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1.  A Pediatric Comminuted Talar Fracture Treated by Minimal K-Wire Fixation Without Using a Tourniquet 
The Iowa Orthopaedic Journal  2014;34:175-180.
Background
Pediatric comminuted talar fractures are reported to be rare, and treatment options such as minimal internal K-wire fixation without using a tourniquet to prevent avascular necrosis have not previously been investigated.
Case Description
We report a case of a comminuted talar body and a non-displaced neck fracture with dislocation of the tibiotalar, talonavicular and subtalar joints with bimalleolar epiphyseal fractures in an 11-year-old boy due to a fall from height. We present radiological findings, the surgical procedure and clinical outcomes of minimal internal K-wire fixation without using a tourniquet.
Literature Review
Avascular necrosis rates are reported to be between 0 % and 66 % after fractures of the neck of the talus and the talar body in children. The likelihood of developing avascular necrosis increases with the severity of the fracture.
Clinical Relevance
To avoid avascular necrosis in a comminuted talar fracture accompanied by tibiotalar, talonavicular, subtalar dislocations and bimalleolar epiphyseal fractures, a minimal internal K-wire fixation without the use of a tourniquet was performed. The outcome was evaluated by the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society score (AOFAS). A score of 90 (excellent) was found at the end of the second year of follow up. Radiology revealed preservation of the joint with no evidence of avascular necrosis, and clinical findings revealed a favorable functional outcome after two years.
Level of Evidence
4
PMCID: PMC4127733  PMID: 25328479
talus; fracture healing; tourniquets; avascular; necrosis
2.  Closed medial total subtalar joint dislocation without ankle fracture: a case report 
Introduction
Total subtalar dislocation without fracture of the ankle is a rare clinical entity; it is usually due to a traumatic high-energy mechanism. Standard treatment is successful closed reduction under general anesthesia followed by non-weight bearing and ankle immobilization with a below-knee cast for 6 weeks.
Case presentation
We present the case of a 30-year-old Moroccan woman who was involved in a road traffic accident. She subsequently received a radiological assessment that objectified a total subtalar dislocation without fracture of her ankle. She was immediately admitted to the operating theater where an immediate reduction was performed under sedation, and immobilization in a plaster boot was adopted for 8 weeks. The management of this traumatic lesion is discussed in the light of the literature.
Conclusions
Medial subtalar dislocation is a rare dislocation and is not commonly seen as a sports injury because it requires transfer of a large amount of kinetic energy. The weaker talocalcaneal and talonavicular ligaments often bear the brunt of the energy and are more commonly disrupted, compared to the relatively stronger calcaneonavicular ligament. Urgent reduction is important, and closed reduction under general anesthesia is usually successful, often facilitated by keeping the knee in flexion to relax the gastrocnemius muscle. Long-term sequelae include talar avascular necrosis and osteochondral fracture, as well as chronic instability and pain.
doi:10.1186/1752-1947-8-313
PMCID: PMC4178312  PMID: 25240955
Ankle; Dislocation; Subtalar joint
3.  Treatment of displaced talar neck fractures using delayed procedures of plate fixation through dual approaches 
International Orthopaedics  2013;38(1):149-154.
Purpose
Treatment of talar neck fractures is challenging. Various surgical approaches and fixation methods have been documented. Clinical outcomes are often dissatisfying due to inadequate reduction and fixation with high rates of complications. Obtaining satisfactory clinical outcomes with minimum complications remains a hard task for orthopaedic surgeons.
Methods
In the period from May 2007 to September 2010, a total of 31 cases with closed displaced talar neck fractures were treated surgically in our department. Injuries were classified according to the Hawkins classification modified by Canale and Kelly. Under general anaesthesia with sufficient muscle relaxation, urgent closed reduction was initiated once the patients were admitted; if the procedure failed, open reduction and provisional stabilisation with Kirschner wires through an anteromedial approach with tibiometatarsal external fixation were performed. When the soft tissue had recovered, definitive fixation was performed with plate and screws through dual approaches. The final follow-up examination included radiological analysis, clinical evaluation and functional outcomes which were carried out according to the Ankle-Hindfoot Scale of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS), patient satisfaction and SF-36.
Results
Twenty-eight patients were followed up for an average of 25 months (range 18–50 months) after the injury. Only two patients had soft tissue complications, and recovery was satisfactory with conservative treatment. All of the fractures healed anatomically without malunion and nonunion, and the average union time was 14 weeks (range 12–24 weeks). Post-traumatic arthritis developed in ten cases, while six patients suffered from avascular necrosis of the talus. Secondary procedures included three cases of subtalar arthrodesis, one case of ankle arthrodesis and one case of total ankle replacement. The mean AOFAS hindfoot score was 78 (range 65–91). According to the SF-36, the average score of the physical component summary was 68 (range 59–81), and the average score of the mental component summary was 74 (range 63–85).
Conclusions
Talar neck fractures are associated with a high incidence of long-term disability and complications. Urgent reduction of the fracture-dislocation and delayed plate fixation through a dual approach when the soft tissue has recovered may minimise the complications and provide good clinical outcomes.
doi:10.1007/s00264-013-2164-2
PMCID: PMC3890131  PMID: 24297608
Ankle; Talar neck fracture; Dual approaches; Internal fixation
4.  Tibiotalar arthrodesis for injuries of the talus 
Indian Journal of Orthopaedics  2008;42(1):87-90.
Background:
Fracture-dislocation of the talus is one of the most severe injuries of the ankle. Opinion varies widely as to the proper treatment of this injury. Since Blair's original description of the tibiotalar fusion in 1943, there is little mention in the literature of his method. The present study reports the results of tibiotalar arthrodesis with modification in Blair's technique.
Materials and Methods:
Eleven cases of modified Blair's tibiotalar arthrodesis were retrospectively studied. The average age was 32.4 years (range, 26-51 years). Six patients had posttraumatic avascular necrosis; five had neglected fracture-dislocation of the talus.
Results:
The mean followup is 8 years (range 3-12 years). Tibiotalar fusion was achieved in all the ankles at an average of 20.5 weeks (range 16-28 weeks). Nine cases having 15°-20° tibiopedal motion had excellent results and two ankles having 10°-15° of tibiopedal motion had good result.
Conclusion:
We achieved good long term results with tibiotalar arthrodesis with modification in Blair technique. The principal modification in the present study is retention of the talar body while performing arthrodesis with anterior sliding graft. The retention of the talar body provides intraoperative stability and in the long term, the retained talar body shares the load transmitted to the anterior and middle subtalar joints thus resulting in improved hind foot function and gait.
doi:10.4103/0019-5413.38588
PMCID: PMC2759590  PMID: 19823662
Anterior tibial sliding graft; arthrodesis; avascular necrosis of talus
5.  Early mobilization after uncomplicated medial subtalar dislocation provides successful functional results 
Background
Subtalar dislocation is a rare injury, with the medial type occurring in the majority of cases. The period of postreduction immobilization is a matter of controversy. Most studies set the period of immobilization between 4 and 8 weeks. The hypothesis in this study is that a period of 2–3 weeks of immobilization in a cast, followed by early mobilization, could provide better functional results than longer periods of immobilization.
Materials and methods
During a period of 4 years, eight patients (six men, two women) with mean age of 37.2 years and uncomplicated medial subtalar dislocation were treated in our institution. Immediate reduction under sedation and cast immobilization was provided in all cases. Our rehabilitation protocol consisted of two completed weeks of immobilization and thereafter ankle range-of-motion exercises and partial weight-bearing mobilization. Patients were followed up for a mean period of 3 years. Clinical results were evaluated using the AOFAS Ankle–Hindfoot scale.
Results
All patients achieved almost normal ankle range of motion and good clinical outcome (mean AOFAS score 92.25). No radiographic evidence of arthritis or avascular necrosis of the talus was detected. Two patients complained of mild pain of the hindfoot. All patients returned to daily routine activities in about 2 months from injury.
Conclusions
Immediate reduction and early mobilization could be key factors for uneventful recovery of uncomplicated medial subtalar dislocation. Multicenter clinical trials are needed for further validation of our initial results.
Level of evidence
III, prospective clinical series study.
doi:10.1007/s10195-011-0126-2
PMCID: PMC3052431  PMID: 21308390
Subtalar joint; Dislocations; Ankle; Foot; Rehabilitation
6.  Early mobilization after uncomplicated medial subtalar dislocation provides successful functional results 
Background
Subtalar dislocation is a rare injury, with the medial type occurring in the majority of cases. The period of postreduction immobilization is a matter of controversy. Most studies set the period of immobilization between 4 and 8 weeks. The hypothesis in this study is that a period of 2–3 weeks of immobilization in a cast, followed by early mobilization, could provide better functional results than longer periods of immobilization.
Materials and methods
During a period of 4 years, eight patients (six men, two women) with mean age of 37.2 years and uncomplicated medial subtalar dislocation were treated in our institution. Immediate reduction under sedation and cast immobilization was provided in all cases. Our rehabilitation protocol consisted of two completed weeks of immobilization and thereafter ankle range-of-motion exercises and partial weight-bearing mobilization. Patients were followed up for a mean period of 3 years. Clinical results were evaluated using the AOFAS Ankle–Hindfoot scale.
Results
All patients achieved almost normal ankle range of motion and good clinical outcome (mean AOFAS score 92.25). No radiographic evidence of arthritis or avascular necrosis of the talus was detected. Two patients complained of mild pain of the hindfoot. All patients returned to daily routine activities in about 2 months from injury.
Conclusions
Immediate reduction and early mobilization could be key factors for uneventful recovery of uncomplicated medial subtalar dislocation. Multicenter clinical trials are needed for further validation of our initial results.
Level of evidence
III, prospective clinical series study.
doi:10.1007/s10195-011-0126-2
PMCID: PMC3052431  PMID: 21308390
Subtalar joint; Dislocations; Ankle; Foot; Rehabilitation
7.  Biomechanical and Neuromuscular Effects of Ankle Taping and Bracing 
Journal of Athletic Training  2002;37(4):436-445.
Objective: An extensive review of clinically relevant research is provided to assist clinicians in understanding the underlying mechanisms by which various ankle-support systems may provide beneficial effects. Strategies for management of different types of ankle ligament conditions are also discussed.
Background: Much of the literature pertaining to ankle instability and external support has focused on assessment of inward displacement of the hindfoot within the frontal plane. Some researchers have emphasized the importance of (1) pathologic rotary displacement of the talus within the transverse plane, (2) the frequent presence of subtalar joint ligament lesions, and (3) the interrelated effects of ankle support on deceleration of inversion velocity and facilitation of neuromuscular response.
Description: The traditional method for application of adhesive tape to the ankle primarily restricts inward displacement of the hindfoot within the frontal plane. The biomechanical rationale for a method of ankle taping that restricts lower leg rotation and triplanar displacement of the foot associated with subtalar motion is presented.
Clinical Advantages: The lateral subtalar-sling taping procedure may limit strain on the anterior talofibular ligament associated with subtalar inversion, restrain anterolateral rotary subluxation of the talus in the presence of ligament laxity, and protect the subtalar ligaments from excessive loading. The medial subtalar sling may reduce strain on the anterior-inferior tibiofibular syndesmosis and enhance hindfoot-to-forefoot force transfer during the push-off phase of the gait cycle.
PMCID: PMC164375  PMID: 12937565
ankle instability; subtalar joint injury; ankle dysfunction
8.  Delayed debridement of an open total talar dislocation reimplanted in the emergency room 
Open total talar dislocation is a rare but well known injury. Its management is controversial and fraught with complications such as infection, avascular necrosis, and post-traumatic osteoarthritis.
We report the case of a woman sustaining a pure open talar dislocation reduced in the emergency room. Debridement was done three days after the injury in the operating room. There was no infection. One year after surgery she complained of occasional pain. Ambulation was normal. She wore regular shoes. The overall alignment of the ankle, hindfoot, and midfoot was normal. Movements of the tibiotalar and subtalar joints were not impaired. She has resumed her regular activities. Radiographs showed no signs of avascular necrosis. All components of the treatment strategy of open total dislocation should be carried out in emergency. This results in environment close to the original biological state. Good results can be achieved if infection is avoided.
doi:10.1016/j.jcot.2014.04.002
PMCID: PMC4223811
Hindfoot; Open dislocation; Reimplantation; Talar injury
9.  Congenital vertical talus: Treatment by reverse ponseti technique 
Indian Journal of Orthopaedics  2008;42(3):347-350.
Background:
The surgery for idiopathic congenital vertical talus (CVT) can lead to stiffness, wound complications and under or over correction. There are sporadic literature on costing with mixed results. We describe our early experience of reverse ponseti technique.
Materials and methods:
Four cases (four feet) of idiopathic congenital vertical talus (CVT) which presented one month after birth were treated by serial manipulation and casting, tendoachilles tenotomy and percutaneous pinning of talonavicular joint. An average of 5.2 (range - four to six) plaster cast applications were required to correct the forefoot deformity. Once the talus and navicular were aligned based on the radiographic talus-first metatarsal axis, percutaneous fixation of the talo-navicular joint with a Kirschner wire, and percutaneous tendoachilles tenotomy under anesthesia was performed following which a cast was applied with the foot in slight dorsiflexion.
Results:
The mean follow-up period for the four cases was 8.5 months (6-12 months). At the end of the treatment all feet were supple and plantigrade but still using ankle foot orthosis (AFO). The mean talocalcaneal angle was 70 degrees before treatment and this reduced to 31 degrees after casting. The mean talar axis first metatasal base angle (TAMBA) angle was 60° before casting and this improved to 10.5°.
Conclusion:
Although our follow-up period is small, we would recommend early casting for idiopathic CVT along the same lines as the Ponseti technique for clubfoot except that the forces applied are in reverse direction. This early casting method can prevent extensive surgery in the future, however, a close vigil is required to detect any early relapse.
doi:10.4103/0019-5413.41860
PMCID: PMC2739479  PMID: 19753164
Casting; congenital vertical talus; conservative treatment
10.  Bony destructive injuries of the calcaneus: long-term results of a minimally invasive procedure followed by early functional exercise: a retrospective study 
BMC Surgery  2014;14:19.
Background
Bony destructive injury of the calcaneus (BDIC) represents one of the most severe comminuted fractures of the calcaneus in which soft tissue coverage remains intact. The features of this injury include a collapsed articular surface, significant widening, severe loss of height and an unrecognisable outline of the calcaneus. This study aims to present the long-term outcomes of BDIC treated in a minimally invasive fashion followed by supervised early exercise.
Methods
Twelve patients with unilateral BDICs were treated at our institution. The main surgical procedures included percutaneous traction and leverage reduction and internal compression fixation with anatomic plates and compression bolts. Early functional exercise was encouraged to mould the subtalar joint. The height, length and width of the calcaneus; Böhler’s and Gissane’s angles; reduction of the articular surfaces; and functional recovery of the affected feet were assessed.
Results
The height, length and width of the calcaneus were substantially restored. The mean Böhler’s and Gissane’s angles of the affected calcaneus were 24.5 and 122.8 degrees, respectively. Five patients regained anatomical or nearly anatomical reduction of their posterior facets. Residual articular displacement of more than 3 mm was noted in three patients. Patients were followed for a mean of 93.9 months. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was 83.8. Nine patients showed excellent or good results. Radiographic evidence of post-traumatic subtalar arthritis was observed in four cases. However, no subtalar arthrodesis was required.
Conclusions
BDICs can be treated effectively with percutaneous reduction and internal compression fixation followed by early active exercise. This protocol resulted in satisfactory radiological and functional outcomes.
doi:10.1186/1471-2482-14-19
PMCID: PMC4021046  PMID: 24725606
Calcaneal fracture; Bony destructive injury; Internal compression fixation; Percutaneous leverage; Early exercise
11.  Minimally invasive ankle arthrodesis with a retrograde locking nail after failed fusion 
Abstract
A retrograde nail with posterior-to-anterior (PA) locking into os calcis, talus and tibia was used to correct deformity and achieve fusion after failed fusion. A variety of methods have been published to achieve union of the ankle and subtalar joint in a failed fusion situation. We have studied a retrograde locking nail technique through a 2.5-cm incision in the non-weightbearing part of the sole of the foot. Remaining cartilage in the ankle joint, where necessary, was percutaneously removed through an anterior approach and the locking nail was inserted after reaming of os calcis, talus and tibia. Locking screw insertion was in the sagittal plane (p.a. direction), in talus os calcis and tibial diaphysis using a nail mounted jig. Ten patients were entered in the study (age 27-60 years). The initial aetiology for attempted fusion was post-traumatic in nine cases and rheumatic in one case. There were 25 previous operations in the cohort not leading to fusion. An additional temporary external fixator was used in four cases to reach and maintain the optimum position for the procedure. The intervention time was 30-75 min. Dynamisation of the nail was performed after four months under local anaesthesia. The mean duration of follow-up was 4 years (3-5.5 years). Radiologically and clinically, fusion was achieved in 16 weeks (range, 12-20 weeks). There was no loosening of the implant or implant failure. A leg length discrepancy was avoided using this technique. There was one complication with varus malunion in a heavy smoker which united after corrective osteotomy, revision nailing and bone grafting. Patient satisfaction was measured on a scale (not visual analogue) of 0 (not satisfied) to 10 (completely satisfied); overall satisfaction averaged 9.5 points (range, 6-10 points). The postoperative ankle-hindfoot score of the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society averaged 73.5 points (range, 61-81 points). Retrograde locked nailing with locking in the sagittal plane is a reliable minimally invasive procedure to achieve fusion of the ankle and the subtalar joint after failed fusion.
doi:10.1007/s11751-007-0018-4
PMCID: PMC2321722  PMID: 18427914
Ankle arthrodesis; Failed fusion; Retrograde nail; Calcaneotalotibial arthrodesis
12.  Minimally invasive ankle arthrodesis with a retrograde locking nail after failed fusion 
Abstract
A retrograde nail with posterior-to-anterior (PA) locking into os calcis, talus and tibia was used to correct deformity and achieve fusion after failed fusion. A variety of methods have been published to achieve union of the ankle and subtalar joint in a failed fusion situation. We have studied a retrograde locking nail technique through a 2.5-cm incision in the non-weightbearing part of the sole of the foot. Remaining cartilage in the ankle joint, where necessary, was percutaneously removed through an anterior approach and the locking nail was inserted after reaming of os calcis, talus and tibia. Locking screw insertion was in the sagittal plane (p.a. direction), in talus os calcis and tibial diaphysis using a nail mounted jig. Ten patients were entered in the study (age 27-60 years). The initial aetiology for attempted fusion was post-traumatic in nine cases and rheumatic in one case. There were 25 previous operations in the cohort not leading to fusion. An additional temporary external fixator was used in four cases to reach and maintain the optimum position for the procedure. The intervention time was 30-75 min. Dynamisation of the nail was performed after four months under local anaesthesia. The mean duration of follow-up was 4 years (3-5.5 years). Radiologically and clinically, fusion was achieved in 16 weeks (range, 12-20 weeks). There was no loosening of the implant or implant failure. A leg length discrepancy was avoided using this technique. There was one complication with varus malunion in a heavy smoker which united after corrective osteotomy, revision nailing and bone grafting. Patient satisfaction was measured on a scale (not visual analogue) of 0 (not satisfied) to 10 (completely satisfied); overall satisfaction averaged 9.5 points (range, 6-10 points). The postoperative ankle-hindfoot score of the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society averaged 73.5 points (range, 61-81 points). Retrograde locked nailing with locking in the sagittal plane is a reliable minimally invasive procedure to achieve fusion of the ankle and the subtalar joint after failed fusion.
doi:10.1007/s11751-007-0018-4
PMCID: PMC2321722  PMID: 18427914
Ankle arthrodesis; Failed fusion; Retrograde nail; Calcaneotalotibial arthrodesis
13.  A new approach to the treatment of congenital vertical talus 
Congenital vertical talus is an uncommon foot deformity that is present at birth and results in a rigid flatfoot deformity. Left untreated the deformity can result in pain and disability. Though the exact etiology of vertical talus is unknown, an increasing number of cases have been shown to have a genetic cause. Approximately 50% of all cases of vertical talus are associated with other neuromuscular abnormalities or known genetic syndromes. The remaining 50% of cases were once thought to be idiopathic in nature. However, there is increasing evidence that many of these cases are related to single gene defects. Most patients with vertical talus have been treated with major reconstructive surgeries that are fraught with complications such as wound necrosis, talar necrosis, undercorrection of the deformity, stiffness of the ankle and subtalar joint, and the eventual need for multiple operative procedures. Recently, a new approach to vertical talus that consists of serial casting and minimal surgery has resulted in excellent correction in the short-term. Longer follow-up will be necessary to ensure maintenance of correction with this new technique. A less invasive approach to the correction of vertical talus may provide more favorable long-term outcomes than more extensive surgery as has been shown to be true for clubfoot outcomes.
doi:10.1007/s11832-007-0037-1
PMCID: PMC2656724  PMID: 19308490
Congenital vertical talus; Flatfoot; Treatment; Genetics; Etiology
14.  Talocrural Dislocation With Associated Weber Type C Fibular Fracture in a Collegiate Football Player: A Case Report 
Journal of Athletic Training  2008;43(3):319-325.
Objective:
To present the case of a talocrural dislocation with a Weber type C fibular fracture in a National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I football athlete.
Background:
The athlete, while attempting to make a tackle during a game, collided with an opponent, who in turn stepped on the lateral aspect of the athlete's ankle, resulting in forced ankle eversion and external rotation. On-field evaluation showed a laterally displaced talocrural dislocation. Immediate reduction was performed in the athletic training room to maintain skin integrity. Post-reduction radiographs revealed a Weber type C fibular fracture and increased medial joint clear space. A below-knee, fiberglass splint was applied to stabilize the ankle joint complex.
Differential Diagnosis:
Subtalar dislocation, Maisonneuve fracture, malleolar fracture, deltoid ligament rupture, syndesmosis disruption.
Treatment:
The sports medicine staff immediately splinted and transported the athlete to the athletic training room to reduce the dislocation. The athlete then underwent an open reduction and internal fixation procedure to stabilize the injury: 2 syndesmosis screws and a fibular plate were placed to keep the ankle joint in an anatomically reduced position. With the guidance of the athletic training staff, the athlete underwent an accelerated physical rehabilitation protocol in an effort to return to sport as quickly and safely as possible.
Uniqueness:
Most talocrural dislocations and associated Weber type C fibular fractures are due to motor vehicle accidents or falls. We are the first to describe this injury in a Division I football player and to present a general rehabilitation protocol for a high-level athlete.
Conclusions:
Sports medicine practitioners must recognize that this injury can occur in the athletic environment. Prompt reduction, early surgical intervention, sufficient resources, and an accelerated rehabilitation protocol all contributed to a successful outcome in the patient.
PMCID: PMC2386426  PMID: 18523569
ankle dislocations; fibular fractures; syndesmosis injuries; athletic injuries
15.  Therapeutic management of complicated talar extrusion: literature review and case report 
Total extrusion of the talus with interruption of all ligaments (missing talus) is a rare injury. We describe the case of a 27-year-old man who reported total extrusion of the talus after a motorbike accident with interruption of all talar ligaments. In the first repair effort, the articular void left by the talus was filled with antibiotic cement and the wound was closed primarily. Nevertheless, the skin overlying the talar joint displayed necrosis. In order to cover the cutaneous defect, improve local vascularization, and allow reimplantation of the talus, a sural fasciocutaneous island flap was harvested. Subsequently, the original talus was placed and arthrodesis of the subtalar joint was performed. The patient was able to walk bearing full weight without support equipment after 6 months. Several therapeutic options have been suggested in such cases, including replacing the talus, tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis, and pseudoarthrodesis. The rarity and peculiarity of such cases make the establishment of generalized guidelines an arduous task, leaving the choice of treatment to the surgeon, in conformity with each case’s peculiarity. In this case use of the flap may have promoted the vascularization of the reimplanted talus, thus avoiding avascular necrosis and allowing successful reimplantation of the original talus.
doi:10.1007/s10195-011-0129-z
PMCID: PMC3052426  PMID: 21350893
Total talar dislocation; Talar extrusion; Missing talus; Distally-based sural fasciocutaneous flap
16.  Therapeutic management of complicated talar extrusion: literature review and case report 
Total extrusion of the talus with interruption of all ligaments (missing talus) is a rare injury. We describe the case of a 27-year-old man who reported total extrusion of the talus after a motorbike accident with interruption of all talar ligaments. In the first repair effort, the articular void left by the talus was filled with antibiotic cement and the wound was closed primarily. Nevertheless, the skin overlying the talar joint displayed necrosis. In order to cover the cutaneous defect, improve local vascularization, and allow reimplantation of the talus, a sural fasciocutaneous island flap was harvested. Subsequently, the original talus was placed and arthrodesis of the subtalar joint was performed. The patient was able to walk bearing full weight without support equipment after 6 months. Several therapeutic options have been suggested in such cases, including replacing the talus, tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis, and pseudoarthrodesis. The rarity and peculiarity of such cases make the establishment of generalized guidelines an arduous task, leaving the choice of treatment to the surgeon, in conformity with each case’s peculiarity. In this case use of the flap may have promoted the vascularization of the reimplanted talus, thus avoiding avascular necrosis and allowing successful reimplantation of the original talus.
doi:10.1007/s10195-011-0129-z
PMCID: PMC3052426  PMID: 21350893
Total talar dislocation; Talar extrusion; Missing talus; Distally-based sural fasciocutaneous flap
17.  Anteromedial subtalar dislocation 
BMJ Case Reports  2013;2013:bcr0320123973.
Subtalar dislocation is the simultaneous dislocation of the talocalcaneal and talonavicular joints of the foot, typically caused by falls from heights, twisting leg injuries and motor vehicle accidents. The dislocation can occur medially, lateral, anterior or posterior, but most commonly occurs from inversion injury producing a medial dislocation. These dislocations may be accompanied by fractures. Careful physical examination must be performed to assess for neurovascular compromise. Most subtalar dislocations can be treated with closed reduction under sedation. However, if the dislocation is associated with an open fracture it may require reduction in the operating room. Treatment should include postreduction plain x-ray and CT scan to evaluate for proper alignment and for fractures. This article presents a case of medial subtalar dislocation in a 23-year-old football player.
doi:10.1136/bcr-03-2012-3973
PMCID: PMC3603425  PMID: 23355551
18.  Delayed surgical treatment for neglected or mal-reduced talar fractures 
International Orthopaedics  2005;29(5):326-329.
From 1993 to 2002, we treated nine patients for neglected or mal-reduced talar fractures. Average patient age was 39 (20–64) years and average follow-up 53 months. The time interval between injury and index operation ranged from 4 weeks to 4 years. Surgical procedures included open reduction with or without bone grafting in six cases, open reduction combined with ankle fusion in one case, talar neck osteotomy in one case, and talar neck osteotomy combined with subtalar fusion in one case. All cases had solid bone union. One patient developed avascular necrosis of the talus needing subsequent ankle arthrodesis. In six patients, adjacent hindfoot arthrosis occurred. The overall AOFAS ankle–hindfoot score was in average 77.4. We conclude that in neglected and mal-reduced talar fractures, surgical treatment can lead to a favourable outcome if the hindfoot joints are not arthritic.
doi:10.1007/s00264-005-0675-1
PMCID: PMC3456640  PMID: 16094539
19.  Minimally invasive, no hardware subtalar arthrodesis with autogenous posterior iliac bone graft 
Sixteen patients underwent minimally invasive subtalar arthrodesis through a mini-invasive approach with posterior iliac graft between 2004 and 2006. No hardware was used to transfix the arthrodesis and partial weight bearing was allowed immediately. The primary indication for surgery was the squeal of fracture os calcis in terms of subtalar joint arthritis, loss of heel height, malalignment of the hindfoot, and pain with weight bearing. There were 12 male and 4 female patients with a mean age of 30 (range 17–52). Patients were followed up for a period of 40.8 months (range 36–48 months). The mean interval from injury to fusion was 2 (+0.6) years ranging from 6 months to 6 years post fracture. The average clinical rating scale based on the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) improved from 36 preoperatively to 78 at the latest follow-up (P < 0.05). Union rate was 94%. Radiographic evaluation revealed a mean increase in calcaneal inclination of 6.25 + 8.3° (P < 0.07) and a mean increase in the lateral talocalcaneal angle of 7.42 + 10.2° (P < 0.08). Complications were graft nonunion in 1 patient and transient tendoachilles tendinitis in another. This technique can be used to decrease the morbidity associated with the late complications of os calcis fractures by aligning the hindfoot, restoring the heel height and correcting calcaneal and talar inclination. It offers the advantage of early weight bearing while avoiding hardware complications.
doi:10.1007/s11751-010-0081-0
PMCID: PMC2839322  PMID: 20360876
Subtalar arthrodesis; Os calcis fracture; Minimally invasive; Posterior iliac crest bone; Grafting
20.  Minimally invasive, no hardware subtalar arthrodesis with autogenous posterior iliac bone graft 
Sixteen patients underwent minimally invasive subtalar arthrodesis through a mini-invasive approach with posterior iliac graft between 2004 and 2006. No hardware was used to transfix the arthrodesis and partial weight bearing was allowed immediately. The primary indication for surgery was the squeal of fracture os calcis in terms of subtalar joint arthritis, loss of heel height, malalignment of the hindfoot, and pain with weight bearing. There were 12 male and 4 female patients with a mean age of 30 (range 17–52). Patients were followed up for a period of 40.8 months (range 36–48 months). The mean interval from injury to fusion was 2 (+0.6) years ranging from 6 months to 6 years post fracture. The average clinical rating scale based on the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) improved from 36 preoperatively to 78 at the latest follow-up (P < 0.05). Union rate was 94%. Radiographic evaluation revealed a mean increase in calcaneal inclination of 6.25 + 8.3° (P < 0.07) and a mean increase in the lateral talocalcaneal angle of 7.42 + 10.2° (P < 0.08). Complications were graft nonunion in 1 patient and transient tendoachilles tendinitis in another. This technique can be used to decrease the morbidity associated with the late complications of os calcis fractures by aligning the hindfoot, restoring the heel height and correcting calcaneal and talar inclination. It offers the advantage of early weight bearing while avoiding hardware complications.
doi:10.1007/s11751-010-0081-0
PMCID: PMC2839322  PMID: 20360876
Subtalar arthrodesis; Os calcis fracture; Minimally invasive; Posterior iliac crest bone; Grafting
21.  Posterior ankle and subtalar arthroscopy: indications, technique, and results 
Over the decades, arthroscopy has grown in popularity for the treatment of many foot and ankle pathologies. While anterior ankle arthroscopy is a widely accepted technique, posterior ankle/subtalar arthroscopy is still a relatively new procedure. The goal of this review is to outline the indications, surgical techniques, and results of posterior ankle/subtalar arthroscopy. The main indications include: 1) osteochondral lesions (of subtalar and posterior ankle joint); 2) posterior soft tissue or bony impingement; 3) os trigonum syndrome; 4) posterior loose bodies; 5) flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tenosynovitis; 6) posterior synovitis; 7) subtalar (or ankle) joint arthritis; 8) posterior tibial, talar, or calcaneal fractures (for arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation). Although posterior ankle/subtalar arthroscopy has shown to be safe and effective in the treatment of many of the above mentioned conditions, thorough knowledge of the anatomy, correct indications, and a precise surgical technique are essential to produce good outcomes.
doi:10.1007/s12178-012-9118-y
PMCID: PMC3535152  PMID: 22426574
Posterior ankle arthroscopy; Subtalar arthroscopy; Prone arthroscopy; Osteochondral lesions; Os trigonum; Posterior arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis; Talocalcaneal coalitions; Foot and ankle
22.  Weaver syndrome associated with bilateral congenital hip and unilateral subtalar dislocation 
Hippokratia  2010;14(3):212-214.
Background: Weaver syndrome is a congenital paediatric syndrome characterized by mental, respiratory and musculoskeletal manifestations. The coexisting deformities of the skull, the face, fingers and toes are typical. We report a case of a girl with Weaver syndrome associated with rare bilateral congenital dislocation of the hips associated with congenital hypoplastic talus and subtalar dislocation of her ankle joint.
Case Report: A 3-year old girl was admitted in our department with typical manifestations of Weaver syndrome, associated with congenital dislocation of bilateral hips, hypoplastic talus and subtalar dislocation of her right ankle. She was in pain while standing upright and incapable of independent walking. Both hips were treated operatively with open reduction and bilateral iliac osteotomy. Two years afterwards she had an open reduction of her talus and extraarticular arthrodesis of her subtalar joint in her right ankle. Six years postoperatively after the hip operations and four years after the ankle operation the girl is ambulant with a painless independent and unaided walking with a mild limp and full range of movements in all the operated joints.
Conclusions: We suggest that children with Weaver syndrome and disabling musculosceletal deformities, particularly affecting their ability to stand up and walk should be treated early, before bone maturity, in order to achieve the best potential musculoskeletal as well as developmental outcome.
PMCID: PMC2943362  PMID: 20981173
Weaver Syndrome; congenital dislocation; hip; ankle
23.  Simultaneous Bilateral Fracture Dislocation of the Talus: A Case Report 
Trauma Monthly  2013;18(2):90-94.
Introduction
Fracture - dislocations of the talus are typically due to high energy injuries. Displaced fracture - dislocations of the talus have poor outcomes in general and complications are common. Although talar fracture is common and comprises the second most common tarsal fracture, bilateral fracture - dislocations of the talus are rare. Not many reports regarding the subject can be found in the literature.
Case Presentation
We report a patient with bilateral fracture - dislocations of the talus treated by open reduction and internal fixation. This patient was a 25 year-old man who sustained bilateral fracture - dislocation of the talus due to a motor vehicle accident.
Conclusions
Bilateral talar fracture - dislocation is rare. The surgical approach discussed together with the pathomechanics of this injury can yield good short term results.
doi:10.5812/traumamon.11228
PMCID: PMC3860673  PMID: 24350160
Dislocation; Talus; Fracture Fixation, Internal
24.  Adjacent tissue involvement of acute inflammatory ankle arthritis on magnetic resonance imaging findings 
International Orthopaedics  2013;37(10):1943-1947.
Purpose
The ankle joint and surrounding subtalar joint have several tendons in close proximity. This study was performed to investigate the concurrent adjacent tissue involvement on MRI findings when the surgical treatment is considered for an acute inflammatory arthritis of the ankle joint.
Methods
Consecutive patients with acute inflammatory ankle arthritis who visited the emergency room and underwent MRI were included. After interobserver reliability testing of MRI findings, adjacent tissue involvement in the acute inflammatory ankle arthritis were evaluated including flexor hallucis longus (FHL), flexor digitorum longus (FDL), tibialis posterior (TP), peroneus longus (PL), peroneus brevis (PB), extensor digitorum longus (EDL), tibialis anterior (Tib Ant), extensor hallucis longus (EHL), subtalar joint, talus, tibia, and calcaneus.
Results
Twenty-five patients (mean age 57.8 years; 16 males and nine females) were included. Of the 25 patients, 23 showed FHL involvement, 21 FDL, 21 TP, 15 PL, 15 PB, three EDL, 21 subtalar joint, six talus, six tibia, and five calcaneus on MR images. No Tib Ant or EHL involvement was observed on MR findings in acute inflammatory ankle arthritis.
Conclusions
Patients with acute inflammatory ankle arthritis showed frequent concomitant surrounding tissue involvement on MRI, which included FHL, FDL, TP, and subtalar joint. This needs to be considered when surgical drainage is planned for acute inflammatory ankle arthritis.
doi:10.1007/s00264-013-1932-3
PMCID: PMC3779583  PMID: 23703539
25.  Neuropathic midfoot deformity: associations with ankle and subtalar joint motion 
Background
Neuropathic deformities impair foot and ankle joint mobility, often leading to abnormal stresses and impact forces. The purpose of our study was to determine differences in radiographic measures of hind foot alignment and ankle joint and subtalar joint motion in participants with and without neuropathic midfoot deformities and to determine the relationships between radiographic measures of hind foot alignment to ankle and subtalar joint motion in participants with and without neuropathic midfoot deformities.
Methods
Sixty participants were studied in three groups. Forty participants had diabetes mellitus (DM) and peripheral neuropathy (PN) with 20 participants having neuropathic midfoot deformity due to Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN), while 20 participants did not have deformity. Participants with diabetes and neuropathy with and without deformity were compared to 20 young control participants without DM, PN or deformity. Talar declination and calcaneal inclination angles were assessed on lateral view weight bearing radiograph. Ankle dorsiflexion, plantar flexion and subtalar inversion and eversion were assessed by goniometry.
Results
Talar declination angle averaged 34±9, 26±4 and 23±3 degrees in participants with deformity, without deformity and young control participants, respectively (p< 0.010). Calcaneal inclination angle averaged 11±10, 18±9 and 21±4 degrees, respectively (p< 0.010). Ankle plantar flexion motion averaged 23±11, 38±10 and 47±7 degrees (p<0.010). The association between talar declination and calcaneal inclination angles with ankle plantar flexion range of motion is strongest in participants with neuropathic midfoot deformity. Participants with talonavicular and calcaneocuboid dislocations result in the most severe restrictions in ankle joint plantar flexion and subtalar joint inversion motions.
Conclusions
An increasing talar declination angle and decreasing calcaneal inclination angle is associated with decreases in ankle joint plantar flexion motion in individuals with neuropathic midfoot deformity due to CN that may contribute to excessive stresses and ultimately plantar ulceration of the midfoot.
doi:10.1186/1757-1146-6-11
PMCID: PMC3616933  PMID: 23531372
Foot alignment; Deformity; Ankle and foot joint goniometry; Limited joint mobility

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