PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-25 (2116039)

Clipboard (0)
None

Related Articles

1.  Educational climate seems unrelated to leadership skills of clinical consultants responsible of postgraduate medical education in clinical departments 
BMC Medical Education  2010;10:62.
Background
The educational climate is crucial in postgraduate medical education. Although leaders are in the position to influence the educational climate, the relationship between leadership skills and educational climate is unknown. This study investigates the relationship between the educational climate in clinical departments and the leadership skills of clinical consultants responsible for education.
Methods
The study was a trans-sectional correlation study. The educational climate was investigated by a survey among all doctors (specialists and trainees) in the departments. Leadership skills of the consultants responsible for education were measured by multi-source feedback scores from heads of departments, peer consultants, and trainees.
Results
Doctors from 42 clinical departments representing 21 specialties participated. The response rate of the educational climate investigation was moderate 52% (420/811), Response rate was high in the multisource-feedback process 84.3% (420/498). The educational climate was scored quite high mean 3.9 (SD 0.3) on a five-point Likert scale. Likewise the leadership skills of the clinical consultants responsible for education were considered good, mean 5.4 (SD 0.6) on a seven-point Likert scale. There was no significant correlation between the scores concerning the educational climate and the scores on leadership skills, r = 0.17 (p = 0.29).
Conclusions
This study found no relation between the educational climate and the leadership skills of the clinical consultants responsible for postgraduate medical education in clinical departments with the instruments used. Our results indicate that consultants responsible for education are in a weak position to influence the educational climate in the clinical department. Further studies are needed to explore, how heads of departments and other factors related to the clinical organisation could influence the educational climate.
doi:10.1186/1472-6920-10-62
PMCID: PMC2955595  PMID: 20858255
2.  Do plastic surgery division heads and program directors have the necessary tools to provide effective leadership? 
Plastic Surgery  2014;22(4):241-245.
Evidence has shown that leadership abilities are not entirely innate and can, in many respects, be learned. Leaders in the corporate world are often trained and assessed for proficiency in several areas including finance, business acumen, accounting, and human resource strategizing and planning, among others. Whether this is true among individuals who assume leadership positions in plastic surgery remains largely unexplored. This study investigated the practice profiles, education/training and challenges of leaders in academic plastic surgery.
BACKGROUND:
Effective leadership is imperative in a changing health care landscape driven by increasing expectations in a setting of rising fiscal pressures. Because evidence suggests that leadership abilities are not simply innate but, rather, effective leadership can be learned, it is prudent for plastic surgeons to evaluate the training and challenges of their leaders because there may be opportunities for further growth and support.
OBJECTIVE:
To investigate the practice profiles, education/training, responsibilities and challenges of leaders within academic plastic surgery.
METHODS:
Following research ethics board approval, an anonymous online survey was sent to division heads and program directors from all university-affiliated plastic surgery divisions in Canada. Survey themes included demographics, education/training, job responsibilities and challenges.
RESULTS:
A response rate of 74% was achieved. The majority of respondents were male (94%), promoted to their current position at a mean age of 48 years, did not have a leadership-focused degree (88%), directly manage 30 people (14 staff, 16 faculty) and were not provided with a job description (65%). Respondents worked an average of 65 h per week, of which 18% was devoted to their leadership role, 59% clinically and the remainder on teaching and research. A discrepancy existed between time spent on their leadership role (18%) and related compensation (10%). Time management (47%) and managing conflict (24%) were described as the greatest leadership challenges by respondents.
CONCLUSIONS:
Several gaps were identified among leaders in plastic surgery including predominance of male sex, limitations in formal leadership training and requisite skill set, as well as compensation and human resources management (emotional intelligence). Leadership and managerial skills are key core competencies, not only for trainees, but certainly for those in a position of leadership. The present study provides evidence that academic departments, universities and medical centres may benefit by re-evaluating how they train, promote and support their leaders in plastic surgery.
PMCID: PMC4271752  PMID: 25535461
Leadership; Management; Plastic surgery; Skill set
3.  Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation 
Introduction
Leadership skills are described by the American College of Surgeons’ Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) course as necessary to provide care for patients during resuscitations. However, leadership is a complex concept, and the tools used to assess the quality of leadership are poorly described, inadequately validated, and infrequently used. Despite its importance, dedicated leadership education is rarely part of physician training programs. The goals of this investigation were the following: 1. Describe how leadership and leadership style affect patient care; 2. Describe how effective leadership is measured; and 3. Describe how to train future physician leaders.
Methods
We searched the PubMed database using the keywords “leadership” and then either “trauma” or “resuscitation” as title search terms, and an expert in emergency medicine and trauma then identified prospective observational and randomized controlled studies measuring leadership and teamwork quality. Study results were categorized as follows: 1) how leadership affects patient care; 2) which tools are available to measure leadership; and 3) methods to train physicians to become better leaders.
Results
We included 16 relevant studies in this review. Overall, these studies showed that strong leadership improves processes of care in trauma resuscitation including speed and completion of the primary and secondary surveys. The optimal style and structure of leadership are influenced by patient characteristics and team composition. Directive leadership is most effective when Injury Severity Score (ISS) is high or teams are inexperienced, while empowering leadership is most effective when ISS is low or teams more experienced. Many scales were employed to measure leadership. The Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ) was the only scale used in more than one study. Seven studies described methods for training leaders. Leadership training programs included didactic teaching followed by simulations. Although programs differed in length, intensity, and training level of participants, all programs demonstrated improved team performance.
Conclusion
Despite the relative paucity of literature on leadership in resuscitations, this review found leadership improves processes of care in trauma and can be enhanced through dedicated training. Future research is needed to validate leadership assessment scales, develop optimal training mechanisms, and demonstrate leadership’s effect on patient-level outcome.
doi:10.5811/westjem.2016.7.29812
PMCID: PMC5017838  PMID: 27625718
4.  Athletic Training Clinical Instructors as Situational Leaders 
Journal of Athletic Training  2002;37(4 suppl):S-261-S-265.
Objective: To present Situational Leadership as a model that can be implemented by clinical instructors during clinical education. Effective leadership occurs when the leadership style is matched with the observed followers' characteristics. Effective leaders anticipate and assess change and adapt quickly and grow with the change, all while leading followers to do the same. As athletic training students' levels of readiness change, clinical instructors also need to transform their leadership styles and strategies to match the students' ever-changing observed needs in different situations.
Data Sources: CINAHL (1982–2002), MEDLINE (1990–2001), SPORT Discus (1949–2002), ERIC (1966–2002), and Internet Web sites were searched. Search terms included leadership, situational leadership, clinical instructors and leadership, teachers as leaders, and clinical education.
Data Synthesis: Situational Leadership is presented as a leadership model to be used by clinical instructors while teaching and supervising athletic training students in the clinical setting. This model can be implemented to improve the clinical-education process. Situational leaders, eg, clinical instructors, must have the flexibility and range of skills to vary their leadership styles to match the challenges that occur while teaching athletic training students.
Conclusions/Recommendations: This leadership style causes the leader to carry a substantial responsibility to lead while giving power away. Communication is one of the most important leadership skills to develop to become an effective leader. It is imperative for the future of the profession that certified athletic trainers continue to develop effective leadership skills to address the changing times in education and expectations of the athletic training profession.
PMCID: PMC164435  PMID: 12937555
leadership; Situational Leadership; teacher as leader; clinical education
5.  Implementing a pilot leadership course for internal medicine residents: design considerations, participant impressions, and lessons learned 
BMC Medical Education  2014;14:257.
Background
Effective clinical leadership is associated with better patient care. We implemented and evaluated a pilot clinical leadership course for second year internal medicine residents at a large United States Academic Medical Center that is part of a multi-hospital health system.
Methods
The course met weekly for two to three hours during July, 2013. Sessions included large group discussions and small group reflection meetings. Topics included leadership styles, emotional intelligence, and leading clinical teams. Course materials were designed internally and featured “business school style” case studies about everyday clinical medicine which explore how leadership skills impact care delivery. Participants evaluated the course’s impact and quality using a post-course survey. Questions were structured in five point likert scale and free text format. Likert scale responses were converted to a 1-5 scale (1 = strongly disagree; 3 = neither agree nor disagree; 5 = strongly agree), and means were compared to the value 3 using one-way T-tests. Responses to free text questions were analyzed using the constant comparative method.
Results
All sixteen pilot course participants completed the survey. Participants overwhelmingly agreed that the course provided content and skills relevant to their clinical responsibilities and leadership roles. Most participants also acknowledged that taking the course improved their understanding of their strengths and weaknesses as leaders, different leadership styles, and how to manage interpersonal conflict on clinical teams. 88% also reported that the course increased their interest in pursuing additional leadership training.
Conclusions
A clinical leadership course for internal medicine residents designed by colleagues, and utilizing case studies about clinical medicine, resulted in significant self-reported improvements in clinical leadership competencies.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12909-014-0257-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/s12909-014-0257-2
PMCID: PMC4261637  PMID: 25433680
Leadership development; Management; Quality of care; Teamwork; Patient safety
6.  Do 360-degree Feedback Survey Results Relate to Patient Satisfaction Measures? 
Background
There is evidence that feedback from 360-degree surveys—combined with coaching—can improve physician team performance and quality of patient care. The Physicians Universal Leadership-Teamwork Skills Education (PULSE) 360 is one such survey tool that is used to assess work colleagues’ and coworkers’ perceptions of a physician’s leadership, teamwork, and clinical practice style. The Clinician & Group-Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and System (CG-CAHPS), developed by the US Department of Health and Human Services to serve as the benchmark for quality health care, is a survey tool for patients to provide feedback that is based on their recent experiences with staff and clinicians and soon will be tied to Medicare-based compensation of participating physicians. Prior research has indicated that patients and coworkers often agree in their assessment of physicians’ behavioral patterns. The goal of the current study was to determine whether 360-degree, also called multisource, feedback provided by coworkers could predict patient satisfaction/experience ratings. A significant relationship between these two forms of feedback could enable physicians to take a more proactive approach to reinforce their strengths and identify any improvement opportunities in their patient interactions by reviewing feedback from team members. An automated 360-degree software process may be a faster, simpler, and less resource-intensive approach than telephoning and interviewing patients for survey responses, and it potentially could facilitate a more rapid credentialing or quality improvement process leading to greater fiscal and professional development gains for physicians.
Questions/purposes
Our primary research question was to determine if PULSE 360 coworkers’ ratings correlate with CG-CAHPS patients’ ratings of overall satisfaction, recommendation of the physician, surgeon respect, and clarity of the surgeon’s explanation. Our secondary research questions were to determine whether CG-CAHPS scores correlate with additional composite scores from the Quality PULSE 360 (eg, insight impact score, focus concerns score, leadership-teamwork index score, etc).
Methods
We retrospectively analyzed existing quality improvement data from CG-CAHPS patient surveys as well as from a department quality improvement initiative using 360-degree survey feedback questionnaires (Quality PULSE 360 with coworkers). Bivariate analyses were conducted to identify significant relationships for inclusion of research variables in multivariate linear analyses (eg, stepwise regression to determine the best fitting predictive model for CG-CAHPS ratings). In all higher order analyses, CG-CAHPS ratings were treated as the dependent variables, whereas PULSE 360 scores served as independent variables. This approach led to the identification of the most predictive linear model for each CG-CAHPS’ performance rating (eg, [1] overall satisfaction; [2] recommendation of the physician; [3] surgeon respect; and [4] clarity of the surgeon’s explanation) regressed on all PULSE scores with which there was a significant bivariate relationship. Backward stepwise regression was then used to remove unnecessary predictors from the linear model based on changes in the variance explained by the model with or without inclusion of the predictor.
Results
The Quality PULSE 360 insight impact score correlated with patient satisfaction (0.50, p = 0.01), patient recommendation (0.58, p = 0.002), patient rating of surgeon respect (0.74, p < 0.001), and patient impression of clarity of the physician explanation (0.69, p < 0.001). Additionally, leadership-teamwork index also correlated with patient rating of surgeon respect (0.46, p = 0.019) and patient impression of clarity of the surgeon’s explanation (0.39, p = 0.05). Multivariate analyses supported retention of insight impact as a predictor of patient overall satisfaction, patient recommendation of the surgeon, and patient rating of surgeon respect. Both insight impact and leadership-teamwork index were retained as predictors of patient impression of explanation. Several other PULSE 360 variables were correlated with CG-CAHPS ratings, but none were retained in the linear models post stepwise regression.
Conclusions
The relationship between Quality PULSE 360 feedback scores and measures of patient satisfaction reaffirm that feedback from work team members may provide helpful information into how patients may be perceiving their physicians’ behavior and vice versa. Furthermore, the findings provide tentative support for the use of team-based feedback to improve the quality of relationships with both coworkers and patients. The 360-degree survey process may offer an effective tool for physicians to obtain feedback about behavior that could directly impact practice reimbursement and reputation or potentially be used for bonuses to incentivize better team professionalism and patient satisfaction, ie, “pay-for-professionalism.” Further research is needed to expand on this line of inquiry, determine which interventions can improve 360-degree and patient satisfaction scores, and explain the shared variance in physician performance that is captured in the perceptions of patients and coworkers.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11999-014-3981-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1007/s11999-014-3981-3
PMCID: PMC4385380  PMID: 25287521
7.  Enhancing capabilities in health professions education 
Objectives
This article documents the results of ongoing summative program evaluation of a suite of postgraduate courses at The University of Western Australia designed to enhance the educational capabilities, academic leadership and scholarly output of health professionals.
Methods
Commencing students were invited to participate in this descriptive, longitudinal study that surveyed students at commencement and subsequently over a seven year period. Data was collected at baseline and follow-up in relation to the respondents’ educational leadership responsibilities, promotions, involvement in new educational programs, and recognition for contributions towards student learning, educational scholarly outputs and involvement in training programs.
Results
The respondents came from a wide range of health professions and worked in various roles, with a quarter already holding leadership positions. During the follow-up period, half reported receiving a new promotion or moving to new positions requiring educational leadership. Those identifying as being involved with the development of new educational programs doubled and 34% received a new teaching award. Scholarly productivity doubled with 45% giving an oral presentation related to education, 21% publishing and 29% being successful in obtaining funding related to an education project. 
Conclusions
These postgraduate courses in health professions education appear to be positively influencing graduates’ capabilities, especially in the areas of educational leadership skills and scholarly productivity. For those looking to develop a community of leaders in health professions education, the authors offer some suggestions.
doi:10.5116/ijme.5641.060c
PMCID: PMC4662867  PMID: 26590857
Faculty development; postgraduate; health professions
8.  Teambuilding and Leadership Training in an Internal Medicine Residency Training Program 
OBJECTIVE
The purpose of this report is to describe and evaluate the impact of a 1-day retreat focused on developing leadership skills and teambuilding among postgraduate year 1 residents in an internal medicine residency.
METHOD
A group of organizers, including members of the staff, the chief medical residents, administrative individuals in the residency office, and an internal organizational development consultant convened to organize an off-site retreat with activities that would provide experiential learning regarding teamwork and leadership, including a “reef survival exercise” and table discussions regarding the characteristics of ideal leaders. In addition, several energizing activities and recreational free time was provided to enhance the interaction and teamwork dimensions of the retreat. To evaluate the impact of the retreat, attendees completed baseline and follow-up questionnaires regarding their experience of the retreat.
RESULTS
Attendees universally regarded the retreat as having value for them. Comparison of baseline to postretreat responses indicated that attendees felt that the retreat enhanced their abilities to be better physicians, resident supervisors, and leaders. Follow-up responses indicated significant increases in attendees’ agreement that good leaders challenge the process, make decisions based on shared visions, allow others to act, recognize individual contributions, and serve as good role models. Results on the survival exercise indicated a high frequency with which team-based decisions surpassed individual members’ decisions, highlighting the importance and value of teamwork to attendees.
CONCLUSIONS
Our main findings were that: participants universally found this 1-day retreat beneficial in helping to develop teamwork and leadership skills and the experiential learning aspects of the retreat were more especially highly rated and highlighted the advantages of teamwork.
In the context that this 1-day retreat was deemed useful by faculty and residents alike, further study is needed to assess the impact of this learning on actual clinical practice and the durability of these lessons.
doi:10.1111/j.1525-1497.2004.30247.x
PMCID: PMC1492383  PMID: 15209609
leadership; residency training; teambuilding
9.  Training of Leadership Skills in Medical Education 
Background: Effective team performance is essential in the delivery of high-quality health-care. Leadership skills therefore are an important part of physicians’ everyday clinical life. To date, the development of leadership skills are underrepresented in medical curricula. Appropriate training methods for equipping doctors with these leadership skills are highly desirable.
Objective: The review aims to summarize the findings in the current literature regarding training in leadership skills in medicine and tries to integrate the findings to guide future research and training development.
Method: The PubMED, ERIC, and PsycArticles, PsycINFO, PSYNDEX and Academic search complete of EBSCOhost were searched for training of leadership skills in medicine in German and English. Relevant articles were identified and findings were integrated and consolidated regarding the leadership principles, target group of training and number of participants, temporal resources of the training, training content and methods, the evaluation design and trainings effects.
Results: Eight studies met all inclusion criteria and no exclusion criteria. The range of training programs is very broad and leadership skill components are diverse. Training designs implied theoretical reflections of leadership phenomena as well as discussions of case studies from practice. The duration of training ranged from several hours to years. Reactions of participants to trainings were positive, yet no behavioral changes through training were examined.
Conclusions: More research is needed to understand the factors critical to success in the development of leadership skills in medical education and to adapt goal-oriented training methods. Requirements analysis might help to gain knowledge about the nature of leadership skills in medicine. The authors propose a stronger focus on behavioral training methods like simulation-based training for leadership skills in medical education.
PMCID: PMC3839077  PMID: 24282452
Education Medical (MeSH [I02.358.399]); Leadership (MeSH [F01.752.609]); training
10.  Leadership Frames and Perceptions of Effectiveness among Health Information Management Program Directors 
Leadership is important to health science education. For program effectiveness, directors should possess leadership skills to appropriately lead and manage their departments. Therefore, it is important to explore the leadership styles of programs' leaders as health science education is undergoing reform. Program directors of two and four-year health information management programs were surveyed to determine leadership styles. The study examined leadership styles or frames, the number of leadership frames employed by directors, and the relationship between leadership frames and their perceptions of their effectiveness as a manager and as a leader. The study shows that program directors are confident of their human resource and structural skills and less sure of the political and symbolic skills required of leaders. These skills in turn are correlated with their self-perceived effectiveness as managers and leaders. Findings from the study may assist program directors in their career development and expansion of health information management programs as a discipline within the health science field.
As academic health centers receive greater pressure from the Institute of Medicine and accrediting agencies to reform health science education, the question of leadership arises. These centers have taken a leadership role in reforming health professional education by partnering with educational institutions to improve the health of communities.
To achieve health education reform, health sciences educators must apply effective leadership skills.1 College and university leadership is challenged on how to best approach educational reform across health science fields. This article discusses leadership styles employed by program directors of one health science department, health information management, in directing programs for health science education reform.
PMCID: PMC2047298  PMID: 18066358
Leadership frames; health information management; program effectiveness
11.  Proceedings of the 3rd Biennial Conference of the Society for Implementation Research Collaboration (SIRC) 2015: advancing efficient methodologies through community partnerships and team science 
Lewis, Cara | Darnell, Doyanne | Kerns, Suzanne | Monroe-DeVita, Maria | Landes, Sara J. | Lyon, Aaron R. | Stanick, Cameo | Dorsey, Shannon | Locke, Jill | Marriott, Brigid | Puspitasari, Ajeng | Dorsey, Caitlin | Hendricks, Karin | Pierson, Andria | Fizur, Phil | Comtois, Katherine A. | Palinkas, Lawrence A. | Chamberlain, Patricia | Aarons, Gregory A. | Green, Amy E. | Ehrhart, Mark. G. | Trott, Elise M. | Willging, Cathleen E. | Fernandez, Maria E. | Woolf, Nicholas H. | Liang, Shuting Lily | Heredia, Natalia I. | Kegler, Michelle | Risendal, Betsy | Dwyer, Andrea | Young, Vicki | Campbell, Dayna | Carvalho, Michelle | Kellar-Guenther, Yvonne | Damschroder, Laura J. | Lowery, Julie C. | Ono, Sarah S. | Carlson, Kathleen F. | Cottrell, Erika K. | O’Neil, Maya E. | Lovejoy, Travis L. | Arch, Joanna J. | Mitchell, Jill L. | Lewis, Cara C. | Marriott, Brigid R. | Scott, Kelli | Coldiron, Jennifer Schurer | Bruns, Eric J. | Hook, Alyssa N. | Graham, Benjamin C. | Jordan, Katelin | Hanson, Rochelle F. | Moreland, Angela | Saunders, Benjamin E. | Resnick, Heidi S. | Stirman, Shannon Wiltsey | Gutner, Cassidy A. | Gamarra, Jennifer | Vogt, Dawne | Suvak, Michael | Wachen, Jennifer Schuster | Dondanville, Katherine | Yarvis, Jeffrey S. | Mintz, Jim | Peterson, Alan L. | Borah, Elisa V. | Litz, Brett T. | Molino, Alma | McCaughan, Stacey Young | Resick, Patricia A. | Pandhi, Nancy | Jacobson, Nora | Serrano, Neftali | Hernandez, Armando | Schreiter, Elizabeth Zeidler- | Wietfeldt, Natalie | Karp, Zaher | Pullmann, Michael D. | Lucenko, Barbara | Pavelle, Bridget | Uomoto, Jacqueline A. | Negrete, Andrea | Cevasco, Molly | Kerns, Suzanne E. U. | Franks, Robert P. | Bory, Christopher | Miech, Edward J. | Damush, Teresa M. | Satterfield, Jason | Satre, Derek | Wamsley, Maria | Yuan, Patrick | O’Sullivan, Patricia | Best, Helen | Velasquez, Susan | Barnett, Miya | Brookman-Frazee, Lauren | Regan, Jennifer | Stadnick, Nicole | Hamilton, Alison | Lau, Anna | Regan, Jennifer | Hamilton, Alison | Stadnick, Nicole | Barnett, Miya | Lau, Anna | Brookman-Frazee, Lauren | Stadnick, Nicole | Lau, Anna | Barnett, Miya | Regan, Jennifer | Roesch, Scott | Brookman-Frazee, Lauren | Powell, Byron J. | Waltz, Thomas J. | Chinman, Matthew J. | Damschroder, Laura | Smith, Jeffrey L. | Matthieu, Monica M. | Proctor, Enola K. | Kirchner, JoAnn E. | Waltz, Thomas J. | Powell, Byron J. | Chinman, Matthew J. | Damschroder, Laura J. | Smith, Jeffrey L. | Matthieu, Monica J. | Proctor, Enola K. | Kirchner, JoAnn E. | Matthieu, Monica M. | Rosen, Craig S. | Waltz, Thomas J. | Powell, Byron J. | Chinman, Matthew J. | Damschroder, Laura J. | Smith, Jeffrey L. | Proctor, Enola K. | Kirchner, JoAnn E. | Walker, Sarah C. | Bishop, Asia S. | Lockhart, Mariko | Rodriguez, Allison L. | Manfredi, Luisa | Nevedal, Andrea | Rosenthal, Joel | Blonigen, Daniel M. | Mauricio, Anne M. | Dishion, Thomas D. | Rudo-Stern, Jenna | Smith, Justin D. | Locke, Jill | Wolk, Courtney Benjamin | Harker, Colleen | Olsen, Anne | Shingledecker, Travis | Barg, Frances | Mandell, David | Beidas, Rinad S. | Hansen, Marissa C. | Aranda, Maria P. | Torres-Vigil, Isabel | Hartzler, Bryan | Steinfeld, Bradley | Gildred, Tory | Harlin, Zandrea | Shephard, Fredric | Ditty, Matthew S. | Doyle, Andrea | Bickel, John A. | Cristaudo, Katharine | Fox, Dan | Combs, Sonia | Lischner, David H. | Van Dorn, Richard A. | Tueller, Stephen J. | Hinde, Jesse M. | Karuntzos, Georgia T. | Monroe-DeVita, Maria | Peterson, Roselyn | Darnell, Doyanne | Berliner, Lucy | Dorsey, Shannon | Murray, Laura K. | Botanov, Yevgeny | Kikuta, Beverly | Chen, Tianying | Navarro-Haro, Marivi | DuBose, Anthony | Korslund, Kathryn E. | Linehan, Marsha M. | Harker, Colleen M. | Karp, Elizabeth A. | Edmunds, Sarah R. | Ibañez, Lisa V. | Stone, Wendy L. | Andrews, Jack H. | Johnides, Benjamin D. | Hausman, Estee M. | Hawley, Kristin M. | Prusaczyk, Beth | Ramsey, Alex | Baumann, Ana | Colditz, Graham | Proctor, Enola K. | Botanov, Yevgeny | Kikuta, Beverly | Chen, Tianying | Navarro-Haro, Marivi | DuBose, Anthony | Korslund, Kathryn E. | Linehan, Marsha M. | Harker, Colleen M. | Karp, Elizabeth A. | Edmunds, Sarah R. | Ibañez, Lisa V. | Stone, Wendy L. | Choy-Brown, Mimi | Andrews, Jack H. | Johnides, Benjamin D. | Hausman, Estee M. | Hawley, Kristin M. | Prusaczyk, Beth | Ramsey, Alex | Baumann, Ana | Colditz, Graham | Proctor, Enola K. | Meza, Rosemary D. | Dorsey, Shannon | Wiltsey-Stirman, Shannon | Sedlar, Georganna | Lucid, Leah | Dorsey, Caitlin | Marriott, Brigid | Zounlome, Nelson | Lewis, Cara | Gutner, Cassidy A. | Monson, Candice M. | Shields, Norman | Mastlej, Marta | Landy, Meredith SH | Lane, Jeanine | Stirman, Shannon Wiltsey | Finn, Natalie K. | Torres, Elisa M. | Ehrhart, Mark. G. | Aarons, Gregory A. | Malte, Carol A. | Lott, Aline | Saxon, Andrew J. | Boyd, Meredith | Scott, Kelli | Lewis, Cara C. | Pierce, Jennifer D. | Lorthios-Guilledroit, Agathe | Richard, Lucie | Filiatrault, Johanne | Hallgren, Kevin | Crotwell, Shirley | Muñoz, Rosa | Gius, Becky | Ladd, Benjamin | McCrady, Barbara | Epstein, Elizabeth | Clapp, John D. | Ruderman, Danielle E. | Barwick, Melanie | Barac, Raluca | Zlotkin, Stanley | Salim, Laila | Davidson, Marnie | Bunger, Alicia C. | Powell, Byron J. | Robertson, Hillary A. | Botsko, Christopher | Landes, Sara J. | Smith, Brandy N. | Rodriguez, Allison L. | Trent, Lindsay R. | Matthieu, Monica M. | Powell, Byron J. | Proctor, Enola K. | Harned, Melanie S. | Navarro-Haro, Marivi | Korslund, Kathryn E. | Chen, Tianying | DuBose, Anthony | Ivanoff, André | Linehan, Marsha M. | Garcia, Antonio R. | Kim, Minseop | Palinkas, Lawrence A. | Snowden, Lonnie | Landsverk, John | Sweetland, Annika C. | Fernandes, Maria Jose | Santos, Edilson | Duarte, Cristiane | Kritski, Afrânio | Krawczyk, Noa | Nelligan, Caitlin | Wainberg, Milton L. | Aarons, Gregory A. | Sommerfeld, David H. | Chi, Benjamin | Ezeanolue, Echezona | Sturke, Rachel | Kline, Lydia | Guay, Laura | Siberry, George | Bennett, Ian M. | Beidas, Rinad | Gold, Rachel | Mao, Johnny | Powers, Diane | Vredevoogd, Mindy | Unutzer, Jurgen | Schroeder, Jennifer | Volpe, Lane | Steffen, Julie | Dorsey, Shannon | Pullmann, Michael D | Kerns, Suzanne E. U. | Jungbluth, Nathaniel | Berliner, Lucy | Thompson, Kelly | Segell, Eliza | McGee-Vincent, Pearl | Liu, Nancy | Walser, Robyn | Runnals, Jennifer | Shaw, R. Keith | Landes, Sara J. | Rosen, Craig | Schmidt, Janet | Calhoun, Patrick | Varkovitzky, Ruth L. | Landes, Sara J. | Drahota, Amy | Martinez, Jonathan I. | Brikho, Brigitte | Meza, Rosemary | Stahmer, Aubyn C. | Aarons, Gregory A. | Williamson, Anna | Rubin, Ronnie M. | Powell, Byron J. | Hurford, Matthew O. | Weaver, Shawna L. | Beidas, Rinad S. | Mandell, David S. | Evans, Arthur C. | Powell, Byron J. | Beidas, Rinad S. | Rubin, Ronnie M. | Stewart, Rebecca E. | Wolk, Courtney Benjamin | Matlin, Samantha L. | Weaver, Shawna | Hurford, Matthew O. | Evans, Arthur C. | Hadley, Trevor R. | Mandell, David S. | Gerke, Donald R. | Prusaczyk, Beth | Baumann, Ana | Lewis, Ericka M. | Proctor, Enola K. | McWilliam, Jenna | Brown, Jacquie | Tucker, Michelle | Conte, Kathleen P | Lyon, Aaron R. | Boyd, Meredith | Melvin, Abigail | Lewis, Cara C. | Liu, Freda | Jungbluth, Nathaniel | Kotte, Amelia | Hill, Kaitlin A. | Mah, Albert C. | Korathu-Larson, Priya A. | Au, Janelle R. | Izmirian, Sonia | Keir, Scott | Nakamura, Brad J. | Higa-McMillan, Charmaine K. | Cooper, Brittany Rhoades | Funaiole, Angie | Dizon, Eleanor | Hawkins, Eric J. | Malte, Carol A. | Hagedorn, Hildi J. | Berger, Douglas | Frank, Anissa | Lott, Aline | Achtmeyer, Carol E. | Mariano, Anthony J. | Saxon, Andrew J. | Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate | Rawson, Richard | Ries, Richard | Roy-Byrne, Peter | Craske, Michelle | Simmons, Dena | Torrente, Catalina | Nathanson, Lori | Carroll, Grace | Smith, Justin D. | Brown, Kimbree | Ramos, Karina | Thornton, Nicole | Dishion, Thomas J. | Stormshak, Elizabeth A. | Shaw, Daniel S. | Wilson, Melvin N. | Choy-Brown, Mimi | Tiderington, Emmy | Smith, Bikki Tran | Padgett, Deborah K. | Rubin, Ronnie M. | Ray, Marilyn L. | Wandersman, Abraham | Lamont, Andrea | Hannah, Gordon | Alia, Kassandra A. | Hurford, Matthew O. | Evans, Arthur C. | Saldana, Lisa | Schaper, Holle | Campbell, Mark | Chamberlain, Patricia | Shapiro, Valerie B. | Kim, B.K. Elizabeth | Fleming, Jennifer L. | LeBuffe, Paul A. | Landes, Sara J. | Lewis, Cara C. | Rodriguez, Allison L. | Marriott, Brigid R. | Comtois, Katherine Anne | Lewis, Cara C. | Stanick, Cameo | Weiner, Bryan J. | Halko, Heather | Dorsey, Caitlin
Implementation Science : IS  2016;11(Suppl 1):85.
Table of contents
Introduction to the 3rd Biennial Conference of the Society for Implementation Research Collaboration: advancing efficient methodologies through team science and community partnerships
Cara Lewis, Doyanne Darnell, Suzanne Kerns, Maria Monroe-DeVita, Sara J. Landes, Aaron R. Lyon, Cameo Stanick, Shannon Dorsey, Jill Locke, Brigid Marriott, Ajeng Puspitasari, Caitlin Dorsey, Karin Hendricks, Andria Pierson, Phil Fizur, Katherine A. Comtois
A1: A behavioral economic perspective on adoption, implementation, and sustainment of evidence-based interventions
Lawrence A. Palinkas
A2: Towards making scale up of evidence-based practices in child welfare systems more efficient and affordable
Patricia Chamberlain
A3: Mixed method examination of strategic leadership for evidence-based practice implementation
Gregory A. Aarons, Amy E. Green, Mark. G. Ehrhart, Elise M. Trott, Cathleen E. Willging
A4: Implementing practice change in Federally Qualified Health Centers: Learning from leaders’ experiences
Maria E. Fernandez, Nicholas H. Woolf, Shuting (Lily) Liang, Natalia I. Heredia, Michelle Kegler, Betsy Risendal, Andrea Dwyer, Vicki Young, Dayna Campbell, Michelle Carvalho, Yvonne Kellar-Guenther
A3: Mixed method examination of strategic leadership for evidence-based practice implementation
Gregory A. Aarons, Amy E. Green, Mark. G. Ehrhart, Elise M. Trott, Cathleen E. Willging
A4: Implementing practice change in Federally Qualified Health Centers: Learning from leaders’ experiences
Maria E. Fernandez, Nicholas H. Woolf, Shuting (Lily) Liang, Natalia I. Heredia, Michelle Kegler, Betsy Risendal, Andrea Dwyer, Vicki Young, Dayna Campbell, Michelle Carvalho, Yvonne Kellar-Guenther
A5: Efficient synthesis: Using qualitative comparative analysis and the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research across diverse studies
Laura J. Damschroder, Julie C. Lowery
A6: Establishing a veterans engagement group to empower patients and inform Veterans Affairs (VA) health services research
Sarah S. Ono, Kathleen F. Carlson, Erika K. Cottrell, Maya E. O’Neil, Travis L. Lovejoy
A7: Building patient-practitioner partnerships in community oncology settings to implement behavioral interventions for anxious and depressed cancer survivors
Joanna J. Arch, Jill L. Mitchell
A8: Tailoring a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy implementation protocol using mixed methods, conjoint analysis, and implementation teams
Cara C. Lewis, Brigid R. Marriott, Kelli Scott
A9: Wraparound Structured Assessment and Review (WrapSTAR): An efficient, yet comprehensive approach to Wraparound implementation evaluation
Jennifer Schurer Coldiron, Eric J. Bruns, Alyssa N. Hook
A10: Improving the efficiency of standardized patient assessment of clinician fidelity: A comparison of automated actor-based and manual clinician-based ratings
Benjamin C. Graham, Katelin Jordan
A11: Measuring fidelity on the cheap
Rochelle F. Hanson, Angela Moreland, Benjamin E. Saunders, Heidi S. Resnick
A12: Leveraging routine clinical materials to assess fidelity to an evidence-based psychotherapy
Shannon Wiltsey Stirman, Cassidy A. Gutner, Jennifer Gamarra, Dawne Vogt, Michael Suvak, Jennifer Schuster Wachen, Katherine Dondanville, Jeffrey S. Yarvis, Jim Mintz, Alan L. Peterson, Elisa V. Borah, Brett T. Litz, Alma Molino, Stacey Young McCaughanPatricia A. Resick
A13: The video vignette survey: An efficient process for gathering diverse community opinions to inform an intervention
Nancy Pandhi, Nora Jacobson, Neftali Serrano, Armando Hernandez, Elizabeth Zeidler- Schreiter, Natalie Wietfeldt, Zaher Karp
A14: Using integrated administrative data to evaluate implementation of a behavioral health and trauma screening for children and youth in foster care
Michael D. Pullmann, Barbara Lucenko, Bridget Pavelle, Jacqueline A. Uomoto, Andrea Negrete, Molly Cevasco, Suzanne E. U. Kerns
A15: Intermediary organizations as a vehicle to promote efficiency and speed of implementation
Robert P. Franks, Christopher Bory
A16: Applying the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research constructs directly to qualitative data: The power of implementation science in action
Edward J. Miech, Teresa M. Damush
A17: Efficient and effective scaling-up, screening, brief interventions, and referrals to treatment (SBIRT) training: a snowball implementation model
Jason Satterfield, Derek Satre, Maria Wamsley, Patrick Yuan, Patricia O’Sullivan
A18: Matching models of implementation to system needs and capacities: addressing the human factor
Helen Best, Susan Velasquez
A19: Agency characteristics that facilitate efficient and successful implementation efforts
Miya Barnett, Lauren Brookman-Frazee, Jennifer Regan, Nicole Stadnick, Alison Hamilton, Anna Lau
A20: Rapid assessment process: Application to the Prevention and Early Intervention transformation in Los Angeles County
Jennifer Regan, Alison Hamilton, Nicole Stadnick, Miya Barnett, Anna Lau, Lauren Brookman-Frazee
A21: The development of the Evidence-Based Practice-Concordant Care Assessment: An assessment tool to examine treatment strategies across practices
Nicole Stadnick, Anna Lau, Miya Barnett, Jennifer Regan, Scott Roesch, Lauren Brookman-Frazee
A22: Refining a compilation of discrete implementation strategies and determining their importance and feasibility
Byron J. Powell, Thomas J. Waltz, Matthew J. Chinman, Laura Damschroder, Jeffrey L. Smith, Monica M. Matthieu, Enola K. Proctor, JoAnn E. Kirchner
A23: Structuring complex recommendations: Methods and general findings
Thomas J. Waltz, Byron J. Powell, Matthew J. Chinman, Laura J. Damschroder, Jeffrey L. Smith, Monica J. Matthieu, Enola K. Proctor, JoAnn E. Kirchner
A24: Implementing prolonged exposure for post-traumatic stress disorder in the Department of Veterans Affairs: Expert recommendations from the Expert Recommendations for Implementing Change (ERIC) project
Monica M. Matthieu, Craig S. Rosen, Thomas J. Waltz, Byron J. Powell, Matthew J. Chinman, Laura J. Damschroder, Jeffrey L. Smith, Enola K. Proctor, JoAnn E. Kirchner
A25: When readiness is a luxury: Co-designing a risk assessment and quality assurance process with violence prevention frontline workers in Seattle, WA
Sarah C. Walker, Asia S. Bishop, Mariko Lockhart
A26: Implementation potential of structured recidivism risk assessments with justice- involved veterans: Qualitative perspectives from providers
Allison L. Rodriguez, Luisa Manfredi, Andrea Nevedal, Joel Rosenthal, Daniel M. Blonigen
A27: Developing empirically informed readiness measures for providers and agencies for the Family Check-Up using a mixed methods approach
Anne M. Mauricio, Thomas D. Dishion, Jenna Rudo-Stern, Justin D. Smith
A28: Pebbles, rocks, and boulders: The implementation of a school-based social engagement intervention for children with autism
Jill Locke, Courtney Benjamin Wolk, Colleen Harker, Anne Olsen, Travis Shingledecker, Frances Barg, David Mandell, Rinad S. Beidas
A29: Problem Solving Teletherapy (PST.Net): A stakeholder analysis examining the feasibility and acceptability of teletherapy in community based aging services
Marissa C. Hansen, Maria P. Aranda, Isabel Torres-Vigil
A30: A case of collaborative intervention design eventuating in behavior therapy sustainment and diffusion
Bryan Hartzler
A31: Implementation of suicide risk prevention in an integrated delivery system: Mental health specialty services
Bradley Steinfeld, Tory Gildred, Zandrea Harlin, Fredric Shephard
A32: Implementation team, checklist, evaluation, and feedback (ICED): A step-by-step approach to Dialectical Behavior Therapy program implementation
Matthew S. Ditty, Andrea Doyle, John A. Bickel III, Katharine Cristaudo
A33: The challenges in implementing muliple evidence-based practices in a community mental health setting
Dan Fox, Sonia Combs
A34: Using electronic health record technology to promote and support evidence-based practice assessment and treatment intervention
David H. Lischner
A35: Are existing frameworks adequate for measuring implementation outcomes? Results from a new simulation methodology
Richard A. Van Dorn, Stephen J. Tueller, Jesse M. Hinde, Georgia T. Karuntzos
A36: Taking global local: Evaluating training of Washington State clinicians in a modularized cogntive behavioral therapy approach designed for low-resource settings
Maria Monroe-DeVita, Roselyn Peterson, Doyanne Darnell, Lucy Berliner, Shannon Dorsey, Laura K. Murray
A37: Attitudes toward evidence-based practices across therapeutic orientations
Yevgeny Botanov, Beverly Kikuta, Tianying Chen, Marivi Navarro-Haro, Anthony DuBose, Kathryn E. Korslund, Marsha M. Linehan
A38: Predicting the use of an evidence-based intervention for autism in birth-to-three programs
Colleen M. Harker, Elizabeth A. Karp, Sarah R. Edmunds, Lisa V. Ibañez, Wendy L. Stone
A39: Supervision practices and improved fidelity across evidence-based practices: A literature review
Mimi Choy-Brown
A40: Beyond symptom tracking: clinician perceptions of a hybrid measurement feedback system for monitoring treatment fidelity and client progress
Jack H. Andrews, Benjamin D. Johnides, Estee M. Hausman, Kristin M. Hawley
A41: A guideline decision support tool: From creation to implementation
Beth Prusaczyk, Alex Ramsey, Ana Baumann, Graham Colditz, Enola K. Proctor
A42: Dabblers, bedazzlers, or total makeovers: Clinician modification of a common elements cognitive behavioral therapy approach
Rosemary D. Meza, Shannon Dorsey, Shannon Wiltsey-Stirman, Georganna Sedlar, Leah Lucid
A43: Characterization of context and its role in implementation: The impact of structure, infrastructure, and metastructure
Caitlin Dorsey, Brigid Marriott, Nelson Zounlome, Cara Lewis
A44: Effects of consultation method on implementation of cognitive processing therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder
Cassidy A. Gutner, Candice M. Monson, Norman Shields, Marta Mastlej, Meredith SH Landy, Jeanine Lane, Shannon Wiltsey Stirman
A45: Cross-validation of the Implementation Leadership Scale factor structure in child welfare service organizations
Natalie K. Finn, Elisa M. Torres, Mark. G. Ehrhart, Gregory A. Aarons
A46: Sustainability of integrated smoking cessation care in Veterans Affairs posttraumatic stress disorder clinics: A qualitative analysis of focus group data from learning collaborative participants
Carol A. Malte, Aline Lott, Andrew J. Saxon
A47: Key characteristics of effective mental health trainers: The creation of the Measure of Effective Attributes of Trainers (MEAT)
Meredith Boyd, Kelli Scott, Cara C. Lewis
A48: Coaching to improve teacher implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs)
Jennifer D. Pierce
A49: Factors influencing the implementation of peer-led health promotion programs targeting seniors: A literature review
Agathe Lorthios-Guilledroit, Lucie Richard, Johanne Filiatrault
A50: Developing treatment fidelity rating systems for psychotherapy research: Recommendations and lessons learned
Kevin Hallgren, Shirley Crotwell, Rosa Muñoz, Becky Gius, Benjamin Ladd, Barbara McCrady, Elizabeth Epstein
A51: Rapid translation of alcohol prevention science
John D. Clapp, Danielle E. Ruderman
A52: Factors implicated in successful implementation: evidence to inform improved implementation from high and low-income countries
Melanie Barwick, Raluca Barac, Stanley Zlotkin, Laila Salim, Marnie
Davidson
A53: Tracking implementation strategies prospectively: A practical approach
Alicia C. Bunger, Byron J. Powell, Hillary A. Robertson
A54: Trained but not implementing: the need for effective implementation planning tools
Christopher Botsko
A55: Evidence, context, and facilitation variables related to implementation of Dialectical Behavior Therapy: Qualitative results from a mixed methods inquiry in the Department of Veterans Affairs
Sara J. Landes, Brandy N. Smith, Allison L. Rodriguez, Lindsay R. Trent, Monica M. Matthieu
A56: Learning from implementation as usual in children’s mental health
Byron J. Powell, Enola K. Proctor
A57: Rates and predictors of implementation after Dialectical Behavior Therapy Intensive Training
Melanie S. Harned, Marivi Navarro-Haro, Kathryn E. Korslund, Tianying Chen, Anthony DuBose, André Ivanoff, Marsha M. Linehan
A58: Socio-contextual determinants of research evidence use in public-youth systems of care
Antonio R. Garcia, Minseop Kim, Lawrence A. Palinkas, Lonnie Snowden, John Landsverk
A59: Community resource mapping to integrate evidence-based depression treatment in primary care in Brazil: A pilot project
Annika C. Sweetland, Maria Jose Fernandes, Edilson Santos, Cristiane Duarte, Afrânio Kritski, Noa Krawczyk, Caitlin Nelligan, Milton L. Wainberg
A60: The use of concept mapping to efficiently identify determinants of implementation in the National Institute of Health--President’s Emergent Plan for AIDS Relief Prevention of Mother to Child HIV Transmission Implementation Science Alliance
Gregory A. Aarons, David H. Sommerfeld, Benjamin Chi, Echezona Ezeanolue, Rachel Sturke, Lydia Kline, Laura Guay, George Siberry
A61: Longitudinal remote consultation for implementing collaborative care for depression
Ian M. Bennett, Rinad Beidas, Rachel Gold, Johnny Mao, Diane Powers, Mindy Vredevoogd, Jurgen Unutzer
A62: Integrating a peer coach model to support program implementation and ensure long- term sustainability of the Incredible Years in community-based settings
Jennifer Schroeder, Lane Volpe, Julie Steffen
A63: Efficient sustainability: Existing community based supervisors as evidence-based treatment supports
Shannon Dorsey, Michael D Pullmann, Suzanne E. U. Kerns, Nathaniel Jungbluth, Lucy Berliner, Kelly Thompson, Eliza Segell
A64: Establishment of a national practice-based implementation network to accelerate adoption of evidence-based and best practices
Pearl McGee-Vincent, Nancy Liu, Robyn Walser, Jennifer Runnals, R. Keith Shaw, Sara J. Landes, Craig Rosen, Janet Schmidt, Patrick Calhoun
A65: Facilitation as a mechanism of implementation in a practice-based implementation network: Improving care in a Department of Veterans Affairs post-traumatic stress disorder outpatient clinic
Ruth L. Varkovitzky, Sara J. Landes
A66: The ACT SMART Toolkit: An implementation strategy for community-based organizations providing services to children with autism spectrum disorder
Amy Drahota, Jonathan I. Martinez, Brigitte Brikho, Rosemary Meza, Aubyn C. Stahmer, Gregory A. Aarons
A67: Supporting Policy In Health with Research: An intervention trial (SPIRIT) - protocol and early findings
Anna Williamson
A68: From evidence based practice initiatives to infrastructure: Lessons learned from a public behavioral health system’s efforts to promote evidence based practices
Ronnie M. Rubin, Byron J. Powell, Matthew O. Hurford, Shawna L. Weaver, Rinad S. Beidas, David S. Mandell, Arthur C. Evans
A69: Applying the policy ecology model to Philadelphia’s behavioral health transformation efforts
Byron J. Powell, Rinad S. Beidas, Ronnie M. Rubin, Rebecca E. Stewart, Courtney Benjamin Wolk, Samantha L. Matlin, Shawna Weaver, Matthew O. Hurford, Arthur C. Evans, Trevor R. Hadley, David S. Mandell
A70: A model for providing methodological expertise to advance dissemination and implementation of health discoveries in Clinical and Translational Science Award institutions
Donald R. Gerke, Beth Prusaczyk, Ana Baumann, Ericka M. Lewis, Enola K. Proctor
A71: Establishing a research agenda for the Triple P Implementation Framework
Jenna McWilliam, Jacquie Brown, Michelle Tucker
A72: Cheap and fast, but what is “best?”: Examining implementation outcomes across sites in a state-wide scaled-up evidence-based walking program, Walk With Ease
Kathleen P Conte
A73: Measurement feedback systems in mental health: Initial review of capabilities and characteristics
Aaron R. Lyon, Meredith Boyd, Abigail Melvin, Cara C. Lewis, Freda Liu, Nathaniel Jungbluth
A74: A qualitative investigation of case managers’ attitudes toward implementation of a measurement feedback system in a public mental health system for youth
Amelia Kotte, Kaitlin A. Hill, Albert C. Mah, Priya A. Korathu-Larson, Janelle R. Au, Sonia Izmirian, Scott Keir, Brad J. Nakamura, Charmaine K. Higa-McMillan
A75: Multiple pathways to sustainability: Using Qualitative Comparative Analysis to uncover the necessary and sufficient conditions for successful community-based implementation
Brittany Rhoades Cooper, Angie Funaiole, Eleanor Dizon
A76: Prescribers’ perspectives on opioids and benzodiazepines and medication alerts to reduce co-prescribing of these medications
Eric J. Hawkins, Carol A. Malte, Hildi J. Hagedorn, Douglas Berger, Anissa Frank, Aline Lott, Carol E. Achtmeyer, Anthony J. Mariano, Andrew J. Saxon
A77: Adaptation of Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management for comorbid anxiety and substance use disorders: Delivery of evidence-based treatment for anxiety in addictions treatment centers
Kate Wolitzky-Taylor, Richard Rawson, Richard Ries, Peter Roy-Byrne, Michelle Craske
A78: Opportunities and challenges of measuring program implementation with online surveys
Dena Simmons, Catalina Torrente, Lori Nathanson, Grace Carroll
A79: Observational assessment of fidelity to a family-centered prevention program: Effectiveness and efficiency
Justin D. Smith, Kimbree Brown, Karina Ramos, Nicole Thornton, Thomas J. Dishion, Elizabeth A. Stormshak, Daniel S. Shaw, Melvin N. Wilson
A80: Strategies and challenges in housing first fidelity: A multistate qualitative analysis
Mimi Choy-Brown, Emmy Tiderington, Bikki Tran Smith, Deborah K. Padgett
A81: Procurement and contracting as an implementation strategy: Getting To Outcomes® contracting
Ronnie M. Rubin, Marilyn L. Ray, Abraham Wandersman, Andrea Lamont, Gordon Hannah, Kassandra A. Alia, Matthew O. Hurford, Arthur C. Evans
A82: Web-based feedback to aid successful implementation: The interactive Stages of Implementation Completion (SIC)TM tool
Lisa Saldana, Holle Schaper, Mark Campbell, Patricia Chamberlain
A83: Efficient methodologies for monitoring fidelity in routine implementation: Lessons from the Allentown Social Emotional Learning Initiative
Valerie B. Shapiro, B.K. Elizabeth Kim, Jennifer L. Fleming, Paul A. LeBuffe
A84: The Society for Implementation Research Collaboration (SIRC) implementation development workshop: Results from a new methodology for enhancing implementation science proposals
Sara J. Landes, Cara C. Lewis, Allison L. Rodriguez, Brigid R. Marriott, Katherine Anne Comtois
A85: An update on the Society for Implementation Research Collaboration (SIRC) Instrument Review Project
doi:10.1186/s13012-016-0428-0
PMCID: PMC4928139  PMID: 27357964
12.  An Educational Intervention to Enhance Nurse Leaders' Perceptions of Patient Safety Culture 
Health Services Research  2005;40(4):997-1020.
Objective
To design a training intervention and then test its effect on nurse leaders' perceptions of patient safety culture.
Study Setting
Three hundred and fifty-six nurses in clinical leadership roles (nurse managers and educators/CNSs) in two Canadian multi-site teaching hospitals (study and control).
Study Design
A prospective evaluation of a patient safety training intervention using a quasi-experimental untreated control group design with pretest and posttest. Nurses in clinical leadership roles in the study group were invited to participate in two patient safety workshops over a 6-month period. Individuals in the study and control groups completed surveys measuring patient safety culture and leadership for improvement prior to training and 4 months following the second workshop.
Extraction Methods
Individual nurse clinical leaders were the unit of analysis. Exploratory factor analysis of the safety culture items was conducted; repeated-measures analysis of variance and paired t-tests were used to evaluate the effect of the training intervention on perceived safety culture (three factors). Hierarchical regression analyses looked at the influence of demographics, leadership for improvement, and the training intervention on nurse leaders' perceptions of safety culture.
Principal Findings
A statistically significant improvement in one of three safety culture measures was shown for the study group (p<.001) and a significant decline was seen on one of the safety culture measures for the control group (p<.05). Leadership support for improvement was found to explain significant amounts of variance in all three patient safety culture measures; workshop attendance explained significant amounts of variance in one of the three safety culture measures. The total R2 for the three full hierarchical regression models ranged from 0.338 and 0.554.
Conclusions
Sensitively delivered training initiatives for nurse leaders can help to foster a safety culture. Organizational leadership support for improvement is, however, also critical for fostering a culture of safety. Together, training interventions and leadership support may have the most significant impact on patient safety culture.
doi:10.1111/j.1475-6773.2005.00401.x
PMCID: PMC1361187  PMID: 16033489
Patient safety; safety culture; leadership; training intervention
13.  Leadership and management in the undergraduate medical curriculum: a qualitative study of students’ attitudes and opinions at one UK medical school 
BMJ Open  2014;4(6):e005353.
Objective
To explore undergraduate medical students’ attitudes towards and opinions about leadership and management education.
Design
Between 2009 and 2012 we conducted a qualitative study comprising five focus group discussions, each devoted to one of the five domains in the Medical Leadership Competency Framework, (Personal Qualities, Working with Others, Managing Services, Improving Services and Setting Direction). Each discussion examined what should be learnt, when should learning occur, what methods should be used, how should learning be assessed, what are the barriers to such education.
Participants
28 students from all three clinical years (4–6) of whom 10 were women.
Results
2 inter-related themes emerged: understanding the broad perspective of patients and other stakeholders involved in healthcare provision and the need to make leadership and management education relevant in the clinical context. Topics suggested by students included structure of the National Health Service (NHS), team working skills, decision-making and negotiating skills. Patient safety was seen as particularly important. Students preferred experiential learning, with placements seen as providing teaching opportunities. Structured observation, reflection, critical appraisal and analysis of mistakes at all levels were mentioned as existing opportunities for integrating leadership and management education. Students’ views about assessment and timing of such education were mixed. Student feedback figured prominently as a method of delivery and a means of assessment, while attitudes of medical professionals, students and of society in general were seen as barriers.
Conclusions
Medical students may be more open to leadership and management education than thought hitherto. These findings offer insights into how students view possible developments in leadership and management education and stress the importance of developing broad perspectives and clinical relevance in this context.
doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005353
PMCID: PMC4078777  PMID: 24965917
Medical Education & Training; Qualitative Research
14.  Self-perception of leadership styles and behaviour in primary health care 
Background
The concept of leadership has been studied in various disciplines and from different theoretical approaches. It is a dynamic concept that evolves over time. There are few studies in our field on managers’ self-perception of their leadership style. There are no pure styles, but one or another style is generally favoured to a greater or lesser degree. In the primary health care (PHC) setting, managers’ leadership style is defined as a set of attitudes, behaviours, beliefs and values. The objectives of this study were to describe and learn about the self-perception of behaviours and leadership styles among PHC managers; to determine the influence of the leadership style on job satisfaction, efficiency, and willingness to work in a team; and to determine the relationship between transformational and transactional styles according age, gender, profession, type of manager years of management experience, and the type of organization.
Methods
To describe leadership styles as perceived by PHC managers, a cross sectional study was performed using an 82 items-self-administered Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ). This questionnaire measures leadership styles, attitudes and behaviour of managers. The items are grouped into three first order variables (transformational, transactional and laissez-faire) and ten second order variables (which discriminate leader behaviours). Additionally, the questionnaire evaluates organizational consequences such as extra-effort, efficiency and satisfaction.
Results
One hundred forty responses from 258 managers of 133 PHC teams in the Barcelona Health Area (response rate: 54.26 %). Most participants were nurses (61.4 %), average age was 49 years and the gender predominantly female (75 %). Globally, managers assessed themselves as equally transactional and transformational leaders (average: 3.30 points).
Grouped by profession, nurses (28.57 % of participants) showed a higher transactional leadership style, over transformational leadership style, compared to physicians (3.38 points, p < 0.003). Considering gender, men obtained the lowest results in transactional style (p < 0.015). Both transactional and transformational styles correlate with efficiency and job satisfaction (r = 0.724 and r = 0.710, respectively).
Conclusions
PHC managers’ self-perception of their leadership style was transactional, focused on the maintenance of the status quo, although there was a trend in some scores towards the transformational style, mainly among nurse managers. Both styles correlate with satisfaction and willingness to strive to work better.
doi:10.1186/s12913-016-1819-2
PMCID: PMC5062861  PMID: 27733141
Leadership; Primary health care; Self-concept; Job satisfaction; MLQ; Managers
15.  Using multimedia tools and high-fidelity simulations to improve medical students' resuscitation performance: an observational study 
BMJ Open  2016;6(9):e012195.
Objectives
The goal of our study was to shed light on educational methods to strengthen medical students' cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) leadership and team skills in order to optimise CPR understanding and success using didactic videos and high-fidelity simulations.
Design
An observational study.
Setting
A tertiary medical centre in Northern Taiwan.
Participants
A total of 104 5–7th year medical students, including 72 men and 32 women.
Interventions
We provided the medical students with a 2-hour training session on advanced CPR. During each class, we divided the students into 1–2 groups; each group consisted of 4–6 team members. Medical student teams were trained by using either method A or B. Method A started with an instructional CPR video followed by a first CPR simulation. Method B started with a first CPR simulation followed by an instructional CPR video. All students then participated in a second CPR simulation.
Outcome measures
Student teams were assessed with checklist rating scores in leadership, teamwork and team member skills, global rating scores by an attending physician and video-recording evaluation by 2 independent individuals.
Results
The 104 medical students were divided into 22 teams. We trained 11 teams using method A and 11 using method B. Total second CPR simulation scores were significantly higher than first CPR simulation scores in leadership (p<0.001), teamwork (p<0.001) and team member skills (p<0.001). For methods A and B students' first CPR simulation scores were similar, but method A students' second CPR simulation scores were significantly higher than those of method B in leadership skills (p=0.034), specifically in the support subcategory (p=0.049).
Conclusions
Although both teaching strategies improved leadership, teamwork and team member performance, video exposure followed by CPR simulation further increased students' leadership skills compared with CPR simulation followed by video exposure.
doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012195
PMCID: PMC5051441  PMID: 27678539
EDUCATION & TRAINING (see Medical Education & Training); MEDICAL EDUCATION & TRAINING; INTENSIVE & CRITICAL CARE
16.  Assessment of leadership training needs of internal medicine residents at the Massachusetts General Hospital 
Internal medicine (IM) physicians, including residents, assume both formal and informal leadership roles that significantly impact clinical and organizational outcomes. However, most internists lack formal leadership training. In 2013 and 2014, we surveyed all rising second-year IM residents at a large northeastern academic medical center about their need for, and preferences regarding, leadership training. Fifty-five of 113 residents (49%) completed the survey. Forty-four residents (80% of respondents) reported a need for additional formal leadership training. A self-reported need for leadership training was not associated with respondents' gender or previous leadership training and experience. Commonly cited leadership skill needs included “leading a team” (98% of residents), “confronting problem employees” (93%), “coaching and developing others” (93%), and “resolving interpersonal conflict” (84%). Respondents preferred to learn about leadership using multiple teaching modalities. Fifty residents (91%) preferred to have a physician teach them about leadership, while 19 (35%) wanted instruction from a hospital manager. IM residents may not receive adequate leadership development education during pregraduate and postgraduate training. IM residents may be more likely to benefit from leadership training interventions that are physician-led, multimodal, and occur during the second year of residency. These findings can help inform the design of effective leadership development programs for physician trainees.
PMCID: PMC4462209  PMID: 26130876
17.  Learning About Self: Leadership Skills for Public Health 
As public health practitioners and as clinicians we are taught to care for our patients, and for our community members. But how much do we teach and learn about how to lead, manage and care for our colleagues, our team members and ourselves? This paper emphasizes the need for leadership learning and teaching to become an essential element of the practice of public health. The paper presents the author’s perspective on the leadership skills required for public health and describes a five-day intensive course designed to enable participants to develop these skills over time. The paper briefly covers leadership definitions, styles and types and key leadership skills. It mainly focuses on the design and ethos of the course, skills self-assessment, group interaction and methods for developing and refining leadership skills. The course uses a collaborative learning approach where the power differential between teachers, facilitators, guests and participants is minimized. It is based on creating an environment where any participant can reveal his or her stories, successes, failures, preferences and dislikes in a safe manner. It encourages continual, constructive individual reflection, self-assessment and group interaction. The course is aimed at the practice of public health leadership, with a particular emphasis on the leadership of self, of knowing oneself, and of knowing and understanding colleagues retrospectively as well as prospectively. The most important outcome is the design and implementation of participants’ own plans for developing and nurturing their leadership skills.
Significance for public healthThe nature of public health is changing rapidly and increasing in complexity. These changes include major shifts in the burden of disease and the insatiable demands of clinical medicine swamping those of public health. Public health practitioners have failed over many years to systematically ensure that leadership and management skills are essential parts of public health training (as they are in MBAs for example). This paper describes an approach and an intensive five-day course to assist practitioners to develop the key leadership skills needed to improve public health, whether it be locally, nationally or globally.
doi:10.4081/jphr.2016.679
PMCID: PMC4856874  PMID: 27190982
Public health; leadership; skills; emotional intelligence
18.  Key Elements of Clinical Physician Leadership at an Academic Medical Center 
Background
A considerable body of literature in the management sciences has defined leadership and how leadership skills can be attained. There is considerably less literature about leadership within medical settings. Physicians-in-training are frequently placed in leadership positions ranging from running a clinical team or overseeing a resuscitation effort. However, physicians-in-training rarely receive such training. The objective of this study was to discover characteristics associated with effective physician leadership at an academic medical center for future development of such training.
Methods
We conducted focus groups with medical professionals (attending physicians, residents, and nurses) at an academic medical center. The focus group discussion script was designed to elicit participants' perceptions of qualities necessary for physician leadership. The lead question asked participants to imagine a scenario in which they either acted as or observed a physician leader. Two independent reviewers reviewed transcripts to identify key domains of physician leadership.
Results
Although the context was not specified, the focus group participants discussed leadership in the context of a clinical team. They identified 4 important themes: management of the team, establishing a vision, communication, and personal attributes.
Conclusions
Physician leadership exists in clinical settings. This study highlights the elements essential to that leadership. Understanding the physician attributes and behaviors that result in effective leadership and teamwork can lay the groundwork for more formal leadership education for physicians-in-training.
doi:10.4300/JGME-D-10-00017.1
PMCID: PMC3186276  PMID: 22379520
19.  A State-Wide Obstetric Hemorrhage Quality Improvement Initiative 
Purpose
The mission of the California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative is to eliminate preventable maternal death and injury and promote equitable maternity care in California. This article describes CMQCC’s statewide multi-stakeholder quality improvement initiative to improve readiness, recognition, response, and reporting of maternal hemorrhage at birth and details the essential role of nurses in its success.
Project Design and Approach
In partnership with the State Department of Maternal, Child, and Adolescent Health, CMQCC identified maternal hemorrhage as a significant quality improvement opportunity. CMQCC organized a multi-disciplinary, multi-stakeholder task force to develop a strategy for addressing obstetric (OB) hemorrhage.
Project Description
The OB Hemorrhage Task Force, co-chaired by nurse and physician team leaders, identified four priorities for action and developed a comprehensive hemorrhage guideline. CMQCC is using a multi-level strategy to disseminate the guideline, including an open access toolkit, a minimal support mentoring model, a county partnership model, and a 30-hospital learning collaborative.
Clinical Implications
In participating hospitals, nurses have been the primary drivers in developing both general and massive hemorrhage policies and procedures, ensuring the availability of critical supplies, organizing team debriefing after a stage 2 or greater hemorrhage, hosting skills stations for measuring blood loss, and running OB hemorrhage drills. Each of these activities requires effort and leadership skill, even in hospitals where clinicians are convinced that these changes are needed. In some hospitals, the burden to convince physicians of the value of these new practices has rested primarily upon nurses. Thus, the state-wide initiative where nurse and physician leaders work together models the value of teamwork and provides a real-time demonstration of the potential for effective interdisciplinary collaboration to make a difference in the quality of care that can be achieved. Nurses provide significant leadership in multi-disciplinary, multi-stakeholder quality projects in California. Ensuring that nurses have the opportunity to participate in formal leadership of these teams and are represented at all workgroup levels is critical to the overall initiative. Nurses brought key understanding of operational issues within and across departments, mobilized engagement across the state through the regional perinatal programs, and developed innovative approaches to solving clinical problems during implementation. Nursing leadership and integrated participation was especially critical in considering the needs of lower-resource settings, and was essential to the toolkit’s enthusiastic adoption at the unit/service level in facilities across the state.
doi:10.1097/NMC.0b013e318227c75f
PMCID: PMC3203841  PMID: 21857200
Quality Improvement; Implementation; Hemorrhage; Practice Guidelines
20.  National Survey Regarding the Importance of Leadership in PGY1 Pharmacy Practice Residency Training 
Hospital Pharmacy  2015;50(11):978-984.
Background:
Leadership is considered a professional obligation for all pharmacists. It is important to integrate leadership training in residency programs to meet the leadership needs and requirements of the profession.
Objective:
To evaluate the importance of leadership development during postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) pharmacy practice residency training as perceived by new practitioners.
Methods:
A 15-question online survey was distributed to residency-trained new practitioners to assess (1) amount of time dedicated to leadership training during residency training, (2) different leadership tools utilized, (3) residents’ participation in various committees or councils, (4) perceived benefit of increased leadership training, (5) importance of having a mentor, (6) understanding of the residency organization’s strategic objectives, (7) discussion of Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative (PPMI) during residency training, and (8) adequacy of leadership training in preparation to become a pharmacy practice leader.
Results:
Although the majority of resident respondents had less than 20% of their residency devoted to leadership, nearly all survey participants acknowledged that leadership is an important component of PGY1 residency training. Residents agreed that their residency experience would have benefited from increased leadership opportunities. Most residents were knowledgeable about their organization’s strategic objectives but did not have a full understanding of pharmacy initiatives such as the PPMI.
Conclusion:
Feedback from residents indicates that an optimal dedication to leadership training would range between 20% and 30% of the residency year. Increased focus on PPMI, mentorship, and expanded use of leadership tools can serve as a way to help meet the future leadership needs of the pharmacy profession and help to better prepare residents to become pharmacy practice leaders.
doi:10.1310/hpj5011-978
PMCID: PMC4750848  PMID: 27621505
administration; leadership; residency; training
21.  Nurses’ evaluation of physicians’ non-clinical performance in emergency departments: advantages, disadvantages and lessons learned 
Background
Peer evaluation is increasingly used as a method to assess physicians’ interpersonal and communication skills. We report on experience with soliciting registered nurses’ feedback on physicians’ non-clinical performance in the ED of a large academic medical center in Lebanon.
Methods
We utilized a secondary analysis of a de-identified database of ED nurses’ assessment of physicians’ non-clinical performance coupled with an evaluation of interventions carried out as a result of this evaluation. The database was compiled as part of quality/performance improvement initiatives using a cross-sectional design to survey registered nurses working at the ED. The survey instrument included open ended and closed ended questions assessing physicians’ communication, professionalism and leadership skills. Three episodes of evaluation were carried out over an 18 month period. Physicians were provided with a communication training carried out after the first cycle of evaluation and a detailed feedback on their assessment by nurses after each evaluation cycle. A paired t-test was carried out to compare mean evaluation scores between the three cycles of evaluation. Thematic analysis of nurses’ qualitative comments was carried out.
Results
A statistically significant increase in the averages of skills was observed between the first and second evaluations, followed by a significant decrease in the averages of the three skills between the second and third evaluations. Personalized feedback to ED physicians and communication training initially contributed to a significant positive impact on improving ED physicians’ non-clinical skills as perceived by the ED nurses. Yet, gains achieved were lost upon reaching the third cycle of evaluation. However, the thematic analysis of the nurses’ qualitative responses portrays a decrease in concerns across the various dimensions of non-clinical performance.
Conclusions
Nurses’ evaluation of the non-clinical performance of physicians has the potential of improving communication, professionalism and leadership skills amongst physicians. For improvement to be realized in a sustainable manner, such programs may need to be offered in a staged and incremental manner over a long period of time with proper dedication of resources and timely monitoring and evaluation of outcomes. Department directors need to be trained on providing peer evaluation feedback in a constructive manner.
doi:10.1186/s12913-015-0733-3
PMCID: PMC4348160  PMID: 25885442
Peer evaluation; Nurses; Physicians; Emergency Department; Lebanon
22.  Rationale and study protocol for the supporting children’s outcomes using rewards, exercise and skills (SCORES) group randomized controlled trial: A physical activity and fundamental movement skills intervention for primary schools in low-income communities 
BMC Public Health  2012;12:427.
Background
Many Australian children are insufficiently active to accrue health benefits and physical activity (PA) levels are consistently lower among youth of low socio-economic position. PA levels decline dramatically during adolescence and evidence suggests that competency in a range of fundamental movement skills (FMS) may serve as a protective factor against this trend.
Methods/design
The Supporting Children’s Outcomes Using Rewards Exercise and Skills (SCORES) intervention is a multi-component PA and FMS intervention for primary schools in low-income communities, which will be evaluated using a group randomized controlled trial. The socio-ecological model provided a framework for the 12-month intervention, which includes the following components: teacher professional learning, student leadership workshops (including leadership accreditation and rewards, e.g., stickers, water bottles), PA policy review, PA equipment packs, parental engagement via newsletters, FMS homework and a parent evening, and community partnerships with local sporting organizations. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, 6- and 12-months. The primary outcomes are PA (accelerometers), FMS (Test of Gross Motor Development II) and cardiorespiratory fitness (multi-stage fitness test). Secondary outcomes include body mass index [using weight (kg)/height (m2)], perceived competence, physical self-esteem, and resilience. Individual and environmental mediators of behavior change (e.g. social support and enjoyment) will also be assessed. The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time will be used to assess the impact of the intervention on PA within physical education lessons. Statistical analyses will follow intention-to-treat principles and hypothesized mediators of PA behavior change will be explored.
Discussion
SCORES is an innovative primary school-based PA and FMS intervention designed to support students attending schools in low-income communities to be more skilled and active. The findings from the study may be used to guide teacher pre-service education, professional learning and school policy in primary schools.
Trial registration
Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry No: ACTRN12611001080910
doi:10.1186/1471-2458-12-427
PMCID: PMC3490777  PMID: 22691451
23.  A questionnaire survey exploring healthcare professionals’ attitudes towards teamwork and safety in acute care areas in South Korea 
BMJ Open  2015;5(7):e007881.
Objectives
Although human factors are important in terms of patient safety, there have been very few reports on the attitudes of healthcare professionals working in acute care settings in South Korea. In the present study, we investigated the attitudes of such professionals, their cultures and their management systems.
Design
A questionnaire survey with 65 items covering nine themes affecting patient safety. Nine themes were compared via a three-or-more-way analysis of variance, with interaction, followed by multiple comparisons among several groups.
Setting
Intensive care units, emergency departments and surgical units of nine urban hospitals.
Participants
592 nurses and 160 physicians.
Intervention
None.
Outcome measures
Mean scores using a five-point scale and combined response scores for each of the nine themes.
Results
The mean score for information-sharing was the highest (3.78±0.49) and that for confidence/assertion was the lowest (2.97±0.34). The mean scores for teamwork, error management, work value, organisational climate, leadership, stress and fatigue level, and error/procedural compliance were intermediate. Physicians showed lower scores in leadership and higher scores in information-sharing than nurses. Respondents with 24 months or less of a clinical career showed higher scores in leadership, stress and fatigue, and error scores and lower scores in work value than more experienced respondents.
Conclusions
Our results suggest that medical personnel in Korea are relatively reluctant to disclose error or assert their different opinions with others. Many did not adequately recognise the negative effects of fatigue and stress, attributed errors to personal incompetence, and error-management systems were inadequate. Discrepancies in leadership and information-sharing were evident between professional groups, and leadership, stress, fatigue level, work value and error scores varied with the length of work experience. These can be used as baseline data to establish training programmes for patient safety in Korea.
doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2015-007881
PMCID: PMC4521544  PMID: 26209120
INTENSIVE & CRITICAL CARE; EDUCATION & TRAINING (see Medical Education & Training)
24.  Policy options to improve leadership of middle managers in the Australian residential aged care setting: a narrative synthesis 
Background
The prevalence of both chronic diseases and multi-morbidity increases with longer life spans. As Australia's population ages, the aged care sector is under increasing pressure to ensure that quality aged care is available. Key to responding to this pressure is leadership and management capability within the aged care workforce. A systematic literature review was conducted to inform the policy development necessary for the enhancement of clinical and managerial leadership skills of middle managers within residential aged care.
Methods
Using scientific journal databases, hand searching of specialist journals, Google, snowballing and suggestions from experts, 4,484 papers were found. After a seven-tiered culling process, we conducted a detailed review (narrative synthesis) of 153 papers relevant to leadership and management development in aged care, incorporating expert and key stakeholder consultations.
Results
• Positive staff experiences of a manager's leadership are critical to ensure job satisfaction and workforce retention, the provision of quality care and the well-being of care recipients, and potentially a reduction of associated costs.
• The essential attributes of good leadership for aged care middle management are a hands-on accessibility and professional expertise in nurturing respect, recognition and team building, along with effective communication and flexibility. However, successful leadership and management outcomes depend on coherent and good organisational leadership (structural and psychological empowerment).
• There is inadequate preparation for middle management leadership roles in the aged care sector and a lack of clear guidelines and key performance indicators to assess leadership and management skills.
• Theory development in aged care leadership and management research is limited. A few effective generic clinical leadership programs targeting both clinical and managerial leaders exist. However, little is known regarding how appropriate and effective they are for the aged care sector.
Conclusions
There is an urgent need for a national strategy that promotes a common approach to aged care leadership and management development, one that is sector-appropriate and congruent with the philosophy of person-centred care now predominant in the sector. The onus is on aged care industries as a whole and various levels of Government to make a concerted effort to establish relevant regulation, legislation and funding.
doi:10.1186/1472-6963-10-190
PMCID: PMC2910696  PMID: 20602798
25.  Leadership in rural medicine: The organization on thin ice? 
Objective
To explore the personal experiences of and conceptions regarding leading rural primary care in Northern Norway.
Design
Qualitative content analysis of focus-group interviews.
Setting
Lead primary care physicians in the three northernmost counties.
Subjects
Four groups with 22 out of 88 municipal lead physicians in the region.
Results
Three main categories were developed and bound together by an implicit theme. Demands and challenges included the wide leadership span of clinical services and public health, placed in a merged line/board position. Constraints of human resources and time and the ever changing organizational context added to the experience of strain. Personal qualifications indicates the lack of leadership motivation and training, which was partly compensated for by a leader role developed through clinical undergraduate training and then through the responsibilities and experiences of clinical work. In Exercising the leadership, the participants described a vision of a coaching and coordinating leadership and, in practice, a display of communication skills, decision-making ability, result focusing, and ad hoc solutions. Leadership was made easier by the features of the small, rural organization, such as overview, close contact with cooperating partners, and a supportive environment. There was incongruence between demands and described qualifications, and between desired and executed leadership, but nevertheless the organization was running. Leadership demonstrated a “working inadequacy”.
Conclusion
Under resource constraints, leadership based on clinical skills favours management by exception which, in the long run, appears to make the leadership less effective. Leadership training which takes into account the prominent features of rural and decentralized primary care is strongly needed.
doi:10.3109/02813432.2011.577148
PMCID: PMC3347941  PMID: 21526921
Clinician; focus-group interviews; physician leadership; rural primary health care

Results 1-25 (2116039)