Martin Giese
P158 Surprise-modulated belief update: how to learn within changing environments?
Mohammad Javad Faraji, Kerstin Preuschoff, Wulfram Gerstner
P159 A fast, stochastic and adaptive model of auditory nerve responses to cochlear implant stimulation
Margriet J. van Gendt, Jeroen J. Briaire, Randy K. Kalkman, Johan H. M. Frijns
P160 Quantitative comparison of graph theoretical measures of simulated and empirical functional brain networks
Won Hee Lee, Sophia Frangou
P161 Determining discriminative properties of fMRI signals in schizophrenia using highly comparative time-series analysis
Ben D. Fulcher, Patricia H. P. Tran, Alex Fornito
P162 Emergence of narrowband LFP oscillations from completely asynchronous activity during seizures and high-frequency oscillations
Stephen V. Gliske, William C. Stacey, Eugene Lim, Katherine A. Holman, Christian G. Fink
P163 Neuronal diversity in structure and function: cross-validation of anatomical and physiological classification of retinal ganglion cells in the mouse
Jinseop S. Kim, Shang Mu, Kevin L. Briggman, H. Sebastian Seung, the EyeWirers
P164 Analysis and modelling of transient firing rate changes in area MT in response to rapid stimulus feature changes
Detlef Wegener, Lisa Bohnenkamp, Udo A. Ernst
P165 Step-wise model fitting accounting for high-resolution spatial measurements: construction of a layer V pyramidal cell model with reduced morphology
Tuomo Mäki-Marttunen, Geir Halnes, Anna Devor, Christoph Metzner, Anders M. Dale, Ole A. Andreassen, Gaute T. Einevoll
P166 Contributions of schizophrenia-associated genes to neuron firing and cardiac pacemaking: a polygenic modeling approach
Tuomo Mäki-Marttunen, Glenn T. Lines, Andy Edwards, Aslak Tveito, Anders M. Dale, Gaute T. Einevoll, Ole A. Andreassen
P167 Local field potentials in a 4 × 4 mm2 multi-layered network model
Espen Hagen, Johanna Senk, Sacha J. van Albada, Markus Diesmann
P168 A spiking network model explains multi-scale properties of cortical dynamics
Maximilian Schmidt, Rembrandt Bakker, Kelly Shen, Gleb Bezgin, Claus-Christian Hilgetag, Markus Diesmann, Sacha Jennifer van Albada
P169 Using joint weight-delay spike-timing dependent plasticity to find polychronous neuronal groups
Haoqi Sun, Olga Sourina, Guang-Bin Huang, Felix Klanner, Cornelia Denk
P170 Tensor decomposition reveals RSNs in simulated resting state fMRI
Katharina Glomb, Adrián Ponce-Alvarez, Matthieu Gilson, Petra Ritter, Gustavo Deco
P171 Getting in the groove: testing a new model-based method for comparing task-evoked vs resting-state activity in fMRI data on music listening
Matthieu Gilson, Maria AG Witek, Eric F. Clarke, Mads Hansen, Mikkel Wallentin, Gustavo Deco, Morten L. Kringelbach, Peter Vuust
P172 STochastic engine for pathway simulation (STEPS) on massively parallel processors
Guido Klingbeil, Erik De Schutter
P173 Toolkit support for complex parallel spatial stochastic reaction–diffusion simulation in STEPS
Weiliang Chen, Erik De Schutter
P174 Modeling the generation and propagation of Purkinje cell dendritic spikes caused by parallel fiber synaptic input
Yunliang Zang, Erik De Schutter
P175 Dendritic morphology determines how dendrites are organized into functional subunits
Sungho Hong, Akira Takashima, Erik De Schutter
P176 A model of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activity in long term depression at Purkinje cells
Criseida Zamora, Andrew R. Gallimore, Erik De Schutter
P177 Reward-modulated learning of population-encoded vectors for insect-like navigation in embodied agents
Dennis Goldschmidt, Poramate Manoonpong, Sakyasingha Dasgupta
P178 Data-driven neural models part II: connectivity patterns of human seizures
Philippa J. Karoly, Dean R. Freestone, Daniel Soundry, Levin Kuhlmann, Liam Paninski, Mark Cook
P179 Data-driven neural models part I: state and parameter estimation
Dean R. Freestone, Philippa J. Karoly, Daniel Soundry, Levin Kuhlmann, Mark Cook
P180 Spectral and spatial information processing in human auditory streaming
Jaejin Lee, Yonatan I. Fishman, Yale E. Cohen
P181 A tuning curve for the global effects of local perturbations in neural activity: Mapping the systems-level susceptibility of the brain
Leonardo L. Gollo, James A. Roberts, Luca Cocchi
P182 Diverse homeostatic responses to visual deprivation mediated by neural ensembles
Yann Sweeney, Claudia Clopath
P183 Opto-EEG: a novel method for investigating functional connectome in mouse brain based on optogenetics and high density electroencephalography
Soohyun Lee, Woo-Sung Jung, Jee Hyun Choi
P184 Biphasic responses of frontal gamma network to repetitive sleep deprivation during REM sleep
Bowon Kim, Youngsoo Kim, Eunjin Hwang, Jee Hyun Choi
P185 Brain-state correlate and cortical connectivity for frontal gamma oscillations in top-down fashion assessed by auditory steady-state response
Younginha Jung, Eunjin Hwang, Yoon-Kyu Song, Jee Hyun Choi
P186 Neural field model of localized orientation selective activation in V1
James Rankin, Frédéric Chavane
P187 An oscillatory network model of Head direction and Grid cells using locomotor inputs
Karthik Soman, Vignesh Muralidharan, V. Srinivasa Chakravarthy
P188 A computational model of hippocampus inspired by the functional architecture of basal ganglia
Karthik Soman, Vignesh Muralidharan, V. Srinivasa Chakravarthy
P189 A computational architecture to model the microanatomy of the striatum and its functional properties
Sabyasachi Shivkumar, Vignesh Muralidharan, V. Srinivasa Chakravarthy
P190 A scalable cortico-basal ganglia model to understand the neural dynamics of targeted reaching
Vignesh Muralidharan, Alekhya Mandali, B. Pragathi Priyadharsini, Hima Mehta, V. Srinivasa Chakravarthy
P191 Emergence of radial orientation selectivity from synaptic plasticity
Catherine E. Davey, David B. Grayden, Anthony N. Burkitt
P192 How do hidden units shape effective connections between neurons?
Braden A. W. Brinkman, Tyler Kekona, Fred Rieke, Eric Shea-Brown, Michael Buice
P193 Characterization of neural firing in the presence of astrocyte-synapse signaling
Maurizio De Pittà, Hugues Berry, Nicolas Brunel
P194 Metastability of spatiotemporal patterns in a large-scale network model of brain dynamics
James A. Roberts, Leonardo L. Gollo, Michael Breakspear
P195 Comparison of three methods to quantify detection and discrimination capacity estimated from neural population recordings
Gary Marsat, Jordan Drew, Phillip D. Chapman, Kevin C. Daly, Samual P. Bradley
P196 Quantifying the constraints for independent evoked and spontaneous NMDA receptor mediated synaptic transmission at individual synapses
Sat Byul Seo, Jianzhong Su, Ege T. Kavalali, Justin Blackwell
P199 Gamma oscillation via adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire neurons
LieJune Shiau, Laure Buhry, Kanishka Basnayake
P200 Visual face representations during memory retrieval compared to perception
Sue-Hyun Lee, Brandon A. Levy, Chris I. Baker
P201 Top-down modulation of sequential activity within packets modeled using avalanche dynamics
Timothée Leleu, Kazuyuki Aihara
Q28 An auto-encoder network realizes sparse features under the influence of desynchronized vascular dynamics
Ryan T. Philips, Karishma Chhabria, V. Srinivasa Chakravarthy
doi:10.1186/s12868-016-0283-6
PMCID: PMC5001212  PMID: 27534393
6.  A Candidate Gene Approach Identifies the TRAF1/C5 Region as a Risk Factor for Rheumatoid Arthritis 
PLoS Medicine  2007;4(9):e278.
Background
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disorder affecting ∼1% of the population. The disease results from the interplay between an individual's genetic background and unknown environmental triggers. Although human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) account for ∼30% of the heritable risk, the identities of non-HLA genes explaining the remainder of the genetic component are largely unknown. Based on functional data in mice, we hypothesized that the immune-related genes complement component 5 (C5) and/or TNF receptor-associated factor 1 (TRAF1), located on Chromosome 9q33–34, would represent relevant candidate genes for RA. We therefore aimed to investigate whether this locus would play a role in RA.
Methods and Findings
We performed a multitiered case-control study using 40 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the TRAF1 and C5 (TRAF1/C5) region in a set of 290 RA patients and 254 unaffected participants (controls) of Dutch origin. Stepwise replication of significant SNPs was performed in three independent sample sets from the Netherlands (ncases/controls = 454/270), Sweden (ncases/controls = 1,500/1,000) and US (ncases/controls = 475/475). We observed a significant association (p < 0.05) of SNPs located in a haplotype block that encompasses a 65 kb region including the 3′ end of C5 as well as TRAF1. A sliding window analysis revealed an association peak at an intergenic region located ∼10 kb from both C5 and TRAF1. This peak, defined by SNP14/rs10818488, was confirmed in a total of 2,719 RA patients and 1,999 controls (odds ratiocommon = 1.28, 95% confidence interval 1.17–1.39, pcombined = 1.40 × 10−8) with a population-attributable risk of 6.1%. The A (minor susceptibility) allele of this SNP also significantly correlates with increased disease progression as determined by radiographic damage over time in RA patients (p = 0.008).
Conclusions
Using a candidate-gene approach we have identified a novel genetic risk factor for RA. Our findings indicate that a polymorphism in the TRAF1/C5 region increases the susceptibility to and severity of RA, possibly by influencing the structure, function, and/or expression levels of TRAF1 and/or C5.
Using a candidate-gene approach, Rene Toes and colleagues identified a novel genetic risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis in theTRAF1/C5 region.
Editors' Summary
Background.
Rheumatoid arthritis is a very common chronic illness that affects around 1% of people in developed countries. It is caused by an abnormal immune reaction to various tissues within the body; as well as affecting joints and causing an inflammatory arthritis, it can also affect many other organs of the body. Severe rheumatoid arthritis can be life-threatening, but even mild forms of the disease cause substantial illness and disability. Current treatments aim to give symptomatic relief with the use of simple analgesics, or anti-inflammatory drugs. In addition, most patients are also treated with what are known as disease-modifying agents, which aim to prevent joint damage. Rheumatoid arthritis is known to have a genetic component. For example, an association has been shown with the part of the genome that contains the human leukocyte antigens (HLAs), which are involved in the immune response. Information on other genes involved would be helpful both for understanding the underlying cause of the disease and possibly for the discovery of new treatments.
Why Was This Study Done?
Previous work in mice that have a disease similar to human rheumatoid arthritis has identified a number of possible candidate genes. One of these genes, complement component 5 (C5) is involved in the complement system—a primitive system within the body that is involved in the defense against foreign molecules. In humans the gene for C5 is located on Chromosome 9 close to another gene involved in the inflammatory response, TNF receptor-associated factor 1 (TRAF1). A preliminary study in humans of this region had shown some evidence, albeit weak, to suggest that this region might be associated with rheumatoid arthritis. The authors set out to look in more detail, and in a larger group of individuals, to see if they could prove this association.
What Did the Researchers Do and Find?
The researchers took 40 genetic markers, known as single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), from across the region that included the C5 and TRAF1 genes. SNPs have each been assigned a unique reference number that specifies a point in the human genome, and each is present in alternate forms so can be differentiated. They compared which of the alternate forms were present in 290 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 254 unaffected participants of Dutch origin. They then repeated the study in three other groups of patients and controls of Dutch, Swedish, and US origin. They found a consistent association with rheumatoid arthritis of one region of 65 kilobases (a small distance in genetic terms) that included one end of the C5 gene as well as the TRAF1 gene. They could refine the area of interest to a piece marked by one particular SNP that lay between the genes. They went on to show that the genetic region in which these genes are located may be involved in the binding of a protein that modifies the transcription of genes, thus providing a possible explanation for the association. Furthermore, they showed that one of the alternate versions of the marker in this region was associated with more aggressive disease.
What Do These Findings Mean?
The finding of a genetic association is the first step in identifying a genetic component of a disease. The strength of this study is that a novel genetic susceptibility factor for RA has been identified and that the overall result is consistent in four different populations as well as being associated with disease severity. Further work will need to be done to confirm the association in other populations and then to identify the precise genetic change involved. Hopefully this work will lead to new avenues of investigation for therapy.
Additional Information.
Please access these Web sites via the online version of this summary at http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.0040278.
• Medline Plus, the health information site for patients from the US National Library of Medicine, has a page of resources on rheumatoid arthritis
• The UK's National Health Service online information site has information on rheumatoid arthritis
• The Arthritis Research Campaign, a UK charity that funds research on all types of arthritis, has a booklet with information for patients on rheumatoid arthritis
• Reumafonds, a Dutch arthritis foundation, gives information on rheumatoid arthritis (in Dutch)
• Autocure is an initiative whose objective is to transform knowledge obtained from molecular research into a cure for an increasing number of patients suffering from inflammatory rheumatic diseases
• The European league against Rheumatism, an organisation which represents the patient, health professionals, and scientific societies of rheumatology of all European nations
doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.0040278
PMCID: PMC1976626  PMID: 17880261
7.  The gastrin and cholecystokinin receptors mediated signaling network: a scaffold for data analysis and new hypotheses on regulatory mechanisms 
BMC Systems Biology  2015;9:40.
Background
The gastrointestinal peptide hormones cholecystokinin and gastrin exert their biological functions via cholecystokinin receptors CCK1R and CCK2R respectively. Gastrin, a central regulator of gastric acid secretion, is involved in growth and differentiation of gastric and colonic mucosa, and there is evidence that it is pro-carcinogenic. Cholecystokinin is implicated in digestion, appetite control and body weight regulation, and may play a role in several digestive disorders.
Results
We performed a detailed analysis of the literature reporting experimental evidence on signaling pathways triggered by CCK1R and CCK2R, in order to create a comprehensive map of gastrin and cholecystokinin-mediated intracellular signaling cascades. The resulting signaling map captures 413 reactions involving 530 molecular species, and incorporates the currently available knowledge into one integrated signaling network. The decomposition of the signaling map into sub-networks revealed 18 modules that represent higher-level structures of the signaling map. These modules allow a more compact mapping of intracellular signaling reactions to known cell behavioral outcomes such as proliferation, migration and apoptosis. The integration of large-scale protein-protein interaction data to this literature-based signaling map in combination with topological analyses allowed us to identify 70 proteins able to increase the compactness of the map. These proteins represent experimentally testable hypotheses for gaining new knowledge on gastrin- and cholecystokinin receptor signaling. The CCKR map is freely available both in a downloadable, machine-readable SBML-compatible format and as a web resource through PAYAO (http://sblab.celldesigner.org:18080/Payao11/bin/).
Conclusion
We have demonstrated how a literature-based CCKR signaling map together with its protein interaction extensions can be analyzed to generate new hypotheses on molecular mechanisms involved in gastrin- and cholecystokinin-mediated regulation of cellular processes.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12918-015-0181-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/s12918-015-0181-z
PMCID: PMC4513977  PMID: 26205660
Cholecystokinin receptor; Map; Model; Modules; Network; Protein-protein interaction; Signaling pathway; Gastrin
8.  Detecting and Removing Inconsistencies between Experimental Data and Signaling Network Topologies Using Integer Linear Programming on Interaction Graphs 
PLoS Computational Biology  2013;9(9):e1003204.
Cross-referencing experimental data with our current knowledge of signaling network topologies is one central goal of mathematical modeling of cellular signal transduction networks. We present a new methodology for data-driven interrogation and training of signaling networks. While most published methods for signaling network inference operate on Bayesian, Boolean, or ODE models, our approach uses integer linear programming (ILP) on interaction graphs to encode constraints on the qualitative behavior of the nodes. These constraints are posed by the network topology and their formulation as ILP allows us to predict the possible qualitative changes (up, down, no effect) of the activation levels of the nodes for a given stimulus. We provide four basic operations to detect and remove inconsistencies between measurements and predicted behavior: (i) find a topology-consistent explanation for responses of signaling nodes measured in a stimulus-response experiment (if none exists, find the closest explanation); (ii) determine a minimal set of nodes that need to be corrected to make an inconsistent scenario consistent; (iii) determine the optimal subgraph of the given network topology which can best reflect measurements from a set of experimental scenarios; (iv) find possibly missing edges that would improve the consistency of the graph with respect to a set of experimental scenarios the most. We demonstrate the applicability of the proposed approach by interrogating a manually curated interaction graph model of EGFR/ErbB signaling against a library of high-throughput phosphoproteomic data measured in primary hepatocytes. Our methods detect interactions that are likely to be inactive in hepatocytes and provide suggestions for new interactions that, if included, would significantly improve the goodness of fit. Our framework is highly flexible and the underlying model requires only easily accessible biological knowledge. All related algorithms were implemented in a freely available toolbox SigNetTrainer making it an appealing approach for various applications.
Author Summary
Cellular signal transduction is orchestrated by communication networks of signaling proteins commonly depicted on signaling pathway maps. However, each cell type may have distinct variants of signaling pathways, and wiring diagrams are often altered in disease states. The identification of truly active signaling topologies based on experimental data is therefore one key challenge in systems biology of cellular signaling. We present a new framework for training signaling networks based on interaction graphs (IG). In contrast to complex modeling formalisms, IG capture merely the known positive and negative edges between the components. This basic information, however, already sets hard constraints on the possible qualitative behaviors of the nodes when perturbing the network. Our approach uses Integer Linear Programming to encode these constraints and to predict the possible changes (down, neutral, up) of the activation levels of the involved players for a given experiment. Based on this formulation we developed several algorithms for detecting and removing inconsistencies between measurements and network topology. Demonstrated by EGFR/ErbB signaling in hepatocytes, our approach delivers direct conclusions on edges that are likely inactive or missing relative to canonical pathway maps. Such information drives the further elucidation of signaling network topologies under normal and pathological phenotypes.
doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003204
PMCID: PMC3764019  PMID: 24039561
9.  A comprehensive map of the influenza A virus replication cycle 
BMC Systems Biology  2013;7:97.
Background
Influenza is a common infectious disease caused by influenza viruses. Annual epidemics cause severe illnesses, deaths, and economic loss around the world. To better defend against influenza viral infection, it is essential to understand its mechanisms and associated host responses. Many studies have been conducted to elucidate these mechanisms, however, the overall picture remains incompletely understood. A systematic understanding of influenza viral infection in host cells is needed to facilitate the identification of influential host response mechanisms and potential drug targets.
Description
We constructed a comprehensive map of the influenza A virus (‘IAV’) life cycle (‘FluMap’) by undertaking a literature-based, manual curation approach. Based on information obtained from publicly available pathway databases, updated with literature-based information and input from expert virologists and immunologists, FluMap is currently composed of 960 factors (i.e., proteins, mRNAs etc.) and 456 reactions, and is annotated with ~500 papers and curation comments. In addition to detailing the type of molecular interactions, isolate/strain specific data are also available. The FluMap was built with the pathway editor CellDesigner in standard SBML (Systems Biology Markup Language) format and visualized as an SBGN (Systems Biology Graphical Notation) diagram. It is also available as a web service (online map) based on the iPathways+ system to enable community discussion by influenza researchers. We also demonstrate computational network analyses to identify targets using the FluMap.
Conclusion
The FluMap is a comprehensive pathway map that can serve as a graphically presented knowledge-base and as a platform to analyze functional interactions between IAV and host factors. Publicly available webtools will allow continuous updating to ensure the most reliable representation of the host-virus interaction network. The FluMap is available at http://www.influenza-x.org/flumap/.
doi:10.1186/1752-0509-7-97
PMCID: PMC3819658  PMID: 24088197
Drug targets; FluMap; Host factors; Influenza virus; Pathways
10.  SBMLsqueezer: A CellDesigner plug-in to generate kinetic rate equations for biochemical networks 
BMC Systems Biology  2008;2:39.
Background
The development of complex biochemical models has been facilitated through the standardization of machine-readable representations like SBML (Systems Biology Markup Language). This effort is accompanied by the ongoing development of the human-readable diagrammatic representation SBGN (Systems Biology Graphical Notation). The graphical SBML editor CellDesigner allows direct translation of SBGN into SBML, and vice versa. For the assignment of kinetic rate laws, however, this process is not straightforward, as it often requires manual assembly and specific knowledge of kinetic equations.
Results
SBMLsqueezer facilitates exactly this modeling step via automated equation generation, overcoming the highly error-prone and cumbersome process of manually assigning kinetic equations. For each reaction the kinetic equation is derived from the stoichiometry, the participating species (e.g., proteins, mRNA or simple molecules) as well as the regulatory relations (activation, inhibition or other modulations) of the SBGN diagram. Such information allows distinctions between, for example, translation, phosphorylation or state transitions. The types of kinetics considered are numerous, for instance generalized mass-action, Hill, convenience and several Michaelis-Menten-based kinetics, each including activation and inhibition. These kinetics allow SBMLsqueezer to cover metabolic, gene regulatory, signal transduction and mixed networks. Whenever multiple kinetics are applicable to one reaction, parameter settings allow for user-defined specifications. After invoking SBMLsqueezer, the kinetic formulas are generated and assigned to the model, which can then be simulated in CellDesigner or with external ODE solvers. Furthermore, the equations can be exported to SBML, LaTeX or plain text format.
Conclusion
SBMLsqueezer considers the annotation of all participating reactants, products and regulators when generating rate laws for reactions. Thus, for each reaction, only applicable kinetic formulas are considered. This modeling scheme creates kinetics in accordance with the diagrammatic representation. In contrast most previously published tools have relied on the stoichiometry and generic modulators of a reaction, thus ignoring and potentially conflicting with the information expressed through the process diagram. Additional material and the source code can be found at the project homepage (URL found in the Availability and requirements section).
doi:10.1186/1752-0509-2-39
PMCID: PMC2412839  PMID: 18447902
11.  Pathway of PPAR-gamma coactivators in thermogenesis: a pivotal traditional Chinese medicine-associated target for individualized treatment of rheumatoid arthritis 
Oncotarget  2016;7(13):15885-15900.
Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) syndromes have been regarded as the crucial clinical manifestations for individualized diagnosis and treatment of complex diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and cancer. Especially, RA patients are classified into cold and hot syndromes with different clinical manifestations, interventions and molecular mechanisms. Better effectiveness of a classic cold syndrome-specific herbal formula Wu-tou decoction (WTD) has been achieved. To explore molecular mechanisms of syndrome-specific formulae is of great clinical significance to improve the effectiveness and pertinence of treatment for the complex diseases with personalized conditions. However, the scientific basis of WTD treatment on RA with the cold syndrome remains unclear. Here, we predicted the putative targets for composite compounds contained in WTD using drugCIPHER-CS and constructed a WTD herbs-putative targets-RA related genes network. Next, a list of major WTD targets was identified based on their topological features, including the degree, node betweenness, closeness and k-coreness in the above pharmacological network. Importantly, pathway enrichment analysis revealed that these major WTD targets were significantly associated with the pathway of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma (PPAR-γ) coactivators in thermogenesis. These computational findings were subsequently verified by experiments on a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) with cold or hot syndromes, and on human fibroblast-like synoviocytes-rheumatoid arthritis (HFLS-RA) cell line. In conclusion, the pathway of PPAR-γ coactivators in thermogenesis might be one of the potential pharmacological targets of WTD to alleviate RA with the TCM cold syndrome. These findings may open new avenues for designing individualized treatment regimens for RA patients.
doi:10.18632/oncotarget.7419
PMCID: PMC4941284  PMID: 26895106
rheumatoid arthritis; traditional Chinese medicine syndrome; network pharmacology; PPAR-gamma; individualized treatment
12.  BiNoM 2.0, a Cytoscape plugin for accessing and analyzing pathways using standard systems biology formats 
BMC Systems Biology  2013;7:18.
Background
Public repositories of biological pathways and networks have greatly expanded in recent years. Such databases contain many pathways that facilitate the analysis of high-throughput experimental work and the formulation of new biological hypotheses to be tested, a fundamental principle of the systems biology approach. However, large-scale molecular maps are not always easy to mine and interpret.
Results
We have developed BiNoM (Biological Network Manager), a Cytoscape plugin, which provides functions for the import-export of some standard systems biology file formats (import from CellDesigner, BioPAX Level 3 and CSML; export to SBML, CellDesigner and BioPAX Level 3), and a set of algorithms to analyze and reduce the complexity of biological networks. BiNoM can be used to import and analyze files created with the CellDesigner software. BiNoM provides a set of functions allowing to import BioPAX files, but also to search and edit their content. As such, BiNoM is able to efficiently manage large BioPAX files such as whole pathway databases (e.g. Reactome). BiNoM also implements a collection of powerful graph-based functions and algorithms such as path analysis, decomposition by involvement of an entity or cyclic decomposition, subnetworks clustering and decomposition of a large network in modules.
Conclusions
Here, we provide an in-depth overview of the BiNoM functions, and we also detail novel aspects such as the support of the BioPAX Level 3 format and the implementation of a new algorithm for the quantification of pathways for influence networks. At last, we illustrate some of the BiNoM functions on a detailed biological case study of a network representing the G1/S transition of the cell cycle, a crucial cellular process disturbed in most human tumors.
doi:10.1186/1752-0509-7-18
PMCID: PMC3646686  PMID: 23453054
Systems biology; Cytoscape; Software; SBML; BioPAX; CellDesigner; Conversion; SBGN; Reactome; Network analysis; Path analysis; Molecular maps; Pathways
13.  Ct3d: tracking microglia motility in 3D using a novel cosegmentation approach 
Bioinformatics  2010;27(4):564-571.
Motivation: Cell tracking is an important method to quantitatively analyze time-lapse microscopy data. While numerous methods and tools exist for tracking cells in 2D time-lapse images, only few and very application-specific tracking tools are available for 3D time-lapse images, which is of high relevance in immunoimaging, in particular for studying the motility of microglia in vivo.
Results: We introduce a novel algorithm for tracking cells in 3D time-lapse microscopy data, based on computing cosegmentations between component trees representing individual time frames using the so-called tree-assignments. For the first time, our method allows to track microglia in three dimensional confocal time-lapse microscopy images. We also evaluate our method on synthetically generated data, demonstrating that our algorithm is robust even in the presence of different types of inhomogeneous background noise.
Availability: Our algorithm is implemented in the ct3d package, which is available under http://www.picb.ac.cn/patterns/Software/ct3d; supplementary videos are available from http://www.picb.ac.cn/patterns/Supplements/ct3d.
Contact: axel@picb.ac.cn; forestdu@ion.ac.cn
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btq691
PMCID: PMC3035800  PMID: 21186244
14.  Understanding network concepts in modules 
BMC Systems Biology  2007;1:24.
Background
Network concepts are increasingly used in biology and genetics. For example, the clustering coefficient has been used to understand network architecture; the connectivity (also known as degree) has been used to screen for cancer targets; and the topological overlap matrix has been used to define modules and to annotate genes. Dozens of potentially useful network concepts are known from graph theory.
Results
Here we study network concepts in special types of networks, which we refer to as approximately factorizable networks. In these networks, the pairwise connection strength (adjacency) between 2 network nodes can be factored into node specific contributions, named node 'conformity'. The node conformity turns out to be highly related to the connectivity. To provide a formalism for relating network concepts to each other, we define three types of network concepts: fundamental-, conformity-based-, and approximate conformity-based concepts. Fundamental concepts include the standard definitions of connectivity, density, centralization, heterogeneity, clustering coefficient, and topological overlap. The approximate conformity-based analogs of fundamental network concepts have several theoretical advantages. First, they allow one to derive simple relationships between seemingly disparate networks concepts. For example, we derive simple relationships between the clustering coefficient, the heterogeneity, the density, the centralization, and the topological overlap. The second advantage of approximate conformity-based network concepts is that they allow one to show that fundamental network concepts can be approximated by simple functions of the connectivity in module networks.
Conclusion
Using protein-protein interaction, gene co-expression, and simulated data, we show that a) many networks comprised of module nodes are approximately factorizable and b) in these types of networks, simple relationships exist between seemingly disparate network concepts. Our results are implemented in freely available R software code, which can be downloaded from the following webpage: http://www.genetics.ucla.edu/labs/horvath/ModuleConformity/ModuleNetworks
doi:10.1186/1752-0509-1-24
PMCID: PMC3238286  PMID: 17547772
15.  Proceedings of the 8th Annual Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation 
Chambers, David | Simpson, Lisa | Hill-Briggs, Felicia | Neta, Gila | Vinson, Cynthia | Chambers, David | Beidas, Rinad | Marcus, Steven | Aarons, Gregory | Hoagwood, Kimberly | Schoenwald, Sonja | Evans, Arthur | Hurford, Matthew | Rubin, Ronnie | Hadley, Trevor | Barg, Frances | Walsh, Lucia | Adams, Danielle | Mandell, David | Martin, Lindsey | Mignogna, Joseph | Mott, Juliette | Hundt, Natalie | Kauth, Michael | Kunik, Mark | Naik, Aanand | Cully, Jeffrey | McGuire, Alan | White, Dominique | Bartholomew, Tom | McGrew, John | Luther, Lauren | Rollins, Angie | Salyers, Michelle | Cooper, Brittany | Funaiole, Angie | Richards, Julie | Lee, Amy | Lapham, Gwen | Caldeiro, Ryan | Lozano, Paula | Gildred, Tory | Achtmeyer, Carol | Ludman, Evette | Addis, Megan | Marx, Larry | Bradley, Katharine | VanDeinse, Tonya | Wilson, Amy Blank | Stacey, Burgin | Powell, Byron | Bunger, Alicia | Cuddeback, Gary | Barnett, Miya | Stadnick, Nicole | Brookman-Frazee, Lauren | Lau, Anna | Dorsey, Shannon | Pullmann, Michael | Mitchell, Shannon | Schwartz, Robert | Kirk, Arethusa | Dusek, Kristi | Oros, Marla | Hosler, Colleen | Gryczynski, Jan | Barbosa, Carolina | Dunlap, Laura | Lounsbury, David | O’Grady, Kevin | Brown, Barry | Damschroder, Laura | Waltz, Thomas | Powell, Byron | Ritchie, Mona | Waltz, Thomas | Atkins, David | Imel, Zac E. | Xiao, Bo | Can, Doğan | Georgiou, Panayiotis | Narayanan, Shrikanth | Berkel, Cady | Gallo, Carlos | Sandler, Irwin | Brown, C. Hendricks | Wolchik, Sharlene | Mauricio, Anne Marie | Gallo, Carlos | Brown, C. Hendricks | Mehrotra, Sanjay | Chandurkar, Dharmendra | Bora, Siddhartha | Das, Arup | Tripathi, Anand | Saggurti, Niranjan | Raj, Anita | Hughes, Eric | Jacobs, Brian | Kirkendall, Eric | Loeb, Danielle | Trinkley, Katy | Yang, Michael | Sprowell, Andrew | Nease, Donald | Lyon, Aaron | Lewis, Cara | Boyd, Meredith | Melvin, Abigail | Nicodimos, Semret | Liu, Freda | Jungbluth, Nathanial | Lyon, Aaron | Lewis, Cara | Boyd, Meredith | Melvin, Abigail | Nicodimos, Semret | Liu, Freda | Jungbluth, Nathanial | Flynn, Allen | Landis-Lewis, Zach | Sales, Anne | Baloh, Jure | Ward, Marcia | Zhu, Xi | Bennett, Ian | Unutzer, Jurgen | Mao, Johnny | Proctor, Enola | Vredevoogd, Mindy | Chan, Ya-Fen | Williams, Nathaniel | Green, Phillip | Bernstein, Steven | Rosner, June-Marie | DeWitt, Michelle | Tetrault, Jeanette | Dziura, James | Hsiao, Allen | Sussman, Scott | O’Connor, Patrick | Toll, Benjamin | Jones, Michael | Gassaway, Julie | Tobin, Jonathan | Zatzick, Douglas | Bradbury, Angela R. | Patrick-Miller, Linda | Egleston, Brian | Olopade, Olufunmilayo I. | Hall, Michael J. | Daly, Mary B. | Fleisher, Linda | Grana, Generosa | Ganschow, Pamela | Fetzer, Dominique | Brandt, Amanda | Farengo-Clark, Dana | Forman, Andrea | Gaber, Rikki S. | Gulden, Cassandra | Horte, Janice | Long, Jessica | Chambers, Rachelle Lorenz | Lucas, Terra | Madaan, Shreshtha | Mattie, Kristin | McKenna, Danielle | Montgomery, Susan | Nielsen, Sarah | Powers, Jacquelyn | Rainey, Kim | Rybak, Christina | Savage, Michelle | Seelaus, Christina | Stoll, Jessica | Stopfer, Jill | Yao, Shirley | Domchek, Susan | Hahn, Erin | Munoz-Plaza, Corrine | Wang, Jianjin | Delgadillo, Jazmine Garcia | Mittman, Brian | Gould, Michael | Liang, Shuting (Lily) | Kegler, Michelle C. | Cotter, Megan | Phillips, Emily | Hermstad, April | Morton, Rentonia | Beasley, Derrick | Martinez, Jeremy | Riehman, Kara | Gustafson, David | Marsch, Lisa | Mares, Louise | Quanbeck, Andrew | McTavish, Fiona | McDowell, Helene | Brown, Randall | Thomas, Chantelle | Glass, Joseph | Isham, Joseph | Shah, Dhavan | Liebschutz, Jane | Lasser, Karen | Watkins, Katherine | Ober, Allison | Hunter, Sarah | Lamp, Karen | Ewing, Brett | Iwelunmor, Juliet | Gyamfi, Joyce | Blackstone, Sarah | Quakyi, Nana Kofi | Plange-Rhule, Jacob | Ogedegbe, Gbenga | Kumar, Pritika | Van Devanter, Nancy | Nguyen, Nam | Nguyen, Linh | Nguyen, Trang | Phuong, Nguyet | Shelley, Donna | Rudge, Sian | Langlois, Etienne | Tricco, Andrea | Ball, Sherry | Lambert-Kerzner, Anne | Sulc, Christine | Simmons, Carol | Shell-Boyd, Jeneen | Oestreich, Taryn | O’Connor, Ashley | Neely, Emily | McCreight, Marina | Labebue, Amy | DiFiore, Doreen | Brostow, Diana | Ho, P. Michael | Aron, David | Harvey, Jillian | McHugh, Megan | Scanlon, Dennis | Lee, Rebecca | Soltero, Erica | Parker, Nathan | McNeill, Lorna | Ledoux, Tracey | McIsaac, Jessie-Lee | MacLeod, Kate | Ata, Nicole | Jarvis, Sherry | Kirk, Sara | Purtle, Jonathan | Dodson, Elizabeth | Brownson, Ross | Mittman, Brian | Curran, Geoffrey | Curran, Geoffrey | Pyne, Jeffrey | Aarons, Gregory | Ehrhart, Mark | Torres, Elisa | Miech, Edward | Miech, Edward | Stevens, Kathleen | Hamilton, Alison | Cohen, Deborah | Padgett, Deborah | Morshed, Alexandra | Patel, Rupa | Prusaczyk, Beth | Aron, David C. | Gupta, Divya | Ball, Sherry | Hand, Rosa | Abram, Jenica | Wolfram, Taylor | Hastings, Molly | Moreland-Russell, Sarah | Tabak, Rachel | Ramsey, Alex | Baumann, Ana | Kryzer, Emily | Montgomery, Katherine | Lewis, Ericka | Padek, Margaret | Powell, Byron | Brownson, Ross | Mamaril, Cezar Brian | Mays, Glen | Branham, Keith | Timsina, Lava | Mays, Glen | Hogg, Rachel | Fagan, Abigail | Shapiro, Valerie | Brown, Eric | Haggerty, Kevin | Hawkins, David | Oesterle, Sabrina | Hawkins, David | Catalano, Richard | McKay, Virginia | Dolcini, M. Margaret | Hoffer, Lee | Moin, Tannaz | Li, Jinnan | Duru, O. Kenrik | Ettner, Susan | Turk, Norman | Chan, Charles | Keckhafer, Abigail | Luchs, Robert | Ho, Sam | Mangione, Carol | Selby, Peter | Zawertailo, Laurie | Minian, Nadia | Balliunas, Dolly | Dragonetti, Rosa | Hussain, Sarwar | Lecce, Julia | Chinman, Matthew | Acosta, Joie | Ebener, Patricia | Malone, Patrick S. | Slaughter, Mary | Freedman, Darcy | Flocke, Susan | Lee, Eunlye | Matlack, Kristen | Trapl, Erika | Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam | Taggart, Morgan | Borawski, Elaine | Parrish, Amanda | Harris, Jeffrey | Kohn, Marlana | Hammerback, Kristen | McMillan, Becca | Hannon, Peggy | Swindle, Taren | Curran, Geoffrey | Whiteside-Mansell, Leanne | Ward, Wendy | Holt, Cheryl | Santos, Sheri Lou | Tagai, Erin | Scheirer, Mary Ann | Carter, Roxanne | Bowie, Janice | Haider, Muhiuddin | Slade, Jimmie | Wang, Min Qi | Masica, Andrew | Ogola, Gerald | Berryman, Candice | Richter, Kathleen | Shelton, Rachel | Jandorf, Lina | Erwin, Deborah | Truong, Khoa | Javier, Joyce R. | Coffey, Dean | Schrager, Sheree M. | Palinkas, Lawrence | Miranda, Jeanne | Johnson, Veda | Hutcherson, Valerie | Ellis, Ruth | Kharmats, Anna | Marshall-King, Sandra | LaPradd, Monica | Fonseca-Becker, Fannie | Kepka, Deanna | Bodson, Julia | Warner, Echo | Fowler, Brynn | Shenkman, Elizabeth | Hogan, William | Odedina, Folakami | De Leon, Jessica | Hooper, Monica | Carrasquillo, Olveen | Reams, Renee | Hurt, Myra | Smith, Steven | Szapocznik, Jose | Nelson, David | Mandal, Prabir | Teufel, James
Implementation Science : IS  2016;11(Suppl 2):100.
Table of contents
A1 Introduction to the 8th Annual Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation: Optimizing Personal and Population Health
David Chambers, Lisa Simpson
D1 Discussion forum: Population health D&I research
Felicia Hill-Briggs
D2 Discussion forum: Global health D&I research
Gila Neta, Cynthia Vinson
D3 Discussion forum: Precision medicine and D&I research
David Chambers
S1 Predictors of community therapists’ use of therapy techniques in a large public mental health system
Rinad Beidas, Steven Marcus, Gregory Aarons, Kimberly Hoagwood, Sonja Schoenwald, Arthur Evans, Matthew Hurford, Ronnie Rubin, Trevor Hadley, Frances Barg, Lucia Walsh, Danielle Adams, David Mandell
S2 Implementing brief cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in primary care: Clinicians' experiences from the field
Lindsey Martin, Joseph Mignogna, Juliette Mott, Natalie Hundt, Michael Kauth, Mark Kunik, Aanand Naik, Jeffrey Cully
S3 Clinician competence: Natural variation, factors affecting, and effect on patient outcomes
Alan McGuire, Dominique White, Tom Bartholomew, John McGrew, Lauren Luther, Angie Rollins, Michelle Salyers
S4 Exploring the multifaceted nature of sustainability in community-based prevention: A mixed-method approach
Brittany Cooper, Angie Funaiole
S5 Theory informed behavioral health integration in primary care: Mixed methods evaluation of the implementation of routine depression and alcohol screening and assessment
Julie Richards, Amy Lee, Gwen Lapham, Ryan Caldeiro, Paula Lozano, Tory Gildred, Carol Achtmeyer, Evette Ludman, Megan Addis, Larry Marx, Katharine Bradley
S6 Enhancing the evidence for specialty mental health probation through a hybrid efficacy and implementation study
Tonya VanDeinse, Amy Blank Wilson, Burgin Stacey, Byron Powell, Alicia Bunger, Gary Cuddeback
S7 Personalizing evidence-based child mental health care within a fiscally mandated policy reform
Miya Barnett, Nicole Stadnick, Lauren Brookman-Frazee, Anna Lau
S8 Leveraging an existing resource for technical assistance: Community-based supervisors in public mental health
Shannon Dorsey, Michael Pullmann
S9 SBIRT implementation for adolescents in urban federally qualified health centers: Implementation outcomes
Shannon Mitchell, Robert Schwartz, Arethusa Kirk, Kristi Dusek, Marla Oros, Colleen Hosler, Jan Gryczynski, Carolina Barbosa, Laura Dunlap, David Lounsbury, Kevin O'Grady, Barry Brown
S10 PANEL: Tailoring Implementation Strategies to Context - Expert recommendations for tailoring strategies to context
Laura Damschroder, Thomas Waltz, Byron Powell
S11 PANEL: Tailoring Implementation Strategies to Context - Extreme facilitation: Helping challenged healthcare settings implement complex programs
Mona Ritchie
S12 PANEL: Tailoring Implementation Strategies to Context - Using menu-based choice tasks to obtain expert recommendations for implementing three high-priority practices in the VA
Thomas Waltz
S13 PANEL: The Use of Technology to Improve Efficient Monitoring of Implementation of Evidence-based Programs - Siri, rate my therapist: Using technology to automate fidelity ratings of motivational interviewing
David Atkins, Zac E. Imel, Bo Xiao, Doğan Can, Panayiotis Georgiou, Shrikanth Narayanan
S14 PANEL: The Use of Technology to Improve Efficient Monitoring of Implementation of Evidence-based Programs - Identifying indicators of implementation quality for computer-based ratings
Cady Berkel, Carlos Gallo, Irwin Sandler, C. Hendricks Brown, Sharlene Wolchik, Anne Marie Mauricio
S15 PANEL: The Use of Technology to Improve Efficient Monitoring of Implementation of Evidence-based Programs - Improving implementation of behavioral interventions by monitoring emotion in spoken speech
Carlos Gallo, C. Hendricks Brown, Sanjay Mehrotra
S16 Scorecards and dashboards to assure data quality of health management information system (HMIS) using R
Dharmendra Chandurkar, Siddhartha Bora, Arup Das, Anand Tripathi, Niranjan Saggurti, Anita Raj
S17 A big data approach for discovering and implementing patient safety insights
Eric Hughes, Brian Jacobs, Eric Kirkendall
S18 Improving the efficacy of a depression registry for use in a collaborative care model
Danielle Loeb, Katy Trinkley, Michael Yang, Andrew Sprowell, Donald Nease
S19 Measurement feedback systems as a strategy to support implementation of measurement-based care in behavioral health
Aaron Lyon, Cara Lewis, Meredith Boyd, Abigail Melvin, Semret Nicodimos, Freda Liu, Nathanial Jungbluth
S20 PANEL: Implementation Science and Learning Health Systems: Intersections and Commonalities - Common loop assay: Methods of supporting learning collaboratives
Allen Flynn
S21 PANEL: Implementation Science and Learning Health Systems: Intersections and Commonalities - Innovating audit and feedback using message tailoring models for learning health systems
Zach Landis-Lewis
S22 PANEL: Implementation Science and Learning Health Systems: Intersections and Commonalities - Implementation science and learning health systems: Connecting the dots
Anne Sales
S23 Facilitation activities of Critical Access Hospitals during TeamSTEPPS implementation
Jure Baloh, Marcia Ward, Xi Zhu
S24 Organizational and social context of federally qualified health centers and variation in maternal depression outcomes
Ian Bennett, Jurgen Unutzer, Johnny Mao, Enola Proctor, Mindy Vredevoogd, Ya-Fen Chan, Nathaniel Williams, Phillip Green
S25 Decision support to enhance treatment of hospitalized smokers: A randomized trial
Steven Bernstein, June-Marie Rosner, Michelle DeWitt, Jeanette Tetrault, James Dziura, Allen Hsiao, Scott Sussman, Patrick O’Connor, Benjamin Toll
S26 PANEL: Developing Sustainable Strategies for the Implementation of Patient-Centered Care across Diverse US Healthcare Systems - A patient-centered approach to successful community transition after catastrophic injury
Michael Jones, Julie Gassaway
S27 PANEL: Developing Sustainable Strategies for the Implementation of Patient-Centered Care across Diverse US Healthcare Systems - Conducting PCOR to integrate mental health and cancer screening services in primary care
Jonathan Tobin
S28 PANEL: Developing Sustainable Strategies for the Implementation of Patient-Centered Care across Diverse US Healthcare Systems - A comparative effectiveness trial of optimal patient-centered care for US trauma care systems
Douglas Zatzick
S29 Preferences for in-person communication among patients in a multi-center randomized study of in-person versus telephone communication of genetic test results for cancer susceptibility
Angela R Bradbury, Linda Patrick-Miller, Brian Egleston, Olufunmilayo I Olopade, Michael J Hall, Mary B Daly, Linda Fleisher, Generosa Grana, Pamela Ganschow, Dominique Fetzer, Amanda Brandt, Dana Farengo-Clark, Andrea Forman, Rikki S Gaber, Cassandra Gulden, Janice Horte, Jessica Long, Rachelle Lorenz Chambers, Terra Lucas, Shreshtha Madaan, Kristin Mattie, Danielle McKenna, Susan Montgomery, Sarah Nielsen, Jacquelyn Powers, Kim Rainey, Christina Rybak, Michelle Savage, Christina Seelaus, Jessica Stoll, Jill Stopfer, Shirley Yao and Susan Domchek
S30 Working towards de-implementation: A mixed methods study in breast cancer surveillance care
Erin Hahn, Corrine Munoz-Plaza, Jianjin Wang, Jazmine Garcia Delgadillo, Brian Mittman Michael Gould
S31Integrating evidence-based practices for increasing cancer screenings in safety-net primary care systems: A multiple case study using the consolidated framework for implementation research
Shuting (Lily) Liang, Michelle C. Kegler, Megan Cotter, Emily Phillips, April Hermstad, Rentonia Morton, Derrick Beasley, Jeremy Martinez, Kara Riehman
S32 Observations from implementing an mHealth intervention in an FQHC
David Gustafson, Lisa Marsch, Louise Mares, Andrew Quanbeck, Fiona McTavish, Helene McDowell, Randall Brown, Chantelle Thomas, Joseph Glass, Joseph Isham, Dhavan Shah
S33 A multicomponent intervention to improve primary care provider adherence to chronic opioid therapy guidelines and reduce opioid misuse: A cluster randomized controlled trial protocol
Jane Liebschutz, Karen Lasser
S34 Implementing collaborative care for substance use disorders in primary care: Preliminary findings from the summit study
Katherine Watkins, Allison Ober, Sarah Hunter, Karen Lamp, Brett Ewing
S35 Sustaining a task-shifting strategy for blood pressure control in Ghana: A stakeholder analysis
Juliet Iwelunmor, Joyce Gyamfi, Sarah Blackstone, Nana Kofi Quakyi, Jacob Plange-Rhule, Gbenga Ogedegbe
S36 Contextual adaptation of the consolidated framework for implementation research (CFIR) in a tobacco cessation study in Vietnam
Pritika Kumar, Nancy Van Devanter, Nam Nguyen, Linh Nguyen, Trang Nguyen, Nguyet Phuong, Donna Shelley
S37 Evidence check: A knowledge brokering approach to systematic reviews for policy
Sian Rudge
S38 Using Evidence Synthesis to Strengthen Complex Health Systems in Low- and Middle-Income Countries
Etienne Langlois
S39 Does it matter: timeliness or accuracy of results? The choice of rapid reviews or systematic reviews to inform decision-making
Andrea Tricco
S40 Evaluation of the veterans choice program using lean six sigma at a VA medical center to identify benefits and overcome obstacles
Sherry Ball, Anne Lambert-Kerzner, Christine Sulc, Carol Simmons, Jeneen Shell-Boyd, Taryn Oestreich, Ashley O'Connor, Emily Neely, Marina McCreight, Amy Labebue, Doreen DiFiore, Diana Brostow, P. Michael Ho, David Aron
S41 The influence of local context on multi-stakeholder alliance quality improvement activities: A multiple case study
Jillian Harvey, Megan McHugh, Dennis Scanlon
S42 Increasing physical activity in early care and education: Sustainability via active garden education (SAGE)
Rebecca Lee, Erica Soltero, Nathan Parker, Lorna McNeill, Tracey Ledoux
S43 Marking a decade of policy implementation: The successes and continuing challenges of a provincial school food and nutrition policy in Canada
Jessie-Lee McIsaac, Kate MacLeod, Nicole Ata, Sherry Jarvis, Sara Kirk
S44 Use of research evidence among state legislators who prioritize mental health and substance abuse issues
Jonathan Purtle, Elizabeth Dodson, Ross Brownson
S45 PANEL: Effectiveness-Implementation Hybrid Designs: Clarifications, Refinements, and Additional Guidance Based on a Systematic Review and Reports from the Field - Hybrid type 1 designs
Brian Mittman, Geoffrey Curran
S46 PANEL: Effectiveness-Implementation Hybrid Designs: Clarifications, Refinements, and Additional Guidance Based on a Systematic Review and Reports from the Field - Hybrid type 2 designs
Geoffrey Curran
S47 PANEL: Effectiveness-Implementation Hybrid Designs: Clarifications, Refinements, and Additional Guidance Based on a Systematic Review and Reports from the Field - Hybrid type 3 designs
Jeffrey Pyne
S48 Linking team level implementation leadership and implementation climate to individual level attitudes, behaviors, and implementation outcomes
Gregory Aarons, Mark Ehrhart, Elisa Torres
S49 Pinpointing the specific elements of local context that matter most to implementation outcomes: Findings from qualitative comparative analysis in the RE-inspire study of VA acute stroke care
Edward Miech
S50 The GO score: A new context-sensitive instrument to measure group organization level for providing and improving care
Edward Miech
S51 A research network approach for boosting implementation and improvement
Kathleen Stevens, I.S.R.N. Steering Council
S52 PANEL: Qualitative methods in D&I Research: Value, rigor and challenge - The value of qualitative methods in implementation research
Alison Hamilton
S53 PANEL: Qualitative methods in D&I Research: Value, rigor and challenge - Learning evaluation: The role of qualitative methods in dissemination and implementation research
Deborah Cohen
S54 PANEL: Qualitative methods in D&I Research: Value, rigor and challenge - Qualitative methods in D&I research
Deborah Padgett
S55 PANEL: Maps & models: The promise of network science for clinical D&I - Hospital network of sharing patients with acute and chronic diseases in California
Alexandra Morshed
S56 PANEL: Maps & models: The promise of network science for clinical D&I - The use of social network analysis to identify dissemination targets and enhance D&I research study recruitment for pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV (PrEP) among men who have sex with men
Rupa Patel
S57 PANEL: Maps & models: The promise of network science for clinical D&I - Network and organizational factors related to the adoption of patient navigation services among rural breast cancer care providers
Beth Prusaczyk
S58 A theory of de-implementation based on the theory of healthcare professionals’ behavior and intention (THPBI) and the becker model of unlearning
David C. Aron, Divya Gupta, Sherry Ball
S59 Observation of registered dietitian nutritionist-patient encounters by dietetic interns highlights low awareness and implementation of evidence-based nutrition practice guidelines
Rosa Hand, Jenica Abram, Taylor Wolfram
S60 Program sustainability action planning: Building capacity for program sustainability using the program sustainability assessment tool
Molly Hastings, Sarah Moreland-Russell
S61 A review of D&I study designs in published study protocols
Rachel Tabak, Alex Ramsey, Ana Baumann, Emily Kryzer, Katherine Montgomery, Ericka Lewis, Margaret Padek, Byron Powell, Ross Brownson
S62 PANEL: Geographic variation in the implementation of public health services: Economic, organizational, and network determinants - Model simulation techniques to estimate the cost of implementing foundational public health services
Cezar Brian Mamaril, Glen Mays, Keith Branham, Lava Timsina
S63 PANEL: Geographic variation in the implementation of public health services: Economic, organizational, and network determinants - Inter-organizational network effects on the implementation of public health services
Glen Mays, Rachel Hogg
S64 PANEL: Building capacity for implementation and dissemination of the communities that care prevention system at scale to promote evidence-based practices in behavioral health - Implementation fidelity, coalition functioning, and community prevention system transformation using communities that care
Abigail Fagan, Valerie Shapiro, Eric Brown
S65 PANEL: Building capacity for implementation and dissemination of the communities that care prevention system at scale to promote evidence-based practices in behavioral health - Expanding capacity for implementation of communities that care at scale using a web-based, video-assisted training system
Kevin Haggerty, David Hawkins
S66 PANEL: Building capacity for implementation and dissemination of the communities that care prevention system at scale to promote evidence-based practices in behavioral health - Effects of communities that care on reducing youth behavioral health problems
Sabrina Oesterle, David Hawkins, Richard Catalano
S68 When interventions end: the dynamics of intervention de-adoption and replacement
Virginia McKay, M. Margaret Dolcini, Lee Hoffer
S69 Results from next-d: can a disease specific health plan reduce incident diabetes development among a national sample of working-age adults with pre-diabetes?
Tannaz Moin, Jinnan Li, O. Kenrik Duru, Susan Ettner, Norman Turk, Charles Chan, Abigail Keckhafer, Robert Luchs, Sam Ho, Carol Mangione
S70 Implementing smoking cessation interventions in primary care settings (STOP): using the interactive systems framework
Peter Selby, Laurie Zawertailo, Nadia Minian, Dolly Balliunas, Rosa Dragonetti, Sarwar Hussain, Julia Lecce
S71 Testing the Getting To Outcomes implementation support intervention in prevention-oriented, community-based settings
Matthew Chinman, Joie Acosta, Patricia Ebener, Patrick S Malone, Mary Slaughter
S72 Examining the reach of a multi-component farmers’ market implementation approach among low-income consumers in an urban context
Darcy Freedman, Susan Flocke, Eunlye Lee, Kristen Matlack, Erika Trapl, Punam Ohri-Vachaspati, Morgan Taggart, Elaine Borawski
S73 Increasing implementation of evidence-based health promotion practices at large workplaces: The CEOs Challenge
Amanda Parrish, Jeffrey Harris, Marlana Kohn, Kristen Hammerback, Becca McMillan, Peggy Hannon
S74 A qualitative assessment of barriers to nutrition promotion and obesity prevention in childcare
Taren Swindle, Geoffrey Curran, Leanne Whiteside-Mansell, Wendy Ward
S75 Documenting institutionalization of a health communication intervention in African American churches
Cheryl Holt, Sheri Lou Santos, Erin Tagai, Mary Ann Scheirer, Roxanne Carter, Janice Bowie, Muhiuddin Haider, Jimmie Slade, Min Qi Wang
S76 Reduction in hospital utilization by underserved patients through use of a community-medical home
Andrew Masica, Gerald Ogola, Candice Berryman, Kathleen Richter
S77 Sustainability of evidence-based lay health advisor programs in African American communities: A mixed methods investigation of the National Witness Project
Rachel Shelton, Lina Jandorf, Deborah Erwin
S78 Predicting the long-term uninsured population and analyzing their gaps in physical access to healthcare in South Carolina
Khoa Truong
S79 Using an evidence-based parenting intervention in churches to prevent behavioral problems among Filipino youth: A randomized pilot study
Joyce R. Javier, Dean Coffey, Sheree M. Schrager, Lawrence Palinkas, Jeanne Miranda
S80 Sustainability of elementary school-based health centers in three health-disparate southern communities
Veda Johnson, Valerie Hutcherson, Ruth Ellis
S81 Childhood obesity prevention partnership in Louisville: creative opportunities to engage families in a multifaceted approach to obesity prevention
Anna Kharmats, Sandra Marshall-King, Monica LaPradd, Fannie Fonseca-Becker
S82 Improvements in cervical cancer prevention found after implementation of evidence-based Latina prevention care management program
Deanna Kepka, Julia Bodson, Echo Warner, Brynn Fowler
S83 The OneFlorida data trust: Achieving health equity through research & training capacity building
Elizabeth Shenkman, William Hogan, Folakami Odedina, Jessica De Leon, Monica Hooper, Olveen Carrasquillo, Renee Reams, Myra Hurt, Steven Smith, Jose Szapocznik, David Nelson, Prabir Mandal
S84 Disseminating and sustaining medical-legal partnerships: Shared value and social return on investment
James Teufel
doi:10.1186/s13012-016-0452-0
PMCID: PMC4977475  PMID: 27490260
16.  Phylogenetic Molecular Ecological Network of Soil Microbial Communities in Response to Elevated CO2 
mBio  2011;2(4):e00122-11.
ABSTRACT
Understanding the interactions among different species and their responses to environmental changes, such as elevated atmospheric concentrations of CO2, is a central goal in ecology but is poorly understood in microbial ecology. Here we describe a novel random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework to discern phylogenetic molecular ecological networks using metagenomic sequencing data of 16S rRNA genes from grassland soil microbial communities, which were sampled from a long-term free-air CO2 enrichment experimental facility at the Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve in Minnesota. Our experimental results demonstrated that an RMT-based network approach is very useful in delineating phylogenetic molecular ecological networks of microbial communities based on high-throughput metagenomic sequencing data. The structure of the identified networks under ambient and elevated CO2 levels was substantially different in terms of overall network topology, network composition, node overlap, module preservation, module-based higher-order organization, topological roles of individual nodes, and network hubs, suggesting that the network interactions among different phylogenetic groups/populations were markedly changed. Also, the changes in network structure were significantly correlated with soil carbon and nitrogen contents, indicating the potential importance of network interactions in ecosystem functioning. In addition, based on network topology, microbial populations potentially most important to community structure and ecosystem functioning can be discerned. The novel approach described in this study is important not only for research on biodiversity, microbial ecology, and systems microbiology but also for microbial community studies in human health, global change, and environmental management.
IMPORTANCE
The interactions among different microbial populations in a community play critical roles in determining ecosystem functioning, but very little is known about the network interactions in a microbial community, owing to the lack of appropriate experimental data and computational analytic tools. High-throughput metagenomic technologies can rapidly produce a massive amount of data, but one of the greatest difficulties is deciding how to extract, analyze, synthesize, and transform such a vast amount of information into biological knowledge. This study provides a novel conceptual framework to identify microbial interactions and key populations based on high-throughput metagenomic sequencing data. This study is among the first to document that the network interactions among different phylogenetic populations in soil microbial communities were substantially changed by a global change such as an elevated CO2 level. The framework developed will allow microbiologists to address research questions which could not be approached previously, and hence, it could represent a new direction in microbial ecology research.
doi:10.1128/mBio.00122-11
PMCID: PMC3143843  PMID: 21791581
17.  A Genomewide Functional Network for the Laboratory Mouse 
PLoS Computational Biology  2008;4(9):e1000165.
Establishing a functional network is invaluable to our understanding of gene function, pathways, and systems-level properties of an organism and can be a powerful resource in directing targeted experiments. In this study, we present a functional network for the laboratory mouse based on a Bayesian integration of diverse genetic and functional genomic data. The resulting network includes probabilistic functional linkages among 20,581 protein-coding genes. We show that this network can accurately predict novel functional assignments and network components and present experimental evidence for predictions related to Nanog homeobox (Nanog), a critical gene in mouse embryonic stem cell pluripotency. An analysis of the global topology of the mouse functional network reveals multiple biologically relevant systems-level features of the mouse proteome. Specifically, we identify the clustering coefficient as a critical characteristic of central modulators that affect diverse pathways as well as genes associated with different phenotype traits and diseases. In addition, a cross-species comparison of functional interactomes on a genomic scale revealed distinct functional characteristics of conserved neighborhoods as compared to subnetworks specific to higher organisms. Thus, our global functional network for the laboratory mouse provides the community with a key resource for discovering protein functions and novel pathway components as well as a tool for exploring systems-level topological and evolutionary features of cellular interactomes. To facilitate exploration of this network by the biomedical research community, we illustrate its application in function and disease gene discovery through an interactive, Web-based, publicly available interface at http://mouseNET.princeton.edu.
Author Summary
Functionally related proteins interact in diverse ways to carry out biological processes, and each protein often participates in multiple pathways. Proteins are therefore organized into a complex network through which different functions of the cell are carried out. An accurate description of such a network is invaluable to our understanding of both the system-level features of a cell and those of an individual biological process. In this study, we used a probabilistic model to combine information from diverse genome-scale studies as well as individual investigations to generate a global functional network for mouse. Our analysis of the global topology of this network reveals biologically relevant systems-level characteristics of the mouse proteome, including conservation of functional neighborhoods and network features characteristic of known disease genes and key transcriptional regulators. We have made this network publicly available for search and dynamic exploration by researchers in the community. Our Web interface enables users to easily generate hypotheses regarding potential functional roles of uncharacterized proteins, investigate possible links between their proteins of interest and disease, and identify new players in specific biological processes.
doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000165
PMCID: PMC2527685  PMID: 18818725
18.  Ectopic Lymphoid Structures Support Ongoing Production of Class-Switched Autoantibodies in Rheumatoid Synovium 
PLoS Medicine  2009;6(1):e1.
Background
Follicular structures resembling germinal centres (GCs) that are characterized by follicular dendritic cell (FDC) networks have long been recognized in chronically inflamed tissues in autoimmune diseases, including the synovium of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, it is debated whether these ectopic structures promote autoimmunity and chronic inflammation driving the production of pathogenic autoantibodies. Anti-citrullinated protein/peptide antibodies (ACPA) are highly specific markers of RA, predict a poor prognosis, and have been suggested to be pathogenic. Therefore, the main study objectives were to determine whether ectopic lymphoid structures in RA synovium: (i) express activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme required for somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination (CSR) of Ig genes; (ii) support ongoing CSR and ACPA production; and (iii) remain functional in a RA/severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) chimera model devoid of new immune cell influx into the synovium.
Methods and Findings
Using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and quantitative Taqman real-time PCR (QT-PCR) in synovial tissue from 55 patients with RA, we demonstrated that FDC+ structures invariably expressed AID with a distribution resembling secondary lymphoid organs. Further, AID+/CD21+ follicular structures were surrounded by ACPA+/CD138+ plasma cells, as demonstrated by immune reactivity to citrullinated fibrinogen. Moreover, we identified a novel subset of synovial AID+/CD20+ B cells outside GCs resembling interfollicular large B cells. In order to gain direct functional evidence that AID+ structures support CSR and in situ manufacturing of class-switched ACPA, 34 SCID mice were transplanted with RA synovium and humanely killed at 4 wk for harvesting of transplants and sera. Persistent expression of AID and Iγ-Cμ circular transcripts (identifying ongoing IgM-IgG class-switching) was observed in synovial grafts expressing FDCs/CD21L. Furthermore, synovial mRNA levels of AID were closely associated with circulating human IgG ACPA in mouse sera. Finally, the survival and proliferation of functional B cell niches was associated with persistent overexpression of genes regulating ectopic lymphoneogenesis.
Conclusions
Our demonstration that FDC+ follicular units invariably express AID and are surrounded by ACPA-producing plasma cells provides strong evidence that ectopic lymphoid structures in the RA synovium are functional and support autoantibody production. This concept is further confirmed by evidence of sustained AID expression, B cell proliferation, ongoing CSR, and production of human IgG ACPA from GC+ synovial tissue transplanted into SCID mice, independently of new B cell influx from the systemic circulation. These data identify AID as a potential therapeutic target in RA and suggest that survival of functional synovial B cell niches may profoundly influence chronic inflammation, autoimmunity, and response to B cell–depleting therapies.
Costantino Pitzalis and colleagues show that lymphoid structures in synovial tissue of patients with rheumatoid arthritis support production of anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies, which continues following transplantation into SCID mice.
Editors' Summary
Background.
More than 1 million people in the United States have rheumatoid arthritis, an “autoimmune” condition that affects the joints. Normally, the immune system provides protection against infection by responding to foreign antigens (molecules that are unique to invading organisms) while ignoring self-antigens present in the body's own tissues. In autoimmune diseases, this ability to discriminate between self and non-self fails for unknown reasons and the immune system begins to attack human tissues. In rheumatoid arthritis, the lining of the joints (the synovium) is attacked, it becomes inflamed and thickened, and chemicals are released that damage all the tissues in the joint. Eventually, the joint may become so scarred that movement is no longer possible. Rheumatoid arthritis usually starts in the small joints in the hands and feet, but larger joints and other tissues (including the heart and blood vessels) can be affected. Its symptoms, which tend to fluctuate, include early morning joint pain, swelling, and stiffness, and feeling generally unwell. Although the disease is not always easy to diagnose, the immune systems of many people with rheumatoid arthritis make “anti-citrullinated protein/peptide antibodies” (ACPA). These “autoantibodies” (which some experts believe can contribute to the joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis) recognize self-proteins that contain the unusual amino acid citrulline, and their detection on blood tests can help make the diagnosis. Although there is no cure for rheumatoid arthritis, the recently developed biologic drugs, often used together with the more traditional disease-modifying therapies, are able to halt its progression by specifically blocking the chemicals that cause joint damage. Painkillers and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can reduce its symptoms, and badly damaged joints can sometimes be surgically replaced.
Why Was This Study Done?
Before scientists can develop a cure for rheumatoid arthritis, they need to know how and why autoantibodies are made that attack the joints in this common and disabling disease. B cells, the immune system cells that make antibodies, mature in structures known as “germinal centers” in the spleen and lymph nodes. In the germinal centers, immature B cells are exposed to antigens and undergo two genetic processes called “somatic hypermutation” and “class-switch recombination” that ensure that each B cell makes an antibody that sticks as tightly as possible to just one antigen. The B cells then multiply and enter the bloodstream where they help to deal with infections. Interestingly, the inflamed synovium of many patients with rheumatoid arthritis contains structures that resemble germinal centers. Could these ectopic (misplaced) lymphoid structures, which are characterized by networks of immune system cells called follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), promote autoimmunity and long-term inflammation by driving the production of autoantibodies within the joint itself? In this study, the researchers investigate this possibility.
What Did the Researchers Do and Find?
The researchers collected synovial tissue from 55 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and used two approaches, called immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR, to investigate whether FDC-containing structures in synovium expressed an enzyme called activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), which is needed for both somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination. All the FDC-containing structures that the researchers found in their samples expressed AID. Furthermore, these AID-containing structures were surrounded by mature B cells making ACPAs. To test whether these B cells were derived from AID-expressing cells resident in the synovium rather than ACPA-expressing immune system cells coming into the synovium from elsewhere in the body, the researchers transplanted synovium from patients with rheumatoid arthritis under the skin of a special sort of mouse that largely lacks its own immune system. Four weeks later, the researchers found that the transplanted human lymphoid tissue was still making AID, that the level of AID expression correlated with the amount of human ACPA in the blood of the mice, and that the B cells in the transplant were proliferating.
What Do These Findings Mean?
These findings show that the ectopic lymphoid structures present in the synovium of some patients with rheumatoid arthritis are functional and are able to make ACPA. Because ACPA may be responsible for joint damage, the survival of these structures could, therefore, be involved in the development and progression of rheumatoid arthritis. More experiments are needed to confirm this idea, but these findings may explain why drugs that effectively clear B cells from the bloodstream do not always produce a marked clinical improvement in rheumatoid arthritis. Finally, they suggest that AID might provide a new target for the development of drugs to treat rheumatoid arthritis.
Additional Information.
Please access these Web sites via the online version of this summary at http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.0060001.
This study is further discussed in a PLoS Medicine Perspective by Rene Toes and Tom Huizinga
The MedlinePlus Encyclopedia has a page on rheumatoid arthritis (in English and Spanish). MedlinePlus provides links to other information on rheumatoid arthritis (in English and Spanish)
The UK National Health Service Choices information service has detailed information on rheumatoid arthritis
The US National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases provides Fast Facts, an easy to read publication for the public, and a more detailed Handbook on rheumatoid arthritis
The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has an overview on rheumatoid arthritis that includes statistics about this disease and its impact on daily life
doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.0060001
PMCID: PMC2621263  PMID: 19143467
19.  Functional Inference of Complex Anatomical Tendinous Networks at a Macroscopic Scale via Sparse Experimentation 
PLoS Computational Biology  2012;8(11):e1002751.
In systems and computational biology, much effort is devoted to functional identification of systems and networks at the molecular-or cellular scale. However, similarly important networks exist at anatomical scales such as the tendon network of human fingers: the complex array of collagen fibers that transmits and distributes muscle forces to finger joints. This network is critical to the versatility of the human hand, and its function has been debated since at least the 16th century. Here, we experimentally infer the structure (both topology and parameter values) of this network through sparse interrogation with force inputs. A population of models representing this structure co-evolves in simulation with a population of informative future force inputs via the predator-prey estimation-exploration algorithm. Model fitness depends on their ability to explain experimental data, while the fitness of future force inputs depends on causing maximal functional discrepancy among current models. We validate our approach by inferring two known synthetic Latex networks, and one anatomical tendon network harvested from a cadaver's middle finger. We find that functionally similar but structurally diverse models can exist within a narrow range of the training set and cross-validation errors. For the Latex networks, models with low training set error [<4%] and resembling the known network have the smallest cross-validation errors [∼5%]. The low training set [<4%] and cross validation [<7.2%] errors for models for the cadaveric specimen demonstrate what, to our knowledge, is the first experimental inference of the functional structure of complex anatomical networks. This work expands current bioinformatics inference approaches by demonstrating that sparse, yet informative interrogation of biological specimens holds significant computational advantages in accurate and efficient inference over random testing, or assuming model topology and only inferring parameters values. These findings also hold clues to both our evolutionary history and the development of versatile machines.
Author Summary
In science and medicine alike, one of the critical steps to understand the working of organisms is to identify how a given individual is similar or different from others. Only then can the specific features of an individual be distinguished from the general properties of that species. However, doing enough input-output experiments on a given organism to obtain a reliable description of its function (i.e., a model) can often harm the organism, or require too much time when testing perishable tissues or human subjects. We have met this challenge by demonstrating that our novel algorithm can accelerate the extraction of accurate functional models in complex tissues by continually tailoring each successive experiment to be more informative. We apply this new method to the problem of describing how the tendons of the fingers interact, which has puzzled scientists and clinicians since the time of Da Vinci. This new computational-experimental method now enables fresh research directions in biological and medical research by allowing the experimental extraction of accurate functional models with minimal damage to the organism. For example, it will allow a better understanding of similarities and differences among related species, and the development of personalized medical treatment.
doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002751
PMCID: PMC3493461  PMID: 23144601
20.  Scale-space measures for graph topology link protein network architecture to function 
Bioinformatics  2014;30(12):i237-i245.
Motivation: The network architecture of physical protein interactions is an important determinant for the molecular functions that are carried out within each cell. To study this relation, the network architecture can be characterized by graph topological characteristics such as shortest paths and network hubs. These characteristics have an important shortcoming: they do not take into account that interactions occur across different scales. This is important because some cellular functions may involve a single direct protein interaction (small scale), whereas others require more and/or indirect interactions, such as protein complexes (medium scale) and interactions between large modules of proteins (large scale).
Results: In this work, we derive generalized scale-aware versions of known graph topological measures based on diffusion kernels. We apply these to characterize the topology of networks across all scales simultaneously, generating a so-called graph topological scale-space. The comprehensive physical interaction network in yeast is used to show that scale-space based measures consistently give superior performance when distinguishing protein functional categories and three major types of functional interactions—genetic interaction, co-expression and perturbation interactions. Moreover, we demonstrate that graph topological scale spaces capture biologically meaningful features that provide new insights into the link between function and protein network architecture.
Availability and implementation: MatlabTM code to calculate the scale-aware topological measures (STMs) is available at http://bioinformatics.tudelft.nl/TSSA
Contact: j.deridder@tudelft.nl
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btu283
PMCID: PMC4058939  PMID: 24931989
21.  Computational Identification of Phospho-Tyrosine Sub-Networks Related to Acanthocyte Generation in Neuroacanthocytosis 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(2):e31015.
Acanthocytes, abnormal thorny red blood cells (RBC), are one of the biological hallmarks of neuroacanthocytosis syndromes (NA), a group of rare hereditary neurodegenerative disorders. Since RBCs are easily accessible, the study of acanthocytes in NA may provide insights into potential mechanisms of neurodegeneration. Previous studies have shown that changes in RBC membrane protein phosphorylation state affect RBC membrane mechanical stability and morphology. Here, we coupled tyrosine-phosphoproteomic analysis to topological network analysis. We aimed to predict signaling sub-networks possibly involved in the generation of acanthocytes in patients affected by the two core NA disorders, namely McLeod syndrome (MLS, XK-related, Xk protein) and chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc, VPS13A-related, chorein protein). The experimentally determined phosphoproteomic data-sets allowed us to relate the subsequent network analysis to the pathogenetic background. To reduce the network complexity, we combined several algorithms of topological network analysis including cluster determination by shortest path analysis, protein categorization based on centrality indexes, along with annotation-based node filtering. We first identified XK- and VPS13A-related protein-protein interaction networks by identifying all the interactomic shortest paths linking Xk and chorein to the corresponding set of proteins whose tyrosine phosphorylation was altered in patients. These networks include the most likely paths of functional influence of Xk and chorein on phosphorylated proteins. We further refined the analysis by extracting restricted sets of highly interacting signaling proteins representing a common molecular background bridging the generation of acanthocytes in MLS and ChAc. The final analysis pointed to a novel, very restricted, signaling module of 14 highly interconnected kinases, whose alteration is possibly involved in generation of acanthocytes in MLS and ChAc.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0031015
PMCID: PMC3280254  PMID: 22355334
22.  Network target for screening synergistic drug combinations with application to traditional Chinese medicine 
BMC Systems Biology  2011;5(Suppl 1):S10.
Background
Multicomponent therapeutics offer bright prospects for the control of complex diseases in a synergistic manner. However, finding ways to screen the synergistic combinations from numerous pharmacological agents is still an ongoing challenge.
Results
In this work, we proposed for the first time a “network target”-based paradigm instead of the traditional "single target"-based paradigm for virtual screening and established an algorithm termed NIMS (Network target-based Identification of Multicomponent Synergy) to prioritize synergistic agent combinations in a high throughput way. NIMS treats a disease-specific biological network as a therapeutic target and assumes that the relationship among agents can be transferred to network interactions among the molecular level entities (targets or responsive gene products) of agents. Then, two parameters in NIMS, Topology Score and Agent Score, are created to evaluate the synergistic relationship between each given agent combinations. Taking the empirical multicomponent system traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) as an illustrative case, we applied NIMS to prioritize synergistic agent pairs from 63 agents on a pathological process instanced by angiogenesis. The NIMS outputs can not only recover five known synergistic agent pairs, but also obtain experimental verification for synergistic candidates combined with, for example, a herbal ingredient Sinomenine, which outperforms the meet/min method. The robustness of NIMS was also showed regarding the background networks, agent genes and topological parameters, respectively. Finally, we characterized the potential mechanisms of multicomponent synergy from a network target perspective.
Conclusions
NIMS is a first-step computational approach towards identification of synergistic drug combinations at the molecular level. The network target-based approaches may adjust current virtual screen mode and provide a systematic paradigm for facilitating the development of multicomponent therapeutics as well as the modernization of TCM.
doi:10.1186/1752-0509-5-S1-S10
PMCID: PMC3121110  PMID: 21689469
23.  Chemical combination effects predict connectivity in biological systems 
Chemical synergies can be novel probes of biological systems.Simulated response shapes depend on target connectivity in a pathway.Experiments with yeast and cancer cells confirm simulated effects.Profiles across many combinations yield target location information.
Living organisms are built of interacting components, whose function and dysfunction can be described through dynamic network models (Davidson et al, 2002). Systems Biology involves the iterative construction of such models (Ideker et al, 2001), and may eventually improve the understanding of diseases using in silico simulations. Such simulations may eventually permit drugs to be prioritized for clinical trials, reducing potential risks and increasing the likelihood of successful outcomes. Given the complexity of biological systems, constructing realistic models will require large and diverse sets of connectivity data.
Chemical combinations provide a new window into biological connectivity. Information gleaned from targeted combinations, such as paired mutations (Tong et al, 2004), has proven to be especially useful for revealing functional interactions between components. We have been screening chemical combinations for therapeutic synergies (Borisy et al, 2003; Zimmermann et al, 2007), collecting full-dose matrices where combinations are tested in all possible pairings of serially diluted single agent doses (Figure 1). Such screens yield a variety of response surfaces with distinct shapes for combinations that work through different known mechanisms, suggesting that combination effects may contain information on the nature of functional connections between drug targets.
Simulations of biological pathways predict synergistic responses to inhibitors that depend on target connectivity. We explored theoretical predictions by simulating a metabolic pathway with pairs of inhibitors aimed at different targets with varying doses. We found that the shape of each combination response depended on how the inhibitor pair's targets were connected in the pathway (Figure 2). The predicted response shapes were robust to plausible variations in the simulated pathway that did not affect the network topology (e.g., kinetic assumptions, parameter values, and nonlinear response functions), but were very sensitive to topological alterations in the modelled network (e.g., feedback regulation or changing the type of junction at a branch point). These findings suggest that connectivity of the inhibitor targets has a major influence on combination response morphology.
The predicted shapes were experimentally confirmed in yeast combination experiments. The proliferation experiment used drugs focused on the sterol biosynthesis pathway, which is mostly linear between the targets covered in this study, and is known to be regulated by negative feedback (Gardner et al, 2001). The combinations between sterol inhibitors confirmed expectations from our simulations, showing dose-additive responses for pairs targeting the same enzyme and strong synergies across enzymes of the shape predicted in our simulations for linear pathways under negative feedback. Combinations across pathways showed much more variable responses with a trend towards less synergy on average.
Further experimental support was obtained from human cells. A combination screen of 90 annotated drugs in a human tumour cell line (HCT116) proliferation assay produced strong synergies for combinations within pathways and more variable effects between targeted functions. Synergy profiles (sets of all synergy scores involving each drug) also showed a greater degree of similarity for pairs of drugs with related targets. Finally, the most extreme outliers were dominated by inhibitors of kinases that are especially critical for HCT116 proliferation (Awwad et al, 2003), with effects that are consistent across mechanistic replicates, showing that chemical combinations can highlight biologically relevant cellular processes.
This study demonstrates the potential of chemical combinations for exploring functional connectivity in biological systems. This information complements genetic studies by providing more details through variable dosing, by directly targeting single domains of multi-domain proteins, and by probing cell types that are not amenable to mutagenesis. Responses from large chemical combination screens can be used to identify molecular targets through chemical–genetic profiling (Macdonald et al, 2006), or to directly constrain network models by means of a prediction-validation procedure (Ideker et al, 2001). This initial exploration can be extended to cover a wider range of response shapes and network topologies, as well as to combinations of three or more chemical agents. Moreover, this approach may even be applicable to non-biological systems where responses to targeted perturbations can be measured.
Efforts to construct therapeutically useful models of biological systems require large and diverse sets of data on functional connections between their components. Here we show that cellular responses to combinations of chemicals reveal how their biological targets are connected. Simulations of pathways with pairs of inhibitors at varying doses predict distinct response surface shapes that are reproduced in a yeast experiment, with further support from a larger screen using human tumour cells. The response morphology yields detailed connectivity constraints between nearby targets, and synergy profiles across many combinations show relatedness between targets in the whole network. Constraints from chemical combinations complement genetic studies, because they probe different cellular components and can be applied to disease models that are not amenable to mutagenesis. Chemical probes also offer increased flexibility, as they can be continuously dosed, temporally controlled, and readily combined. After extending this initial study to cover a wider range of combination effects and pathway topologies, chemical combinations may be used to refine network models or to identify novel targets. This response surface methodology may even apply to non-biological systems where responses to targeted perturbations can be measured.
doi:10.1038/msb4100116
PMCID: PMC1828746  PMID: 17332758
chemical genetics; combinations and synergy; metabolic and regulatory networks; simulation and data analysis
24.  Integrative Modelling of the Influence of MAPK Network on Cancer Cell Fate Decision 
PLoS Computational Biology  2013;9(10):e1003286.
The Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) network consists of tightly interconnected signalling pathways involved in diverse cellular processes, such as cell cycle, survival, apoptosis and differentiation. Although several studies reported the involvement of these signalling cascades in cancer deregulations, the precise mechanisms underlying their influence on the balance between cell proliferation and cell death (cell fate decision) in pathological circumstances remain elusive. Based on an extensive analysis of published data, we have built a comprehensive and generic reaction map for the MAPK signalling network, using CellDesigner software. In order to explore the MAPK responses to different stimuli and better understand their contributions to cell fate decision, we have considered the most crucial components and interactions and encoded them into a logical model, using the software GINsim. Our logical model analysis particularly focuses on urinary bladder cancer, where MAPK network deregulations have often been associated with specific phenotypes. To cope with the combinatorial explosion of the number of states, we have applied novel algorithms for model reduction and for the compression of state transition graphs, both implemented into the software GINsim. The results of systematic simulations for different signal combinations and network perturbations were found globally coherent with published data. In silico experiments further enabled us to delineate the roles of specific components, cross-talks and regulatory feedbacks in cell fate decision. Finally, tentative proliferative or anti-proliferative mechanisms can be connected with established bladder cancer deregulations, namely Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) over-expression and Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 (FGFR3) activating mutations.
Author Summary
Depending on environmental conditions, strongly intertwined cellular signalling pathways are activated, involving activation/inactivation of proteins and genes in response to external and/or internal stimuli. Alterations of some components of these pathways can lead to wrong cell behaviours. For instance, cancer-related deregulations lead to high proliferation of malignant cells enabling sustained tumour growth. Understanding the precise mechanisms underlying these pathways is necessary to delineate efficient therapeutical approaches for each specific tumour type. We particularly focused on the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) signalling network, whose involvement in cancer is well established, although the precise conditions leading to its positive or negative influence on cell proliferation are still poorly understood. We tackled this problem by first collecting sparse published biological information into a comprehensive map describing the MAPK network in terms of stylised chemical reactions. This information source was then used to build a dynamical Boolean model recapitulating network responses to characteristic stimuli observed in selected bladder cancers. Systematic model simulations further allowed us to link specific network components and interactions with proliferative/anti-proliferative cell responses.
doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003286
PMCID: PMC3821540  PMID: 24250280
25.  Optimal Network Alignment with Graphlet Degree Vectors 
Cancer Informatics  2010;9:121-137.
Important biological information is encoded in the topology of biological networks. Comparative analyses of biological networks are proving to be valuable, as they can lead to transfer of knowledge between species and give deeper insights into biological function, disease, and evolution. We introduce a new method that uses the Hungarian algorithm to produce optimal global alignment between two networks using any cost function. We design a cost function based solely on network topology and use it in our network alignment. Our method can be applied to any two networks, not just biological ones, since it is based only on network topology. We use our new method to align protein-protein interaction networks of two eukaryotic species and demonstrate that our alignment exposes large and topologically complex regions of network similarity. At the same time, our alignment is biologically valid, since many of the aligned protein pairs perform the same biological function. From the alignment, we predict function of yet unannotated proteins, many of which we validate in the literature. Also, we apply our method to find topological similarities between metabolic networks of different species and build phylogenetic trees based on our network alignment score. The phylogenetic trees obtained in this way bear a striking resemblance to the ones obtained by sequence alignments. Our method detects topologically similar regions in large networks that are statistically significant. It does this independent of protein sequence or any other information external to network topology.
PMCID: PMC2901631  PMID: 20628593
network alignment; biological networks; network topology; protein function prediction; phylogeny

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