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1.  Integration of home care services. Preliminary results from the EURHOMAP study 
Purpose
To show the extent to which social and health care services are integrated across European home care systems.
Introduction and theory
Home care incorporates several types of services. It is part of both the social system and health care system. Different disciplines/providers from different organisational settings, which may be financed differently, provide care at the clients' home. Furthermore, client's access to care may be organised in various ways. A European wide study (EURHOMAP) is used to look at these aspects in several countries.
Methods
A systematic literature review and consultations with experts across Europe resulted in a set of consensus-based indicators. Major topics are: provision, financing and regulation. Data were collected in 31 countries in 2008–2009. To enhance comparability, a panel of key informants in each country answered a set of questions related to four vignettes about people in need of home care.
Results and conclusion
Results will be presented for some countries which form a contrast in the extent of service delivery and integration in home care. The delivery, needs assessment, financing and policy and regulation of each will be discussed. There are several levels at which integration can occur: regulation, financing, access and service delivery. Whether and at which level integration occurs varies from country to country.
PMCID: PMC2807082
home care; integrated care; Europe
2.  Hospital-at-Home Programs for Patients With Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) 
Executive Summary
In July 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) evidentiary framework, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding treatment strategies for patients with COPD. This project emerged from a request by the Health System Strategy Division of the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care that MAS provide them with an evidentiary platform on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of COPD interventions.
After an initial review of health technology assessments and systematic reviews of COPD literature, and consultation with experts, MAS identified the following topics for analysis: vaccinations (influenza and pneumococcal), smoking cessation, multidisciplinary care, pulmonary rehabilitation, long-term oxygen therapy, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation for acute and chronic respiratory failure, hospital-at-home for acute exacerbations of COPD, and telehealth (including telemonitoring and telephone support). Evidence-based analyses were prepared for each of these topics. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed where appropriate. In addition, a review of the qualitative literature on patient, caregiver, and provider perspectives on living and dying with COPD was conducted, as were reviews of the qualitative literature on each of the technologies included in these analyses.
The Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Mega-Analysis series is made up of the following reports, which can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: http://www.hqontario.ca/en/mas/mas_ohtas_mn.html.
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Evidentiary Framework
Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccinations for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis
Smoking Cessation for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis
Community-Based Multidisciplinary Care for Patients With Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis
Pulmonary Rehabilitation for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis
Long-term Oxygen Therapy for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis
Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis
Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation for Chronic Respiratory Failure Patients With Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis
Hospital-at-Home Programs for Patients With Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis
Home Telehealth for Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis
Cost-Effectiveness of Interventions for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Using an Ontario Policy Model
Experiences of Living and Dying With COPD: A Systematic Review and Synthesis of the Qualitative Empirical Literature
For more information on the qualitative review, please contact Mita Giacomini at: http://fhs.mcmaster.ca/ceb/faculty_member_giacomini.htm.
For more information on the economic analysis, please visit the PATH website: http://www.path-hta.ca/About-Us/Contact-Us.aspx.
The Toronto Health Economics and Technology Assessment (THETA) collaborative has produced an associated report on patient preference for mechanical ventilation. For more information, please visit the THETA website: http://theta.utoronto.ca/static/contact.
Objective
The objective of this analysis was to compare hospital-at-home care with inpatient hospital care for patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who present to the emergency department (ED).
Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population
Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a disease state characterized by airflow limitation that is not fully reversible. This airflow limitation is usually both progressive and associated with an abnormal inflammatory response of the lungs to noxious particles or gases. The natural history of COPD involves periods of acute-onset worsening of symptoms, particularly increased breathlessness, cough, and/or sputum, that go beyond normal day-to-day variations; these are known as acute exacerbations.
Two-thirds of COPD exacerbations are caused by an infection of the tracheobronchial tree or by air pollution; the cause in the remaining cases is unknown. On average, patients with moderate to severe COPD experience 2 or 3 exacerbations each year.
Exacerbations have an important impact on patients and on the health care system. For the patient, exacerbations result in decreased quality of life, potentially permanent losses of lung function, and an increased risk of mortality. For the health care system, exacerbations of COPD are a leading cause of ED visits and hospitalizations, particularly in winter.
Technology
Hospital-at-home programs offer an alternative for patients who present to the ED with an exacerbation of COPD and require hospital admission for their treatment. Hospital-at-home programs provide patients with visits in their home by medical professionals (typically specialist nurses) who monitor the patients, alter patients’ treatment plans if needed, and in some programs, provide additional care such as pulmonary rehabilitation, patient and caregiver education, and smoking cessation counselling.
There are 2 types of hospital-at-home programs: admission avoidance and early discharge hospital-at-home. In the former, admission avoidance hospital-at-home, after patients are assessed in the ED, they are prescribed the necessary medications and additional care needed (e.g., oxygen therapy) and then sent home where they receive regular visits from a medical professional. In early discharge hospital-at-home, after being assessed in the ED, patients are admitted to the hospital where they receive the initial phase of their treatment. These patients are discharged into a hospital-at-home program before the exacerbation has resolved. In both cases, once the exacerbation has resolved, the patient is discharged from the hospital-at-home program and no longer receives visits in his/her home.
In the models that exist to date, hospital-at-home programs differ from other home care programs because they deal with higher acuity patients who require higher acuity care, and because hospitals retain the medical and legal responsibility for patients. Furthermore, patients requiring home care services may require such services for long periods of time or indefinitely, whereas patients in hospital-at-home programs require and receive the services for a short period of time only.
Hospital-at-home care is not appropriate for all patients with acute exacerbations of COPD. Ineligible patients include: those with mild exacerbations that can be managed without admission to hospital; those who require admission to hospital; and those who cannot be safely treated in a hospital-at-home program either for medical reasons and/or because of a lack of, or poor, social support at home.
The proposed possible benefits of hospital-at-home for treatment of exacerbations of COPD include: decreased utilization of health care resources by avoiding hospital admission and/or reducing length of stay in hospital; decreased costs; increased health-related quality of life for patients and caregivers when treated at home; and reduced risk of hospital-acquired infections in this susceptible patient population.
Ontario Context
No hospital-at-home programs for the treatment of acute exacerbations of COPD were identified in Ontario. Patients requiring acute care for their exacerbations are treated in hospitals.
Research Question
What is the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and safety of hospital-at-home care compared with inpatient hospital care of acute exacerbations of COPD?
Research Methods
Literature Search
Search Strategy
A literature search was performed on August 5, 2010, using OVID MEDLINE, OVID MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, OVID EMBASE, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Wiley Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database for studies published from January 1, 1990, to August 5, 2010. Abstracts were reviewed by a single reviewer and, for those studies meeting the eligibility criteria, full-text articles were obtained. Reference lists and health technology assessment websites were also examined for any additional relevant studies not identified through the systematic search.
Inclusion Criteria
English language full-text reports;
health technology assessments, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs);
studies performed exclusively in patients with a diagnosis of COPD or studies including patients with COPD as well as patients with other conditions, if results are reported for COPD patients separately;
studies performed in patients with acute exacerbations of COPD who present to the ED;
studies published between January 1, 1990, and August 5, 2010;
studies comparing hospital-at-home and inpatient hospital care for patients with acute exacerbations of COPD;
studies that include at least 1 of the outcomes of interest (listed below).
Cochrane Collaboration reviews have defined hospital-at-home programs as those that provide patients with active treatment for their acute exacerbation in their home by medical professionals for a limited period of time (in this case, until the resolution of the exacerbation). If a hospital-at-home program had not been available, these patients would have been admitted to hospital for their treatment.
Exclusion Criteria
< 18 years of age
animal studies
duplicate publications
grey literature
Outcomes of Interest
Patient/clinical outcomes
mortality
lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second)
health-related quality of life
patient or caregiver preference
patient or caregiver satisfaction with care
complications
Health system outcomes
hospital readmissions
length of stay in hospital and hospital-at-home
ED visits
transfer to long-term care
days to readmission
eligibility for hospital-at-home
Statistical Methods
When possible, results were pooled using Review Manager 5 Version 5.1; otherwise, results were summarized descriptively. Data from RCTs were analyzed using intention-to-treat protocols. In addition, a sensitivity analysis was done assigning all missing data/withdrawals to the event. P values less than 0.05 were considered significant. A priori subgroup analyses were planned for the acuity of hospital-at-home program, type of hospital-at-home program (early discharge or admission avoidance), and severity of the patients’ COPD. Additional subgroup analyses were conducted as needed based on the identified literature. Post hoc sample size calculations were performed using STATA 10.1.
Quality of Evidence
The quality of each included study was assessed, taking into consideration allocation concealment, randomization, blinding, power/sample size, withdrawals/dropouts, and intention-to-treat analyses.
The quality of the body of evidence was assessed as high, moderate, low, or very low according to the GRADE Working Group criteria. The following definitions of quality were used in grading the quality of the evidence:
Summary of Findings
Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in this review: 1 health technology assessment, 5 systematic reviews, and 7 RCTs.
The following conclusions are based on low to very low quality of evidence. The reviewed evidence was based on RCTs that were inadequately powered to observe differences between hospital-at-home and inpatient hospital care for most outcomes, so there is a strong possibility of type II error. Given the low to very low quality of evidence, these conclusions must be considered with caution.
Approximately 21% to 37% of patients with acute exacerbations of COPD who present to the ED may be eligible for hospital-at-home care.
Of the patients who are eligible for care, some may refuse to participate in hospital-at-home care.
Eligibility for hospital-at-home care may be increased depending on the design of the hospital-at-home program, such as the size of the geographical service area for hospital-at-home and the hours of operation for patient assessment and entry into hospital-at-home.
Hospital-at-home care for acute exacerbations of COPD was associated with a nonsignificant reduction in the risk of mortality and hospital readmissions compared with inpatient hospital care during 2- to 6-month follow-up.
Limited, very low quality evidence suggests that hospital readmissions are delayed in patients who received hospital-at-home care compared with those who received inpatient hospital care (mean additional days before readmission comparing hospital-at-home to inpatient hospital care ranged from 4 to 38 days).
There is insufficient evidence to determine whether hospital-at-home care, compared with inpatient hospital care, is associated with improved lung function.
The majority of studies did not find significant differences between hospital-at-home and inpatient hospital care for a variety of health-related quality of life measures at follow-up. However, follow-up may have been too late to observe an impact of hospital-at-home care on quality of life.
A conclusion about the impact of hospital-at-home care on length of stay for the initial exacerbation (defined as days in hospital or days in hospital plus hospital-at-home care for inpatient hospital and hospital-at-home, respectively) could not be determined because of limited and inconsistent evidence.
Patient and caregiver satisfaction with care is high for both hospital-at-home and inpatient hospital care.
PMCID: PMC3384361  PMID: 23074420
3.  Internet-Based Device-Assisted Remote Monitoring of Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices 
Executive Summary
Objective
The objective of this Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) report was to conduct a systematic review of the available published evidence on the safety, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of Internet-based device-assisted remote monitoring systems (RMSs) for therapeutic cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) such as pacemakers (PMs), implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs), and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices. The MAS evidence-based review was performed to support public financing decisions.
Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population
Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a major cause of fatalities in developed countries. In the United States almost half a million people die of SCD annually, resulting in more deaths than stroke, lung cancer, breast cancer, and AIDS combined. In Canada each year more than 40,000 people die from a cardiovascular related cause; approximately half of these deaths are attributable to SCD.
Most cases of SCD occur in the general population typically in those without a known history of heart disease. Most SCDs are caused by cardiac arrhythmia, an abnormal heart rhythm caused by malfunctions of the heart’s electrical system. Up to half of patients with significant heart failure (HF) also have advanced conduction abnormalities.
Cardiac arrhythmias are managed by a variety of drugs, ablative procedures, and therapeutic CIEDs. The range of CIEDs includes pacemakers (PMs), implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs), and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices. Bradycardia is the main indication for PMs and individuals at high risk for SCD are often treated by ICDs.
Heart failure (HF) is also a significant health problem and is the most frequent cause of hospitalization in those over 65 years of age. Patients with moderate to severe HF may also have cardiac arrhythmias, although the cause may be related more to heart pump or haemodynamic failure. The presence of HF, however, increases the risk of SCD five-fold, regardless of aetiology. Patients with HF who remain highly symptomatic despite optimal drug therapy are sometimes also treated with CRT devices.
With an increasing prevalence of age-related conditions such as chronic HF and the expanding indications for ICD therapy, the rate of ICD placement has been dramatically increasing. The appropriate indications for ICD placement, as well as the rate of ICD placement, are increasingly an issue. In the United States, after the introduction of expanded coverage of ICDs, a national ICD registry was created in 2005 to track these devices. A recent survey based on this national ICD registry reported that 22.5% (25,145) of patients had received a non-evidence based ICD and that these patients experienced significantly higher in-hospital mortality and post-procedural complications.
In addition to the increased ICD device placement and the upfront device costs, there is the need for lifelong follow-up or surveillance, placing a significant burden on patients and device clinics. In 2007, over 1.6 million CIEDs were implanted in Europe and the United States, which translates to over 5.5 million patient encounters per year if the recommended follow-up practices are considered. A safe and effective RMS could potentially improve the efficiency of long-term follow-up of patients and their CIEDs.
Technology
In addition to being therapeutic devices, CIEDs have extensive diagnostic abilities. All CIEDs can be interrogated and reprogrammed during an in-clinic visit using an inductive programming wand. Remote monitoring would allow patients to transmit information recorded in their devices from the comfort of their own homes. Currently most ICD devices also have the potential to be remotely monitored. Remote monitoring (RM) can be used to check system integrity, to alert on arrhythmic episodes, and to potentially replace in-clinic follow-ups and manage disease remotely. They do not currently have the capability of being reprogrammed remotely, although this feature is being tested in pilot settings.
Every RMS is specifically designed by a manufacturer for their cardiac implant devices. For Internet-based device-assisted RMSs, this customization includes details such as web application, multiplatform sensors, custom algorithms, programming information, and types and methods of alerting patients and/or physicians. The addition of peripherals for monitoring weight and pressure or communicating with patients through the onsite communicators also varies by manufacturer. Internet-based device-assisted RMSs for CIEDs are intended to function as a surveillance system rather than an emergency system.
Health care providers therefore need to learn each application, and as more than one application may be used at one site, multiple applications may need to be reviewed for alarms. All RMSs deliver system integrity alerting; however, some systems seem to be better geared to fast arrhythmic alerting, whereas other systems appear to be more intended for remote follow-up or supplemental remote disease management. The different RMSs may therefore have different impacts on workflow organization because of their varying frequency of interrogation and methods of alerts. The integration of these proprietary RM web-based registry systems with hospital-based electronic health record systems has so far not been commonly implemented.
Currently there are 2 general types of RMSs: those that transmit device diagnostic information automatically and without patient assistance to secure Internet-based registry systems, and those that require patient assistance to transmit information. Both systems employ the use of preprogrammed alerts that are either transmitted automatically or at regular scheduled intervals to patients and/or physicians.
The current web applications, programming, and registry systems differ greatly between the manufacturers of transmitting cardiac devices. In Canada there are currently 4 manufacturers—Medtronic Inc., Biotronik, Boston Scientific Corp., and St Jude Medical Inc.—which have regulatory approval for remote transmitting CIEDs. Remote monitoring systems are proprietary to the manufacturer of the implant device. An RMS for one device will not work with another device, and the RMS may not work with all versions of the manufacturer’s devices.
All Internet-based device-assisted RMSs have common components. The implanted device is equipped with a micro-antenna that communicates with a small external device (at bedside or wearable) commonly known as the transmitter. Transmitters are able to interrogate programmed parameters and diagnostic data stored in the patients’ implant device. The information transfer to the communicator can occur at preset time intervals with the participation of the patient (waving a wand over the device) or it can be sent automatically (wirelessly) without their participation. The encrypted data are then uploaded to an Internet-based database on a secure central server. The data processing facilities at the central database, depending on the clinical urgency, can trigger an alert for the physician(s) that can be sent via email, fax, text message, or phone. The details are also posted on the secure website for viewing by the physician (or their delegate) at their convenience.
Research Questions
The research directions and specific research questions for this evidence review were as follows:
To identify the Internet-based device-assisted RMSs available for follow-up of patients with therapeutic CIEDs such as PMs, ICDs, and CRT devices.
To identify the potential risks, operational issues, or organizational issues related to Internet-based device-assisted RM for CIEDs.
To evaluate the safety, acceptability, and effectiveness of Internet-based device-assisted RMSs for CIEDs such as PMs, ICDs, and CRT devices.
To evaluate the safety, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of Internet-based device-assisted RMSs for CIEDs compared to usual outpatient in-office monitoring strategies.
To evaluate the resource implications or budget impact of RMSs for CIEDs in Ontario, Canada.
Research Methods
Literature Search
The review included a systematic review of published scientific literature and consultations with experts and manufacturers of all 4 approved RMSs for CIEDs in Canada. Information on CIED cardiac implant clinics was also obtained from Provincial Programs, a division within the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care with a mandate for cardiac implant specialty care. Various administrative databases and registries were used to outline the current clinical follow-up burden of CIEDs in Ontario. The provincial population-based ICD database developed and maintained by the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) was used to review the current follow-up practices with Ontario patients implanted with ICD devices.
Search Strategy
A literature search was performed on September 21, 2010 using OVID MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Cochrane Library, and the International Agency for Health Technology Assessment (INAHTA) for studies published from 1950 to September 2010. Search alerts were generated and reviewed for additional relevant literature until December 31, 2010. Abstracts were reviewed by a single reviewer and, for those studies meeting the eligibility criteria full-text articles were obtained. Reference lists were also examined for any additional relevant studies not identified through the search.
Inclusion Criteria
published between 1950 and September 2010;
English language full-reports and human studies;
original reports including clinical evaluations of Internet-based device-assisted RMSs for CIEDs in clinical settings;
reports including standardized measurements on outcome events such as technical success, safety, effectiveness, cost, measures of health care utilization, morbidity, mortality, quality of life or patient satisfaction;
randomized controlled trials (RCTs), systematic reviews and meta-analyses, cohort and controlled clinical studies.
Exclusion Criteria
non-systematic reviews, letters, comments and editorials;
reports not involving standardized outcome events;
clinical reports not involving Internet-based device assisted RM systems for CIEDs in clinical settings;
reports involving studies testing or validating algorithms without RM;
studies with small samples (<10 subjects).
Outcomes of Interest
The outcomes of interest included: technical outcomes, emergency department visits, complications, major adverse events, symptoms, hospital admissions, clinic visits (scheduled and/or unscheduled), survival, morbidity (disease progression, stroke, etc.), patient satisfaction, and quality of life.
Summary of Findings
The MAS evidence review was performed to review available evidence on Internet-based device-assisted RMSs for CIEDs published until September 2010. The search identified 6 systematic reviews, 7 randomized controlled trials, and 19 reports for 16 cohort studies—3 of these being registry-based and 4 being multi-centered. The evidence is summarized in the 3 sections that follow.
1. Effectiveness of Remote Monitoring Systems of CIEDs for Cardiac Arrhythmia and Device Functioning
In total, 15 reports on 13 cohort studies involving investigations with 4 different RMSs for CIEDs in cardiology implant clinic groups were identified in the review. The 4 RMSs were: Care Link Network® (Medtronic Inc,, Minneapolis, MN, USA); Home Monitoring® (Biotronic, Berlin, Germany); House Call 11® (St Jude Medical Inc., St Pauls, MN, USA); and a manufacturer-independent RMS. Eight of these reports were with the Home Monitoring® RMS (12,949 patients), 3 were with the Care Link® RMS (167 patients), 1 was with the House Call 11® RMS (124 patients), and 1 was with a manufacturer-independent RMS (44 patients). All of the studies, except for 2 in the United States, (1 with Home Monitoring® and 1 with House Call 11®), were performed in European countries.
The RMSs in the studies were evaluated with different cardiac implant device populations: ICDs only (6 studies), ICD and CRT devices (3 studies), PM and ICD and CRT devices (4 studies), and PMs only (2 studies). The patient populations were predominately male (range, 52%–87%) in all studies, with mean ages ranging from 58 to 76 years. One study population was unique in that RMSs were evaluated for ICDs implanted solely for primary prevention in young patients (mean age, 44 years) with Brugada syndrome, which carries an inherited increased genetic risk for sudden heart attack in young adults.
Most of the cohort studies reported on the feasibility of RMSs in clinical settings with limited follow-up. In the short follow-up periods of the studies, the majority of the events were related to detection of medical events rather than system configuration or device abnormalities. The results of the studies are summarized below:
The interrogation of devices on the web platform, both for continuous and scheduled transmissions, was significantly quicker with remote follow-up, both for nurses and physicians.
In a case-control study focusing on a Brugada population–based registry with patients followed-up remotely, there were significantly fewer outpatient visits and greater detection of inappropriate shocks. One death occurred in the control group not followed remotely and post-mortem analysis indicated early signs of lead failure prior to the event.
Two studies examined the role of RMSs in following ICD leads under regulatory advisory in a European clinical setting and noted:
– Fewer inappropriate shocks were administered in the RM group.
– Urgent in-office interrogations and surgical revisions were performed within 12 days of remote alerts.
– No signs of lead fracture were detected at in-office follow-up; all were detected at remote follow-up.
Only 1 study reported evaluating quality of life in patients followed up remotely at 3 and 6 months; no values were reported.
Patient satisfaction was evaluated in 5 cohort studies, all in short term follow-up: 1 for the Home Monitoring® RMS, 3 for the Care Link® RMS, and 1 for the House Call 11® RMS.
– Patients reported receiving a sense of security from the transmitter, a good relationship with nurses and physicians, positive implications for their health, and satisfaction with RM and organization of services.
– Although patients reported that the system was easy to implement and required less than 10 minutes to transmit information, a variable proportion of patients (range, 9% 39%) reported that they needed the assistance of a caregiver for their transmission.
– The majority of patients would recommend RM to other ICD patients.
– Patients with hearing or other physical or mental conditions hindering the use of the system were excluded from studies, but the frequency of this was not reported.
Physician satisfaction was evaluated in 3 studies, all with the Care Link® RMS:
– Physicians reported an ease of use and high satisfaction with a generally short-term use of the RMS.
– Physicians reported being able to address the problems in unscheduled patient transmissions or physician initiated transmissions remotely, and were able to handle the majority of the troubleshooting calls remotely.
– Both nurses and physicians reported a high level of satisfaction with the web registry system.
2. Effectiveness of Remote Monitoring Systems in Heart Failure Patients for Cardiac Arrhythmia and Heart Failure Episodes
Remote follow-up of HF patients implanted with ICD or CRT devices, generally managed in specialized HF clinics, was evaluated in 3 cohort studies: 1 involved the Home Monitoring® RMS and 2 involved the Care Link® RMS. In these RMSs, in addition to the standard diagnostic features, the cardiac devices continuously assess other variables such as patient activity, mean heart rate, and heart rate variability. Intra-thoracic impedance, a proxy measure for lung fluid overload, was also measured in the Care Link® studies. The overall diagnostic performance of these measures cannot be evaluated, as the information was not reported for patients who did not experience intra-thoracic impedance threshold crossings or did not undergo interventions. The trial results involved descriptive information on transmissions and alerts in patients experiencing high morbidity and hospitalization in the short study periods.
3. Comparative Effectiveness of Remote Monitoring Systems for CIEDs
Seven RCTs were identified evaluating RMSs for CIEDs: 2 were for PMs (1276 patients) and 5 were for ICD/CRT devices (3733 patients). Studies performed in the clinical setting in the United States involved both the Care Link® RMS and the Home Monitoring® RMS, whereas all studies performed in European countries involved only the Home Monitoring® RMS.
3A. Randomized Controlled Trials of Remote Monitoring Systems for Pacemakers
Two trials, both multicenter RCTs, were conducted in different countries with different RMSs and study objectives. The PREFER trial was a large trial (897 patients) performed in the United States examining the ability of Care Link®, an Internet-based remote PM interrogation system, to detect clinically actionable events (CAEs) sooner than the current in-office follow-up supplemented with transtelephonic monitoring transmissions, a limited form of remote device interrogation. The trial results are summarized below:
In the 375-day mean follow-up, 382 patients were identified with at least 1 CAE—111 patients in the control arm and 271 in the remote arm.
The event rate detected per patient for every type of CAE, except for loss of atrial capture, was higher in the remote arm than the control arm.
The median time to first detection of CAEs (4.9 vs. 6.3 months) was significantly shorter in the RMS group compared to the control group (P < 0.0001).
Additionally, only 2% (3/190) of the CAEs in the control arm were detected during a transtelephonic monitoring transmission (the rest were detected at in-office follow-ups), whereas 66% (446/676) of the CAEs were detected during remote interrogation.
The second study, the OEDIPE trial, was a smaller trial (379 patients) performed in France evaluating the ability of the Home Monitoring® RMS to shorten PM post-operative hospitalization while preserving the safety of conventional management of longer hospital stays.
Implementation and operationalization of the RMS was reported to be successful in 91% (346/379) of the patients and represented 8144 transmissions.
In the RM group 6.5% of patients failed to send messages (10 due to improper use of the transmitter, 2 with unmanageable stress). Of the 172 patients transmitting, 108 patients sent a total of 167 warnings during the trial, with a greater proportion of warnings being attributed to medical rather than technical causes.
Forty percent had no warning message transmission and among these, 6 patients experienced a major adverse event and 1 patient experienced a non-major adverse event. Of the 6 patients having a major adverse event, 5 contacted their physician.
The mean medical reaction time was faster in the RM group (6.5 ± 7.6 days vs. 11.4 ± 11.6 days).
The mean duration of hospitalization was significantly shorter (P < 0.001) for the RM group than the control group (3.2 ± 3.2 days vs. 4.8 ± 3.7 days).
Quality of life estimates by the SF-36 questionnaire were similar for the 2 groups at 1-month follow-up.
3B. Randomized Controlled Trials Evaluating Remote Monitoring Systems for ICD or CRT Devices
The 5 studies evaluating the impact of RMSs with ICD/CRT devices were conducted in the United States and in European countries and involved 2 RMSs—Care Link® and Home Monitoring ®. The objectives of the trials varied and 3 of the trials were smaller pilot investigations.
The first of the smaller studies (151 patients) evaluated patient satisfaction, achievement of patient outcomes, and the cost-effectiveness of the Care Link® RMS compared to quarterly in-office device interrogations with 1-year follow-up.
Individual outcomes such as hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and unscheduled clinic visits were not significantly different between the study groups.
Except for a significantly higher detection of atrial fibrillation in the RM group, data on ICD detection and therapy were similar in the study groups.
Health-related quality of life evaluated by the EuroQoL at 6-month or 12-month follow-up was not different between study groups.
Patients were more satisfied with their ICD care in the clinic follow-up group than in the remote follow-up group at 6-month follow-up, but were equally satisfied at 12- month follow-up.
The second small pilot trial (20 patients) examined the impact of RM follow-up with the House Call 11® system on work schedules and cost savings in patients randomized to 2 study arms varying in the degree of remote follow-up.
The total time including device interrogation, transmission time, data analysis, and physician time required was significantly shorter for the RM follow-up group.
The in-clinic waiting time was eliminated for patients in the RM follow-up group.
The physician talk time was significantly reduced in the RM follow-up group (P < 0.05).
The time for the actual device interrogation did not differ in the study groups.
The third small trial (115 patients) examined the impact of RM with the Home Monitoring® system compared to scheduled trimonthly in-clinic visits on the number of unplanned visits, total costs, health-related quality of life (SF-36), and overall mortality.
There was a 63.2% reduction in in-office visits in the RM group.
Hospitalizations or overall mortality (values not stated) were not significantly different between the study groups.
Patient-induced visits were higher in the RM group than the in-clinic follow-up group.
The TRUST Trial
The TRUST trial was a large multicenter RCT conducted at 102 centers in the United States involving the Home Monitoring® RMS for ICD devices for 1450 patients. The primary objectives of the trial were to determine if remote follow-up could be safely substituted for in-office clinic follow-up (3 in-office visits replaced) and still enable earlier physician detection of clinically actionable events.
Adherence to the protocol follow-up schedule was significantly higher in the RM group than the in-office follow-up group (93.5% vs. 88.7%, P < 0.001).
Actionability of trimonthly scheduled checks was low (6.6%) in both study groups. Overall, actionable causes were reprogramming (76.2%), medication changes (24.8%), and lead/system revisions (4%), and these were not different between the 2 study groups.
The overall mean number of in-clinic and hospital visits was significantly lower in the RM group than the in-office follow-up group (2.1 per patient-year vs. 3.8 per patient-year, P < 0.001), representing a 45% visit reduction at 12 months.
The median time from onset of first arrhythmia to physician evaluation was significantly shorter (P < 0.001) in the RM group than in the in-office follow-up group for all arrhythmias (1 day vs. 35.5 days).
The median time to detect clinically asymptomatic arrhythmia events—atrial fibrillation (AF), ventricular fibrillation (VF), ventricular tachycardia (VT), and supra-ventricular tachycardia (SVT)—was also significantly shorter (P < 0.001) in the RM group compared to the in-office follow-up group (1 day vs. 41.5 days) and was significantly quicker for each of the clinical arrhythmia events—AF (5.5 days vs. 40 days), VT (1 day vs. 28 days), VF (1 day vs. 36 days), and SVT (2 days vs. 39 days).
System-related problems occurred infrequently in both groups—in 1.5% of patients (14/908) in the RM group and in 0.7% of patients (3/432) in the in-office follow-up group.
The overall adverse event rate over 12 months was not significantly different between the 2 groups and individual adverse events were also not significantly different between the RM group and the in-office follow-up group: death (3.4% vs. 4.9%), stroke (0.3% vs. 1.2%), and surgical intervention (6.6% vs. 4.9%), respectively.
The 12-month cumulative survival was 96.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 95.5%–97.6%) in the RM group and 94.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 91.8%–96.6%) in the in-office follow-up group, and was not significantly different between the 2 groups (P = 0.174).
The CONNECT Trial
The CONNECT trial, another major multicenter RCT, involved the Care Link® RMS for ICD/CRT devices in a15-month follow-up study of 1,997 patients at 133 sites in the United States. The primary objective of the trial was to determine whether automatically transmitted physician alerts decreased the time from the occurrence of clinically relevant events to medical decisions. The trial results are summarized below:
Of the 575 clinical alerts sent in the study, 246 did not trigger an automatic physician alert. Transmission failures were related to technical issues such as the alert not being programmed or not being reset, and/or a variety of patient factors such as not being at home and the monitor not being plugged in or set up.
The overall mean time from the clinically relevant event to the clinical decision was significantly shorter (P < 0.001) by 17.4 days in the remote follow-up group (4.6 days for 172 patients) than the in-office follow-up group (22 days for 145 patients).
– The median time to a clinical decision was shorter in the remote follow-up group than in the in-office follow-up group for an AT/AF burden greater than or equal to 12 hours (3 days vs. 24 days) and a fast VF rate greater than or equal to 120 beats per minute (4 days vs. 23 days).
Although infrequent, similar low numbers of events involving low battery and VF detection/therapy turned off were noted in both groups. More alerts, however, were noted for out-of-range lead impedance in the RM group (18 vs. 6 patients), and the time to detect these critical events was significantly shorter in the RM group (same day vs. 17 days).
Total in-office clinic visits were reduced by 38% from 6.27 visits per patient-year in the in-office follow-up group to 3.29 visits per patient-year in the remote follow-up group.
Health care utilization visits (N = 6,227) that included cardiovascular-related hospitalization, emergency department visits, and unscheduled clinic visits were not significantly higher in the remote follow-up group.
The overall mean length of hospitalization was significantly shorter (P = 0.002) for those in the remote follow-up group (3.3 days vs. 4.0 days) and was shorter both for patients with ICD (3.0 days vs. 3.6 days) and CRT (3.8 days vs. 4.7 days) implants.
The mortality rate between the study arms was not significantly different between the follow-up groups for the ICDs (P = 0.31) or the CRT devices with defribillator (P = 0.46).
Conclusions
There is limited clinical trial information on the effectiveness of RMSs for PMs. However, for RMSs for ICD devices, multiple cohort studies and 2 large multicenter RCTs demonstrated feasibility and significant reductions in in-office clinic follow-ups with RMSs in the first year post implantation. The detection rates of clinically significant events (and asymptomatic events) were higher, and the time to a clinical decision for these events was significantly shorter, in the remote follow-up groups than in the in-office follow-up groups. The earlier detection of clinical events in the remote follow-up groups, however, was not associated with lower morbidity or mortality rates in the 1-year follow-up. The substitution of almost all the first year in-office clinic follow-ups with RM was also not associated with an increased health care utilization such as emergency department visits or hospitalizations.
The follow-up in the trials was generally short-term, up to 1 year, and was a more limited assessment of potential longer term device/lead integrity complications or issues. None of the studies compared the different RMSs, particularly the different RMSs involving patient-scheduled transmissions or automatic transmissions. Patients’ acceptance of and satisfaction with RM were reported to be high, but the impact of RM on patients’ health-related quality of life, particularly the psychological aspects, was not evaluated thoroughly. Patients who are not technologically competent, having hearing or other physical/mental impairments, were identified as potentially disadvantaged with remote surveillance. Cohort studies consistently identified subgroups of patients who preferred in-office follow-up. The evaluation of costs and workflow impact to the health care system were evaluated in European or American clinical settings, and only in a limited way.
Internet-based device-assisted RMSs involve a new approach to monitoring patients, their disease progression, and their CIEDs. Remote monitoring also has the potential to improve the current postmarket surveillance systems of evolving CIEDs and their ongoing hardware and software modifications. At this point, however, there is insufficient information to evaluate the overall impact to the health care system, although the time saving and convenience to patients and physicians associated with a substitution of in-office follow-up by RM is more certain. The broader issues surrounding infrastructure, impacts on existing clinical care systems, and regulatory concerns need to be considered for the implementation of Internet-based RMSs in jurisdictions involving different clinical practices.
PMCID: PMC3377571  PMID: 23074419
4.  Home care in Europe: a systematic literature review 
Background
Health and social services provided at home are becoming increasingly important. Hence, there is a need for information on home care in Europe. The objective of this literature review was to respond to this need by systematically describing what has been reported on home care in Europe in the scientific literature over the past decade.
Methods
A systematic literature search was performed for papers on home care published in English, using the following data bases: Cinahl, the Cochrane Library, Embase, Medline, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts, and Social Care Online. Studies were only included if they complied with the definition of home care, were published between January 1998 and October 2009, and dealt with at least one of the 31 specified countries. Clinical interventions, instrument developments, local projects and reviews were excluded. The data extracted included: the characteristics of the study and aspects of home care 'policy & regulation', 'financing', 'organisation & service delivery', and 'clients & informal carers'.
Results
Seventy-four out of 5,133 potentially relevant studies met the inclusion criteria, providing information on 18 countries. Many focused on the characteristics of home care recipients and on the organisation of home care. Geographical inequalities, market forces, quality and integration of services were also among the issues frequently discussed.
Conclusions
Home care systems appeared to differ both between and within countries. The papers included, however, provided only a limited picture of home care. Many studies only focused on one aspect of the home care system and international comparative studies were rare. Furthermore, little information emerged on home care financing and on home care in general in Eastern Europe. This review clearly shows the need for more scientific publications on home care, especially studies comparing countries. A comprehensive and more complete insight into the state of home care in Europe requires the gathering of information using a uniform framework and methodology.
doi:10.1186/1472-6963-11-207
PMCID: PMC3170599  PMID: 21878111
home care; European Union; care systems; international comparison
5.  Home Telehealth for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) 
Executive Summary
In July 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) evidentiary framework, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding treatment strategies for patients with COPD. This project emerged from a request by the Health System Strategy Division of the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care that MAS provide them with an evidentiary platform on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of COPD interventions.
After an initial review of health technology assessments and systematic reviews of COPD literature, and consultation with experts, MAS identified the following topics for analysis: vaccinations (influenza and pneumococcal), smoking cessation, multidisciplinary care, pulmonary rehabilitation, long-term oxygen therapy, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation for acute and chronic respiratory failure, hospital-at-home for acute exacerbations of COPD, and telehealth (including telemonitoring and telephone support). Evidence-based analyses were prepared for each of these topics. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed where appropriate. In addition, a review of the qualitative literature on patient, caregiver, and provider perspectives on living and dying with COPD was conducted, as were reviews of the qualitative literature on each of the technologies included in these analyses.
The Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Mega-Analysis series is made up of the following reports, which can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: http://www.hqontario.ca/en/mas/mas_ohtas_mn.html.
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Evidentiary Framework
Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccinations for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis
Smoking Cessation for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis
Community-Based Multidisciplinary Care for Patients With Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis
Pulmonary Rehabilitation for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis
Long-term Oxygen Therapy for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis
Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis
Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation for Chronic Respiratory Failure Patients With Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis
Hospital-at-Home Programs for Patients With Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis
Home Telehealth for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis
Cost-Effectiveness of Interventions for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Using an Ontario Policy Model
Experiences of Living and Dying With COPD: A Systematic Review and Synthesis of the Qualitative Empirical Literature
For more information on the qualitative review, please contact Mita Giacomini at: http://fhs.mcmaster.ca/ceb/faculty_member_giacomini.htm.
For more information on the economic analysis, please visit the PATH website: http://www.path-hta.ca/About-Us/Contact-Us.aspx.
The Toronto Health Economics and Technology Assessment (THETA) collaborative has produced an associated report on patient preference for mechanical ventilation. For more information, please visit the THETA website: http://theta.utoronto.ca/static/contact.
Objective
The objective of this analysis was to conduct an evidence-based assessment of home telehealth technologies for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in order to inform recommendations regarding the access and provision of these services in Ontario. This analysis was one of several analyses undertaken to evaluate interventions for COPD. The perspective of this assessment was that of the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, a provincial payer of medically necessary health care services.
Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population
Canada is facing an increase in chronic respiratory diseases due in part to its aging demographic. The projected increase in COPD will put a strain on health care payers and providers. There is therefore an increasing demand for telehealth services that improve access to health care services while maintaining or improving quality and equality of care. Many telehealth technologies however are in the early stages of development or diffusion and thus require study to define their application and potential harms or benefits. The Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) therefore sought to evaluate telehealth technologies for COPD.
Technology
Telemedicine (or telehealth) refers to using advanced information and communication technologies and electronic medical devices to support the delivery of clinical care, professional education, and health-related administrative services.
Generally there are 4 broad functions of home telehealth interventions for COPD:
to monitor vital signs or biological health data (e.g., oxygen saturation),
to monitor symptoms, medication, or other non-biologic endpoints (e.g., exercise adherence),
to provide information (education) and/or other support services (such as reminders to exercise or positive reinforcement), and
to establish a communication link between patient and provider.
These functions often require distinct technologies, although some devices can perform a number of these diverse functions. For the purposes of this review, MAS focused on home telemonitoring and telephone only support technologies.
Telemonitoring (or remote monitoring) refers to the use of medical devices to remotely collect a patient’s vital signs and/or other biologic health data and the transmission of those data to a monitoring station for interpretation by a health care provider.
Telephone only support refers to disease/disorder management support provided by a health care provider to a patient who is at home via telephone or videoconferencing technology in the absence of transmission of patient biologic data.
Research Questions
What is the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and safety of home telemonitoring compared with usual care for patients with COPD?
What is the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and safety of telephone only support programs compared with usual care for patients with COPD?
Research Methods
Literature Search
Search Strategy
A literature search was performed on November 3, 2010 using OVID MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Cochrane Library, and the International Agency for Health Technology Assessment (INAHTA) for studies published from January 1, 2000 until November 3, 2010. Abstracts were reviewed by a single reviewer and, for those studies meeting the eligibility criteria, full-text articles were obtained. Reference lists were also examined for any additional relevant studies not identified through the search. Articles with unknown eligibility were reviewed with a second clinical epidemiologist, and then a group of epidemiologists until consensus was established. The quality of evidence was assessed as high, moderate, low, or very low according to GRADE methodology.
Inclusion Criteria – Question #1
frequent transmission of a patient’s physiological data collected at home and without a health care professional physically present to health care professionals for routine monitoring through the use of a communication technology;
monitoring combined with a coordinated management and feedback system based on transmitted data;
telemonitoring as a key component of the intervention (subjective determination);
usual care as provided by the usual care provider for the control group;
randomized controlled trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials (CCTs), systematic reviews, and/or meta-analyses;
published between January 1, 2000 and November 3, 2010.
Inclusion Criteria – Question #2
scheduled or frequent contact between patient and a health care professional via telephone or videoconferencing technology in the absence of transmission of patient physiological data;
monitoring combined with a coordinated management and feedback system based on transmitted data;
telephone support as a key component of the intervention (subjective determination);
usual care as provided by the usual care provider for the control group;
RCTs, CCTs, systematic reviews, and/or meta-analyses;
published between January 1, 2000 and November 3, 2010.
Exclusion Criteria
published in a language other than English;
intervention group (and not control) receiving some form of home visits by a medical professional, typically a nurse (i.e., telenursing) beyond initial technology set-up and education, to collect physiological data, or to somehow manage or treat the patient;
not recording patient or health system outcomes (e.g., technical reports testing accuracy, reliability or other development-related outcomes of a device, acceptability/feasibility studies, etc.);
not using an independent control group that received usual care (e.g., studies employing historical or periodic controls).
Outcomes of Interest
hospitalizations (primary outcome)
mortality
emergency department visits
length of stay
quality of life
other […]
Subgroup Analyses (a priori)
length of intervention (primary)
severity of COPD (primary)
Quality of Evidence
The quality of evidence assigned to individual studies was determined using a modified CONSORT Statement Checklist for Randomized Controlled Trials. (1) The CONSORT Statement was adapted to include 3 additional quality measures: the adequacy of control group description, significant differential loss to follow-up between groups, and greater than or equal to 30% study attrition. Individual study quality was defined based on total scores according to the CONSORT Statement checklist: very low (0 to < 40%), low (≥ 40 to < 60%), moderate (≥ 60 to < 80%), and high (≥ 80 to 100%).
The quality of the body of evidence was assessed as high, moderate, low, or very low according to the GRADE Working Group criteria. The following definitions of quality were used in grading the quality of the evidence:
Summary of Findings
Six publications, representing 5 independent trials, met the eligibility criteria for Research Question #1. Three trials were RCTs reported across 4 publications, whereby patients were randomized to home telemonitoring or usual care, and 2 trials were CCTs, whereby patients or health care centers were nonrandomly assigned to intervention or usual care.
A total of 310 participants were studied across the 5 included trials. The mean age of study participants in the included trials ranged from 61.2 to 74.5 years for the intervention group and 61.1 to 74.5 years for the usual care group. The percentage of men ranged from 40% to 64% in the intervention group and 46% to 72% in the control group.
All 5 trials were performed in a moderate to severe COPD patient population. Three trials initiated the intervention following discharge from hospital. One trial initiated the intervention following a pulmonary rehabilitation program. The final trial initiated the intervention during management of patients at an outpatient clinic.
Four of the 5 trials included oxygen saturation (i.e., pulse oximetry) as one of the biological patient parameters being monitored. Additional parameters monitored included forced expiratory volume in one second, peak expiratory flow, and temperature.
There was considerable clinical heterogeneity between trials in study design, methods, and intervention/control. In relation to the telemonitoring intervention, 3 of the 5 included studies used an electronic health hub that performed multiple functions beyond the monitoring of biological parameters. One study used only a pulse oximeter device alone with modem capabilities. Finally, in 1 study, patients measured and then forwarded biological data to a nurse during a televideo consultation. Usual care varied considerably between studies.
Only one trial met the eligibility criteria for Research Question #2. The included trial was an RCT that randomized 60 patients to nurse telephone follow-up or usual care (no telephone follow-up). Participants were recruited from the medical department of an acute-care hospital in Hong Kong and began receiving follow-up after discharge from the hospital with a diagnosis of COPD (no severity restriction). The intervention itself consisted of only two 10-to 20-minute telephone calls, once between days 3 to 7 and once between days 14 to 20, involving a structured, individualized educational and supportive programme led by a nurse that focused on 3 components: assessment, management options, and evaluation.
Regarding Research Question #1:
Low to very low quality evidence (according to GRADE) finds non-significant effects or conflicting effects (of significant or non-significant benefit) for all outcomes examined when comparing home telemonitoring to usual care.
There is a trend towards significant increase in time free of hospitalization and use of other health care services with home telemonitoring, but these findings need to be confirmed further in randomized trials of high quality.
There is severe clinical heterogeneity between studies that limits summary conclusions.
The economic impact of home telemonitoring is uncertain and requires further study.
Home telemonitoring is largely dependent on local information technologies, infrastructure, and personnel, and thus the generalizability of external findings may be low. Jurisdictions wishing to replicate home telemonitoring interventions should likely test those interventions within their jurisdictional framework before adoption, or should focus on home-grown interventions that are subjected to appropriate evaluation and proven effective.
Regarding Research Question #2:
Low quality evidence finds significant benefit in favour of telephone-only support for self-efficacy and emergency department visits when compared to usual care, but non-significant results for hospitalizations and hospital length of stay.
There are very serious issues with the generalizability of the evidence and thus additional research is required.
PMCID: PMC3384362  PMID: 23074421
6.  Integrated working between residential care homes and primary care: a survey of care homes in England 
BMC Geriatrics  2012;12:71.
Background
Older people living in care homes in England have complex health needs due to a range of medical conditions, mental health needs and frailty. Despite an increasing policy expectation that professionals should operate in an integrated way across organisational boundaries, there is a lack of understanding between care homes and the National Health Service (NHS) about how the two sectors should work together, meaning that residents can experience a poor "fit" between their needs, and services they can access. This paper describes a survey to establish the current extent of integrated working that exists between care homes and primary and community health and social services.
Methods
A self-completion, online questionnaire was designed by the research team. Items on the different dimensions of integration (funding, administrative, organisational, service delivery, clinical care) were included. The survey was sent to a random sample of residential care homes with more than 25 beds (n = 621) in England in 2009. Responses were analysed using quantitative and qualitative methods.
Results
The survey achieved an overall response rate of 15.8%. Most care homes (78.7%) worked with more than one general practice. Respondents indicated that a mean of 14.1 professionals/ services (other than GPs) had visited the care homes in the last six months (SD 5.11, median 14); a mean of .39 (SD.163) professionals/services per bed. The most frequent services visiting were district nursing, chiropody and community psychiatric nurses. Many (60%) managers considered that they worked with the NHS in an integrated way, including sharing documents, engaging in integrated care planning and joint learning and training. However, some care home managers cited working practices dictated by NHS methods of service delivery and priorities for care, rather than those of the care home or residents, a lack of willingness by NHS professionals to share information, and low levels of respect for the experience and knowledge of care home staff.
Conclusions
Care homes are a hub for a wide range of NHS activity, but this is ad hoc with no recognised way to support working together. Integration between care homes and local health services is only really evident at the level of individual working relationships and reflects patterns of collaborative working rather than integration. More integrated working between care homes and primary health services has the potential to improve quality of care in a cost- effective manner, but strategic decisions to create more formal arrangements are required to bring this about. Commissioners of services for older people need to capitalise on good working relationships and address idiosyncratic patterns of provision to care homes.The low response rate is indicative of the difficulty of undertaking research in care homes.
doi:10.1186/1471-2318-12-71
PMCID: PMC3534387  PMID: 23151009
7.  Proceedings of the 3rd IPLeiria’s International Health Congress 
Tomás, Catarina Cardoso | Oliveira, Emanuel | Sousa, D. | Uba-Chupel, M. | Furtado, G. | Rocha, C. | Teixeira, A. | Ferreira, P. | Alves, Celeste | Gisin, Stefan | Catarino, Elisabete | Carvalho, Nelma | Coucelo, Tiago | Bonfim, Luís | Silva, Carina | Franco, Débora | González, Jesús Alcoba | Jardim, Helena G. | Silva, Rita | Baixinho, Cristina L. | Presado, Mª Helena | Marques, Mª Fátima | Cardoso, Mário E. | Cunha, Marina | Mendes, Joana | Xavier, Ana | Galhardo, Ana | Couto, Margarida | Frade, João G. | Nunes, Carla | Mesquita, João R. | Nascimento, Maria S. | Gonçalves, Guilherme | Castro, Conceição | Mártires, Alice | Monteiro, Mª João | Rainho, Conceição | Caballero, Francisco P. | Monago, Fatima M. | Guerrero, Jose T. | Monago, Rocio M. | Trigo, Africa P. | Gutierrez, Milagros L. | Milanés, Gemma M. | Reina, Mercedes G. | Villanueva, Ana G. | Piñero, Ana S. | Aliseda, Isabel R. | Ramirez, Francisco B. | Ribeiro, Andrea | Quelhas, Ana | Manso, Conceição | Caballero, Francisco P. | Guerrero, Jose T. | Monago, Fatima M. | Santos, Rafael B. | Jimenez, Nuria R. | Nuñez, Cristina G. | Gomez, Inmaculada R. | Fernandez, Mª Jose L. | Marquez, Laura A. | Moreno, Ana L. | Huertas, Mª Jesus Tena | Ramirez, Francisco B. | Seabra, Daniel | Salvador, Mª Céu | Braga, Luciene | Parreira, Pedro | Salgueiro-Oliveira, Anabela | Arreguy-Sena, Cristina | Oliveira, Bibiana F. | Henriques, Mª Adriana | Santos, Joana | Lebre, Sara | Marques, Alda | Festas, Clarinda | Rodrigues, Sandra | Ribeiro, Andrea | Lumini, José | Figueiredo, Ana G. | Hernandez-Martinez, Francisco J. | Campi, Liliana | Quintana-Montesdeoca, Mª Pino | Jimenez-Diaz, Juan F. | Rodriguez-De-Vera, Bienvenida C. | Parente, Alexandra | Mata, Mª Augusta | Pereira, Ana Mª | Fernandes, Adília | Brás, Manuel | Pinto, Mª Rosário | Parreira, Pedro | Basto, Marta L. | Rei, Ana C. | Mónico, Lisete M. | Sousa, Gilberta | Morna, Clementina | Freitas, Otília | Freitas, Gregório | Jardim, Ana | Vasconcelos, Rita | Horta, Lina G. | Rosa, Roger S. | Kranz, Luís F. | Nugem, Rita C. | Siqueira, Mariana S. | Bordin, Ronaldo | Kniess, Rosiane | Lacerda, Josimari T. | Guedes, Joana | Machado, Idalina | Almeida, Sidalina | Zilhão, Adriano | Alves, Helder | Ribeiro, Óscar | Amaral, Ana P. | Santos, Ana | Monteiro, Joana | Rocha, Mª Clara | Cruz, Rui | Amaral, Ana P. | Lourenço, Marina | Rocha, Mª Clara | Cruz, Rui | Antunes, Sandra | Mendonça, Verónica | Andrade, Isabel | Osório, Nádia | Valado, Ana | Caseiro, Armando | Gabriel, António | Martins, Anabela C. | Mendes, Fernando | Cabral, Lídia | Ferreira, Manuela | Gonçalves, Amadeu | Luz, Tatiana D. | Luz, Leonardo | Martins, Raul | Morgado, Alice | Vale-Dias, Maria L. | Porta-Nova, Rui | Fleig, Tânia C. | Reuter, Éboni M. | Froemming, Miriam B. | Guerreiro, Sabrina L. | Carvalho, Lisiane L. | Guedelha, Daniel | Coelho, P. | Pereira, A. | Calha, António | Cordeiro, Raul | Gonçalves, Ana | Certo, Ana | Galvão, Ana | Mata, Mª Augusta | Welter, Aline | Pereira, Elayne | Ribeiro, Sandra | Kretzer, Marcia | Jiménez-Díaz, Juan-Fernando | Jiménez-Rodríguez, Carla | Hernández-Martínez, Francisco-José | Rodríguez-De-Vera, Bienvenida-Del-Carmen | Marques-Rodrigues, Alexandre | Coelho, Patrícia | Bernardes, Tiago | Pereira, Alexandre | Sousa, Patrícia | Filho, João G. | Nazario, Nazare | Kretzer, Marcia | Amaral, Odete | Garrido, António | Veiga, Nélio | Nunes, Carla | Pedro, Ana R. | Pereira, Carlos | Almeia, António | Fernandes, Helder M. | Vasconcelos, Carlos | Sousa, Nelson | Reis, Victor M. | Monteiro, M. João | Mendes, Romeu | Pinto, Isabel C. | Pires, Tânia | Gama, João | Preto, Vera | Silva, Norberto | Magalhães, Carlos | Martins, Matilde | Duarte, Mafalda | Paúl, Constança | Martín, Ignácio | Pinheiro, Arminda A. | Xavier, Sandra | Azevedo, Julieta | Bento, Elisabete | Marques, Cristiana | Marques, Mariana | Macedo, António | Pereira, Ana T. | Almeida, José P. | Almeida, António | Alves, Josiane | Sousa, Nelson | Saavedra, Francisco | Mendes, Romeu | Maia, Ana S. | Oliveira, Michelle T. | Sousa, Anderson R. | Ferreira, Paulo P. | Lopes, Luci S. | Santiago, Eujcely C. | Monteiro, Sílvia | Jesus, Ângelo | Colaço, Armanda | Carvalho, António | Silva, Rita P. | Cruz, Agostinho | Ferreira, Ana | Marques, Catarina | Figueiredo, João P. | Paixão, Susana | Ferreira, Ana | Lopes, Carla | Moreira, Fernando | Figueiredo, João P. | Ferreira, Ana | Ribeiro, Diana | Moreira, Fernando | Figueiredo, João P. | Paixão, Susana | Fernandes, Telma | Amado, Diogo | Leal, Jéssica | Azevedo, Marcelo | Ramalho, Sónia | Mangas, Catarina | Ribeiro, Jaime | Gonçalves, Rita | Nunes, Amélia F | Tuna, Ana R. | Martins, Carlos R. | Forte, Henriqueta D. | Costa, Cláudia | Tenedório, José A. | Santana, Paula | Andrade, J. A. | Pinto, J. L. | Campofiorito, C. | Nunes, S. | Carmo, A. | Kaliniczenco, A. | Alves, B. | Mendes, F. | Jesus, C. | Fonseca, F. | Gehrke, F. | Albuquerque, Carlos | Batista, Rita | Cunha, Madalena | Madureira, António | Ribeiro, Olivério | Martins, Rosa | Madeira, Teresa | Peixoto-Plácido, Catarina | Santos, Nuno | Santos, Osvaldo | Bergland, Astrid | Bye, Asta | Lopes, Carla | Alarcão, Violeta | Goulão, Beatriz | Mendonça, Nuno | Nicola, Paulo | Clara, João G. | Gomes, João | Querido, Ana | Tomás, Catarina | Carvalho, Daniel | Cordeiro, Marina | Rosa, Marlene C. | Marques, Alda | Brandão, Daniela | Ribeiro, Óscar | Araújo, Lia | Paúl, Constança | Minghelli, Beatriz | Richaud, Sylvina | Mendes, Ana L. | Marta-Simões, Joana | Trindade, Inês A. | Ferreira, Cláudia | Carvalho, Teresa | Cunha, Marina | Pinto-Gouveia, José | Fernandes, Morgana C. | Rosa, Roger S. | Nugem, Rita C. | Kranz, Luís F. | Siqueira, Mariana S. | Bordin, Ronaldo | Martins, Anabela C. | Medeiros, Anabela | Pimentel, Rafaela | Fernandes, Andreia | Mendonça, Carlos | Andrade, Isabel | Andrade, Susana | Menezes, Ruth L. | Bravo, Rafael | Miranda, Marta | Ugartemendia, Lierni | Tena, José Mª | Pérez-Caballero, Francisco L. | Fuentes-Broto, Lorena | Rodríguez, Ana B. | Carmen, Barriga | Carneiro, M. A. | Domingues, J. N. | Paixão, S. | Figueiredo, J. | Nascimento, V. B. | Jesus, C. | Mendes, F | Gehrke, F. | Alves, B. | Azzalis, L. | Fonseca, F. | Martins, Ana R. | Nunes, Amélia | Jorge, Arminda | Veiga, Nélio | Amorim, Ana | Silva, André | Martinho, Liliana | Monteiro, Luís | Silva, Rafael | Coelho, Carina | Amaral, Odete | Coelho, Inês | Pereira, Carlos | Correia, André | Rodrigues, Diana | Marante, Nídia | Silva, Pedro | Carvalho, Sara | Araujo, André Rts | Ribeiro, Maximiano | Coutinho, Paula | Ventura, Sandra | Roque, Fátima | Calvo, Cristina | Reses, Manoela | Conde, Jorge | Ferreira, Ana | Figueiredo, João | Silva, David | Seiça, Luís | Soares, Raquel | Mourão, Ricardo | Kraus, Teresa | Abreu, Ana C. | Padilha, José M. | Alves, Júlia M. | Sousa, Paulino | Oliveira, Manuel | Sousa, Joana | Novais, Sónia | Mendes, Felismina | Pinto, Joana | Cruz, Joana | Marques, Alda | Duarte, Hugo | Dixe, Maria Dos Anjos | Sousa, Pedro | Cruz, Inês | Bastos, Fernanda | Pereira, Filipe | Carvalho, Francisco L. | Oliveira, Teresa T. | Raposo, Vítor R. | Rainho, Conceição | Ribeiro, José C. | Barroso, Isabel | Rodrigues, Vítor | Neves, Carmo | Oliveira, Teresa C. | Oliveira, Bárbara | Morais, Mª Carminda | Baylina, Pilar | Rodrigues, Rogério | Azeredo, Zaida | Vicente, Corália | Dias, Hélia | Sim-Sim, Margarida | Parreira, Pedro | Salgueiro-Oliveira, Anabela | Castilho, Amélia | Melo, Rosa | Graveto, João | Gomes, José | Vaquinhas, Marina | Carvalho, Carla | Mónico, Lisete | Brito, Nuno | Sarroeira, Cassilda | Amendoeira, José | Cunha, Fátima | Cândido, Anabela | Fernandes, Patrícia | Silva, Helena R. | Silva, Elsa | Barroso, Isabel | Lapa, Leila | Antunes, Cristina | Gonçalves, Ana | Galvão, Ana | Gomes, Mª José | Escanciano, Susana R. | Freitas, Maria | Parreira, Pedro | Marôco, João | Fernandes, Ana R. | Cabral, Cremilde | Alves, Samuel | Sousa, Pedro | Ferreira, António | Príncipe, Fernanda | Seppänen, Ulla-Maija | Ferreira, Margarida | Carvalhais, Maribel | Silva, Marilene | Ferreira, Manuela | Silva, Joana | Neves, Jéssica | Costa, Diana | Santos, Bruno | Duarte, Soraia | Marques, Sílvia | Ramalho, Sónia | Mendes, Isabel | Louro, Clarisse | Menino, Eva | Dixe, Maria | Dias, Sara S. | Cordeiro, Marina | Tomás, Catarina | Querido, Ana | Carvalho, Daniel | Gomes, João | Valim, Frederico C. | Costa, Joyce O. | Bernardes, Lúcia G. | Prebianchi, Helena | Rosa, Marlene Cristina | Gonçalves, Narcisa | Martins, Maria M. | Kurcgant, Paulina | Vieira, André | Bento, Sandrina | Deodato, Sérgio | Rabiais, Isabel | Reis, Laura | Torres, Ana | Soares, Sérgio | Ferreira, Margarida | Graça, Pedro | Leitão, Céu | Abreu, Renato | Bellém, Fernando | Almeida, Ana | Ribeiro-Varandas, Edna | Tavares, Ana | Frade, João G. | Henriques, Carolina | Menino, Eva | Louro, Clarisse | Jordão, Célia | Neco, Sofia | Morais, Carminda | Ferreira, Pedro | Silva, Carla R. | Brito, Alice | Silva, Antónia | Duarte, Hugo | Dixe, Maria Dos Anjos | Sousa, Pedro | Postolache, Gabriela | Oliveira, Raul | Moreira, Isabel | Pedro, Luísa | Vicente, Sónia | Domingos, Samuel | Postolache, Octavian | Silva, Darlen | Filho, João G. | Nazario, Nazare | Kretzer, Marcia | Schneider, Dulcineia | Marques, Fátima M. | Parreira, Pedro | Carvalho, Carla | Mónico, Lisete M. | Pinto, Carlos | Vicente, Sara | Breda, São João | Gomes, José H. | Melo, Rosa | Parreira, Pedro | Salgueiro, Anabela | Graveto, João | Vaquinhas, Marina | Castilho, Amélia | Jesus, Ângelo | Duarte, Nuno | Lopes, José C. | Nunes, Hélder | Cruz, Agostinho | Salgueiro-Oliveira, Anabela | Parreira, Pedro | Basto, Marta L. | Braga, Luciene M. | Ferreira, António | Araújo, Beatriz | Alves, José M. | Ferreira, Margarida | Carvalhais, Maribel | Silva, Marilene | Novais, Sónia | Sousa, Ana S. | Ferrito, Cândida | Ferreira, Pedro L. | Rodrigues, Alexandre | Ferreira, Margarida | Oliveira, Isabel | Ferreira, Manuela | Neves, Jéssica | Costa, Diana | Duarte, Soraia | Silva, Joana | Santos, Bruno | Martins, Cristina | Macedo, Ana P. | Araújo, Odete | Augusto, Cláudia | Braga, Fátima | Gomes, Lisa | Silva, Maria A. | Rosário, Rafaela | Pimenta, Luís | Carreira, Diana | Teles, Patrícia | Barros, Teresa | Tomás, Catarina | Querido, Ana | Carvalho, Daniel | Gomes, João | Cordeiro, Marina | Carvalho, Daniel | Querido, Ana | Tomás, Catarina | Gomes, João | Cordeiro, Marina | Jácome, Cristina | Marques, Alda | Capelas, Sylvie | Hall, Andreia | Alves, Dina | Lousada, Marisa | Loureiro, Mª Helena | Camarneiro, Ana | Silva, Margarida | Mendes, Aida | Pedreiro, Ana | G.Silva, Anne | Coelho, Elza S. | Melo, Flávio | Ribeiro, Fernando | Torres, Rui | Costa, Rui | Pinho, Tânia | Jácome, Cristina | Marques, Alda | Cruz, Bárbara | Seabra, Daniel | Carreiras, Diogo | Ventura, Maria | Cruz, x | Brooks, Dina | Marques, Alda | Pinto, M Rosário | Parreira, Pedro | Lima-Basto, Marta | Neves, Miguel | Mónico, Lisete M. | Bizarro, Carla | Cunha, Marina | Galhardo, Ana | Margarida, Couto | Amorim, Ana P. | Silva, Eduardo | Cruz, Susana | Padilha, José M. | Valente, Jorge | Guerrero, José T. | Caballero, Francisco P. | Santos, Rafael B. | Gonzalez, Estefania P. | Monago, Fátima M. | Ugalde, Lierni U. | Vélez, Marta M. | Tena, Maria J. | Guerrero, José T. | Bravo, Rafael | Pérez-Caballero, Francisco L. | Becerra, Isabel A. | Agudelo, Mª Elizabeth | Acedo, Guadalupe | Bajo, Roberto | Malheiro, Isabel | Gaspar, Filomena | Barros, Luísa | Furtado, Guilherme | Uba-Chupel, Mateus | Marques, Mariana | Rama, Luís | Braga, Margarida | Ferreira, José P. | Teixeira, Ana Mª | Cruz, João | Barbosa, Tiago | Simões, Ângela | Coelho, Luís | Rodrigues, Alexandre | Jiménez-Díaz, Juan-Fernando | Martinez-Hernandez, Francisco | Rodriguez-De-Vera, Bienvenida | Ferreira, Pedro | Rodrigues, Alexandrina | Ramalho, André | Petrica, João | Mendes, Pedro | Serrano, João | Santo, Inês | Rosado, António | Mendonça, Paula | Freitas, Kátia | Ferreira, Dora | Brito, António | Fernandes, Renato | Gomes, Sofia | Moreira, Fernando | Pinho, Cláudia | Oliveira, Rita | Oliveira, Ana I. | Mendonça, Paula | Casimiro, Ana P. | Martins, Patrícia | Silva, Iryna | Evangelista, Diana | Leitão, Catarina | Velosa, Fábia | Carecho, Nélio | Coelho, Luís | Menino, Eva | Dixe, Anjos | Catarino, Helena | Soares, Fátima | Gama, Ester | Gordo, Clementina | Moreira, Eliana | Midões, Cristiana | Santos, Marlene | Machado, Sara | Oliveira, Vânia P. | Santos, Marlene | Querido, Ana | Dixe, Anjos | Marques, Rita | Charepe, Zaida | Antunes, Ana | Santos, Sofia | Rosa, Marlene C. | Rosa, Marlene C. | Marques, Silvana F. | Minghelli, Beatriz | CaroMinghelli, Eulália | Luís, Mª José | Brandão, Teresa | Mendes, Pedro | Marinho, Daniel | Petrica, João | Monteiro, Diogo | Paulo, Rui | Serrano, João | Santo, Inês | Monteiro, Lina | Ramalho, Fátima | Santos-Rocha, Rita | Morgado, Sónia | Bento, Teresa | Sousa, Gilberta | Freitas, Otília | Silva, Isabel | Freitas, Gregório | Morna, Clementina | Vasconcelos, Rita | Azevedo, Tatiana | Soares, Salete | Pisco, Jacinta | Ferreira, Paulo P. | Olszewer, Efrain O. | Oliveira, Michelle T. | Sousa, Anderson R. | Maia, Ana S. | Oliveira, Sebastião T. | Santos, Erica | Oliveira, Ana I. | Maia, Carla | Moreira, Fernando | Santos, Joana | Mendes, Maria F. | Oliveira, Rita F. | Pinho, Cláudia | Barreira, Eduarda | Pereira, Ana | Vaz, Josiana A. | Novo, André | Silva, Luís D. | Maia, Bruno | Ferreira, Eduardo | Pires, Filipa | Andrade, Renato | Camarinha, Luís | Silva, Luís D. | Maia, Bruno | Ferreira, Eduardo | Pires, Filipa | Andrade, Renato | Camarinha, Luís | César, Ana F. | Poço, Mariana | Ventura, David | Loura, Raquel | Gomes, Pedro | Gomes, Catarina | Silva, Cláudia | Melo, Elsa | Lindo, João | Domingos, Joana | Mendes, Zaida | Poeta, Susana | Carvalho, Tiago | Tomás, Catarina | Catarino, Helena | Dixe, Mª Anjos | Ramalho, André | Rosado, António | Mendes, Pedro | Paulo, Rui | Garcia, Inês | Petrica, João | Rodrigues, Sandra | Meneses, Rui | Afonso, Carlos | Faria, Luís | Seixas, Adérito | Cordeiro, Marina | Granjo, Paulo | Gomes, José C. | Souza, Nelba R. | Furtado, Guilherme E. | Rocha, Saulo V. | Silva, Paula | Carvalho, Joana | Morais, Marina Ana | Santos, Sofia | Lebre, Paula | Antunes, Ana | Calha, António | Xavier, Ana | Cunha, Marina | Pinto-Gouveia, José | Alencar, Liana | Cunha, Madalena | Madureira, António | Cardoso, Ilda | Galhardo, Ana | Daniel, Fernanda | Rodrigues, Vítor | Luz, Leonardo | Luz, Tatiana | Ramos, Maurício R. | Medeiros, Dayse C. | Carmo, Bruno M. | Seabra, André | Padez, Cristina | Silva, Manuel C. | Rodrigues, António | Coelho, Patrícia | Coelho, Alexandre | Caminha, Madson | Matheus, Filipe | Mendes, Elenice | Correia, Jony | Kretzer, Marcia | Hernandez-Martinez, Francisco J. | Jimenez-Diaz, Juan F. | Rodriguez-De-Vera, Bienvendida C. | Jimenez-Rodriguez, Carla | Armas-Gonzalez, Yadira | Rodrigues, Cátia | Pedroso, Rosa | Apolinário-Hagen, Jennifer | Vehreschild, Viktor | Veloso, Milene | Magalhães, Celina | Cabral, Isabel | Ferraz, Maira | Nave, Filipe | Costa, Emília | Matos, Filomena | Pacheco, José | Dias, António | Pereira, Carlos | Duarte, João | Cunha, Madalena | Silva, Daniel | Mónico, Lisete M. | Alferes, Valentim R. | Brêda, Mª São João | Carvalho, Carla | Parreira, Pedro M. | Morais, Mª Carminda | Ferreira, Pedro | Pimenta, Rui | Boavida, José | Pinto, Isabel C. | Pires, Tânia | Silva, Catarina | Ribeiro, Maria | Viega-Branco, Maria | Pereira, Filomena | Pereira, Ana Mª | Almeida, Fabrícia M. | Estevez, Gustavo L. | Ribeiro, Sandra | Kretzer, Marcia R. | João, Paulo V. | Nogueira, Paulo | Novais, Sandra | Pereira, Ana | Carneiro, Lara | Mota, Maria | Cruz, Rui | Santiago, Luiz | Fontes-Ribeiro, Carlos | Furtado, Guilherme | Rocha, Saulo V. | Coutinho, André P. | Neto, João S. | Vasconcelos, Lélia R. | Souza, Nelba R. | Dantas, Estélio | Dinis, Alexandra | Carvalho, Sérgio | Castilho, Paula | Pinto-Gouveia, José | Sarreira-Santos, Alexandra | Figueiredo, Amélia | Medeiros-Garcia, Lurdes | Seabra, Paulo | Rodrigues, Rosa | Morais, Mª Carminda | Fernandes, Paula O. | Santiago, Conceição | Figueiredo, Mª Henriqueta | Basto, Marta L. | Guimarães, Teresa | Coelho, André | Graça, Anabela | Silva, Ana M. | Fonseca, Ana R. | Vale-Dias, Luz | Minas, Bárbara | Franco-Borges, Graciete | Simões, Cristina | Santos, Sofia | Serra, Ana | Matos, Maria | Jesus, Luís | Tavares, Ana S. | Almeida, Ana | Leitão, Céu | Varandas, Edna | Abreu, Renato | Bellém, Fernando | Trindade, Inês A. | Ferreira, Cláudia | Pinto-Gouveia, José | Marta-Simões, Joana | Amaral, Odete | Miranda, Cristiana | Guimarães, Pedro | Gonçalves, Rodrigo | Veiga, Nélio | Pereira, Carlos | Fleig, Tânia C. | San-Martin, Elisabete A. | Goulart, Cássia L. | Schneiders, Paloma B. | Miranda, Natacha F. | Carvalho, Lisiane L. | Silva, Andrea G. | Topa, Joana | Nogueira, Conceição | Neves, Sofia | Ventura, Rita | Nazaré, Cristina | Brandão, Daniela | Freitas, Alberto | Ribeiro, Óscar | Paúl, Constança | Mercê, Cristiana | Branco, Marco | Almeida, Pedro | Nascimento, Daniela | Pereira, Juliana | Catela, David | Rafael, Helga | Reis, Alcinda C. | Mendes, Ana | Valente, Ana R. | Lousada, Marisa | Sousa, Diana | Baltazar, Ana L. | Loureiro, Mª Helena | Oliveira, Ana | Aparício, José | Marques, Alda | Marques, Alda | Oliveira, Ana | Neves, Joana | Ayoub, Rodrigo | Sousa, Luís | Marques-Vieira, Cristina | Severino, Sandy | José, Helena | Cadorio, Inês | Lousada, Marisa | Cunha, Marina | Andrade, Diogo | Galhardo, Ana | Couto, Margarida | Mendes, Fernando | Domingues, Cátia | Schukg, Susann | Abrantes, Ana M. | Gonçalves, Ana C. | Sales, Tiago | Teixo, Ricardo | Silva, Rita | Estrela, Jéssica | Laranjo, Mafalda | Casalta-Lopes, João | Rocha, Clara | Simões, Paulo C. | Sarmento-Ribeiro, Ana B. | Botelho, Mª Filomena | Rosa, Manuel S. | Fonseca, Virgínia | Colaço, Diogo | Neves, Vanessa | Jesus, Carlos | Hesse, Camilla | Rocha, Clara | Osório, Nádia | Valado, Ana | Caseiro, Armando | Gabriel, António | Svensson, Lola | Mendes, Fernando | Siba, Wafa A. | Pereira, Cristina | Tomaz, Jorge | Carvalho, Teresa | Pinto-Gouveia, José | Cunha, Marina | Duarte, Diana | Lopes, Nuno V. | Fonseca-Pinto, Rui | Duarte, Diana | Lopes, Nuno V. | Fonseca-Pinto, Rui | Martins, Anabela C. | Brandão, Piedade | Martins, Laura | Cardoso, Margarida | Morais, Nuno | Cruz, Joana | Alves, Nuno | Faria, Paula | Mateus, Artur | Morouço, Pedro | Alves, Nuno | Ferreira, Nelson | Mateus, Artur | Faria, Paula | Morouço, Pedro | Malheiro, Isabel | Gaspar, Filomena | Barros, Luísa | Parreira, Pedro | Cardoso, Andreia | Mónico, Lisete | Carvalho, Carla | Lopes, Albino | Salgueiro-Oliveira, Anabela | Seixas, Adérito | Soares, Valter | Dias, Tiago | Vardasca, Ricardo | Gabriel, Joaquim | Rodrigues, Sandra | Paredes, Hugo | Reis, Arsénio | Marinho, Sara | Filipe, Vítor | Lains, Jorge | Barroso, João | Da Motta, Carolina | Carvalho, Célia B. | Pinto-Gouveia, José | Peixoto, Ermelindo | Gomes, Ana A. | Costa, Vanessa | Couto, Diana | Marques, Daniel R. | Leitão, José A. | Tavares, José | Azevedo, Maria H. | Silva, Carlos F. | Freitas, João | Parreira, Pedro | Marôco, João | Garcia-Gordillo, Miguel A. | Collado-Mateo, Daniel | Chen, Gang | Iezzi, Angelo | Sala, José A. | Parraça, José A. | Gusi, Narcis | Sousa, Jani | Marques, Mariana | Jardim, Jacinto | Pereira, Anabela | Simões, Sónia | Cunha, Marina | Sardo, Pedro | Guedes, Jenifer | Lindo, João | Machado, Paulo | Melo, Elsa | Carvalho, Célia B. | Benevides, Joana | Sousa, Marina | Cabral, Joana | Da Motta, Carolina | Pereira, Ana T. | Xavier, Sandra | Azevedo, Julieta | Bento, Elisabete | Marques, Cristiana | Carvalho, Rosa | Marques, Mariana | Macedo, António | Silva, Ana M. | Alves, Juliana | Gomes, Ana A. | Marques, Daniel R. | Azevedo, Mª Helena | Silva, Carlos | Mendes, Ana | Lee, Huei D. | Spolaôr, Newton | Oliva, Jefferson T. | Chung, Wu F. | Fonseca-Pinto, Rui | Bairros, Keila | Silva, Cláudia D. | Souza, Clóvis A. | Schroeder, Silvana S. | Araújo, Elsa | Monteiro, Helena | Costa, Ricardo | Dias, Sara S. | Torgal, Jorge | Henriques, Carolina G. | Santos, Luísa | Caceiro, Elisa F. | Ramalho, Sónia A. | Oliveira, Rita | Afreixo, Vera | Santos, João | Mota, Priscilla | Cruz, Agostinho | Pimentel, Francisco | Marques, Rita | Dixe, Mª Anjos | Querido, Ana | Sousa, Patrícia | Benevides, Joana | Da Motta, Carolina | Sousa, Marina | Caldeira, Suzana N. | Carvalho, Célia B. | Querido, Ana | Tomás, Catarina | Carvalho, Daniel | Gomes, João | Cordeiro, Marina | Costa, Joyce O. | Valim, Frederico C. | Ribeiro, Lígia C. | Charepe, Zaida | Querido, Ana | Figueiredo, Mª Henriqueta | Aquino, Priscila S. | Ribeiro, Samila G. | Pinheiro, Ana B. | Lessa, Paula A. | Oliveira, Mirna F. | Brito, Luísa S. | Pinto, Ítalo N. | Furtado, Alessandra S. | Castro, Régia B. | Aquino, Caroline Q. | Martins, Eveliny S. | Pinheiro, Ana B | Aquino, Priscila S. | Oliveira, Lara L. | Pinheiro, Patrícia C. | Sousa, Caroline R. | Freitas, Vívien A. | Silva, Tatiane M. | Lima, Adman S. | Aquino, Caroline Q. | Andrade, Karizia V. | Oliveira, Camila A. | Vidal, Eglidia F. | Ganho-Ávila, Ana | Moura-Ramos, Mariana | Gonçalves, Óscar | Almeida, Jorge | Silva, Armando | Brito, Irma | Amado, João | Rodrigo, António | Santos, Sofia | Gomes, Fernando | Rosa, Marlene C. | Marques, Silvana F. | Luís, Sara | Cavalheiro, Luís | Ferreira, Pedro | Gonçalves, Rui | Lopes, Rui S. | Cavalheiro, Luís | Ferreira, Pedro | Gonçalves, Rui | Fiorin, Bruno H. | Santos, Marina S. | Oliveira, Edmar S. | Moreira, Rita L. | Oliveira, Elizabete A. | Filho, Braulio L. | Palmeira, Lara | Garcia, Teresa | Pinto-Gouveia, José | Cunha, Marina | Cardoso, Sara | Palmeira, Lara | Cunha, Marina | Pinto-Gouveia, José | Marta-Simões, Joana | Mendes, Ana L. | Trindade, Inês A. | Oliveira, Sara | Ferreira, Cláudia | Mendes, Ana L. | Marta-Simões, Joana | Trindade, Inês A. | Ferreira, Cláudia | Nave, Filipe | Campos, Mariana | Gaudêncio, Iris | Martins, Fernando | Ferreira, Lino | Lopes, Nuno | Fonseca-Pinto, Rui | Rodrigues, Rogério | Azeredo, Zaida | Vicente, Corália | Silva, Joana | Sousa, Patrícia | Marques, Rita | Mendes, Isabel | Rodrigues, Rogério | Azeredo, Zaida | Vicente, Corália | Vardasca, Ricardo | Marques, Ana R. | Seixas, Adérito | Carvalho, Rui | Gabriel, Joaquim | Ferreira, Paulo P. | Oliveira, Michelle T. | Sousa, Anderson R. | Maia, Ana S. | Oliveira, Sebastião T. | Costa, Pablo O. | Silva, Maiza M. | Arreguy-Sena, Cristina | Alvarenga-Martins, Nathália | Pinto, Paulo F. | Oliveira, Denize C. | Parreira, Pedro D. | Gomes, Antônio T. | Braga, Luciene M. | Araújo, Odete | Lage, Isabel | Cabrita, José | Teixeira, Laetitia | Marques, Rita | Dixe, Mª Anjos | Querido, Ana | Sousa, Patrícia | Silva, Sara | Cordeiro, Eugénio | Pimentel, João | Ferro-Lebres, Vera | Souza, Juliana A. | Tavares, Mariline | Dixe, Mª Anjos | Sousa, Pedro | Passadouro, Rui | Peralta, Teresa | Ferreira, Carlos | Lourenço, Georgina | Serrano, João | Petrica, João | Paulo, Rui | Honório, Samuel | Mendes, Pedro | Simões, Alexandra | Carvalho, Lucinda | Pereira, Alexandre | Silva, Sara | Sousa, Paulino | Padilha, José M. | Figueiredo, Daniela | Valente, Carolina | Marques, Alda | Ribas, Patrícia | Sousa, Joana | Brandão, Frederico | Sousa, Cesar | Martins, Matilde | Sousa, Patrícia | Marques, Rita | Mendes, Francisco | Fernandes, Rosina | Martins, Emília | Magalhães, Cátia | Araújo, Patrícia | Grande, Carla | Mata, Mª Augusta | Vieitez, Juan G. | Bianchini, Bruna | Nazario, Nazare | Filho, João G. | Kretzer, Marcia | Costa, Tânia | Almeida, Armando | Baffour, Gabriel | Almeida, Armando | Costa, Tânia | Baffour, Gabriel | Azeredo, Zaida | Laranjeira, Carlos | Guerra, Magda | Barbeiro, Ana P. | Ferreira, Regina | Lopes, Sara | Nunes, Liliana | Mendes, Ana | Martins, Julian | Schneider, Dulcineia | Kretzer, Marcia | Magajewski, Flávio | Soares, Célia | Marques, António | Batista, Marco | Castuera, Ruth J. | Mesquita, Helena | Faustino, António | Santos, Jorge | Honório, Samuel | Vizzotto, Betina P. | Frigo, Leticia | Pivetta, Hedioneia F. | Sardo, Dolores | Martins, Cristina | Abreu, Wilson | Figueiredo, Mª Céu | Batista, Marco | Jimenez-Castuera, Ruth | Petrica, João | Serrano, João | Honório, Samuel | Paulo, Rui | Mendes, Pedro | Sousa, Patrícia | Marques, Rita | Faustino, António | Silveira, Paulo | Serrano, João | Paulo, Rui | Mendes, Pedro | Honório, Samuel | Oliveira, Catarina | Bastos, Fernanda | Cruz, Inês | Rodriguez, Cláudia K. | Kretzer, Márcia R. | Nazário, Nazaré O. | Cruz, Pedro | Vaz, Daniela C. | Ruben, Rui B. | Avelelas, Francisco | Silva, Susana | Campos, Mª Jorge | Almeida, Maria | Gonçalves, Liliana | Antunes, Lígia | Sardo, Pedro | Guedes, Jenifer | Simões, João | Machado, Paulo | Melo, Elsa | Cardoso, Susana | Santos, Osvaldo | Nunes, Carla | Loureiro, Isabel | Santos, Flávia | Alves, Gilberto | Soar, Cláudia | Marsi, Teresa O. | Silva, Ernestina | Pedrosa, Dora | Leça, Andrea | Silva, Daniel | Galvão, Ana | Gomes, Maria | Fernandes, Paula | Noné, Ana | Combadão, Jaime | Ramalhete, Cátia | Figueiredo, Paulo | Caeiro, Patrícia | Fontana, Karine C. | Lacerda, Josimari T. | Machado, Patrícia O. | Borges, Raphaelle | Barbosa, Flávio | Sá, Dayse | Brunhoso, Germana | Aparício, Graça | Carvalho, Amâncio | Garcia, Ana P. | Fernandes, Paula O. | Santos, Adriana | Veiga, Nélio | Brás, Carina | Carvalho, Inês | Batalha, Joana | Glória, Margarida | Bexiga, Filipa | Coelho, Inês | Amaral, Odete | Pereira, Carlos | Pinho, Cláudia | Paraíso, Nilson | Oliveira, Ana I. | Lima, Cristóvão F. | Dias, Alberto P. | Silva, Pedro | Espada, Mário | Marques, Mário | Pereira, Ana | Pereira, Ana Mª | Veiga-Branco, Mª | Pereira, Filomena | Ribeiro, Maria | Lima, Vera | Oliveira, Ana I. | Pinho, Cláudia | Cruz, Graça | Oliveira, Rita F. | Barreiros, Luísa | Moreira, Fernando | Camarneiro, Ana | Loureiro, Mª Helena | Silva, Margarida | Duarte, Catarina | Jesus, Ângelo | Cruz, Agostinho | Mota, Maria | Novais, Sandra | Nogueira, Paulo | Pereira, Ana | Carneiro, Lara | João, Paulo V. | Lima, Teresa Maneca | Salgueiro-Oliveira, Anabela | Vaquinhas, Marina | Parreira, Pedro | Melo, Rosa | Graveto, João | Castilho, Amélia | Gomes, José H. | Medina, María S. | Blanco, Valeriana G. | Santos, Osvaldo | Lopes, Elisa | Virgolino, Ana | Dinis, Alexandra | Ambrósio, Sara | Almeida, Inês | Marques, Tatiana | Heitor, Mª João | Garcia-Gordillo, Miguel A. | Collado-Mateo, Daniel | Olivares, Pedro R. | Parraça, José A. | Sala, José A. | Castilho, Amélia | Graveto, João | Parreira, Pedro | Oliveira, Anabela | Gomes, José H. | Melo, Rosa | Vaquinhas, Marina | Cheio, Mónica | Cruz, Agostinho | Pereira, Olívia R. | Pinto, Sara | Oliveira, Adriana | Manso, M. Conceição | Sousa, Carla | Vinha, Ana F. | Machado, Mª Manuela | Vieira, Margarida | Fernandes, Beatriz | Tomás, Teresa | Quirino, Diogo | Desouzart, Gustavo | Matos, Rui | Bordini, Magali | Mouroço, Pedro | Matos, Ana R. | Serapioni, Mauro | Guimarães, Teresa | Fonseca, Virgínia | Costa, André | Ribeiro, João | Lobato, João | Martin, Inmaculada Z. | Björklund, Anita | Tavares, Aida I. | Ferreira, Pedro | Passadouro, Rui | Morgado, Sónia | Tavares, Nuno | Valente, João | Martins, Anabela C. | Araújo, Patrícia | Fernandes, Rosina | Mendes, Francisco | Magalhães, Cátia | Martins, Emília | Mendes, Pedro | Paulo, Rui | Faustino, António | Mesquita, Helena | Honório, Samuel | Batista, Marco | Lacerda, Josimari T. | Ortiga, Angela B. | Calvo, Mª Cristina | Natal, Sônia | Pereira, Marta | Ferreira, Manuela | Prata, Ana R. | Nelas, Paula | Duarte, João | Carneiro, Juliana | Oliveira, Ana I. | Pinho, Cláudia | Couto, Cristina | Oliveira, Rita F. | Moreira, Fernando | Maia, Ana S. | Oliveira, Michelle T. | Sousa, Anderson R. | Ferreira, Paulo P. | Souza, Géssica M. | Almada, Lívia F. | Conceição, Milena A. | Santiago, Eujcely C. | Rodrigues, Sandra | Domingues, Gabriela | Ferreira, Irina | Faria, Luís | Seixas, Adérito | Costa, Ana R. | Jesus, Ângelo | Cardoso, Américo | Meireles, Alexandra | Colaço, Armanda | Cruz, Agostinho | Vieira, Viviane L. | Vincha, Kellem R. | Cervato-Mancuso, Ana Mª | Faria, Melissa | Reis, Cláudia | Cova, Marco P. | Ascenso, Rita T. | Almeida, Henrique A. | Oliveira, Eunice G. | Santana, Miguel | Pereira, Rafael | Oliveira, Eunice G. | Almeida, Henrique A. | Ascenso, Rita T. | Jesus, Rita | Tapadas, Rodrigo | Tim-Tim, Carolina | Cezanne, Catarina | Lagoa, Matilde | Dias, Sara S. | Torgal, Jorge | Lopes, João | Almeida, Henrique | Amado, Sandra | Carrão, Luís | Cunha, Madalena | Saboga-Nunes, Luís | Albuquerque, Carlos | Ribeiro, Olivério | Oliveira, Suzete | Morais, Mª Carminda | Martins, Emília | Mendes, Francisco | Fernandes, Rosina | Magalhães, Cátia | Araújo, Patrícia | Pedro, Ana R. | Amaral, Odete | Escoval, Ana | Assunção, Victor | Luís, Henrique | Luís, Luís | Apolinário-Hagen, Jennifer | Vehreschild, Viktor | Fotschl, Ulrike | Lirk, Gerald | Martins, Anabela C. | Andrade, Isabel | Mendes, Fernando | Mendonça, Verónica | Antunes, Sandra | Andrade, Isabel | Osório, Nádia | Valado, Ana | Caseiro, Armando | Gabriel, António | Martins, Anabela C. | Mendes, Fernando | Silva, Paula A. | Mónico, Lisete M. | Parreira, Pedro M. | Carvalho, Carla | Carvalho, Carla | Parreira, Pedro M. | Mónico, Lisete M. | Ruivo, Joana | Silva, Vânia | Sousa, Paulino | Padilha, José M. | Ferraz, Vera | Aparício, Graça | Duarte, João | Vasconcelos, Carlos | Almeida, António | Neves, Joel | Correia, Telma | Amorim, Helena | Mendes, Romeu | Saboga-Nunes, Luís | Cunha, Madalena | Albuquerque, Carlos | Pereira, Elsa S. | Santos, Leonino S. | Reis, Ana S. | Silva, Helena R. | Rombo, João | Fernandes, Jorge C. | Fernandes, Patrícia | Ribeiro, Jaime | Mangas, Catarina | Freire, Ana | Silva, Sara | Francisco, Irene | Oliveira, Ana | Catarino, Helena | Dixe, Mª Anjos | Louro, Mª Clarisse | Lopes, Saudade | Dixe, Anjos | Dixe, Mª Anjos | Menino, Eva | Catarino, Helena | Soares, Fátima | Oliveira, Ana P. | Gordo, Sara | Kraus, Teresa | Tomás, Catarina | Queirós, Paulo | Rodrigues, Teresa | Sousa, Pedro | Frade, João G. | Lobão, Catarina | Moura, Cynthia B. | Dreyer, Laysa C. | Meneghetti, Vanize | Cabral, Priscila P. | Pinto, Francisca | Sousa, Paulino | Esteves, Mª Raquel | Galvão, Sofia | Tytgat, Ite | Andrade, Isabel | Osório, Nádia | Valado, Ana | Caseiro, Armando | Gabriel, António | Martins, Anabela C. | Mendes, Fernando | Casas-Novas, Mónica | Bernardo, Helena | Andrade, Isabel | Sousa, Gracinda | Sousa, Ana P. | Rocha, Clara | Belo, Pedro | Osório, Nádia | Valado, Ana | Caseiro, Armando | Gabriel, António | Martins, Anabela C. | Mendes, Fernando | Martins, Fátima | Pulido-Fuentes, Montserrat | Barroso, Isabel | Cabral, Gil | Monteiro, M. João | Rainho, Conceição | Prado, Alessandro | Carvalho, Yara M. | Campos, Maria | Moreira, Liliana | Ferreira, José | Teixeira, Ana | Rama, Luís | Campos, Maria | Moreira, Liliana | Ferreira, José | Teixeira, Ana | Rama, Luís
BMC Health Services Research  2016;16(Suppl 3):200.
Table of contents
S1 Health literacy and health education in adolescence
Catarina Cardoso Tomás
S2 The effect of a walking program on the quality of life and well-being of people with schizophrenia
Emanuel Oliveira, D. Sousa, M. Uba-Chupel, G. Furtado, C. Rocha, A. Teixeira, P. Ferreira
S3 Diagnosis and innovative treatments - the way to a better medical practice
Celeste Alves
S4 Simulation-based learning and how it is a high contribution
Stefan Gisin
S5 Formative research about acceptability, utilization and promotion of a home fortification programme with micronutrient powders (MNP) in the Autonomous Region of Príncipe, São Tomé and Príncipe
Elisabete Catarino, Nelma Carvalho, Tiago Coucelo, Luís Bonfim, Carina Silva
S6 Safety culture of the patient: a reflexion about the therapeutic approach on the patient with vocal pathology
Débora Franco
S7 About wine, fortune cookies and patient experience
Jesús Alcoba González
O1 The psychological impact on the emergency crews after the disaster event on February 20, 2010
Helena G. Jardim, Rita Silva
O2 Musculoskeletal disorders in midwives
Cristina L. Baixinho, Mª Helena Presado, Mª Fátima Marques, Mário E. Cardoso
O3 Negative childhood experiences and fears of compassion: Implications for psychological difficulties in adolescence
Marina Cunha, Joana Mendes, Ana Xavier, Ana Galhardo, Margarida Couto
O4 Optimal age to give the first dose of measles vaccine in Portugal
João G. Frade, Carla Nunes, João R. Mesquita, Maria S. Nascimento, Guilherme Gonçalves
O5 Functional assessment of elderly in primary care
Conceição Castro, Alice Mártires, Mª João Monteiro, Conceição Rainho
O6 Smoking and coronary events in a population of Spanish health-care centre: An observational study
Francisco P. Caballero, Fatima M. Monago, Jose T. Guerrero, Rocio M. Monago, Africa P. Trigo, Milagros L. Gutierrez, Gemma M. Milanés, Mercedes G. Reina, Ana G. Villanueva, Ana S. Piñero, Isabel R. Aliseda, Francisco B. Ramirez
O7 Prevalence of musculoskeletal injuries in Portuguese musicians
Andrea Ribeiro, Ana Quelhas, Conceição Manso
O8 Hip fractures, psychotropic drug consumption and comorbidity in patients of a primary care practice in Spain
Francisco P. Caballero, Jose T. Guerrero, Fatima M. Monago, Rafael B. Santos, Nuria R. Jimenez, Cristina G. Nuñez, Inmaculada R. Gomez, Mª Jose L. Fernandez, Laura A. Marquez, Ana L. Moreno, Mª Jesus Tena Huertas, Francisco B. Ramirez
O9 The role of self-criticism and shame in social anxiety in a clinical SAD sample
Daniel Seabra, Mª Céu Salvador
O10 Obstruction and infiltration: a proposal of a quality indicator
Luciene Braga, Pedro Parreira, Anabela Salgueiro-Oliveira, Cristina Arreguy-Sena, Bibiana F. Oliveira, Mª Adriana Henriques
O11 Balance and anxiety and depression symptoms in old age people
Joana Santos, Sara Lebre, Alda Marques
O12 Prevalence of postural changes and risk factors in school children and adolescents in a northern region (Porto)
Clarinda Festas, Sandra Rodrigues, Andrea Ribeiro, José Lumini
O13 Ischemic stroke vs. haemorrhagic stroke survival rate
Ana G. Figueiredo
O14 Chronobiological factors as responsible for the appearance of locomotor pathology in adolescents
Francisco J. Hernandez-Martinez, Liliana Campi, Mª Pino Quintana-Montesdeoca, Juan F. Jimenez-Diaz, Bienvenida C. Rodriguez-De-Vera
O15 Risk of malnutrition in the elderly of Bragança
Alexandra Parente, Mª Augusta Mata, Ana Mª Pereira, Adília Fernandes, Manuel Brás
O16 A Lifestyle Educational Programme for primary care diabetic patients: the design of a complex nursing intervention
Mª Rosário Pinto, Pedro Parreira, Marta L. Basto, Ana C. Rei, Lisete M. Mónico
O17 Medication adherence in elderly people
Gilberta Sousa, Clementina Morna, Otília Freitas, Gregório Freitas, Ana Jardim, Rita Vasconcelos
O18 Hospitalization for cervical cancer of residents in the metropolitan region of Porto Alegre, Southern Brazil, 2012 to 2014
Lina G. Horta, Roger S. Rosa, Luís F. Kranz, Rita C. Nugem, Mariana S. Siqueira, Ronaldo Bordin
O19 Oncologic assistance of high complexity: evaluation of regulating accesses
Rosiane Kniess, Josimari T. Lacerda
O20 Perceived barriers for using health care services by the older population as seen by the social sector: findings from the Vila Nova de Gaia Gerontological Plan
Joana Guedes, Idalina Machado, Sidalina Almeida, Adriano Zilhão, Helder Alves, Óscar Ribeiro
O21 Sleep difficulties and depressive symptoms in college students
Ana P. Amaral, Ana Santos, Joana Monteiro, Mª Clara Rocha, Rui Cruz
O22 Psychopathological symptoms and medication use in higher education
Ana P. Amaral, Marina Lourenço, Mª Clara Rocha, Rui Cruz
O23 Sexually transmitted diseases in higher education institutions
Sandra Antunes, Verónica Mendonça, Isabel Andrade, Nádia Osório, Ana Valado, Armando Caseiro, António Gabriel, Anabela C. Martins, Fernando Mendes
O24 Alcohol consumption and suicide ideation in higher education students
Lídia Cabral, Manuela Ferreira, Amadeu Gonçalves
O25 Quality of life in university students
Tatiana D. Luz, Leonardo Luz, Raul Martins
O26 Male and female adolescent antisocial behaviour: characterizing vulnerabilities in a Portuguese sample
Alice Morgado, Maria L. Vale-Dias
O27 Risk factors for mental health in higher education students of health sciences
Rui Porta-Nova
O28 International classification of functioning disability and health as reflexive reasoning in primary attention in health
Tânia C. Fleig, Éboni M. Reuter, Miriam B. Froemming, Sabrina L. Guerreiro, Lisiane L. Carvalho
O29 Risk factors and cardiovascular disease in Portalegre
Daniel Guedelha, P. Coelho, A. Pereira
O30 Health status of the elderly population living in Portalegre historic city centre: A longitudinal study
António Calha, Raul Cordeiro
O31 Student’s sleep in higher education: sleep quality among students of the IPB
Ana Gonçalves, Ana Certo, Ana Galvão, Mª Augusta Mata
O32 Trend in mortality from cervical cancer in the metropolitan area of Florianópolis, state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, 2000 to 2013
Aline Welter, Elayne Pereira, Sandra Ribeiro, Marcia Kretzer
O33 Adherence to treatment in the elderly in an urban environment in Spain
Juan-Fernando Jiménez-Díaz, Carla Jiménez-Rodríguez, Francisco-José Hernández-Martínez, Bienvenida-Del-Carmen Rodríguez-De-Vera, Alexandre Marques-Rodrigues
O34 Beira Baixa Blood Pressure Study (Study PABB)
Patrícia Coelho, Tiago Bernardes, Alexandre Pereira
O35 Trends in cervical cancer mortality statistics in Santa Catarina State, Brazil, by age group and macro-region, from 2000 to 2013
Patrícia Sousa, João G. Filho, Nazare Nazario, Marcia Kretzer
O36 Sleep problems among Portuguese adolescents: a public health issue
Odete Amaral, António Garrido, Nélio Veiga, Carla Nunes, Ana R. Pedro, Carlos Pereira
O37 Association between body fat and health-related quality of life in patients with type 2 diabetes
António Almeia, Helder M. Fernandes, Carlos Vasconcelos, Nelson Sousa, Victor M. Reis, M. João Monteiro, Romeu Mendes
O38 Therapy adherence and polypharmacy in non-institutionalized elderly from Amares county, Portugal
Isabel C. Pinto, Tânia Pires, João Gama
O39 Prevalence of surgical site infection in adults at a hospital unit in the North of Portugal
Vera Preto, Norberto Silva, Carlos Magalhães, Matilde Martins
O40 Frailty phenotype in old age: implications to intervention
Mafalda Duarte, Constança Paúl, Ignácio Martín
O41 Portuguese women: sexual symptoms in perimenopause
Arminda A. Pinheiro
O42 Predictive ability of the Perinatal Depression Screening and Prevention Tool – preliminary results of the categorical approach
Sandra Xavier, Julieta Azevedo, Elisabete Bento, Cristiana Marques, Mariana Marques, António Macedo, Ana T. Pereira
O43 Aging and muscle strength in patients with type 2 diabetes: cross sectional analysis
José P. Almeida, António Almeida, Josiane Alves, Nelson Sousa, Francisco Saavedra, Romeu Mendes
O44 Accessibility of the elderly in the prevention of hypertension in a family health unit
Ana S. Maia, Michelle T. Oliveira, Anderson R. Sousa, Paulo P. Ferreira, Luci S. Lopes, Eujcely C. Santiago
O45 Community Health screenings and self-reported chronic diseases
Sílvia Monteiro, Ângelo Jesus, Armanda Colaço, António Carvalho, Rita P. Silva, Agostinho Cruz
O46 Evaluation of indoor air quality in Kindergartens
Ana Ferreira, Catarina Marques, João P. Figueiredo, Susana Paixão
O47 Atmospheric exposure to chemical agents under the occupational activity of pathology technicians
Ana Ferreira, Carla Lopes, Fernando Moreira, João P. Figueiredo
O48 Occupational exposure to air pollutants in night entertainment venues workers
Ana Ferreira, Diana Ribeiro, Fernando Moreira, João P. Figueiredo, Susana Paixão
O49 Beliefs and attitudes of young people towards breastfeeding
Telma Fernandes, Diogo Amado, Jéssica Leal, Marcelo Azevedo, Sónia Ramalho
O50 Profiling informal caregivers: surveying needs in the care of the elderly
Catarina Mangas, Jaime Ribeiro, Rita Gonçalves
O51 Visual health in teenagers
Amélia F Nunes, Ana R. Tuna, Carlos R. Martins, Henriqueta D. Forte
O52 Amenable mortality and the geographic accessibility to healthcare in Portugal
Cláudia Costa, José A. Tenedório, Paula Santana
O53 Bacterial contamination of door handles in a São Paulo See Metropolitan Cathedral public restrooms in Brazil
J. A. Andrade, J. L. Pinto, C. Campofiorito, S. Nunes, A. Carmo, A. Kaliniczenco, B. Alves, F. Mendes, C. Jesus, F. Fonseca, F. Gehrke
O54 Adherence of patients to rehabilitation programmes
Carlos Albuquerque, Rita Batista, Madalena Cunha, António Madureira, Olivério Ribeiro, Rosa Martins
O55 Prevalence of malnutrition among Portuguese elderly living in nursing homes: preliminary results of the PEN-3S project
Teresa Madeira, Catarina Peixoto-Plácido, Nuno Santos, Osvaldo Santos, Astrid Bergland, Asta Bye, Carla Lopes, Violeta Alarcão, Beatriz Goulão, Nuno Mendonça, Paulo Nicola, João G. Clara
O56 Relation between emotional intelligence and mental illness in health students
João Gomes, Ana Querido, Catarina Tomás, Daniel Carvalho, Marina Cordeiro
P1 Fall risk factors in people older than 50 years old – a pilot report
Marlene C. Rosa, Alda Marques
P2 What about the Portuguese oldest old? A global overview using census data
Daniela Brandão, Óscar Ribeiro, Lia Araújo, Constança Paúl
P3 Prevalence of injuries in senior amateur volleyball athletes in Alentejo and Algarve clubs, Portugal: factors associated
Beatriz Minghelli, Sylvina Richaud
P4 Shame feelings and quality of life: the role of acceptance and decentring
Ana L. Mendes, Joana Marta-Simões, Inês A. Trindade, Cláudia Ferreira
P5 Assessment of social support during deployment in portuguese colonial war veterans
Teresa Carvalho, Marina Cunha, José Pinto-Gouveia
P6 Hospitalization for acute viral bronchiolitis of residents in the metropolitan region of Porto Alegre, Southern Brazil, 2012 to 2014
Morgana C. Fernandes, Roger S. Rosa, Rita C. Nugem, Luís F. Kranz, Mariana S. Siqueira, Ronaldo Bordin
P7 Falls-risk screening – an opportunity for preventing falls in the elderly from Nordeste
Anabela C. Martins, Anabela Medeiros, Rafaela Pimentel, Andreia Fernandes, Carlos Mendonça, Isabel Andrade, Susana Andrade, Ruth L. Menezes
P8 Aging provokes chronodisruption in mature people in temperature circadian rhythm
Rafael Bravo, Marta Miranda, Lierni Ugartemendia, José Mª Tena, Francisco L. Pérez-Caballero, Lorena Fuentes-Broto, Ana B. Rodríguez, Barriga Carmen
P9 The influence of climate and pollution factors in dengue cases of great ABC region, São Paulo
M. A. Carneiro, J. N. Domingues, S. Paixão, J. Figueiredo, V. B. Nascimento, C. Jesus, F Mendes, F. Gehrke, B. Alves, L. Azzalis, F. Fonseca
P10 Visual function and impact of visual therapy in children with learning disabilities: a pilot study
Ana R. Martins, Amélia Nunes, Arminda Jorge
P11 Edentulism and the need of oral rehabilitation among institutionalized elderly
Nélio Veiga, Ana Amorim, André Silva, Liliana Martinho, Luís Monteiro, Rafael Silva, Carina Coelho, Odete Amaral, Inês Coelho, Carlos Pereira, André Correia
P12 Therapy adherence of outpatients in the pharmacy services of a hospital unit
Diana Rodrigues, Nídia Marante, Pedro Silva, Sara Carvalho, André Rts Araujo, Maximiano Ribeiro, Paula Coutinho, Sandra Ventura, Fátima Roque
P13 Universal access and comprehensive care of oral health: an availability study
Cristina Calvo, Manoela Reses
P14 Is the respiratory function of children a predictor of air quality? Coimbra as a case study
Jorge Conde, Ana Ferreira, João Figueiredo
P15 Meaning-in-life of college students
David Silva, Luís Seiça, Raquel Soares, Ricardo Mourão, Teresa Kraus
O57 Training needs for nurses in palliative care
Ana C. Abreu, José M. Padilha, Júlia M. Alves
O58 Impact of computerized information systems in the global nurses’ workload: nurses’ perceptions and real-time
Paulino Sousa, Manuel Oliveira, Joana Sousa
O59 The perspective of health care professionals on self-care in hereditary neurodegenerative disease: a qualitative study
Sónia Novais, Felismina Mendes
O60 Contribution for health-related physical fitness reference values in healthy adolescents
Joana Pinto, Joana Cruz, Alda Marques
School of Health Sciences, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
O61 Perception of learning, satisfaction and self-efficacy of nursing students about High-Fidelity Simulation
Hugo Duarte, Maria Dos Anjos Dixe, Pedro Sousa
O62 Analysis of statements of diagnosis about health deviation in self-care requisites customized in a Nursing Practice Support System (SAPE®): Management of therapeutic regimen
Inês Cruz, Fernanda Bastos, Filipe Pereira
O63 Hybrid management and hospital governance: doctors and nurses as managers
Francisco L. Carvalho, Teresa T. Oliveira, Vítor R. Raposo
O64 Time management in health professionals
Conceição Rainho, José C. Ribeiro, Isabel Barroso, Vítor Rodrigues
O65 Financial rewards and wellbeing in primary health care
Carmo Neves, Teresa C. Oliveira
O66 Patient safety promotion in the operating room
Bárbara Oliveira, Mª Carminda Morais, Pilar Baylina
O67 Difficulties and needs of pre-graduate nursing students in the area of Geriatrics/Gerontology
Rogério Rodrigues, Zaida Azeredo, Corália Vicente
O68 Teaching and learning sexuality in nursing education
Hélia Dias, Margarida Sim-Sim
O69 Entrepreneurial Motivations Questionnaire: AFC and CFA in academy
Pedro Parreira, Anabela Salgueiro-Oliveira, Amélia Castilho, Rosa Melo, João Graveto, José Gomes, Marina Vaquinhas, Carla Carvalho, Lisete Mónico, Nuno Brito
O70 Nursing intervention to patient with Permanent Pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators: a qualitative analysis
Cassilda Sarroeira, José Amendoeira, Fátima Cunha, Anabela Cândido, Patrícia Fernandes, Helena R. Silva, Elsa Silva
O71 Alcohol consumption among nursing students: where does education fail?
Isabel Barroso, Leila Lapa, Cristina Antunes
O72 Labour stress in nursing
Ana Gonçalves, Ana Galvão, Mª José Gomes, Susana R. Escanciano
O73 The influence of safe staff nursing in patient satisfaction with nursing care
Maria Freitas, Pedro Parreira, João Marôco
O74 Intention to use eHealth strategies with nursing students
Ana R. Fernandes, Cremilde Cabral, Samuel Alves, Pedro Sousa
O75 Community Based Mental Health: contributions of an interdisciplinary international program for students in higher health education
António Ferreira, Fernanda Príncipe, Ulla-Maija Seppänen, Margarida Ferreira, Maribel Carvalhais, Marilene Silva
O76 Study of satisfaction at work of graduates in nursing: 2002-2014
Manuela Ferreira, Joana Silva, Jéssica Neves, Diana Costa, Bruno Santos, Soraia Duarte
O77 Health professionals’ attitudes towards breastfeeding
Sílvia Marques, Sónia Ramalho, Isabel Mendes
O78 Continuity of nursing care to person with type 2 diabetes
Clarisse Louro, Eva Menino, Maria Dixe, Sara S. Dias
O79 Stigma toward mental illness among future health professionals
Marina Cordeiro, Catarina Tomás, Ana Querido, Daniel Carvalho, João Gomes
O80 Working with fears and anxieties of medical students in search of a humanized care
Frederico C. Valim, Joyce O. Costa, Lúcia G. Bernardes
P16 Surgical paediatrics patients’ psycho prophylaxis at a teaching hospital
Helena Prebianchi
P17 Patient-perceived outcomes in physiotherapy – a pilot study
Marlene Cristina Rosa
P18 Building competencies for managers in nursing
Narcisa Gonçalves, Maria M. Martins, Paulina Kurcgant
P19 Theoretical basis underlying physiotherapy practice in stroke rehabilitation
André Vieira
P20 When the life-cycle ends: the nurse’s confrontation with death
Sandrina Bento, Sérgio Deodato, Isabel Rabiais
P21 Nursing students’ opinion about the supervision relationship during their first clinical experience
Laura Reis
P22 Nursing Relational Laboratory: Pedagogical, dialogic and critical project
Ana Torres, Sérgio Soares, Margarida Ferreira, Pedro Graça
P23 Job satisfaction of bioscientists at a Lisbon hospital
Céu Leitão, Renato Abreu, Fernando Bellém, Ana Almeida, Edna Ribeiro-Varandas, Ana Tavares
P24 Sociodemographic and professional profile of nurses and its relation with the importance of family in nursing practices
João G. Frade, Carolina Henriques, Eva Menino, Clarisse Louro, Célia Jordão
P25 Professional satisfaction of rehabilitation nurses
Sofia Neco, Carminda Morais, Pedro Ferreira
P26 The person living with a stoma: the formalization of knowledge in nursing
Carla R. Silva, Alice Brito, Antónia Silva
P27 Validation of the Portuguese versions of the nursing students’ perceptions of learning and learner satisfaction with simulation tool
Hugo Duarte, Maria Dos Anjos Dixe, Pedro Sousa
P28 Physiotherapists’ perceived knowledge on technologies for electronic health records for physiotherapy
Gabriela Postolache, Raul Oliveira, Isabel Moreira, Luísa Pedro, Sónia Vicente, Samuel Domingos, Octavian Postolache
P29 Quality of life and physical activity of medicine undergraduate students in the University of Southern Santa Catarina, Brazil
Darlen Silva, João G. Filho, Nazare Nazario, Marcia Kretzer, Dulcineia Schneider
P30 The curricular skills for decision making education in a Nursing Degree
Fátima M. Marques
P31 Effect of nurses’ mobilization in satisfaction at work and turnover: An empirical study in the hospital setting
Pedro Parreira, Carla Carvalho, Lisete M. Mónico, Carlos Pinto, Sara Vicente, São João Breda
P32 Entrepreneurial skills of students of polytechnic higher education in Portugal: Business influences
José H. Gomes, Rosa Melo, Pedro Parreira, Anabela Salgueiro, João Graveto, Marina Vaquinhas, Amélia Castilho
P33 Design and assessment of e-learning modules for Pharmacology
Ângelo Jesus, Nuno Duarte, José C. Lopes, Hélder Nunes, Agostinho Cruz
P34 Perspective of nurses involved in an action-research study on the changes observed in care provision: results from a focus group
Anabela Salgueiro-Oliveira, Pedro Parreira, Marta L. Basto, Luciene M. Braga
P35 Use of peer feedback by nursing students during clinical training: teacher’s perception
António Ferreira, Beatriz Araújo, José M. Alves, Margarida Ferreira, Maribel Carvalhais, Marilene Silva, Sónia Novais
P36 What’s new on endotracheal suctioning recommendations
Ana S. Sousa, Cândida Ferrito
P37 Assessment of the nurses satisfaction on the Central Region of Portugal
Pedro L. Ferreira, Alexandre Rodrigues, Margarida Ferreira, Isabel Oliveira
P38 Study of graduate’s satisfaction with the school of nursing
Manuela Ferreira, Jéssica Neves, Diana Costa, Soraia Duarte, Joana Silva, Bruno Santos
P39 Partnership between the school of nursing and the hospital: Supervisors´ perspectives
Cristina Martins, Ana P. Macedo, Odete Araújo, Cláudia Augusto, Fátima Braga, Lisa Gomes, Maria A. Silva, Rafaela Rosário
P40 Coping strategies of college students
Luís Pimenta, Diana Carreira, Patrícia Teles, Teresa Barros
P41 Emotional intelligence and mental health stigma in health students
Catarina Tomás, Ana Querido, Daniel Carvalho, João Gomes, Marina Cordeiro
P42 Stigma of mental health assessment: Comparison between health courses
Daniel Carvalho, Ana Querido, Catarina Tomás, João Gomes, Marina Cordeiro
O81 Short- and long-term effects of pulmonary rehabilitation in mild COPD
Cristina Jácome, Alda Marques
O82 Phonological awareness programme for preschool children
Sylvie Capelas, Andreia Hall, Dina Alves, Marisa Lousada
O83 REforma ATIVA: An efficient health promotion program to be implemented during retirement
Mª Helena Loureiro, Ana Camarneiro, Margarida Silva, Aida Mendes, Ana Pedreiro
O84 Intervention for men who batter women, a case report
Anne G.Silva, Elza S. Coelho
O85 Immediate effects of Bowen Therapy on muscle tone and flexibility
Flávio Melo, Fernando Ribeiro, Rui Torres, Rui Costa
O86 Predictive equation for incremental shuttle walk test in adolescents
Tânia Pinho, Cristina Jácome, Alda Marques
O87 Life satisfaction and psychopathology in institutionalized elderly people: The results of an adapted Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction program
Bárbara Cruz, Daniel Seabra, Diogo Carreira, Maria Ventura
O88 Outcome changes in COPD rehabilitation: exploring the relationship between physical activity and health-related outcomes
Joana Cruz, Dina Brooks, Alda Marques
O89 Assessing the effectiveness of a Complex Nursing Intervention
M Rosário Pinto, Pedro Parreira, Marta Lima-Basto, Miguel Neves, Lisete M. Mónico
O90 Psychotherapeutic intervention in addiction disorders: Change in psychopathological symptoms and emotional states
Carla Bizarro, Marina Cunha, Ana Galhardo, Couto Margarida, Ana P. Amorim, Eduardo Silva
O91 Economic impact of a nursing intervention program to promote self-management in COPD
Susana Cruz, José M. Padilha, Jorge Valente
O92 Multimodal acute pain management during uterine artery embolization in treatment of uterine myomas
José T. Guerrero, Francisco P. Caballero, Rafael B. Santos, Estefania P. Gonzalez, Fátima M. Monago, Lierni U. Ugalde, Marta M. Vélez, Maria J. Tena
O93 Fluid administration strategies in major surgery: Goal-directed therapy
José T. Guerrero, Rafael Bravo, Francisco L. Pérez-Caballero, Isabel A. Becerra, Mª Elizabeth Agudelo, Guadalupe Acedo, Roberto Bajo
O94 Development and implementation of a self-management educational programme using lay-led’s in adolescents Spina Bifida: A pilot study
Isabel Malheiro, Filomena Gaspar, Luísa Barros
O95 Influence of chair-based yoga exercises on salivary anti-microbial proteins in institutionalized frail-elderly women: a preliminary study
Guilherme Furtado, Mateus Uba-Chupel, Mariana Marques, Luís Rama, Margarida Braga, José P. Ferreira, Ana Mª Teixeira
O96 High intensity interval training vs moderate intensity continuous training impact on diabetes 2
João Cruz, Tiago Barbosa, Ângela Simões, Luís Coelho
O97 Family caregiver of people with pressure ulcer: Nursing intervention plan
Alexandre Rodrigues, Juan-Fernando Jiménez-Díaz, Francisco Martinez-Hernández, Bienvenida Rodriguez-De-Vera, Pedro Ferreira, Alexandrina Rodrigues
O98 Chronic effects of exercise on motor memory consolidation in elderly people
André Ramalho, João Petrica, Pedro Mendes, João Serrano, Inês Santo, António Rosado
O99 Impression cytology of the ocular surface: Collection technique and sample processing
Paula Mendonça, Kátia Freitas
O100 Does sport practice affect the reaction time in neuromuscular activity?
Dora Ferreira, António Brito, Renato Fernandes
O101 Efficiency of the enteral administration of fibbers in the treatment of chronic obstipation
Sofia Gomes, Fernando Moreira, Cláudia Pinho, Rita Oliveira, Ana I. Oliveira
O102 Fast decalcifier in compact bone and spongy bone
Paula Mendonça, Ana P. Casimiro, Patrícia Martins, Iryna Silva
O103 Health promotion in the elderly – Intervention project in dementia
Diana Evangelista
O104 Prevention of musculoskeletal disorders through an exercise protocol held in labour context
Catarina Leitão, Fábia Velosa, Nélio Carecho, Luís Coelho
O105 Knowledge of teachers and other education agents on diabetes type 1: Effectiveness of an intervention program
Eva Menino, Anjos Dixe, Helena Catarino, Fátima Soares, Ester Gama, Clementina Gordo
O106 Treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain: a systematic review of clinical trials of phase II and III
Eliana Moreira, Cristiana Midões, Marlene Santos
O107 New drugs for osteoporosis treatment: Systematic review of clinical trials of phase II and III
Sara Machado, Vânia P. Oliveira, Marlene Santos
O108 Promoting hope at the end of life: Effectiveness of an Intervention Programme
Ana Querido, Anjos Dixe, Rita Marques, Zaida Charepe
P43 Psychomotor therapy effects on adaptive behaviour and motor proficiency of adults with intellectual disability
Ana Antunes, Sofia Santos
P44 The effect of exercise therapy in multiple sclerosis – a single study case
Marlene C. Rosa
P45 Physical condition and self-efficacy in people with fall risk – a preliminary study
Marlene C. Rosa, Silvana F. Marques
P46 Shock waves: their effectiveness in improving the symptoms of calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder
Beatriz Minghelli, Eulália Caro
P47 Pacifier – construction and pilot application of a parenting intervention for parents of babies until six months in primary health care
Mª José Luís, Teresa Brandão
P48 The influence of Motor Imagery in fine motor skills of individuals with disabilities
Pedro Mendes, Daniel Marinho, João Petrica, Diogo Monteiro, Rui Paulo, João Serrano, Inês Santo
P49 Evaluation of the effects of a walking programme on the fall risk factors in older people – a longitudinal pilot study
Lina Monteiro, Fátima Ramalho, Rita Santos-Rocha, Sónia Morgado, Teresa Bento
P50 Nursing intervention programme in lifestyles of adolescents
Gilberta Sousa, Otília Freitas, Isabel Silva, Gregório Freitas, Clementina Morna, Rita Vasconcelos
P51 The person submitted to hip replacement rehabilitation, at home
Tatiana Azevedo, Salete Soares, Jacinta Pisco
P52 Effects of Melatonin use in the treatment of neurovegetative diseases
Paulo P. Ferreira, Efrain O. Olszewer, Michelle T. Oliveira, Anderson R. Sousa, Ana S. Maia, Sebastião T. Oliveira
P53 Review of Phytotherapy and other natural substances in alcohol abuse and alcoholism
Erica Santos, Ana I. Oliveira, Carla Maia, Fernando Moreira, Joana Santos, Maria F. Mendes, Rita F. Oliveira, Cláudia Pinho
P54 Dietary programme impact on biochemical markers in diabetics: systematic review
Eduarda Barreira, Ana Pereira, Josiana A. Vaz, André Novo
P55 Biological approaches to knee osteoarthritis: platelet-rich plasma and hyaluronic acid
Luís D. Silva, Bruno Maia, Eduardo Ferreira, Filipa Pires, Renato Andrade, Luís Camarinha
P56 Platelet-rich plasma and hyaluronic acid intra-articular injections for the treatment of ankle osteoarthritis
Luís D. Silva, Bruno Maia, Eduardo Ferreira, Filipa Pires, Renato Andrade, Luís Camarinha
P57 The impact of preventive measures in the incidence of diabetic foot ulcers: a systematic review
Ana F. César, Mariana Poço, David Ventura, Raquel Loura, Pedro Gomes, Catarina Gomes, Cláudia Silva, Elsa Melo, João Lindo
P58 Dating violence among young adolescents
Joana Domingos, Zaida Mendes, Susana Poeta, Tiago Carvalho, Catarina Tomás, Helena Catarino, Mª Anjos Dixe
P59 Physical activity and motor memory in pedal dexterity
André Ramalho, António Rosado, Pedro Mendes, Rui Paulo, Inês Garcia, João Petrica
P60 The effects of whole body vibration on the electromyographic activity of thigh muscles
Sandra Rodrigues, Rui Meneses, Carlos Afonso, Luís Faria, Adérito Seixas
P61 Mental health promotion in the workplace
Marina Cordeiro, Paulo Granjo, José C. Gomes
P62 Influence of physical exercise on the self-perception of body image in elderly women: A systematic review of qualitative studies
Nelba R. Souza, Guilherme E. Furtado, Saulo V. Rocha, Paula Silva, Joana Carvalho
O109 Psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the Éxamen Geronto-Psychomoteur (P-EGP)
Marina Ana Morais, Sofia Santos, Paula Lebre, Ana Antunes
O110 Symptoms of depression in the elderly population of Portugal, Spain and Italy
António Calha
O111 Emotion regulation strategies and psychopathology symptoms: A comparison between adolescents with and without deliberate self-harm
Ana Xavier, Marina Cunha, José Pinto-Gouveia
O112 Prevalence of physical disability in people with leprosy
Liana Alencar, Madalena Cunha, António Madureira
O113 Quality of life and self-esteem in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus patients
Ilda Cardoso, Ana Galhardo, Fernanda Daniel, Vítor Rodrigues
O114 Cross-cultural comparison of gross motor coordination in children from Brazil and Portugal
Leonardo Luz, Tatiana Luz, Maurício R. Ramos, Dayse C. Medeiros, Bruno M. Carmo, André Seabra, Cristina Padez, Manuel C. Silva
O115 Electrocardiographic differences between African and Caucasian people
António Rodrigues, Patrícia Coelho, Alexandre Coelho
O116 Factors associated with domestic, sexual and other types of violence in the city of Palhoça - Brazil
Madson Caminha, Filipe Matheus, Elenice Mendes, Jony Correia, Marcia Kretzer
O117 Tinnitus prevalence study of users of a hospital of public management - Spain
Francisco J. Hernandez-Martinez, Juan F. Jimenez-Diaz, Bienvendida C. Rodriguez-De-Vera, Carla Jimenez-Rodriguez, Yadira Armas-Gonzalez
O118 Difficulties experienced by parents of children with diabetes mellitus of preschool age in therapeutic and nutritional management
Cátia Rodrigues, Rosa Pedroso
O119 E-mental health - “nice to have” or “must have”? Exploring the attitudes towards e-mental health in the general population
Jennifer Apolinário-Hagen, Viktor Vehreschild
O120 Violence against children and adolescents and the role of health professionals: Knowing how to identify and care
Milene Veloso, Celina Magalhães, Isabel Cabral, Maira Ferraz
O121 Marital violence. A study in the Algarve population
Filipe Nave, Emília Costa, Filomena Matos, José Pacheco
O122 Clinical factors and adherence to treatment in ischemic heart disease
António Dias, Carlos Pereira, João Duarte, Madalena Cunha, Daniel Silva
O123 Can religiosity improve optimism in participants in states of illness, when controlling for life satisfaction?
Lisete M. Mónico, Valentim R. Alferes, Mª São João Brêda, Carla Carvalho, Pedro M. Parreira
O124 Empowerment, knowledge and quality of life of people with diabetes type 2 in the Alto Minho Health Local Unit
Mª Carminda Morais, Pedro Ferreira, Rui Pimenta, José Boavida
O125 Antihypertensive therapy adherence among hypertensive patients from Bragança county, Portugal
Isabel C. Pinto, Tânia Pires, Catarina Silva
O126 Subjective perception of sexual achievement - An exploratory study on people with overweight
Maria Ribeiro, Maria Viega-Branco, Filomena Pereira, Ana Mª Pereira
O127 Physical activity level and associated factors in hypertensive individuals registered in the family health strategy of a basic health unit from the city of Palhoça, Santa Catarina, Brazil
Fabrícia M. Almeida, Gustavo L. Estevez, Sandra Ribeiro, Marcia R. Kretzer
O128 Perception of functional fitness and health in non-institutionalised elderly from rural areas
Paulo V. João, Paulo Nogueira, Sandra Novais, Ana Pereira, Lara Carneiro, Maria Mota
O129 Medication adherence in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus treated at primary health care in Coimbra
Rui Cruz, Luiz Santiago, Carlos Fontes-Ribeiro
O130 Multivariate association between body mass index and multi-comorbidities in elderly people living in low socio-economic status context
Guilherme Furtado, Saulo V. Rocha, André P. Coutinho, João S. Neto, Lélia R. Vasconcelos, Nelba R. Souza, Estélio Dantas
O131 Metacognition, rumination and experiential avoidance in Borderline Personality Disorder
Alexandra Dinis, Sérgio Carvalho, Paula Castilho, José Pinto-Gouveia
O132 Health issues in a vulnerable population: nursing consultation in a public bathhouse in Lisbon
Alexandra Sarreira-Santos, Amélia Figueiredo, Lurdes Medeiros-Garcia, Paulo Seabra
O133 The perception of quality of life in people with multiple sclerosis accompanied in External Consultation of the Local Health Unit of Alto Minho
Rosa Rodrigues, Mª Carminda Morais, Paula O. Fernandes
O134 Representation of interaction established between immigrant women and nurse during pregnancy to postpartum, from the perspective of immigrant women
Conceição Santiago, Mª Henriqueta Figueiredo, Marta L. Basto
O135 Illness perceptions and medication adherence in hypertension
Teresa Guimarães, André Coelho, Anabela Graça, Ana M. Silva, Ana R. Fonseca
O136 A Portuguese study on adults’ intimate partner violence, interpersonal trust and hope
Luz Vale-Dias, Bárbara Minas, Graciete Franco-Borges
P63 QOL’ predictors of people with intellectual disability and general population
Cristina Simões, Sofia Santos
P64 Content validation of the Communication Disability Profile (CDP) - Portuguese Version
Ana Serra, Maria Matos, Luís Jesus
P65 Study of biochemical and haematological changes in football players
Ana S. Tavares, Ana Almeida, Céu Leitão, Edna Varandas, Renato Abreu, Fernando Bellém
P66 Body image dissatisfaction in inflammatory bowel disease: exploring the role of chronic illness-related shame
Inês A. Trindade, Cláudia Ferreira, José Pinto-Gouveia, Joana Marta-Simões
P67 Obesity and sleep in the adult population - a systematic review
Odete Amaral, Cristiana Miranda, Pedro Guimarães, Rodrigo Gonçalves, Nélio Veiga, Carlos Pereira
P68 Frequency of daytime sleepiness and obstructive sleep apnea risk in COPD patients
Tânia C. Fleig, Elisabete A. San-Martin, Cássia L. Goulart, Paloma B. Schneiders, Natacha F. Miranda, Lisiane L. Carvalho, Andrea G. Silva
P69 Working with immigrant-origin clients: discourses and practices of health professionals
Joana Topa, Conceição Nogueira, Sofia Neves
P70 Systemic Lupus Erythematosus – what are audiovestibular changes?
Rita Ventura, Cristina Nazaré
P71 Mental disorders in the oldest old: findings from the Portuguese national hospitalization database
Daniela Brandão, Alberto Freitas, Óscar Ribeiro, Constança Paúl
P72 Recurrence analysis in postural control in children with cerebral palsy
Cristiana Mercê, Marco Branco, Pedro Almeida, Daniela Nascimento, Juliana Pereira, David Catela
P73 The experience of self-care in the elderly with COPD: contributions to reflect proximity care
Helga Rafael
P74 Culturally competent nurses: managing unpredictability in clinical practice with immigrants
Alcinda C. Reis
O137 Paediatric speech and language screening: An instrument for health professionals
Ana Mendes, Ana R. Valente, Marisa Lousada
O138 Anthropometric and nutritional assessment in bodybuilders
Diana Sousa, Ana L. Baltazar, Mª Helena Loureiro
O139 Computerized adventitious respiratory sounds in children with lower respiratory tract infections
Ana Oliveira, José Aparício, Alda Marques
O140 Role of computerized respiratory sounds as a marker in LRTI
Alda Marques, Ana Oliveira, Joana Neves, Rodrigo Ayoub
O141 Confirmatory factor analysis of the Personal Wellbeing Index in people with chronic kidney disease
Luís Sousa, Cristina Marques-Vieira, Sandy Severino, Helena José
O142 Phonological awareness skills in school aged children
Inês Cadorio, Marisa Lousada
O143 Assessment of early memories of warmth and safeness in interaction with peers: its relationship with psychopathology in adolescence
Marina Cunha, Diogo Andrade, Ana Galhardo, Margarida Couto
O144 The molecular effects induced by single shot irradiation on a diffuse large B cell lymphoma cell line
Fernando Mendes, Cátia Domingues, Susann Schukg, Ana M. Abrantes, Ana C. Gonçalves, Tiago Sales, Ricardo Teixo, Rita Silva, Jéssica Estrela, Mafalda Laranjo, João Casalta-Lopes, Clara Rocha, Paulo C. Simões, Ana B. Sarmento-Ribeiro, Mª Filomena Botelho, Manuel S. Rosa
O145 Morpho-functional characterization of cardiac chambers by Transthoracic Echocardiography, in young athletes of gymnastics competition
Virgínia Fonseca, Diogo Colaço, Vanessa Neves
O146 Prevalence of the antibodies of the new histo-blood system – FORS system
Carlos Jesus, Camilla Hesse, Clara Rocha, Nádia Osório, Ana Valado, Armando Caseiro, António Gabriel, Lola Svensson, Fernando Mendes, Wafa A. Siba, Cristina Pereira, Jorge Tomaz
O147 Assessment of the war-related perceived threat in Portuguese Colonial War Veterans
Teresa Carvalho, José Pinto-Gouveia, Marina Cunha
O148 Pulse transit time estimation for continuous blood pressure measurement: A comparative study
Diana Duarte, Nuno V. Lopes, Rui Fonseca-Pinto
O149 Blood pressure assessment during standard clinical manoeuvres: A non-invasive PPT based approach
Diana Duarte, Nuno V. Lopes, Rui Fonseca-Pinto
O150 Development and initial validation of the Activities and Participation Profile related to Mobility (APPM)
Anabela C. Martins
O151 MEASYCare-2010 Standard–A geriatric evaluation system in primary health care: Reliability and validity of the latest version in Portugal
Piedade Brandão, Laura Martins, Margarida Cardoso
O152 Interrater and intrarater reliability and agreement of the range of shoulder flexion in the standing upright position through photographic assessment
Nuno Morais, Joana Cruz
O153 Three-dimensional biofabrication techniques for tissue regeneration
Nuno Alves, Paula Faria, Artur Mateus, Pedro Morouço
O154 A new computer tool for biofabrication applied to tissue engineering
Nuno Alves, Nelson Ferreira, Artur Mateus, Paula Faria, Pedro Morouço
O155 Development and psychometric qualities of a scale to measure the functional independence of adolescents with motor impairment
Isabel Malheiro, Filomena Gaspar, Luísa Barros
O156 Organizational Trust in Health services: Exploratory and Confirmatory factor analysis of the Organizational Trust Inventory- Short Form (OTI-SF)
Pedro Parreira, Andreia Cardoso, Lisete Mónico, Carla Carvalho, Albino Lopes, Anabela Salgueiro-Oliveira
O157 Thermal symmetry: An indicator of occupational task asymmetries in physiotherapy
Adérito Seixas, Valter Soares, Tiago Dias, Ricardo Vardasca, Joaquim Gabriel, Sandra Rodrigues
O158 A study of ICT active monitoring adoption in stroke rehabilitation
Hugo Paredes, Arsénio Reis, Sara Marinho, Vítor Filipe, João Barroso
O159 Paranoia Checklist (Portuguese Version): Preliminary studies in a mixed sample of patients and healthy controls
Carolina Da Motta, Célia B. Carvalho, José Pinto-Gouveia, Ermelindo Peixoto
O160 Reliability and validity of the Composite Scale on Morningness: European Portuguese version, in adolescents and young adults
Ana A. Gomes, Vanessa Costa, Diana Couto, Daniel R. Marques, José A. Leitão, José Tavares, Maria H. Azevedo, Carlos F. Silva
O161 Evaluation scale of patient satisfaction with nursing care: Psychometric properties evaluation
João Freitas, Pedro Parreira, João Marôco
O162 Impact of fibromyalgia on quality of life: Comparing results from generic instruments and FIQR
Miguel A. Garcia-Gordillo, Daniel Collado-Mateo, Gang Chen, Angelo Iezzi, José A. Sala, José A. Parraça, Narcis Gusi
O163 Preliminary study of the adaptation and validation of the Rating Scale of Resilient Self: Resilience, self-harm and suicidal ideation in adolescents
Jani Sousa, Mariana Marques, Jacinto Jardim, Anabela Pereira, Sónia Simões, Marina Cunha
O164 Development of the first pressure ulcer in inpatient setting: Focus on length of stay
Pedro Sardo, Jenifer Guedes, João Lindo, Paulo Machado, Elsa Melo
O165 Forms of Self-Criticizing and Self-Reassuring Scale: Adaptation and early findings in a sample of Portuguese children
Célia B. Carvalho, Joana Benevides, Marina Sousa, Joana Cabral, Carolina Da Motta
O166 Predictive ability of the Perinatal Depression Screening and Prevention Tool – Preliminary results of the dimensional approach
Ana T. Pereira, Sandra Xavier, Julieta Azevedo, Elisabete Bento, Cristiana Marques, Rosa Carvalho, Mariana Marques, António Macedo
O167 Psychometric properties of the BaSIQS-Basic Scale on insomnia symptoms and quality of sleep, in adults and in the elderly
Ana M. Silva, Juliana Alves, Ana A. Gomes, Daniel R. Marques, Mª Helena Azevedo, Carlos Silva
O168 Enlightening the human decision in health: The skin melanocytic classification challenge
Ana Mendes, Huei D. Lee, Newton Spolaôr, Jefferson T. Oliva, Wu F. Chung, Rui Fonseca-Pinto
O169 Test-retest reliability household life study and health questionnaire Pomerode (SHIP-BRAZIL)
Keila Bairros, Cláudia D. Silva, Clóvis A. Souza, Silvana S. Schroeder
O170 Characterization of sun exposure behaviours among medical students from Nova Medical School
Elsa Araújo, Helena Monteiro, Ricardo Costa, Sara S. Dias, Jorge Torgal
O171 Spirituality in pregnant women
Carolina G. Henriques, Luísa Santos, Elisa F. Caceiro, Sónia A. Ramalho
O172 Polypharmacy in older patients with cancer
Rita Oliveira, Vera Afreixo, João Santos, Priscilla Mota, Agostinho Cruz, Francisco Pimentel
O173 Quality of life of caregivers of people with advanced chronic disease: Translation and validation of the quality of life in life threatening illness - family carer version (QOLLTI-C-PT)
Rita Marques, Mª Anjos Dixe, Ana Querido, Patrícia Sousa
O174 The psychometric properties of the brief Other as Shamer Scale for Children (OAS-C): preliminary validation studies in a sample of Portuguese children
Joana Benevides, Carolina Da Motta, Marina Sousa, Suzana N. Caldeira, Célia B. Carvalho
O175 Measuring emotional intelligence in health care students – Revalidation of WLEIS-P
Ana Querido, Catarina Tomás, Daniel Carvalho, João Gomes, Marina Cordeiro
O176 Health indicators in prenatal assistance: The impact of computerization and of under-production in basic health centres
Joyce O. Costa, Frederico C. Valim, Lígia C. Ribeiro
O177 Hope genogram: Assessment of resources and interaction patterns in the family of the child with cerebral palsy
Zaida Charepe, Ana Querido, Mª Henriqueta Figueiredo
O178 The influence of childbirth type in postpartum quality of life
Priscila S. Aquino, Samila G. Ribeiro, Ana B. Pinheiro, Paula A. Lessa, Mirna F. Oliveira, Luísa S. Brito, Ítalo N. Pinto, Alessandra S. Furtado, Régia B. Castro, Caroline Q. Aquino, Eveliny S. Martins
O179 Women’s beliefs about pap smear test and cervical cancer: influence of social determinants
Ana B Pinheiro, Priscila S. Aquino, Lara L. Oliveira, Patrícia C. Pinheiro, Caroline R. Sousa, Vívien A. Freitas, Tatiane M. Silva, Adman S. Lima, Caroline Q. Aquino, Karizia V. Andrade, Camila A. Oliveira, Eglidia F. Vidal
O180 Validity of the Portuguese version of the ASI-3: Is anxiety sensitivity a unidimensional or multidimensional construct?
Ana Ganho-Ávila, Mariana Moura-Ramos, Óscar Gonçalves, Jorge Almeida
O181 Lifestyles of higher education students: the influence of self-esteem and psychological well-being
Armando Silva, Irma Brito, João Amado
P75 Assessing the quality of life of persons with significant intellectual disability: Portuguese version of Escala de San Martín
António Rodrigo, Sofia Santos, Fernando Gomes
P76 Childhood obesity and breastfeeding - A systematic review
Marlene C. Rosa, Silvana F. Marques
P77 Cross-cultural adaptation of the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) for the Portuguese population
Sara Luís, Luís Cavalheiro, Pedro Ferreira, Rui Gonçalves
P78 Cross-cultural adaptation of the Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation score (PRWE) for the Portuguese population
Rui S. Lopes, Luís Cavalheiro, Pedro Ferreira, Rui Gonçalves
P79 Cross-cultural adaptation of the Myocardial Infraction Dimensional Assessment Scale (MIDAS) for Brazilian Portuguese language
Bruno H. Fiorin, Marina S. Santos, Edmar S. Oliveira, Rita L. Moreira, Elizabete A. Oliveira, Braulio L. Filho
P80 The revised Portuguese version of the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire: A confirmatory factor analysis
Lara Palmeira, Teresa Garcia, José Pinto-Gouveia, Marina Cunha
P81 Assessing weight-related psychological inflexibility: An exploratory factor analysis of the AAQW’s Portuguese version
Sara Cardoso, Lara Palmeira, Marina Cunha; José Pinto-Gouveia
P82 Validation of the Body Appreciation Scale-2 for Portuguese women
Joana Marta-Simões, Ana L. Mendes, Inês A. Trindade, Sara Oliveira, Cláudia Ferreira
P83 The Portuguese validation of the Dietary Intent Scale
Ana L. Mendes, Joana Marta-Simões, Inês A. Trindade, Cláudia Ferreira
P84 Construction and validation of the Inventory of Marital Violence (IVC)
Filipe Nave
P85 Portable continuous blood pressure monitor system
Mariana Campos, Iris Gaudêncio, Fernando Martins, Lino Ferreira, Nuno Lopes, Rui Fonseca-Pinto
P86 Construction and validation of the Scale of Perception of the Difficulties in Caring for the Elderly (SPDCE)
Rogério Rodrigues, Zaida Azeredo, Corália Vicente
P87 Development and validation of a comfort rating scale for the elderly hospitalized with chronic illness
Joana Silva, Patrícia Sousa, Rita Marques
P88 Construction and validation of the Postpartum Paternal Quality of Life Questionnaire (PP-QOL)
Isabel Mendes, Rogério Rodrigues, Zaida Azeredo, Corália Vicente
P89 Infrared thermal imaging: A tool for assessing diabetic foot ulcers
Ricardo Vardasca, Ana R. Marques, Adérito Seixas, Rui Carvalho, Joaquim Gabriel
P90 Pressure ulcers in an intensive care unit: An experience report
Paulo P. Ferreira, Michelle T. Oliveira, Anderson R. Sousa, Ana S. Maia, Sebastião T. Oliveira, Pablo O. Costa, Maiza M. Silva
P91 Validation of figures used in evocations: instrument to capture representations
Cristina Arreguy-Sena, Nathália Alvarenga-Martins, Paulo F. Pinto, Denize C. Oliveira, Pedro D. Parreira, Antônio T. Gomes, Luciene M. Braga
P92 Telephone assistance to decrease burden in informal caregivers of stroke older people: Monitoring and diagnostic evaluation
Odete Araújo, Isabel Lage, José Cabrita, Laetitia Teixeira
P93 Hope of informal caregivers of people with chronic and advanced disease
Rita Marques, Mª Anjos Dixe, Ana Querido, Patrícia Sousa
P94 Functionality and quality information from the Portuguese National Epidemiological Surveillance System
Sara Silva, Eugénio Cordeiro, João Pimentel
P95 Resting metabolic rate objectively measured vs. Harris and Benedict formula
Vera Ferro-Lebres, Juliana A. Souza, Mariline Tavares
O182 Characteristics of non-urgent patients: Cross-sectional study of an emergency department
Mª Anjos Dixe, Pedro Sousa, Rui Passadouro, Teresa Peralta, Carlos Ferreira, Georgina Lourenço
O183 Physical fitness and health in children of the 1st Cycle of Education
João Serrano, João Petrica, Rui Paulo, Samuel Honório, Pedro Mendes
O184 The impact of physical activity on sleep quality, in children
Alexandra Simões, Lucinda Carvalho, Alexandre Pereira
O185 What is the potential for using Information and Communication Technologies in Arterial Hypertension self-management?
Sara Silva, Paulino Sousa, José M. Padilha
O186 Exploring psychosocial factors associated with risk of falling in older patients undergoing haemodialysis
Daniela Figueiredo, Carolina Valente, Alda Marques
O187 Development of pressure ulcers on the face in patients undergoing non-invasive ventilation
Patrícia Ribas, Joana Sousa, Frederico Brandão, Cesar Sousa, Matilde Martins
O188 The elder hospitalized: Limiting factors of comfort
Patrícia Sousa, Rita Marques
O189 Physical activity and health state self-perception by Portuguese adults
Francisco Mendes, Rosina Fernandes, Emília Martins, Cátia Magalhães, Patrícia Araújo
O190 Satisfaction with social support in the elderly of the district of Bragança
Carla Grande, Mª Augusta Mata, Juan G. Vieitez
O191 Prevalence of death by traumatic brain injury and associated factors in intensive care unit of a general hospital, Brazil
Bruna Bianchini, Nazare Nazario, João G. Filho, Marcia Kretzer
O192 Relation between family caregivers burden and health status of elderly dependents
Tânia Costa, Armando Almeida, Gabriel Baffour
O193 Phenomena sensitive to nursing care in day centre
Armando Almeida, Tânia Costa, Gabriel Baffour
O194 Frailty: what do the elderly think?
Zaida Azeredo, Carlos Laranjeira, Magda Guerra, Ana P. Barbeiro
O195 The therapeutic self-care as a nursing-sensitive outcome: A correlational study
Regina Ferreira
O196 Phonetic-phonological acquisition for the European Portuguese from 18 months to 6 years and 12 months
Sara Lopes, Liliana Nunes, Ana Mendes
O197 Quality of life of patients undergoing liver transplant surgery
Julian Martins, Dulcineia Schneider, Marcia Kretzer, Flávio Magajewski
O198 Professional competences in health: views of older people from different European Countries
Célia Soares, António Marques
O199 Life satisfaction of working adults due to the number of hours of weekly exercise
Marco Batista, Ruth J. Castuera, Helena Mesquita, António Faustino, Jorge Santos, Samuel Honório
O200 Therapeutic itinerary of women with breast cancer in Santa Maria City/RS
Betina P. Vizzotto, Leticia Frigo, Hedioneia F. Pivetta
O201 The breastfeeding prevalence at 4 months: Maternal experience as a determining factor
Dolores Sardo
O202 The impact of the transition to parenthood in health and well-being
Cristina Martins, Wilson Abreu, Mª Céu Figueiredo
P96 Self-determined motivation and well-being in Portuguese active adults of both genders
Marco Batista, Ruth Jimenez-Castuera, João Petrica, João Serrano, Samuel Honório, Rui Paulo, Pedro Mendes
P97 The geriatric care: ways and means of comforting
Patrícia Sousa, Rita Marques
P98 The influence of relative age, subcutaneous adiposity and physical growth on Castelo Branco under-15 soccer players 2015
António Faustino, Paulo Silveira, João Serrano, Rui Paulo, Pedro Mendes, Samuel Honório
P99 Data for the diagnostic process focused on self-care – managing medication regime: An integrative literature review
Catarina Oliveira, Fernanda Bastos, Inês Cruz
P100 Art therapy as mental health promotion for children
Cláudia K. Rodriguez, Márcia R. Kretzer, Nazaré O. Nazário
P101 Chemical characterization of fungal chitosan for industrial applications
Pedro Cruz, Daniela C. Vaz, Rui B. Ruben, Francisco Avelelas, Susana Silva, Mª Jorge Campos
P102 The impact of caring older people at home
Maria Almeida, Liliana Gonçalves, Lígia Antunes
P103 Development of the first pressure ulcer in an inpatient setting: Focus on patients’ characteristics
Pedro Sardo, Jenifer Guedes, João Simões, Paulo Machado, Elsa Melo
P104 Association between General Self-efficacy and Physical Activity among Adolescents
Susana Cardoso, Osvaldo Santos, Carla Nunes, Isabel Loureiro
O203 Characterization of the habits of online acquisition of medicinal products in Portugal
Flávia Santos, Gilberto Alves
O204 Waiting room – A space for health education
Cláudia Soar, Teresa O. Marsi
O205 Safey culture evaluation in hospitalized children
Ernestina Silva, Dora Pedrosa, Andrea Leça, Daniel Silva
O206 Sexual Self-awareness and Body Image
Ana Galvão, Maria Gomes, Paula Fernandes, Ana Noné
O207 Perception of a Portuguese population regarding the acquisition and consumption of functional foods
Jaime Combadão, Cátia Ramalhete, Paulo Figueiredo, Patrícia Caeiro
O208 The work process in primary health care: evaluation in municipalities of southern Brazil
Karine C. Fontana, Josimari T. Lacerda, Patrícia O. Machado
O209 Exploration and evaluation of potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria isolated from Amazon buffalo milk
Raphaelle Borges, Flávio Barbosa, Dayse Sá
O210 Road safety for children: Using children’s observation, as a passenger
Germana Brunhoso, Graça Aparício, Amâncio Carvalho
O211 Perception and application of quality-by-design by the Pharmaceutical industry in Portugal
Ana P. Garcia, Paula O. Fernandes, Adriana Santos
O212 Oral health among Portuguese children and adolescents: a public health issue
Nélio Veiga, Carina Brás, Inês Carvalho, Joana Batalha, Margarida Glória, Filipa Bexiga, Inês Coelho, Odete Amaral, Carlos Pereira
O213 Plant species as a medicinal resource in Igatu-Chapada Diamantina (Bahia, Brazil)
Cláudia Pinho, Nilson Paraíso, Ana I. Oliveira, Cristóvão F. Lima, Alberto P. Dias
O214 Characterization of cognitive and functional performance in everyday tasks: Implications for health in institutionalised older adults
Pedro Silva, Mário Espada, Mário Marques, Ana Pereira
O215 BMI and the perception of the importance given to sexuality in obese and overweight people
Ana Mª Pereira, Mª Veiga-Branco, Filomena Pereira, Maria Ribeiro
O216 Analysis and comparison of microbiological contaminations of two different composition pacifiers
Vera Lima, Ana I. Oliveira, Cláudia Pinho, Graça Cruz, Rita F. Oliveira, Luísa Barreiros, Fernando Moreira
O217 Experiences of couple relationships in the transition to retirement
Ana Camarneiro, Mª Helena Loureiro, Margarida Silva
O218 Preventive and corrective treatment of drug-induced calcium deficiency: an analysis in a community pharmacy setting
Catarina Duarte, Ângelo Jesus, Agostinho Cruz
O219 Profile of mood states in physically active elderly subjects: Is there a relation with health perception?
Maria Mota, Sandra Novais, Paulo Nogueira, Ana Pereira, Lara Carneiro, Paulo V. João
O220 (Un)Safety behaviour at work: the role of education towards a health and safety culture
Teresa Maneca Lima
O221 Analysis of the entrepreneurial profile of students attending higher education in Portugal: the Carland Entrepreneurship Index application
Anabela Salgueiro-Oliveira, Marina Vaquinhas, Pedro Parreira, Rosa Melo, João Graveto, Amélia Castilho, José H. Gomes
O222 Evaluation of welfare and quality of life of pregnant working women regarding the age of the pregnant
María S. Medina, Valeriana G. Blanco
O223 Psychological wellbeing protection among unemployed and temporary workers: Uncovering effective community-based interventions with a Delphi panel
Osvaldo Santos, Elisa Lopes, Ana Virgolino, Alexandra Dinis, Sara Ambrósio, Inês Almeida, Tatiana Marques, Mª João Heitor
O224 Chilean population norms derived from the Health-related quality of life SF-6D
Miguel A. Garcia-Gordillo, Daniel Collado-Mateo, Pedro R. Olivares, José A. Parraça, José A. Sala
O225 Motivation of college students toward Entrepreneurship: The influence of social and economic instability
Amélia Castilho, João Graveto, Pedro Parreira, Anabela Oliveira, José H. Gomes, Rosa Melo, Marina Vaquinhas
O226 Use of aromatic and medicinal plants, drugs and herbal products in Bragança city
Mónia Cheio, Agostinho Cruz, Olívia R. Pereira
O227 Edible flowers as new novel foods concept for health promotion
Sara Pinto, Adriana Oliveira, M. Conceição Manso, Carla Sousa, Ana F. Vinha
O228 The influence of leisure activities on the health and welfare of older people living in nursing homes
Mª Manuela Machado, Margarida Vieira
O229 Risk of falling, fear of falling and functionality in community-dwelling older adults
Beatriz Fernandes, Teresa Tomás, Diogo Quirino
O230 Musculoskeletal pain and postural habits in children and teenage students
Gustavo Desouzart, Rui Matos, Magali Bordini, Pedro Mouroço
O231 What's different in Southern Europe? The question of citizens’ participation in health systems
Ana R. Matos, Mauro Serapioni
O232 Occupational stress in Portuguese police officers
Teresa Guimarães, Virgínia Fonseca, André Costa, João Ribeiro, João Lobato
O233 Is occupational therapy culturally relevant to promote mental health in Burkina Faso?
Inmaculada Z. Martin, Anita Björklund
P105 Pay-for-performance satisfaction and quality in primary care
Aida I. Tavares, Pedro Ferreira, Rui Passadouro
P106 Economic development through life expectancy lenses
Sónia Morgado
P107 What is the effectiveness of exercise on smoking cessation to prevent clinical complications of smoking?
Nuno Tavares, João Valente, Anabela C. Martins
P108 A systematic review of the effects of yoga on mental health
Patrícia Araújo, Rosina Fernandes, Francisco Mendes, Cátia Magalhães, Emília Martins
P109 Healthy lifestyle: comparison between higher education students that lived until adult age in rural and urban environment
Pedro Mendes, Rui Paulo, António Faustino, Helena Mesquita, Samuel Honório, Marco Batista
P110 Evaluation of the Mobile Emergency Care Service (SAMU) in Brazil
Josimari T. Lacerda, Angela B. Ortiga, Mª Cristina Calvo, Sônia Natal
P111 Bioactive compounds - antioxidant activity of tropical fruits
Marta Pereira
P112 Use of non-pharmacological methods to relieve pain in labour
Manuela Ferreira, Ana R. Prata, Paula Nelas, João Duarte
P113 Mechanical safety of pacifiers sold in Portuguese pharmacies and childcare stores
Juliana Carneiro, Ana I. Oliveira, Cláudia Pinho, Cristina Couto, Rita F. Oliveira, Fernando Moreira
P114 The importance of prenatal consultation: Information to pregnant women given on a unit of primary care
Ana S. Maia, Michelle T. Oliveira, Anderson R. Sousa, Paulo P. Ferreira, Géssica M. Souza, Lívia F. Almada, Milena A. Conceição, Eujcely C. Santiago
P115 Influence of different backpack loading conditions on neck and lumbar muscles activity of elementary school children
Sandra Rodrigues, Gabriela Domingues, Irina Ferreira, Luís Faria, Adérito Seixas
P116 Efficacy and safety of dry extract Hedera helix in the treatment of productive cough
Ana R. Costa, Ângelo Jesus, Américo Cardoso, Alexandra Meireles, Armanda Colaço, Agostinho Cruz
P117 A portrait of the evaluation processes of education groups in primary health care
Viviane L. Vieira, Kellem R. Vincha, Ana Mª Cervato-Mancuso
P118 Benefits of vitamins C and E in sensorineural hearing loss: a review
Melissa Faria, Cláudia Reis
P119 BODY SNAPSHOT – a web-integrated anthropometric evaluation system
Marco P. Cova, Rita T. Ascenso, Henrique A. Almeida, Eunice G. Oliveira
P120 Anthropometric evaluation and variation during pregnancy
Miguel Santana, Rafael Pereira, Eunice G. Oliveira, Henrique A. Almeida, Rita T. Ascenso
P121 Knowledge of college students on the amendments of their eating habits and physical activity index in the transition to higher education
Rita Jesus, Rodrigo Tapadas, Carolina Tim-Tim, Catarina Cezanne, Matilde Lagoa, Sara S. Dias, Jorge Torgal
P122 Muscular activity of a rally race car driver
João Lopes, Henrique Almeida, Sandra Amado, Luís Carrão
O234 Literacy and results in health
Madalena Cunha, Luís Saboga-Nunes, Carlos Albuquerque, Olivério Ribeiro
O235 Literacy promotion and empowerment of type 2 diabetics elderly in four family health units of the group of health centers of Dão Lafões
Suzete Oliveira, Mª Carminda Morais
O236 Mediterranean diet, health and life quality among Portuguese children
Emília Martins, Francisco Mendes, Rosina Fernandes, Cátia Magalhães, Patrícia Araújo
O237 Health literacy, from data to action - translation, validation and application of the European Health Literacy Survey in Portugal (HLS-EU-PT)
Ana R. Pedro, Odete Amaral, Ana Escoval
O238 Oral health literacy evaluation in a Portuguese military population
Victor Assunção, Henrique Luís, Luís Luís
O239 Preferences to Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy – do attachment orientations matter?
Jennifer Apolinário-Hagen, Viktor Vehreschild
O240 A comparative transnational study in health literacy between Austria and Portugal
Ulrike Fotschl, Gerald Lirk, Anabela C. Martins, Isabel Andrade, Fernando Mendes
O241 Health literacy and social behaviours: relationship with sexually transmitted diseases?
Verónica Mendonça, Sandra Antunes, Isabel Andrade, Nádia Osório, Ana Valado, Armando Caseiro, António Gabriel, Anabela C. Martins, Fernando Mendes
O242 Parenting styles and attachment to parents: what relationships?
Paula A. Silva, Lisete M. Mónico, Pedro M. Parreira, Carla Carvalho
O243 Work-life balance in health professionals and professors: comparative study of workers with shift work and fixed schedule
Carla Carvalho, Pedro M. Parreira, Lisete M. Mónico, Joana Ruivo
O244 Technology literacy in self-management of diabetes
Vânia Silva, Paulino Sousa, José M. Padilha
O245 Satisfaction with therapeutic education and its relationship with clinical variables in children with type 1 diabetes
Vera Ferraz, Graça Aparício, João Duarte
O246 Nutrition-related knowledge in middle-age and older patients with type 2 diabetes
Carlos Vasconcelos, António Almeida, Joel Neves, Telma Correia, Helena Amorim, Romeu Mendes
O247 Validating the HLS-EU-(PT) questionnaire to measure health literacy in adolescents (CrAdLiSa project: HLS-EU-PT)
Luís Saboga-Nunes, Madalena Cunha, Carlos Albuquerque
O248 Health education in people with coronary heart disease: Experience of the cardiology department of a hospital on the outskirts of Lisbon
Elsa S. Pereira, Leonino S. Santos, Ana S. Reis, Helena R. Silva, João Rombo, Jorge C. Fernandes, Patrícia Fernandes
O249 Information and training needs of informal caregivers of individuals with stroke sequelae: a qualitative survey
Jaime Ribeiro, Catarina Mangas, Ana Freire
O250 Prevention of psychoactive substances consumption in students from 6th grade of Albergaria-a-Velha´s School Group
Sara Silva, Irene Francisco, Ana Oliveira
O251 Promoting healthy sexuality: shared responsibility for family, youth and educators
Helena Catarino, Mª Anjos Dixe, Mª Clarisse Louro
O252 Sexual risk behaviour in adolescents and young people
Saudade Lopes, Anjos Dixe
O253 Knowledge of school staff on type 1 diabetes
Mª Anjos Dixe, Eva Menino, Helena Catarino, Fátima Soares, Ana P. Oliveira, Sara Gordo, Teresa Kraus
O254 Sexual health in adolescents: the impact of information search in literacy
Catarina Tomás, Paulo Queirós, Teresa Rodrigues
P123 Improving basic life support skills in adolescents through a training programme
Pedro Sousa, João G. Frade, Catarina Lobão
P124 Difficulties in sexual education reported by basic education teachers in the city of Foz do Iguaçu - Brazil
Cynthia B. Moura, Laysa C. Dreyer, Vanize Meneghetti, Priscila P. Cabral
P125 Breast cancer survivors: subjects and resources for information. A qualitative systematic review
Francisca Pinto, Paulino Sousa, Mª Raquel Esteves
P126 Relationship between health literacy and prevalence of STI in Biomedical Laboratory Science students
Sofia Galvão, Ite Tytgat, Isabel Andrade, Nádia Osório, Ana Valado, Armando Caseiro, António Gabriel, Anabela C. Martins, Fernando Mendes
P127 Health literacy, risk behaviours and sexually transmitted diseases among blood donors
Mónica Casas-Novas, Helena Bernardo, Isabel Andrade, Gracinda Sousa, Ana P. Sousa, Clara Rocha, Pedro Belo, Nádia Osório, Ana Valado, Armando Caseiro, António Gabriel, Anabela C. Martins, Fernando Mendes
P128 Promoting literacy in pregnancy health-care
Fátima Martins, Montserrat Pulido-Fuentes
P129 The lifestyles of the operating assistants of education
Isabel Barroso, Gil Cabral, M. João Monteiro, Conceição Rainho
P130 Experiences of service-learning health and the literary art: reflections about the health education
Alessandro Prado, Yara M. Carvalho
P131 Life long swimming – a European Erasmus + project
Maria Campos, Liliana Moreira, José Ferreira, Ana Teixeira, Luís Rama
doi:10.1186/s12913-016-1423-5
PMCID: PMC4943498  PMID: 27409075
8.  Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of home palliative care services for adults with advanced illness and their caregivers 
Background
Extensive evidence shows that well over 50% of people prefer to be cared for and to die at home provided circumstances allow choice. Despite best efforts and policies, one-third or less of all deaths take place at home in many countries of the world.
Objectives
1. To quantify the effect of home palliative care services for adult patients with advanced illness and their family caregivers on patients' odds of dying at home; 2. to examine the clinical effectiveness of home palliative care services on other outcomes for patients and their caregivers such as symptom control, quality of life, caregiver distress and satisfaction with care; 3. to compare the resource use and costs associated with these services; 4. to critically appraise and summarise the current evidence on cost-effectiveness.
Search methods
We searched 12 electronic databases up to November 2012. We checked the reference lists of all included studies, 49 relevant systematic reviews, four key textbooks and recent conference abstracts. We contacted 17 experts and researchers for unpublished data.
Selection criteria
We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials (CCTs), controlled before and after studies (CBAs) and interrupted time series (ITSs) evaluating the impact of home palliative care services on outcomes for adults with advanced illness or their family caregivers, or both.
Data collection and analysis
One review author assessed the identified titles and abstracts. Two independent reviewers performed assessment of all potentially relevant studies, data extraction and assessment of methodological quality. We carried out meta-analysis where appropriate and calculated numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNTBs) for the primary outcome (death at home).
Main results
We identified 23 studies (16 RCTs, 6 of high quality), including 37,561 participants and 4042 family caregivers, largely with advanced cancer but also congestive heart failure (CHF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), HIV/AIDS and multiple sclerosis (MS), among other conditions. Meta-analysis showed increased odds of dying at home (odds ratio (OR) 2.21, 95% CI 1.31 to 3.71; Z = 2.98, P value = 0.003; Chi2 = 20.57, degrees of freedom (df) = 6, P value = 0.002; I2 = 71%; NNTB 5, 95% CI 3 to 14 (seven trials with 1222 participants, three of high quality)). In addition, narrative synthesis showed evidence of small but statistically significant beneficial effects of home palliative care services compared to usual care on reducing symptom burden for patients (three trials, two of high quality, and one CBA with 2107 participants) and of no effect on caregiver grief (three RCTs, two of high quality, and one CBA with 2113 caregivers). Evidence on cost-effectiveness (six studies) is inconclusive.
Authors' conclusions
The results provide clear and reliable evidence that home palliative care increases the chance of dying at home and reduces symptom burden in particular for patients with cancer, without impacting on caregiver grief. This justifies providing home palliative care for patients who wish to die at home. More work is needed to study cost-effectiveness especially for people with non-malignant conditions, assessing place of death and appropriate outcomes that are sensitive to change and valid in these populations, and to compare different models of home palliative care, in powered studies.
PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY
Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of home-based palliative care services for adults with advanced illness and their caregivers
When faced with the prospect of dying with an advanced illness, the majority of people prefer to die at home, yet in many countries around the world they are most likely to die in hospital. We reviewed all known studies that evaluated home palliative care services, i.e. experienced home care teams of health professionals specialised in the control of a wide range of problems associated with advanced illness – physical, psychological, social, spiritual. We wanted to see how much of a difference these services make to people's chances of dying at home, but also to other important aspects for patients towards the end of life, such as symptoms (e.g. pain) and family distress. We also compared the impact on the costs with care. On the basis of 23 studies including 37,561 patients and 4042 family caregivers, we found that when someone with an advanced illness gets home palliative care, their chances of dying at home more than double. Home palliative care services also help reduce the symptom burden people may experience as a result of advanced illness, without increasing grief for family caregivers after the patient dies. In these circumstances, patients who wish to die at home should be offered home palliative care. There is still scope to improve home palliative care services and increase the benefits for patients and families without raising costs.
doi:10.1002/14651858.CD007760.pub2
PMCID: PMC4473359  PMID: 23744578
9.  A European study investigating patterns of transition from home care towards institutional dementia care: the protocol of a RightTimePlaceCare study 
BMC Public Health  2012;12:68.
Background
Health care policies in many countries aim to enable people with dementia to live in their own homes as long as possible. However, at some point during the disease the needs of a significant number of people with dementia cannot be appropriately met at home and institutional care is required. Evidence as to best practice strategies enabling people with dementia to live at home as long as possible and also identifying the right time to trigger admission to a long-term nursing care facility is therefore urgently required. The current paper presents the rationale and methods of a study generating primary data for best-practice development in the transition from home towards institutional nursing care for people with dementia and their informal caregivers. The study has two main objectives: 1) investigate country-specific factors influencing institutionalization and 2) investigate the circumstances of people with dementia and their informal caregivers in eight European countries. Additionally, data for economic evaluation purposes are being collected.
Methods/design
This paper describes a prospective study, conducted in eight European countries (Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Netherlands, Sweden, Spain, United Kingdom). A baseline assessment and follow-up measurement after 3 months will be performed. Two groups of people with dementia and their informal caregivers will be included: 1) newly admitted to institutional long-term nursing care facilities; and 2) receiving professional long-term home care, and being at risk for institutionalization. Data will be collected on outcomes for people with dementia (e.g. quality of life, quality of care), informal caregivers (e.g. caregiver burden, quality of life) and costs (e.g. resource utilization). Statistical analyses consist of descriptive and multivariate regression techniques and cross-country comparisons.
Discussion
The current study, which is part of a large European project 'RightTimePlaceCare', generates primary data on outcomes and costs of long-term nursing care for people with dementia and their informal caregivers, specifically focusing on the transition from home towards institutional care. Together with data collected in three other work packages, knowledge gathered in this study will be used to inform and empower patients, professionals, policy and related decision makers to manage and improve health and social dementia care services.
doi:10.1186/1471-2458-12-68
PMCID: PMC3328268  PMID: 22269343
Dementia; Long-term care; Professional home care; Nursing homes
10.  Caregiver- and Patient-Directed Interventions for Dementia 
Executive Summary
In early August 2007, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began work on the Aging in the Community project, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding healthy aging in the community. The Health System Strategy Division at the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care subsequently asked the secretariat to provide an evidentiary platform for the ministry’s newly released Aging at Home Strategy.
After a broad literature review and consultation with experts, the secretariat identified 4 key areas that strongly predict an elderly person’s transition from independent community living to a long-term care home. Evidence-based analyses have been prepared for each of these 4 areas: falls and fall-related injuries, urinary incontinence, dementia, and social isolation. For the first area, falls and fall-related injuries, an economic model is described in a separate report.
Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/mas_about.html, to review these titles within the Aging in the Community series.
Aging in the Community: Summary of Evidence-Based Analyses
Prevention of Falls and Fall-Related Injuries in Community-Dwelling Seniors: An Evidence-Based Analysis
Behavioural Interventions for Urinary Incontinence in Community-Dwelling Seniors: An Evidence-Based Analysis
Caregiver- and Patient-Directed Interventions for Dementia: An Evidence-Based Analysis
Social Isolation in Community-Dwelling Seniors: An Evidence-Based Analysis
The Falls/Fractures Economic Model in Ontario Residents Aged 65 Years and Over (FEMOR)
This report features the evidence-based analysis on caregiver- and patient-directed interventions for dementia and is broken down into 4 sections:
Introduction
Caregiver-Directed Interventions for Dementia
Patient-Directed Interventions for Dementia
Economic Analysis of Caregiver- and Patient-Directed Interventions for Dementia
Caregiver-Directed Interventions for Dementia
Objective
To identify interventions that may be effective in supporting the well-being of unpaid caregivers of seniors with dementia living in the community.
Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition
Dementia is a progressive and largely irreversible syndrome that is characterized by a loss of cognitive function severe enough to impact social or occupational functioning. The components of cognitive function affected include memory and learning, attention, concentration and orientation, problem-solving, calculation, language, and geographic orientation. Dementia was identified as one of the key predictors in a senior’s transition from independent community living to admission to a long-term care (LTC) home, in that approximately 90% of individuals diagnosed with dementia will be institutionalized before death. In addition, cognitive decline linked to dementia is one of the most commonly cited reasons for institutionalization.
Prevalence estimates of dementia in the Ontario population have largely been extrapolated from the Canadian Study of Health and Aging conducted in 1991. Based on these estimates, it is projected that there will be approximately 165,000 dementia cases in Ontario in the year 2008, and by 2010 the number of cases will increase by nearly 17% over 2005 levels. By 2020 the number of cases is expected to increase by nearly 55%, due to a rise in the number of people in the age categories with the highest prevalence (85+). With the increase in the aging population, dementia will continue to have a significant economic impact on the Canadian health care system. In 1991, the total costs associated with dementia in Canada were $3.9 billion (Cdn) with $2.18 billion coming from LTC.
Caregivers play a crucial role in the management of individuals with dementia because of the high level of dependency and morbidity associated with the condition. It has been documented that a greater demand is faced by dementia caregivers compared with caregivers of persons with other chronic diseases. The increased burden of caregiving contributes to a host of chronic health problems seen among many informal caregivers of persons with dementia. Much of this burden results from managing the behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), which have been established as a predictor of institutionalization for elderly patients with dementia.
It is recognized that for some patients with dementia, an LTC facility can provide the most appropriate care; however, many patients move into LTC unnecessarily. For individuals with dementia to remain in the community longer, caregivers require many types of formal and informal support services to alleviate the stress of caregiving. These include both respite care and psychosocial interventions. Psychosocial interventions encompass a broad range of interventions such as psychoeducational interventions, counseling, supportive therapy, and behavioural interventions.
Assuming that 50% of persons with dementia live in the community, a conservative estimate of the number of informal caregivers in Ontario is 82,500. Accounting for the fact that 29% of people with dementia live alone, this leaves a remaining estimate of 58,575 Ontarians providing care for a person with dementia with whom they reside.
Description of Interventions
The 2 main categories of caregiver-directed interventions examined in this review are respite care and psychosocial interventions. Respite care is defined as a break or relief for the caregiver. In most cases, respite is provided in the home, through day programs, or at institutions (usually 30 days or less). Depending on a caregiver’s needs, respite services will vary in delivery and duration. Respite care is carried out by a variety of individuals, including paid staff, volunteers, family, or friends.
Psychosocial interventions encompass a broad range of interventions and have been classified in various ways in the literature. This review will examine educational, behavioural, dementia-specific, supportive, and coping interventions. The analysis focuses on behavioural interventions, that is, those designed to help the caregiver manage BPSD. As described earlier, BPSD are one of the most challenging aspects of caring for a senior with dementia, causing an increase in caregiver burden. The analysis also examines multicomponent interventions, which include at least 2 of the above-mentioned interventions.
Methods of Evidence-Based Analysis
A comprehensive search strategy was used to identify systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that examined the effectiveness of interventions for caregivers of dementia patients.
Questions
Section 2.1
Are respite care services effective in supporting the well-being of unpaid caregivers of seniors with dementia in the community?
Do respite care services impact on rates of institutionalization of these seniors?
Section 2.2
Which psychosocial interventions are effective in supporting the well-being of unpaid caregivers of seniors with dementia in the community?
Which interventions reduce the risk for institutionalization of seniors with dementia?
Outcomes of Interest
any quantitative measure of caregiver psychological health, including caregiver burden, depression, quality of life, well-being, strain, mastery (taking control of one’s situation), reactivity to behaviour problems, etc.;
rate of institutionalization; and
cost-effectiveness.
Assessment of Quality of Evidence
The quality of the evidence was assessed as High, Moderate, Low, or Very low according to the GRADE methodology and GRADE Working Group. As per GRADE the following definitions apply:
Summary of Findings
Conclusions in Table 1 are drawn from Sections 2.1 and 2.2 of the report.
Summary of Conclusions on Caregiver-Directed Interventions
There is limited evidence from RCTs that respite care is effective in improving outcomes for those caring for seniors with dementia.
There is considerable qualitative evidence of the perceived benefits of respite care.
Respite care is known as one of the key formal support services for alleviating caregiver burden in those caring for dementia patients.
Respite care services need to be tailored to individual caregiver needs as there are vast differences among caregivers and patients with dementia (severity, type of dementia, amount of informal/formal support available, housing situation, etc.)
There is moderate- to high-quality evidence that individual behavioural interventions (≥ 6 sessions), directed towards the caregiver (or combined with the patient) are effective in improving psychological health in dementia caregivers.
There is moderate- to high-quality evidence that multicomponent interventions improve caregiver psychosocial health and may affect rates of institutionalization of dementia patients.
RCT indicates randomized controlled trial.
Patient-Directed Interventions for Dementia
Objective
The section on patient-directed interventions for dementia is broken down into 4 subsections with the following questions:
3.1 Physical Exercise for Seniors with Dementia – Secondary Prevention
What is the effectiveness of physical exercise for the improvement or maintenance of basic activities of daily living (ADLs), such as eating, bathing, toileting, and functional ability, in seniors with mild to moderate dementia?
3.2 Nonpharmacologic and Nonexercise Interventions to Improve Cognitive Functioning in Seniors With Dementia – Secondary Prevention
What is the effectiveness of nonpharmacologic interventions to improve cognitive functioning in seniors with mild to moderate dementia?
3.3 Physical Exercise for Delaying the Onset of Dementia – Primary Prevention
Can exercise decrease the risk of subsequent cognitive decline/dementia?
3.4 Cognitive Interventions for Delaying the Onset of Dementia – Primary Prevention
Does cognitive training decrease the risk of cognitive impairment, deterioration in the performance of basic ADLs or instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs),1 or incidence of dementia in seniors with good cognitive and physical functioning?
Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition
Secondary Prevention2
Exercise
Physical deterioration is linked to dementia. This is thought to be due to reduced muscle mass leading to decreased activity levels and muscle atrophy, increasing the potential for unsafe mobility while performing basic ADLs such as eating, bathing, toileting, and functional ability.
Improved physical conditioning for seniors with dementia may extend their independent mobility and maintain performance of ADL.
Nonpharmacologic and Nonexercise Interventions
Cognitive impairments, including memory problems, are a defining feature of dementia. These impairments can lead to anxiety, depression, and withdrawal from activities. The impact of these cognitive problems on daily activities increases pressure on caregivers.
Cognitive interventions aim to improve these impairments in people with mild to moderate dementia.
Primary Prevention3
Exercise
Various vascular risk factors have been found to contribute to the development of dementia (e.g., hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, overweight).
Physical exercise is important in promoting overall and vascular health. However, it is unclear whether physical exercise can decrease the risk of cognitive decline/dementia.
Nonpharmacologic and Nonexercise Interventions
Having more years of education (i.e., a higher cognitive reserve) is associated with a lower prevalence of dementia in crossectional population-based studies and a lower incidence of dementia in cohorts followed longitudinally. However, it is unclear whether cognitive training can increase cognitive reserve or decrease the risk of cognitive impairment, prevent or delay deterioration in the performance of ADLs or IADLs or reduce the incidence of dementia.
Description of Interventions
Physical exercise and nonpharmacologic/nonexercise interventions (e.g., cognitive training) for the primary and secondary prevention of dementia are assessed in this review.
Evidence-Based Analysis Methods
A comprehensive search strategy was used to identify systematic reviews and RCTs that examined the effectiveness, safety and cost effectiveness of exercise and cognitive interventions for the primary and secondary prevention of dementia.
Questions
Section 3.1: What is the effectiveness of physical exercise for the improvement or maintenance of ADLs in seniors with mild to moderate dementia?
Section 3.2: What is the effectiveness of nonpharmacologic/nonexercise interventions to improve cognitive functioning in seniors with mild to moderate dementia?
Section 3.3: Can exercise decrease the risk of subsequent cognitive decline/dementia?
Section 3.4: Does cognitive training decrease the risk of cognitive impairment, prevent or delay deterioration in the performance of ADLs or IADLs, or reduce the incidence of dementia in seniors with good cognitive and physical functioning?
Assessment of Quality of Evidence
The quality of the evidence was assessed as High, Moderate, Low, or Very low according to the GRADE methodology. As per GRADE the following definitions apply:
Summary of Findings
Table 2 summarizes the conclusions from Sections 3.1 through 3.4.
Summary of Conclusions on Patient-Directed Interventions*
Previous systematic review indicated that “cognitive training” is not effective in patients with dementia.
A recent RCT suggests that CST (up to 7 weeks) is effective for improving cognitive function and quality of life in patients with dementia.
Regular leisure time physical activity in midlife is associated with a reduced risk of dementia in later life (mean follow-up 21 years).
Regular physical activity in seniors is associated with a reduced risk of cognitive decline (mean follow-up 2 years).
Regular physical activity in seniors is associated with a reduced risk of dementia (mean follow-up 6–7 years).
Evidence that cognitive training for specific functions (memory, reasoning, and speed of processing) produces improvements in these specific domains.
Limited inconclusive evidence that cognitive training can offset deterioration in the performance of self-reported IADL scores and performance assessments.
1° indicates primary; 2°, secondary; CST, cognitive stimulation therapy; IADL, instrumental activities of daily living; RCT, randomized controlled trial.
Benefit/Risk Analysis
As per the GRADE Working Group, the overall recommendations consider 4 main factors:
the trade-offs, taking into account the estimated size of the effect for the main outcome, the confidence limits around those estimates, and the relative value placed on the outcome;
the quality of the evidence;
translation of the evidence into practice in a specific setting, taking into consideration important factors that could be expected to modify the size of the expected effects such as proximity to a hospital or availability of necessary expertise; and
uncertainty about the baseline risk for the population of interest.
The GRADE Working Group also recommends that incremental costs of health care alternatives should be considered explicitly alongside the expected health benefits and harms. Recommendations rely on judgments about the value of the incremental health benefits in relation to the incremental costs. The last column in Table 3 reflects the overall trade-off between benefits and harms (adverse events) and incorporates any risk/uncertainty (cost-effectiveness).
Overall Summary Statement of the Benefit and Risk for Patient-Directed Interventions*
Economic Analysis
Budget Impact Analysis of Effective Interventions for Dementia
Caregiver-directed behavioural techniques and patient-directed exercise programs were found to be effective when assessing mild to moderate dementia outcomes in seniors living in the community. Therefore, an annual budget impact was calculated based on eligible seniors in the community with mild and moderate dementia and their respective caregivers who were willing to participate in interventional home sessions. Table 4 describes the annual budget impact for these interventions.
Annual Budget Impact (2008 Canadian Dollars)
Assumed 7% prevalence of dementia aged 65+ in Ontario.
Assumed 8 weekly sessions plus 4 monthly phone calls.
Assumed 12 weekly sessions plus biweekly sessions thereafter (total of 20).
Assumed 2 sessions per week for first 5 weeks. Assumed 90% of seniors in the community with dementia have mild to moderate disease. Assumed 4.5% of seniors 65+ are in long-term care, and the remainder are in the community. Assumed a rate of participation of 60% for both patients and caregivers and of 41% for patient-directed exercise. Assumed 100% compliance since intervention administered at the home. Cost for trained staff from Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care data source. Assumed cost of personal support worker to be equivalent to in-home support. Cost for recreation therapist from Alberta government Website.
Note: This budget impact analysis was calculated for the first year after introducing the interventions from the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care perspective using prevalence data only. Prevalence estimates are for seniors in the community with mild to moderate dementia and their respective caregivers who are willing to participate in an interventional session administered at the home setting. Incidence and mortality rates were not factored in. Current expenditures in the province are unknown and therefore were not included in the analysis. Numbers may change based on population trends, rate of intervention uptake, trends in current programs in place in the province, and assumptions on costs. The number of patients was based on patients likely to access these interventions in Ontario based on assumptions stated below from the literature. An expert panel confirmed resource consumption.
PMCID: PMC3377513  PMID: 23074509
11.  Proceedings of the 8th Annual Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation 
Chambers, David | Simpson, Lisa | Hill-Briggs, Felicia | Neta, Gila | Vinson, Cynthia | Chambers, David | Beidas, Rinad | Marcus, Steven | Aarons, Gregory | Hoagwood, Kimberly | Schoenwald, Sonja | Evans, Arthur | Hurford, Matthew | Rubin, Ronnie | Hadley, Trevor | Barg, Frances | Walsh, Lucia | Adams, Danielle | Mandell, David | Martin, Lindsey | Mignogna, Joseph | Mott, Juliette | Hundt, Natalie | Kauth, Michael | Kunik, Mark | Naik, Aanand | Cully, Jeffrey | McGuire, Alan | White, Dominique | Bartholomew, Tom | McGrew, John | Luther, Lauren | Rollins, Angie | Salyers, Michelle | Cooper, Brittany | Funaiole, Angie | Richards, Julie | Lee, Amy | Lapham, Gwen | Caldeiro, Ryan | Lozano, Paula | Gildred, Tory | Achtmeyer, Carol | Ludman, Evette | Addis, Megan | Marx, Larry | Bradley, Katharine | VanDeinse, Tonya | Wilson, Amy Blank | Stacey, Burgin | Powell, Byron | Bunger, Alicia | Cuddeback, Gary | Barnett, Miya | Stadnick, Nicole | Brookman-Frazee, Lauren | Lau, Anna | Dorsey, Shannon | Pullmann, Michael | Mitchell, Shannon | Schwartz, Robert | Kirk, Arethusa | Dusek, Kristi | Oros, Marla | Hosler, Colleen | Gryczynski, Jan | Barbosa, Carolina | Dunlap, Laura | Lounsbury, David | O’Grady, Kevin | Brown, Barry | Damschroder, Laura | Waltz, Thomas | Powell, Byron | Ritchie, Mona | Waltz, Thomas | Atkins, David | Imel, Zac E. | Xiao, Bo | Can, Doğan | Georgiou, Panayiotis | Narayanan, Shrikanth | Berkel, Cady | Gallo, Carlos | Sandler, Irwin | Brown, C. Hendricks | Wolchik, Sharlene | Mauricio, Anne Marie | Gallo, Carlos | Brown, C. Hendricks | Mehrotra, Sanjay | Chandurkar, Dharmendra | Bora, Siddhartha | Das, Arup | Tripathi, Anand | Saggurti, Niranjan | Raj, Anita | Hughes, Eric | Jacobs, Brian | Kirkendall, Eric | Loeb, Danielle | Trinkley, Katy | Yang, Michael | Sprowell, Andrew | Nease, Donald | Lyon, Aaron | Lewis, Cara | Boyd, Meredith | Melvin, Abigail | Nicodimos, Semret | Liu, Freda | Jungbluth, Nathanial | Lyon, Aaron | Lewis, Cara | Boyd, Meredith | Melvin, Abigail | Nicodimos, Semret | Liu, Freda | Jungbluth, Nathanial | Flynn, Allen | Landis-Lewis, Zach | Sales, Anne | Baloh, Jure | Ward, Marcia | Zhu, Xi | Bennett, Ian | Unutzer, Jurgen | Mao, Johnny | Proctor, Enola | Vredevoogd, Mindy | Chan, Ya-Fen | Williams, Nathaniel | Green, Phillip | Bernstein, Steven | Rosner, June-Marie | DeWitt, Michelle | Tetrault, Jeanette | Dziura, James | Hsiao, Allen | Sussman, Scott | O’Connor, Patrick | Toll, Benjamin | Jones, Michael | Gassaway, Julie | Tobin, Jonathan | Zatzick, Douglas | Bradbury, Angela R. | Patrick-Miller, Linda | Egleston, Brian | Olopade, Olufunmilayo I. | Hall, Michael J. | Daly, Mary B. | Fleisher, Linda | Grana, Generosa | Ganschow, Pamela | Fetzer, Dominique | Brandt, Amanda | Farengo-Clark, Dana | Forman, Andrea | Gaber, Rikki S. | Gulden, Cassandra | Horte, Janice | Long, Jessica | Chambers, Rachelle Lorenz | Lucas, Terra | Madaan, Shreshtha | Mattie, Kristin | McKenna, Danielle | Montgomery, Susan | Nielsen, Sarah | Powers, Jacquelyn | Rainey, Kim | Rybak, Christina | Savage, Michelle | Seelaus, Christina | Stoll, Jessica | Stopfer, Jill | Yao, Shirley | Domchek, Susan | Hahn, Erin | Munoz-Plaza, Corrine | Wang, Jianjin | Delgadillo, Jazmine Garcia | Mittman, Brian | Gould, Michael | Liang, Shuting (Lily) | Kegler, Michelle C. | Cotter, Megan | Phillips, Emily | Hermstad, April | Morton, Rentonia | Beasley, Derrick | Martinez, Jeremy | Riehman, Kara | Gustafson, David | Marsch, Lisa | Mares, Louise | Quanbeck, Andrew | McTavish, Fiona | McDowell, Helene | Brown, Randall | Thomas, Chantelle | Glass, Joseph | Isham, Joseph | Shah, Dhavan | Liebschutz, Jane | Lasser, Karen | Watkins, Katherine | Ober, Allison | Hunter, Sarah | Lamp, Karen | Ewing, Brett | Iwelunmor, Juliet | Gyamfi, Joyce | Blackstone, Sarah | Quakyi, Nana Kofi | Plange-Rhule, Jacob | Ogedegbe, Gbenga | Kumar, Pritika | Van Devanter, Nancy | Nguyen, Nam | Nguyen, Linh | Nguyen, Trang | Phuong, Nguyet | Shelley, Donna | Rudge, Sian | Langlois, Etienne | Tricco, Andrea | Ball, Sherry | Lambert-Kerzner, Anne | Sulc, Christine | Simmons, Carol | Shell-Boyd, Jeneen | Oestreich, Taryn | O’Connor, Ashley | Neely, Emily | McCreight, Marina | Labebue, Amy | DiFiore, Doreen | Brostow, Diana | Ho, P. Michael | Aron, David | Harvey, Jillian | McHugh, Megan | Scanlon, Dennis | Lee, Rebecca | Soltero, Erica | Parker, Nathan | McNeill, Lorna | Ledoux, Tracey | McIsaac, Jessie-Lee | MacLeod, Kate | Ata, Nicole | Jarvis, Sherry | Kirk, Sara | Purtle, Jonathan | Dodson, Elizabeth | Brownson, Ross | Mittman, Brian | Curran, Geoffrey | Curran, Geoffrey | Pyne, Jeffrey | Aarons, Gregory | Ehrhart, Mark | Torres, Elisa | Miech, Edward | Miech, Edward | Stevens, Kathleen | Hamilton, Alison | Cohen, Deborah | Padgett, Deborah | Morshed, Alexandra | Patel, Rupa | Prusaczyk, Beth | Aron, David C. | Gupta, Divya | Ball, Sherry | Hand, Rosa | Abram, Jenica | Wolfram, Taylor | Hastings, Molly | Moreland-Russell, Sarah | Tabak, Rachel | Ramsey, Alex | Baumann, Ana | Kryzer, Emily | Montgomery, Katherine | Lewis, Ericka | Padek, Margaret | Powell, Byron | Brownson, Ross | Mamaril, Cezar Brian | Mays, Glen | Branham, Keith | Timsina, Lava | Mays, Glen | Hogg, Rachel | Fagan, Abigail | Shapiro, Valerie | Brown, Eric | Haggerty, Kevin | Hawkins, David | Oesterle, Sabrina | Hawkins, David | Catalano, Richard | McKay, Virginia | Dolcini, M. Margaret | Hoffer, Lee | Moin, Tannaz | Li, Jinnan | Duru, O. Kenrik | Ettner, Susan | Turk, Norman | Chan, Charles | Keckhafer, Abigail | Luchs, Robert | Ho, Sam | Mangione, Carol | Selby, Peter | Zawertailo, Laurie | Minian, Nadia | Balliunas, Dolly | Dragonetti, Rosa | Hussain, Sarwar | Lecce, Julia | Chinman, Matthew | Acosta, Joie | Ebener, Patricia | Malone, Patrick S. | Slaughter, Mary | Freedman, Darcy | Flocke, Susan | Lee, Eunlye | Matlack, Kristen | Trapl, Erika | Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam | Taggart, Morgan | Borawski, Elaine | Parrish, Amanda | Harris, Jeffrey | Kohn, Marlana | Hammerback, Kristen | McMillan, Becca | Hannon, Peggy | Swindle, Taren | Curran, Geoffrey | Whiteside-Mansell, Leanne | Ward, Wendy | Holt, Cheryl | Santos, Sheri Lou | Tagai, Erin | Scheirer, Mary Ann | Carter, Roxanne | Bowie, Janice | Haider, Muhiuddin | Slade, Jimmie | Wang, Min Qi | Masica, Andrew | Ogola, Gerald | Berryman, Candice | Richter, Kathleen | Shelton, Rachel | Jandorf, Lina | Erwin, Deborah | Truong, Khoa | Javier, Joyce R. | Coffey, Dean | Schrager, Sheree M. | Palinkas, Lawrence | Miranda, Jeanne | Johnson, Veda | Hutcherson, Valerie | Ellis, Ruth | Kharmats, Anna | Marshall-King, Sandra | LaPradd, Monica | Fonseca-Becker, Fannie | Kepka, Deanna | Bodson, Julia | Warner, Echo | Fowler, Brynn | Shenkman, Elizabeth | Hogan, William | Odedina, Folakami | De Leon, Jessica | Hooper, Monica | Carrasquillo, Olveen | Reams, Renee | Hurt, Myra | Smith, Steven | Szapocznik, Jose | Nelson, David | Mandal, Prabir | Teufel, James
Implementation Science : IS  2016;11(Suppl 2):100.
Table of contents
A1 Introduction to the 8th Annual Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation: Optimizing Personal and Population Health
David Chambers, Lisa Simpson
D1 Discussion forum: Population health D&I research
Felicia Hill-Briggs
D2 Discussion forum: Global health D&I research
Gila Neta, Cynthia Vinson
D3 Discussion forum: Precision medicine and D&I research
David Chambers
S1 Predictors of community therapists’ use of therapy techniques in a large public mental health system
Rinad Beidas, Steven Marcus, Gregory Aarons, Kimberly Hoagwood, Sonja Schoenwald, Arthur Evans, Matthew Hurford, Ronnie Rubin, Trevor Hadley, Frances Barg, Lucia Walsh, Danielle Adams, David Mandell
S2 Implementing brief cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in primary care: Clinicians' experiences from the field
Lindsey Martin, Joseph Mignogna, Juliette Mott, Natalie Hundt, Michael Kauth, Mark Kunik, Aanand Naik, Jeffrey Cully
S3 Clinician competence: Natural variation, factors affecting, and effect on patient outcomes
Alan McGuire, Dominique White, Tom Bartholomew, John McGrew, Lauren Luther, Angie Rollins, Michelle Salyers
S4 Exploring the multifaceted nature of sustainability in community-based prevention: A mixed-method approach
Brittany Cooper, Angie Funaiole
S5 Theory informed behavioral health integration in primary care: Mixed methods evaluation of the implementation of routine depression and alcohol screening and assessment
Julie Richards, Amy Lee, Gwen Lapham, Ryan Caldeiro, Paula Lozano, Tory Gildred, Carol Achtmeyer, Evette Ludman, Megan Addis, Larry Marx, Katharine Bradley
S6 Enhancing the evidence for specialty mental health probation through a hybrid efficacy and implementation study
Tonya VanDeinse, Amy Blank Wilson, Burgin Stacey, Byron Powell, Alicia Bunger, Gary Cuddeback
S7 Personalizing evidence-based child mental health care within a fiscally mandated policy reform
Miya Barnett, Nicole Stadnick, Lauren Brookman-Frazee, Anna Lau
S8 Leveraging an existing resource for technical assistance: Community-based supervisors in public mental health
Shannon Dorsey, Michael Pullmann
S9 SBIRT implementation for adolescents in urban federally qualified health centers: Implementation outcomes
Shannon Mitchell, Robert Schwartz, Arethusa Kirk, Kristi Dusek, Marla Oros, Colleen Hosler, Jan Gryczynski, Carolina Barbosa, Laura Dunlap, David Lounsbury, Kevin O'Grady, Barry Brown
S10 PANEL: Tailoring Implementation Strategies to Context - Expert recommendations for tailoring strategies to context
Laura Damschroder, Thomas Waltz, Byron Powell
S11 PANEL: Tailoring Implementation Strategies to Context - Extreme facilitation: Helping challenged healthcare settings implement complex programs
Mona Ritchie
S12 PANEL: Tailoring Implementation Strategies to Context - Using menu-based choice tasks to obtain expert recommendations for implementing three high-priority practices in the VA
Thomas Waltz
S13 PANEL: The Use of Technology to Improve Efficient Monitoring of Implementation of Evidence-based Programs - Siri, rate my therapist: Using technology to automate fidelity ratings of motivational interviewing
David Atkins, Zac E. Imel, Bo Xiao, Doğan Can, Panayiotis Georgiou, Shrikanth Narayanan
S14 PANEL: The Use of Technology to Improve Efficient Monitoring of Implementation of Evidence-based Programs - Identifying indicators of implementation quality for computer-based ratings
Cady Berkel, Carlos Gallo, Irwin Sandler, C. Hendricks Brown, Sharlene Wolchik, Anne Marie Mauricio
S15 PANEL: The Use of Technology to Improve Efficient Monitoring of Implementation of Evidence-based Programs - Improving implementation of behavioral interventions by monitoring emotion in spoken speech
Carlos Gallo, C. Hendricks Brown, Sanjay Mehrotra
S16 Scorecards and dashboards to assure data quality of health management information system (HMIS) using R
Dharmendra Chandurkar, Siddhartha Bora, Arup Das, Anand Tripathi, Niranjan Saggurti, Anita Raj
S17 A big data approach for discovering and implementing patient safety insights
Eric Hughes, Brian Jacobs, Eric Kirkendall
S18 Improving the efficacy of a depression registry for use in a collaborative care model
Danielle Loeb, Katy Trinkley, Michael Yang, Andrew Sprowell, Donald Nease
S19 Measurement feedback systems as a strategy to support implementation of measurement-based care in behavioral health
Aaron Lyon, Cara Lewis, Meredith Boyd, Abigail Melvin, Semret Nicodimos, Freda Liu, Nathanial Jungbluth
S20 PANEL: Implementation Science and Learning Health Systems: Intersections and Commonalities - Common loop assay: Methods of supporting learning collaboratives
Allen Flynn
S21 PANEL: Implementation Science and Learning Health Systems: Intersections and Commonalities - Innovating audit and feedback using message tailoring models for learning health systems
Zach Landis-Lewis
S22 PANEL: Implementation Science and Learning Health Systems: Intersections and Commonalities - Implementation science and learning health systems: Connecting the dots
Anne Sales
S23 Facilitation activities of Critical Access Hospitals during TeamSTEPPS implementation
Jure Baloh, Marcia Ward, Xi Zhu
S24 Organizational and social context of federally qualified health centers and variation in maternal depression outcomes
Ian Bennett, Jurgen Unutzer, Johnny Mao, Enola Proctor, Mindy Vredevoogd, Ya-Fen Chan, Nathaniel Williams, Phillip Green
S25 Decision support to enhance treatment of hospitalized smokers: A randomized trial
Steven Bernstein, June-Marie Rosner, Michelle DeWitt, Jeanette Tetrault, James Dziura, Allen Hsiao, Scott Sussman, Patrick O’Connor, Benjamin Toll
S26 PANEL: Developing Sustainable Strategies for the Implementation of Patient-Centered Care across Diverse US Healthcare Systems - A patient-centered approach to successful community transition after catastrophic injury
Michael Jones, Julie Gassaway
S27 PANEL: Developing Sustainable Strategies for the Implementation of Patient-Centered Care across Diverse US Healthcare Systems - Conducting PCOR to integrate mental health and cancer screening services in primary care
Jonathan Tobin
S28 PANEL: Developing Sustainable Strategies for the Implementation of Patient-Centered Care across Diverse US Healthcare Systems - A comparative effectiveness trial of optimal patient-centered care for US trauma care systems
Douglas Zatzick
S29 Preferences for in-person communication among patients in a multi-center randomized study of in-person versus telephone communication of genetic test results for cancer susceptibility
Angela R Bradbury, Linda Patrick-Miller, Brian Egleston, Olufunmilayo I Olopade, Michael J Hall, Mary B Daly, Linda Fleisher, Generosa Grana, Pamela Ganschow, Dominique Fetzer, Amanda Brandt, Dana Farengo-Clark, Andrea Forman, Rikki S Gaber, Cassandra Gulden, Janice Horte, Jessica Long, Rachelle Lorenz Chambers, Terra Lucas, Shreshtha Madaan, Kristin Mattie, Danielle McKenna, Susan Montgomery, Sarah Nielsen, Jacquelyn Powers, Kim Rainey, Christina Rybak, Michelle Savage, Christina Seelaus, Jessica Stoll, Jill Stopfer, Shirley Yao and Susan Domchek
S30 Working towards de-implementation: A mixed methods study in breast cancer surveillance care
Erin Hahn, Corrine Munoz-Plaza, Jianjin Wang, Jazmine Garcia Delgadillo, Brian Mittman Michael Gould
S31Integrating evidence-based practices for increasing cancer screenings in safety-net primary care systems: A multiple case study using the consolidated framework for implementation research
Shuting (Lily) Liang, Michelle C. Kegler, Megan Cotter, Emily Phillips, April Hermstad, Rentonia Morton, Derrick Beasley, Jeremy Martinez, Kara Riehman
S32 Observations from implementing an mHealth intervention in an FQHC
David Gustafson, Lisa Marsch, Louise Mares, Andrew Quanbeck, Fiona McTavish, Helene McDowell, Randall Brown, Chantelle Thomas, Joseph Glass, Joseph Isham, Dhavan Shah
S33 A multicomponent intervention to improve primary care provider adherence to chronic opioid therapy guidelines and reduce opioid misuse: A cluster randomized controlled trial protocol
Jane Liebschutz, Karen Lasser
S34 Implementing collaborative care for substance use disorders in primary care: Preliminary findings from the summit study
Katherine Watkins, Allison Ober, Sarah Hunter, Karen Lamp, Brett Ewing
S35 Sustaining a task-shifting strategy for blood pressure control in Ghana: A stakeholder analysis
Juliet Iwelunmor, Joyce Gyamfi, Sarah Blackstone, Nana Kofi Quakyi, Jacob Plange-Rhule, Gbenga Ogedegbe
S36 Contextual adaptation of the consolidated framework for implementation research (CFIR) in a tobacco cessation study in Vietnam
Pritika Kumar, Nancy Van Devanter, Nam Nguyen, Linh Nguyen, Trang Nguyen, Nguyet Phuong, Donna Shelley
S37 Evidence check: A knowledge brokering approach to systematic reviews for policy
Sian Rudge
S38 Using Evidence Synthesis to Strengthen Complex Health Systems in Low- and Middle-Income Countries
Etienne Langlois
S39 Does it matter: timeliness or accuracy of results? The choice of rapid reviews or systematic reviews to inform decision-making
Andrea Tricco
S40 Evaluation of the veterans choice program using lean six sigma at a VA medical center to identify benefits and overcome obstacles
Sherry Ball, Anne Lambert-Kerzner, Christine Sulc, Carol Simmons, Jeneen Shell-Boyd, Taryn Oestreich, Ashley O'Connor, Emily Neely, Marina McCreight, Amy Labebue, Doreen DiFiore, Diana Brostow, P. Michael Ho, David Aron
S41 The influence of local context on multi-stakeholder alliance quality improvement activities: A multiple case study
Jillian Harvey, Megan McHugh, Dennis Scanlon
S42 Increasing physical activity in early care and education: Sustainability via active garden education (SAGE)
Rebecca Lee, Erica Soltero, Nathan Parker, Lorna McNeill, Tracey Ledoux
S43 Marking a decade of policy implementation: The successes and continuing challenges of a provincial school food and nutrition policy in Canada
Jessie-Lee McIsaac, Kate MacLeod, Nicole Ata, Sherry Jarvis, Sara Kirk
S44 Use of research evidence among state legislators who prioritize mental health and substance abuse issues
Jonathan Purtle, Elizabeth Dodson, Ross Brownson
S45 PANEL: Effectiveness-Implementation Hybrid Designs: Clarifications, Refinements, and Additional Guidance Based on a Systematic Review and Reports from the Field - Hybrid type 1 designs
Brian Mittman, Geoffrey Curran
S46 PANEL: Effectiveness-Implementation Hybrid Designs: Clarifications, Refinements, and Additional Guidance Based on a Systematic Review and Reports from the Field - Hybrid type 2 designs
Geoffrey Curran
S47 PANEL: Effectiveness-Implementation Hybrid Designs: Clarifications, Refinements, and Additional Guidance Based on a Systematic Review and Reports from the Field - Hybrid type 3 designs
Jeffrey Pyne
S48 Linking team level implementation leadership and implementation climate to individual level attitudes, behaviors, and implementation outcomes
Gregory Aarons, Mark Ehrhart, Elisa Torres
S49 Pinpointing the specific elements of local context that matter most to implementation outcomes: Findings from qualitative comparative analysis in the RE-inspire study of VA acute stroke care
Edward Miech
S50 The GO score: A new context-sensitive instrument to measure group organization level for providing and improving care
Edward Miech
S51 A research network approach for boosting implementation and improvement
Kathleen Stevens, I.S.R.N. Steering Council
S52 PANEL: Qualitative methods in D&I Research: Value, rigor and challenge - The value of qualitative methods in implementation research
Alison Hamilton
S53 PANEL: Qualitative methods in D&I Research: Value, rigor and challenge - Learning evaluation: The role of qualitative methods in dissemination and implementation research
Deborah Cohen
S54 PANEL: Qualitative methods in D&I Research: Value, rigor and challenge - Qualitative methods in D&I research
Deborah Padgett
S55 PANEL: Maps & models: The promise of network science for clinical D&I - Hospital network of sharing patients with acute and chronic diseases in California
Alexandra Morshed
S56 PANEL: Maps & models: The promise of network science for clinical D&I - The use of social network analysis to identify dissemination targets and enhance D&I research study recruitment for pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV (PrEP) among men who have sex with men
Rupa Patel
S57 PANEL: Maps & models: The promise of network science for clinical D&I - Network and organizational factors related to the adoption of patient navigation services among rural breast cancer care providers
Beth Prusaczyk
S58 A theory of de-implementation based on the theory of healthcare professionals’ behavior and intention (THPBI) and the becker model of unlearning
David C. Aron, Divya Gupta, Sherry Ball
S59 Observation of registered dietitian nutritionist-patient encounters by dietetic interns highlights low awareness and implementation of evidence-based nutrition practice guidelines
Rosa Hand, Jenica Abram, Taylor Wolfram
S60 Program sustainability action planning: Building capacity for program sustainability using the program sustainability assessment tool
Molly Hastings, Sarah Moreland-Russell
S61 A review of D&I study designs in published study protocols
Rachel Tabak, Alex Ramsey, Ana Baumann, Emily Kryzer, Katherine Montgomery, Ericka Lewis, Margaret Padek, Byron Powell, Ross Brownson
S62 PANEL: Geographic variation in the implementation of public health services: Economic, organizational, and network determinants - Model simulation techniques to estimate the cost of implementing foundational public health services
Cezar Brian Mamaril, Glen Mays, Keith Branham, Lava Timsina
S63 PANEL: Geographic variation in the implementation of public health services: Economic, organizational, and network determinants - Inter-organizational network effects on the implementation of public health services
Glen Mays, Rachel Hogg
S64 PANEL: Building capacity for implementation and dissemination of the communities that care prevention system at scale to promote evidence-based practices in behavioral health - Implementation fidelity, coalition functioning, and community prevention system transformation using communities that care
Abigail Fagan, Valerie Shapiro, Eric Brown
S65 PANEL: Building capacity for implementation and dissemination of the communities that care prevention system at scale to promote evidence-based practices in behavioral health - Expanding capacity for implementation of communities that care at scale using a web-based, video-assisted training system
Kevin Haggerty, David Hawkins
S66 PANEL: Building capacity for implementation and dissemination of the communities that care prevention system at scale to promote evidence-based practices in behavioral health - Effects of communities that care on reducing youth behavioral health problems
Sabrina Oesterle, David Hawkins, Richard Catalano
S68 When interventions end: the dynamics of intervention de-adoption and replacement
Virginia McKay, M. Margaret Dolcini, Lee Hoffer
S69 Results from next-d: can a disease specific health plan reduce incident diabetes development among a national sample of working-age adults with pre-diabetes?
Tannaz Moin, Jinnan Li, O. Kenrik Duru, Susan Ettner, Norman Turk, Charles Chan, Abigail Keckhafer, Robert Luchs, Sam Ho, Carol Mangione
S70 Implementing smoking cessation interventions in primary care settings (STOP): using the interactive systems framework
Peter Selby, Laurie Zawertailo, Nadia Minian, Dolly Balliunas, Rosa Dragonetti, Sarwar Hussain, Julia Lecce
S71 Testing the Getting To Outcomes implementation support intervention in prevention-oriented, community-based settings
Matthew Chinman, Joie Acosta, Patricia Ebener, Patrick S Malone, Mary Slaughter
S72 Examining the reach of a multi-component farmers’ market implementation approach among low-income consumers in an urban context
Darcy Freedman, Susan Flocke, Eunlye Lee, Kristen Matlack, Erika Trapl, Punam Ohri-Vachaspati, Morgan Taggart, Elaine Borawski
S73 Increasing implementation of evidence-based health promotion practices at large workplaces: The CEOs Challenge
Amanda Parrish, Jeffrey Harris, Marlana Kohn, Kristen Hammerback, Becca McMillan, Peggy Hannon
S74 A qualitative assessment of barriers to nutrition promotion and obesity prevention in childcare
Taren Swindle, Geoffrey Curran, Leanne Whiteside-Mansell, Wendy Ward
S75 Documenting institutionalization of a health communication intervention in African American churches
Cheryl Holt, Sheri Lou Santos, Erin Tagai, Mary Ann Scheirer, Roxanne Carter, Janice Bowie, Muhiuddin Haider, Jimmie Slade, Min Qi Wang
S76 Reduction in hospital utilization by underserved patients through use of a community-medical home
Andrew Masica, Gerald Ogola, Candice Berryman, Kathleen Richter
S77 Sustainability of evidence-based lay health advisor programs in African American communities: A mixed methods investigation of the National Witness Project
Rachel Shelton, Lina Jandorf, Deborah Erwin
S78 Predicting the long-term uninsured population and analyzing their gaps in physical access to healthcare in South Carolina
Khoa Truong
S79 Using an evidence-based parenting intervention in churches to prevent behavioral problems among Filipino youth: A randomized pilot study
Joyce R. Javier, Dean Coffey, Sheree M. Schrager, Lawrence Palinkas, Jeanne Miranda
S80 Sustainability of elementary school-based health centers in three health-disparate southern communities
Veda Johnson, Valerie Hutcherson, Ruth Ellis
S81 Childhood obesity prevention partnership in Louisville: creative opportunities to engage families in a multifaceted approach to obesity prevention
Anna Kharmats, Sandra Marshall-King, Monica LaPradd, Fannie Fonseca-Becker
S82 Improvements in cervical cancer prevention found after implementation of evidence-based Latina prevention care management program
Deanna Kepka, Julia Bodson, Echo Warner, Brynn Fowler
S83 The OneFlorida data trust: Achieving health equity through research & training capacity building
Elizabeth Shenkman, William Hogan, Folakami Odedina, Jessica De Leon, Monica Hooper, Olveen Carrasquillo, Renee Reams, Myra Hurt, Steven Smith, Jose Szapocznik, David Nelson, Prabir Mandal
S84 Disseminating and sustaining medical-legal partnerships: Shared value and social return on investment
James Teufel
doi:10.1186/s13012-016-0452-0
PMCID: PMC4977475  PMID: 27490260
12.  A self-evaluation tool for integrated care services: the Development Model for Integrated Care applied in practice 
Purpose
The purpose of the workshop is to show the applications of the Development Model for Integrated Care (DMIC) in practice. This relatively new and validated model, can be used by integrated care practices to evaluate their integrated care, to assess their phase of development and reveal improvement areas. In the workshop the results of the use of the model in three types of integrated care settings in the Netherlands will be presented. Participants are offered practical instruments based on the validated DMIC to use in their own setting and will be introduced to the webbased tool.
Context
To integrate care from multiple providers into a coherent and streamlined client-focused service, a large number of activities and agreements have to be implemented like streamlining information flows and adequate transfers of clients. In the large range of possible activities it is often not clear what essential activities are and where to start or continue. Also, knowledge about how to further develop integrated care services is needed. The Development Model for Integrated Care (DMIC), based on PhD research of Mirella Minkman, describes nine clusters containing in total 89 elements that contribute to the integration of care. The clusters are named: ‘client-centeredness’, ‘delivery system’, ‘performance management’, ‘quality of care’, ‘result-focused learning’, ‘interprofessional teamwork’, ‘roles and tasks’, ‘commitment’, and ‘transparant entrepreneurship’ [1–3]. In 2011 a new digital webbased self-evolution tool which contains the 89 elements grouped in nine clusters was developed. The DMIC also describes four phases of development [4]. The model is empirically validated in practice by assessing the relevance and implementation of the elements and development phases in 84 integrated care services in The Netherlands: in stroke, acute myocardial infarct (AMI), and dementia services. The validation studies are recently published [5, 6]. In 2011 also other integrated care services started using the model [7]. Vilans developed a digital web-based self-evaluation tool for integrated care services based on the DMIC. A palliative care network, four diabetes services, a youth care service and a network for autism used the self-evaluation tool to evaluate the development of their integrated care service. Because of its generic character, the model and tool are believed to be also interesting internationally.
Data sources
In the workshop we will present the results of three studies in integrated diabetes, youth and palliative care. The three projects consist of multiple steps, see below. Workshop participants could also work with the DMIC following these steps.
One: Preparation of the digital self-evolution tool for integrated care services
Although they are very different, the three integrated care services all wanted to gain insight in their development and improvement opportunities. We tailored the digital self-evaluation tool for each specific integrated care services, but for all the basis was the DMIC. Personal accounts for the digital DMIC self-evalution survey were sent to multiple partners working in each integrated care service (4–16 partners).
Two: Use of the online self-evaluation tool each partner of the local integrated care setting evaluated the integrated care by filling in the web-based questionnaire. The tool consists of three parts (A-C) named: general information about the integrated care practice (A); the clusters and elements of the DMIC (B); and the four phases of development (C). The respondents rated the relevance and presence of each element in their integrated care practice. Respondents were asked to estimate in which phase of development their thought their service was.
Three: Analysing the results
Advisers from Vilans, the Centre of excellence for long-term care in the Netherlands, analysed the self-evolution results in cooperation with the integrated care coordinators. The results show the total amount of implemented integrated care elements per cluster in spider graphs and the development phase as calculated by the DMIC model. Suggestions for further development of the integrated care services were analysed and reported.
Four: Discussing the implications for further development
In a workshop with the local integrated care partners the results of the self-evaluation were presented and discussed. We noticed remarkable results and highlight elements for further development. In addition, we gave advice for further development appropriate to the development phase of the integrated care service. Furthermore, the professionals prioritized the elements and decided which elements to start working on. This resulted in a (quality improvement) plan for the further development of the integrated care service.
Five: Reporting results
In a report all the results of the survey (including consensus scores) and the workshops came together. The integrated care coordinators stated that the reports really helped them to assess their improvement strategy. Also, there was insight in the development phase of their service which gave tools for further development.
Case description
The three cases presented are a palliative network, an integrated diabetes services and an integrated care network for youth in the Netherlands. The palliative care network wanted to reflect on their current development, to build a guiding framework for further development of the network. About sixteen professionals within the network worked with the digital self-evaluation tool and the DMIC: home care organisations, welfare organizations, hospice centres, health care organisations, community organizations.
For diabetes care, a Dutch health care insurance company wished to gain insight in the development of the contracted integrated care services to stimulate further development of the services. Professionals of three diabetes integrated care services were invited to fill in the digital self-evaluation tool. Of each integrated care service professionals like a general practitioner, a diabetes nurse, a medical specialist, a dietician and a podiatrist were invited. In youth care, a local health organisation wondered whether the DMIC could be helpful to visualize the results of youth integrated care services at process- and organisational level. The goal of the project was to define indicators at a process- and organisational level for youth care services based on the DMIC. In the future, these indicators might be used to evaluate youth care integrated care services and improve the quality of youth care within the Netherlands.
Conclusions and discussion
It is important for the quality of integrated care services that the involved coordinators, managers and professionals are aware of the development process of the integrated care service and that they focus on elements which can further develop and improve their integrated care. However, we noticed that integrated care services in the Netherlands experience difficulties in developing their integrated care service. It is often not clear what essential activities are to work on and how to further develop the integrated care service. A guiding framework for the development of integrated care was missing. The DMIC model has been developed for that reason and offers a useful tool for assessment, self-evaluation or improvement of integrated care services in practice. The model has been validated for AMI, dementia and stroke services. The latest new studies in diabetes, palliative care and youth care gave further insight in the generic character of the DMIC. Based on these studies it can be assumed that the DMIC can be used for multiple types of integrated care services. The model is assumed to be interesting for an international audience. Improving integrated care is a complex topic in a large number of countries; the DMIC is also based on the international literature. Dutch integrated care coordinators stated that the DMIC helped them to assess their integrated care development in practice and supported them in obtaining ideas for expanding and improving their integrated care activities.
The web-based self-evaluation tool focuses on a process- and organisational level of integrated care. Also, the self assessed development phase can be compared to the development phase as calculated by the DMIC tool. The cases showed this is fruitful input for discussions. When using the tool, the results can also be used in quality policy reports and improvement plans. The web-based tool is being tested at this moment in practice, but in San Marino we can present the latest webversion and demonstrate with a short video how to use the tool and model. During practical exercises in the workshop the participants will experience how the application of the DMIC can work for them in practice or in research. For integrated care researchers and policy makers, the DMIC questionnaire and tool is a promising method for further research and policy plans in integrated care.
PMCID: PMC3617779
development model for integrated care; development of integrated care services; implementation and improvement of integrated care; self evaluation
13.  Complexity in Non-Pharmacological Caregiving Activities at the End of Life: An International Qualitative Study 
PLoS Medicine  2012;9(2):e1001173.
In a qualitative study reported by Olav Lindqvist and colleagues, the range of nonpharmacological caregiving activities used in the last days of a patient's life are described.
Background
In late-stage palliative cancer care, relief of distress and optimized well-being become primary treatment goals. Great strides have been made in improving and researching pharmacological treatments for symptom relief; however, little systematic knowledge exists about the range of non-pharmacological caregiving activities (NPCAs) staff use in the last days of a patient's life.
Methods and Findings
Within a European Commission Seventh Framework Programme project to optimize research and clinical care in the last days of life for patients with cancer, OPCARE9, we used a free-listing technique to identify the variety of NPCAs performed in the last days of life. Palliative care staff at 16 units in nine countries listed in detail NPCAs they performed over several weeks. In total, 914 statements were analyzed in relation to (a) the character of the statement and (b) the recipient of the NPCA. A substantial portion of NPCAs addressed bodily care and contact with patients and family members, with refraining from bodily care also described as a purposeful caregiving activity. Several forms for communication were described; information and advice was at one end of a continuum, and communicating through nonverbal presence and bodily contact at the other. Rituals surrounding death and dying included not only spiritual/religious issues, but also more subtle existential, legal, and professional rituals. An unexpected and hitherto under-researched area of focus was on creating an aesthetic, safe, and pleasing environment, both at home and in institutional care settings.
Conclusions
Based on these data, we argue that palliative care in the last days of life is multifaceted, with physical, psychological, social, spiritual, and existential care interwoven in caregiving activities. Providing for fundamental human needs close to death appears complex and sophisticated; it is necessary to better distinguish nuances in such caregiving to acknowledge, respect, and further develop end-of-life care.
Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary
Editors' Summary
Background
End-of-life care is a major public health issue, yet despite the inevitability of death, issues related to death and dying are often taboo, and, if mentioned, are often referred to as “palliative care.” There are detailed definitions of palliative care, but in essence, the purpose of palliative care is to relieve any suffering in patients who are dying from progressive illness and to provide the best possible quality of life for both the patient and his or her family. In order to achieve this aim, both pharmacological and non-pharmacological management is necessary, with the latter taking a central role. Recently, a European Commission Seventh Framework Programme project, OPCARE9, aimed to improve the care of dying patients in Europe and beyond by optimizing research and clinical care for patients with cancer in the last days of their life, especially regarding well-being and comfort as death becomes imminent.
Why Was This Study Done?
There is now a growing literature base in non-pharmacological management at the end of an individual's life, particularly in relation to psychological, ethical, and communication issues as well as family-focused and culturally appropriate care. Despite this progress, there is currently little systematic knowledge in how health workers use such non-pharmacological approaches in their efforts to maximize well-being and comfort in patients experiencing their very last days of life. Therefore, in order to advance knowledge in this important clinical area, in this study the researchers reviewed and identified the variety of non-pharmacological caregiving activities performed by different professionals in the last days and hours of life for patients with cancer (and their families) in palliative care settings in the countries that participated in OPCARE9.
What Did the Researchers Do and Find?
The researchers modified an anthropological approach to collect relevant information in participating European countries—Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Slovenia, Sweden, Switzerland, and the UK—and Argentina and New Zealand. Staff in palliative care settings generated a list of non-pharmacological caregiving activities after discussion about which interventions and activities they carried out with patients and families during the last days of life. This preliminary list of statements was added to if staff performed a new activity when in contact with patients or the patients' family during the last days of life. The researchers then used computer-assisted qualitative data analysis to code the statements.
Using this methodology, the researchers analyzed 914 statements of caregiving activities from 16 different facilities in nine countries. The greatest number of activities described some type of caregiving for an individual carried out through contact with his or her body, such as attending to diverse bodily needs (such as cleaning and moisturizing) while maintaining comfort and dignity. Listening, talking with, and understanding (particularly between professionals and the family) was the next most frequent activity, followed by creating an esthetical, safe, and pleasing environment for the dying person and his or her family, and necessary “backstage” activities, such as organizing paperwork or care plans. Other common activities included observing and assessing, which were often described as being carried out simultaneously with other interventions; just being present (described as increasingly important close to death); performing rituals surrounding death and dying (usually directed to families); guiding and facilitating (encompassing support in a compassionate manner); and finally, giving oral and written information and advice (usually to families).
What Do These Findings Mean?
These findings show that providing for fundamental human needs close to death is complex and sophisticated but ultimately integrated into a common theme of caregiving. This study also identifies a number of areas needing further investigation, such as enhancing the sensory and general environment for the patient and family. Finally, this study suggests that developing a greater level of detail, such as improved terminology for end-of-life care, would enhance appreciation of the nuances and complexity present in non-pharmacological care provision during the last days of life, with potential benefit for clinical practice, teaching, and research.
Additional Information
Please access these websites via the online version of this summary at http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1001173.
The OPCARE9 website details more information about this end-of-life care initiative
The World Health Organization website defines palliative care, and Wikipedia gives more information (note that Wikipedia is a free online encyclopedia that anyone can edit; available in several languages)
NHS Choices also provides information about end-of-life care
doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001173
PMCID: PMC3279347  PMID: 22347815
14.  Implementing the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations on resident physician work hours, supervision, and safety 
Long working hours and sleep deprivation have been a facet of physician training in the US since the advent of the modern residency system. However, the scientific evidence linking fatigue with deficits in human performance, accidents and errors in industries from aeronautics to medicine, nuclear power, and transportation has mounted over the last 40 years. This evidence has also spawned regulations to help ensure public safety across safety-sensitive industries, with the notable exception of medicine.
In late 2007, at the behest of the US Congress, the Institute of Medicine embarked on a year-long examination of the scientific evidence linking resident physician sleep deprivation with clinical performance deficits and medical errors. The Institute of Medicine’s report, entitled “Resident duty hours: Enhancing sleep, supervision and safety”, published in January 2009, recommended new limits on resident physician work hours and workload, increased supervision, a heightened focus on resident physician safety, training in structured handovers and quality improvement, more rigorous external oversight of work hours and other aspects of residency training, and the identification of expanded funding sources necessary to implement the recommended reforms successfully and protect the public and resident physicians themselves from preventable harm.
Given that resident physicians comprise almost a quarter of all physicians who work in hospitals, and that taxpayers, through Medicare and Medicaid, fund graduate medical education, the public has a deep investment in physician training. Patients expect to receive safe, high-quality care in the nation’s teaching hospitals. Because it is their safety that is at issue, their voices should be central in policy decisions affecting patient safety. It is likewise important to integrate the perspectives of resident physicians, policy makers, and other constituencies in designing new policies. However, since its release, discussion of the Institute of Medicine report has been largely confined to the medical education community, led by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME).
To begin gathering these perspectives and developing a plan to implement safer work hours for resident physicians, a conference entitled “Enhancing sleep, supervision and safety: What will it take to implement the Institute of Medicine recommendations?” was held at Harvard Medical School on June 17–18, 2010. This White Paper is a product of a diverse group of 26 representative stakeholders bringing relevant new information and innovative practices to bear on a critical patient safety problem. Given that our conference included experts from across disciplines with diverse perspectives and interests, not every recommendation was endorsed by each invited conference participant. However, every recommendation made here was endorsed by the majority of the group, and many were endorsed unanimously. Conference members participated in the process, reviewed the final product, and provided input before publication. Participants provided their individual perspectives, which do not necessarily represent the formal views of any organization.
In September 2010 the ACGME issued new rules to go into effect on July 1, 2011. Unfortunately, they stop considerably short of the Institute of Medicine’s recommendations and those endorsed by this conference. In particular, the ACGME only applied the limitation of 16 hours to first-year resident physicans. Thus, it is clear that policymakers, hospital administrators, and residency program directors who wish to implement safer health care systems must go far beyond what the ACGME will require. We hope this White Paper will serve as a guide and provide encouragement for that effort.
Resident physician workload and supervision
By the end of training, a resident physician should be able to practice independently. Yet much of resident physicians’ time is dominated by tasks with little educational value. The caseload can be so great that inadequate reflective time is left for learning based on clinical experiences. In addition, supervision is often vaguely defined and discontinuous. Medical malpractice data indicate that resident physicians are frequently named in lawsuits, most often for lack of supervision. The recommendations are: The ACGME should adjust resident physicians workload requirements to optimize educational value. Resident physicians as well as faculty should be involved in work redesign that eliminates nonessential and noneducational activity from resident physician dutiesMechanisms should be developed for identifying in real time when a resident physician’s workload is excessive, and processes developed to activate additional providersTeamwork should be actively encouraged in delivery of patient care. Historically, much of medical training has focused on individual knowledge, skills, and responsibility. As health care delivery has become more complex, it will be essential to train resident and attending physicians in effective teamwork that emphasizes collective responsibility for patient care and recognizes the signs, both individual and systemic, of a schedule and working conditions that are too demanding to be safeHospitals should embrace the opportunities that resident physician training redesign offers. Hospitals should recognize and act on the potential benefits of work redesign, eg, increased efficiency, reduced costs, improved quality of care, and resident physician and attending job satisfactionAttending physicians should supervise all hospital admissions. Resident physicians should directly discuss all admissions with attending physicians. Attending physicians should be both cognizant of and have input into the care patients are to receive upon admission to the hospitalInhouse supervision should be required for all critical care services, including emergency rooms, intensive care units, and trauma services. Resident physicians should not be left unsupervised to care for critically ill patients. In settings in which the acuity is high, physicians who have completed residency should provide direct supervision for resident physicians. Supervising physicians should always be physically in the hospital for supervision of resident physicians who care for critically ill patientsThe ACGME should explicitly define “good” supervision by specialty and by year of training. Explicit requirements for intensity and level of training for supervision of specific clinical scenarios should be providedCenters for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) should use graduate medical education funding to provide incentives to programs with proven, effective levels of supervision. Although this action would require federal legislation, reimbursement rules would help to ensure that hospitals pay attention to the importance of good supervision and require it from their training programs
Resident physician work hours
Although the IOM “Sleep, supervision and safety” report provides a comprehensive review and discussion of all aspects of graduate medical education training, the report’s focal point is its recommendations regarding the hours that resident physicians are currently required to work. A considerable body of scientific evidence, much of it cited by the Institute of Medicine report, describes deteriorating performance in fatigued humans, as well as specific studies on resident physician fatigue and preventable medical errors.
The question before this conference was what work redesign and cultural changes are needed to reform work hours as recommended by the Institute of Medicine’s evidence-based report? Extensive scientific data demonstrate that shifts exceeding 12–16 hours without sleep are unsafe. Several principles should be followed in efforts to reduce consecutive hours below this level and achieve safer work schedules. The recommendations are: Limit resident physician work hours to 12–16 hour maximum shiftsA minimum of 10 hours off duty should be scheduled between shiftsResident physician input into work redesign should be actively solicitedSchedules should be designed that adhere to principles of sleep and circadian science; this includes careful consideration of the effects of multiple consecutive night shifts, and provision of adequate time off after night work, as specified in the IOM reportResident physicians should not be scheduled up to the maximum permissible limits; emergencies frequently occur that require resident physicians to stay longer than their scheduled shifts, and this should be anticipated in scheduling resident physicians’ work shiftsHospitals should anticipate the need for iterative improvement as new schedules are initiated; be prepared to learn from the initial phase-in, and change the plan as neededAs resident physician work hours are redesigned, attending physicians should also be considered; a potential consequence of resident physician work hour reduction and increased supervisory requirements may be an increase in work for attending physicians; this should be carefully monitored, and adjustments to attending physician work schedules made as needed to prevent unsafe work hours or working conditions for this group“Home call” should be brought under the overall limits of working hours; work load and hours should be monitored in each residency program to ensure that resident physicians and fellows on home call are getting sufficient sleepMedicare funding for graduate medical education in each hospital should be linked with adherence to the Institute of Medicine limits on resident physician work hours
Moonlighting by resident physicians
The Institute of Medicine report recommended including external as well as internal moonlighting in working hour limits. The recommendation is: All moonlighting work hours should be included in the ACGME working hour limits and actively monitored. Hospitals should formalize a moonlighting policy and establish systems for actively monitoring resident physician moonlighting
Safety of resident physicians
The “Sleep, supervision and safety” report also addresses fatigue-related harm done to resident physicians themselves. The report focuses on two main sources of physical injury to resident physicians impaired by fatigue, ie, needle-stick exposure to blood-borne pathogens and motor vehicle crashes. Providing safe transportation home for resident physicians is a logistical and financial challenge for hospitals. Educating physicians at all levels on the dangers of fatigue is clearly required to change driving behavior so that safe hospital-funded transport home is used effectively. Fatigue-related injury prevention (including not driving while drowsy) should be taught in medical school and during residency, and reinforced with attending physicians; hospitals and residency programs must be informed that resident physicians’ ability to judge their own level of impairment is impaired when they are sleep deprived; hence, leaving decisions about the capacity to drive to impaired resident physicians is not recommendedHospitals should provide transportation to all resident physicians who report feeling too tired to drive safely; in addition, although consecutive work should not exceed 16 hours, hospitals should provide transportation for all resident physicians who, because of unforeseen reasons or emergencies, work for longer than consecutive 24 hours; transportation under these circumstances should be automatically provided to house staff, and should not rely on self-identification or request
Training in effective handovers and quality improvement
Handover practice for resident physicians, attendings, and other health care providers has long been identified as a weak link in patient safety throughout health care settings. Policies to improve handovers of care must be tailored to fit the appropriate clinical scenario, recognizing that information overload can also be a problem. At the heart of improving handovers is the organizational effort to improve quality, an effort in which resident physicians have typically been insufficiently engaged. The recommendations are: Hospitals should train attending and resident physicians in effective handovers of careHospitals should create uniform processes for handovers that are tailored to meet each clinical setting; all handovers should be done verbally and face-to-face, but should also utilize written toolsWhen possible, hospitals should integrate hand-over tools into their electronic medical records (EMR) systems; these systems should be standardized to the extent possible across residency programs in a hospital, but may be tailored to the needs of specific programs and services; federal government should help subsidize adoption of electronic medical records by hospitals to improve signoutWhen feasible, handovers should be a team effort including nurses, patients, and familiesHospitals should include residents in their quality improvement and patient safety efforts; the ACGME should specify in their core competency requirements that resident physicians work on quality improvement projects; likewise, the Joint Commission should require that resident physicians be included in quality improvement and patient safety programs at teaching hospitals; hospital administrators and residency program directors should create opportunities for resident physicians to become involved in ongoing quality improvement projects and root cause analysis teams; feedback on successful quality improvement interventions should be shared with resident physicians and broadly disseminatedQuality improvement/patient safety concepts should be integral to the medical school curriculum; medical school deans should elevate the topics of patient safety, quality improvement, and teamwork; these concepts should be integrated throughout the medical school curriculum and reinforced throughout residency; mastery of these concepts by medical students should be tested on the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) stepsFederal government should support involvement of resident physicians in quality improvement efforts; initiatives to improve quality by including resident physicians in quality improvement projects should be financially supported by the Department of Health and Human Services
Monitoring and oversight of the ACGME
While the ACGME is a key stakeholder in residency training, external voices are essential to ensure that public interests are heard in the development and monitoring of standards. Consequently, the Institute of Medicine report recommended external oversight and monitoring through the Joint Commission and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The recommendations are: Make comprehensive fatigue management a Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goal; fatigue is a safety concern not only for resident physicians, but also for nurses, attending physicians, and other health care workers; the Joint Commission should seek to ensure that all health care workers, not just resident physicians, are working as safely as possibleFederal government, including the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, should encourage development of comprehensive fatigue management programs which all health systems would eventually be required to implementMake ACGME compliance with working hours a “ condition of participation” for reimbursement of direct and indirect graduate medical education costs; financial incentives will greatly increase the adoption of and compliance with ACGME standards
Future financial support for implementation
The Institute of Medicine’s report estimates that $1.7 billion (in 2008 dollars) would be needed to implement its recommendations. Twenty-five percent of that amount ($376 million) will be required just to bring hospitals into compliance with the existing 2003 ACGME rules. Downstream savings to the health care system could potentially result from safer care, but these benefits typically do not accrue to hospitals and residency programs, who have been asked historically to bear the burden of residency reform costs. The recommendations are: The Institute of Medicine should convene a panel of stakeholders, including private and public funders of health care and graduate medical education, to lay down the concrete steps necessary to identify and allocate the resources needed to implement the recommendations contained in the IOM “Resident duty hours: Enhancing sleep, supervision and safety” report. Conference participants suggested several approaches to engage public and private support for this initiativeEfforts to find additional funding to implement the Institute of Medicine recommendations should focus more broadly on patient safety and health care delivery reform; policy efforts focused narrowly upon resident physician work hours are less likely to succeed than broad patient safety initiatives that include residency redesign as a key componentHospitals should view the Institute of Medicine recommendations as an opportunity to begin resident physician work redesign projects as the core of a business model that embraces safety and ultimately saves resourcesBoth the Secretary of Health and Human Services and the Director of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services should take the Institute of Medicine recommendations into consideration when promulgating rules for innovation grantsThe National Health Care Workforce Commission should consider the Institute of Medicine recommendations when analyzing the nation’s physician workforce needs
Recommendations for future research
Conference participants concurred that convening the stakeholders and agreeing on a research agenda was key. Some observed that some sectors within the medical education community have been reluctant to act on the data. Several logical funders for future research were identified. But above all agencies, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is the only stakeholder that funds graduate medical education upstream and will reap savings downstream if preventable medical errors are reduced as a result of reform of resident physician work hours.
doi:10.2147/NSS.S19649
PMCID: PMC3630963  PMID: 23616719
resident; hospital; working hours; safety
15.  Eurocan plus report: feasibility study for coordination of national cancer research activities 
Summary
The EUROCAN+PLUS Project, called for by the European Parliament, was launched in October 2005 as a feasibility study for coordination of national cancer research activities in Europe. Over the course of the next two years, the Project process organized over 60 large meetings and countless smaller meetings that gathered in total over a thousand people, the largest Europe–wide consultation ever conducted in the field of cancer research.
Despite a strong tradition in biomedical science in Europe, fragmentation and lack of sustainability remain formidable challenges for implementing innovative cancer research and cancer care improvement. There is an enormous duplication of research effort in the Member States, which wastes time, wastes money and severely limits the total intellectual concentration on the wide cancer problem. There is a striking lack of communication between some of the biggest actors on the European scene, and there are palpable tensions between funders and those researchers seeking funds.
It is essential to include the patients’ voice in the establishment of priority areas in cancer research at the present time. The necessity to have dialogue between funders and scientists to establish the best mechanisms to meet the needs of the entire community is evident. A top priority should be the development of translational research (in its widest form), leading to the development of effective and innovative cancer treatments and preventive strategies. Translational research ranges from bench–to–bedside innovative cancer therapies and extends to include bringing about changes in population behaviours when a risk factor is established.
The EUROCAN+PLUS Project recommends the creation of a small, permanent and independent European Cancer Initiative (ECI). This should be a model structure and was widely supported at both General Assemblies of the project. The ECI should assume responsibility for stimulating innovative cancer research and facilitating processes, becoming the common voice of the cancer research community and serving as an interface between the cancer research community and European citizens, patients’ organizations, European institutions, Member States, industry and small and medium enterprises (SMEs), putting into practice solutions aimed at alleviating barriers to collaboration and coordination of cancer research activities in the European Union, and dealing with legal and regulatory issues. The development of an effective ECI will require time, but this entity should be established immediately. As an initial step, coordination efforts should be directed towards the creation of a platform on translational research that could encompass (1) coordination between basic, clinical and epidemiological research; (2) formal agreements of co–operation between comprehensive cancer centres and basic research laboratories throughout Europe and (3) networking between funding bodies at the European level.
The European Parliament and its instruments have had a major influence in cancer control in Europe, notably in tobacco control and in the implementation of effective population–based screening. To make further progress there is a need for novelty and innovation in cancer research and prevention in Europe, and having a platform such as the ECI, where those involved in all aspects of cancer research can meet, discuss and interact, is a decisive development for Europe.
Executive Summary
Cancer is one of the biggest public health crises facing Europe in the 21st century—one for which Europe is currently not prepared nor preparing itself. Cancer is a major cause of death in Europe with two million casualties and three million new cases diagnosed annually, and the situation is set to worsen as the population ages.
These facts led the European Parliament, through the Research Directorate-General of the European Commission, to call for initiatives for better coordination of cancer research efforts in the European Union. The EUROCAN+PLUS Project was launched in October 2005 as a feasibility study for coordination of national cancer research activities. Over the course of the next two years, the Project process organized over 60 large meetings and countless smaller meetings that gathered in total over a thousand people. In this respect, the Project became the largest Europe-wide consultation ever conducted in the field of cancer research, implicating researchers, cancer centres and hospitals, administrators, healthcare professionals, funding agencies, industry, patients’ organizations and patients.
The Project first identified barriers impeding research and collaboration in research in Europe. Despite a strong tradition in biomedical science in Europe, fragmentation and lack of sustainability remain the formidable challenges for implementing innovative cancer research and cancer care improvement. There is an enormous duplication of research effort in the Member States, which wastes time, wastes money and severely limits the total intellectual concentration on the wide cancer problem. There is a striking lack of communication between some of the biggest actors on the European scene, and there are palpable tensions between funders and those researchers seeking funds.
In addition, there is a shortage of leadership, a multiplicity of institutions each focusing on its own agenda, sub–optimal contact with industry, inadequate training, non–existent career paths, low personnel mobility in research especially among clinicians and inefficient funding—all conspiring against efficient collaboration in cancer care and research. European cancer research today does not have a functional translational research continuum, that is the process that exploits biomedical research innovations and converts them into prevention methods, diagnostic tools and therapies. Moreover, epidemiological research is not integrated with other types of cancer research, and the implementation of the European Directives on Clinical Trials 1 and on Personal Data Protection 2 has further slowed the innovation process in Europe. Furthermore, large inequalities in health and research exist between the EU–15 and the New Member States.
The picture is not entirely bleak, however, as the European cancer research scene presents several strengths, such as excellent basic research and clinical research and innovative etiological research that should be better exploited.
When considering recommendations, several priority dimensions had to be retained. It is essential that proposals include actions and recommendations that can benefit all Member States of the European Union and not just States with the elite centres. It is also essential to have a broader patient orientation to help provide the knowledge to establish cancer control possibilities when we exhaust what can be achieved by the implementation of current knowledge. It is vital that the actions proposed can contribute to the Lisbon Strategy to make Europe more innovative and competitive in (cancer) research.
The Project participants identified six areas for which consensus solutions should be implemented in order to obtain better coordination of cancer research activities. The required solutions are as follows. The proactive management of innovation, detection, facilitation of collaborations and maintenance of healthy competition within the European cancer research community.The establishment of an exchange portal of information for health professionals, patients and policy makers.The provision of guidance for translational and clinical research including the establishment of a translational research platform involving comprehensive cancer centres and cancer research centres.The coordination of calls and financial management of cancer research projects.The construction of a ‘one–stop shop’ as a contact interface between the industry, small and medium enterprises, scientists and other stakeholders.The support of greater involvement of healthcare professionals in translational research and multidisciplinary training.
In the course of the EUROCAN+PLUS consultative process, several key collaborative projects emerged between the various groups and institutes engaged in the consultation. There was a collaboration network established with Europe’s leading Comprehensive Cancer Centres; funding was awarded for a closer collaboration of Owners of Cancer Registries in Europe (EUROCOURSE); there was funding received from FP7 for an extensive network of leading Biological Resource Centres in Europe (BBMRI); a Working Group identified the special needs of Central, Eastern and South–eastern Europe and proposed a remedy (‘Warsaw Declaration’), and the concept of developing a one–stop shop for dealing with academia and industry including the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) was discussed in detail.
Several other dimensions currently lacking were identified. There is an absolute necessity to include the patients’ voice in the establishment of priority areas in cancer research at the present time. It was a salutary lesson when it was recognized that all that is known about the quality of life of the cancer patient comes from the experience of a tiny proportion of cancer patients included in a few clinical trials. The necessity to have dialogue between funders and scientists to establish the best mechanisms to meet the needs of the entire community was evident. A top priority should be the development of translational research (in its widest form) and the development of effective and innovative cancer treatments and preventative strategies in the European Union. Translational research ranges from bench-to-bedside innovative cancer therapies and extends to include bringing about changes in population behaviours when a risk factor is established.
Having taken note of the barriers and the solutions and having examined relevant examples of existing European organizations in the field, it was agreed during the General Assembly of 19 November 2007 that the EUROCAN+PLUS Project had to recommend the creation of a small, permanent and neutral ECI. This should be a model structure and was widely supported at both General Assemblies of the project. The proposal is based on the successful model of the European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO), and its principal aims include providing a forum where researchers from all backgrounds and from all countries can meet with members of other specialities including patients, nurses, clinicians, funders and scientific administrators to develop priority programmes to make Europe more competitive in research and more focused on the cancer patient.
The ECI should assume responsibility for: stimulating innovative cancer research and facilitating processes;becoming the common voice of the cancer research community and serving as an interface between the cancer research community and European citizens, patients’ and organizations;European institutions, Member States, industry and small and medium enterprises;putting into practice the aforementioned solutions aimed at alleviating barriers and coordinating cancer research activities in the EU;dealing with legal and regulatory issues.
Solutions implemented through the ECI will lead to better coordination and collaboration throughout Europe, more efficient use of resources, an increase in Europe’s attractiveness to the biomedical industry and better quality of cancer research and education of health professionals.
The Project considered that European legal instruments currently available were inadequate for addressing many aspects of the barriers identified and for the implementation of effective, lasting solutions. Therefore, the legal environment that could shelter an idea like the ECI remains to be defined but should be done so as a priority. In this context, the initiative of the European Commission for a new legal entity for research infrastructure might be a step in this direction. The development of an effective ECI will require time, but this should be established immediately. As an initial step, coordination efforts should be directed towards the creation of a platform on translational research that could encompass: (1) coordination between basic, clinical and epidemiological research; (2) formal agreements of co-operation between comprehensive cancer centres and basic research laboratories throughout Europe; (3) networking between funding bodies at the European level. Another topic deserving immediate attention is the creation of a European database on cancer research projects and cancer research facilities.
Despite enormous progress in cancer control in Europe during the past two decades, there was an increase of 300,000 in the number of new cases of cancer diagnosed between 2004 and 2006. The European Parliament and its instruments have had a major influence in cancer control, notably in tobacco control and in the implementation of effective population–based screening. To make further progress there is a need for novelty and innovation in cancer research and prevention in Europe, and having a platform such as the ECI, where those involved in all aspects of cancer research can meet, discuss and interact, is a decisive development for Europe.
doi:10.3332/ecancer.2011.84
PMCID: PMC3234055  PMID: 22274749
16.  Place and Cause of Death in Centenarians: A Population-Based Observational Study in England, 2001 to 2010 
PLoS Medicine  2014;11(6):e1001653.
Catherine J. Evans and colleagues studied how many and where centenarians in England die, their causes of death, and how these measures have changed from 2001 to 2010.
Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary
Background
Centenarians are a rapidly growing demographic group worldwide, yet their health and social care needs are seldom considered. This study aims to examine trends in place of death and associations for centenarians in England over 10 years to consider policy implications of extreme longevity.
Methods and Findings
This is a population-based observational study using death registration data linked with area-level indices of multiple deprivations for people aged ≥100 years who died 2001 to 2010 in England, compared with those dying at ages 80-99. We used linear regression to examine the time trends in number of deaths and place of death, and Poisson regression to evaluate factors associated with centenarians’ place of death. The cohort totalled 35,867 people with a median age at death of 101 years (range: 100–115 years). Centenarian deaths increased 56% (95% CI 53.8%–57.4%) in 10 years. Most died in a care home with (26.7%, 95% CI 26.3%–27.2%) or without nursing (34.5%, 95% CI 34.0%–35.0%) or in hospital (27.2%, 95% CI 26.7%–27.6%). The proportion of deaths in nursing homes decreased over 10 years (−0.36% annually, 95% CI −0.63% to −0.09%, p = 0.014), while hospital deaths changed little (0.25% annually, 95% CI −0.06% to 0.57%, p = 0.09). Dying with frailty was common with “old age” stated in 75.6% of death certifications. Centenarians were more likely to die of pneumonia (e.g., 17.7% [95% CI 17.3%–18.1%] versus 6.0% [5.9%–6.0%] for those aged 80–84 years) and old age/frailty (28.1% [27.6%–28.5%] versus 0.9% [0.9%–0.9%] for those aged 80–84 years) and less likely to die of cancer (4.4% [4.2%–4.6%] versus 24.5% [24.6%–25.4%] for those aged 80–84 years) and ischemic heart disease (8.6% [8.3%–8.9%] versus 19.0% [18.9%–19.0%] for those aged 80–84 years) than were younger elderly patients. More care home beds available per 1,000 population were associated with fewer deaths in hospital (PR 0.98, 95% CI 0.98–0.99, p<0.001).
Conclusions
Centenarians are more likely to have causes of death certified as pneumonia and frailty and less likely to have causes of death of cancer or ischemic heart disease, compared with younger elderly patients. To reduce reliance on hospital care at the end of life requires recognition of centenarians’ increased likelihood to “acute” decline, notably from pneumonia, and wider provision of anticipatory care to enable people to remain in their usual residence, and increasing care home bed capacity.
Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary
Editors’ Summary
Background
People who live to be more than 100 years old—centenarians—are congratulated and honored in many countries. In the UK, for example, the Queen sends a personal greeting to individuals on their 100th birthday. The number of UK residents who reach this notable milestone is increasing steadily, roughly doubling every 10 years. The latest Office of National Statistics (ONS) figures indicate that 13,350 centenarians were living in the UK in 2012 (20 centenarians per 100,000 people in the population) compared to only 7,740 in 2002. If current trends continue, by 2066 there may be more than half a million centenarians living in the UK. And similar increases in the numbers of centenarians are being seen in many other countries. The exact number of centenarians living worldwide is uncertain but is thought to be around 317,000 and is projected to rise to about 18 million by the end of this century.
Why Was This Study Done?
Traditional blessings often include the wish that the blessing’s recipient lives to be at least 100 years old. However, extreme longevity is associated with increasing frailty—declining physical function, increasing disability, and increasing vulnerability to a poor clinical outcome following, for example, an infection. Consequently, many centenarians require 24-hour per day care in a nursing home or a residential care home. Moreover, although elderly people, including centenarians, generally prefer to die in a home environment rather than a clinical environment, many centenarians end up dying in a hospital. To ensure that centenarians get their preferred end-of-life care, policy makers and clinicians need to know as much as possible about the health and social needs of this specific and unique group of elderly people. In this population-based observational study, the researchers examine trends in the place of death and factors associated with the place of death among centenarians in England over a 10-year period.
What Did the Researchers Do and Find?
The researchers extracted information about the place and cause of death of centenarians in England between 2001 and 2010 from the ONS death registration database, linked these data with area level information on deprivation and care-home bed capacity, and analyzed the data statistically. Over the 10-year study period, 35,867 centenarians (mainly women, average age 101 years) died in England. The annual number of centenarian deaths increased from 2,823 in 2001 to 4,393 in 2010. Overall, three-quarters of centenarian death certificates stated “old age” as the cause of death. About a quarter of centenarians died in the hospital, a quarter died in a nursing home, and a third died in a care home without nursing; only one in ten centenarians died at home. The proportion of deaths in a nursing home increased slightly over the study period but there was little change in the number of hospital deaths. Compared with younger age groups (80–84 year olds), centenarians were more likely to die from pneumonia and “old age” and less likely to die from cancer and heart disease. Among centenarians, dying in the hospital was more likely to be reported to be associated with pneumonia or heart disease than with dementia; death in the hospital was also associated with having four or more contributing causes of death and with living in a deprived area. Finally, living in an area with a higher care-home bed capacity was associated with a lower risk of dying in the hospital.
What Do These Findings Mean?
These findings suggest that many centenarians have outlived death from the chronic diseases that are the common causes of death among younger groups of elderly people and that dying in the hospital is often associated with pneumonia. Overall, these findings suggest that centenarians are a group of people living with a risk of death from increasing frailty that is exacerbated by acute lung infection. The accuracy of these findings is likely to be affected by the quality of UK death certification data. Although this is generally high, the strength of some of the reported associations may be affected, for example, by the tendency of clinicians to record the cause of death in the very elderly as “old age” to provide some comfort to surviving relatives. Importantly, however, these findings suggest that care-home capacity and the provision of anticipatory care should be increased in England (and possibly in other countries) to ensure that more of the growing number of centenarians can end their long lives outside hospital.
Additional Information
Please access these websites via the online version of this summary at http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1001653.
The US National Institute on Aging provides information about healthy aging, including information on longevity (in English and Spanish)
The National End of Life Care Intelligence Network, England is a government organization that gathers data on care provided to adults approaching the end of life to improve service quality and productivity
The Worldwide Palliative Care Alliance promotes universal access to affordable palliative care through the support of regional and national palliative care organizations
The non-for-profit organization AgeUK provides information about all aspects of aging
Wikipedia has a page on centenarians (note that Wikipedia is a free online encyclopedia that anyone can edit; available in several languages)
The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population; its “Living Beyond 100” report examines the research base on centenarians and calls for policy to reflect the ongoing UK increase in extreme longevity
This study is part of GUIDE_Care, a project initiated by the Cicely Saunders Institute to investigate patterns in place of death and the factors that affect these patterns
doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001653
PMCID: PMC4043499  PMID: 24892645
17.  Planning elderly and palliative care in Montenegro 
Introduction
Montenegro, a newly independent Balkan state with a population of 650,000, has a health care reform programme supported by the World Bank. This paper describes planning for integrated elderly and palliative care.
Description
The current service is provided only through a single long-stay hospital, which has institutionalised patients and limited facilities. Broad estimates were made of current financial expenditures on elderly care. A consultation was undertaken with stakeholders to propose an integrated system linking primary and secondary health care with social care; supporting people to live, and die well, at home; developing local nursing homes for people with higher dependency; creating specialised elderly-care services within hospitals; and providing good end-of-life care for all who need it. Effectiveness may be measured by monitoring patient and carers’ perceptions of the care experience.
Discussion
Changes in provision of elderly care may be achieved through redirection of existing resources, but the health and social care services also need to enhance elderly care budgets. The challenges for implementation include management skills, engaging professionals and political commitment.
Conclusion
Middle-income countries such as Montenegro can develop elderly and palliative care services through redirection of existing finance if accompanied by new service objectives, staff skills and integrated management.
PMCID: PMC2691939  PMID: 19513178
planning; elderly; palliative care; economics; Europe
18.  Changing Patterns in Place of Cancer Death in England: A Population-Based Study 
PLoS Medicine  2013;10(3):e1001410.
Wei Gao and colleagues describe how location of death has changed for patients with cancer in England between 1993 and 2010.
Background
Most patients with cancer prefer to die at home or in a hospice, but hospitals remain the most common place of death (PoD).This study aims to explore the changing time trends of PoD and the associated factors, which are essential for end-of-life care improvement.
Methods and Findings
The study analysed all cancer deaths in England collected by the Office for National Statistics during 1993–2010 (n = 2,281,223). Time trends of age- and gender-standardised proportion of deaths in individual PoDs were evaluated using weighted piecewise linear regression. Variables associated with PoD (home or hospice versus hospital) were determined using proportion ratio (PR) derived from the log-binomial regression, adjusting for clustering effects. Hospital remained the most common PoD throughout the study period (48.0%; 95% CI 47.9%–48.0%), followed by home (24.5%; 95% CI 24.4%–24.5%), and hospice (16.4%; 95% CI 16.3%–16.4%). Home and hospice deaths increased since 2005 (0.87%; 95% CI 0.74%–0.99%/year, 0.24%; 95% CI 0.17%–0.32%/year, respectively, p<0.001), while hospital deaths declined (−1.20%; 95% CI −1.41 to −0.99/year, p<0.001). Patients who died from haematological cancer (PRs 0.46–0.52), who were single, widowed, or divorced (PRs 0.75–0.88), and aged over 75 (PRs 0.81–0.84 for 75–84; 0.66–0.72 for 85+) were less likely to die in home or hospice (p<0.001; reference groups: colorectal cancer, married, age 25–54). There was little improvement in patients with lung cancer of dying in home or hospice (PRs 0.87–0.88). Marital status became the second most important factor associated with PoD, after cancer type. Patients from less deprived areas (higher quintile of the deprivation index) were more likely to die at home or in a hospice than those from more deprived areas (lower quintile of the deprivation index; PRs 1.02–1.12). The analysis is limited by a lack of data on individual patients' preferences for PoD or a clinical indication of the most appropriate PoD.
Conclusions
More efforts are needed to reduce hospital deaths. Health care facilities should be improved and enhanced to support the increased home and hospice deaths. People who are single, widowed, or divorced should be a focus for end-of-life care improvement, along with known at risk groups such as haematological cancer, lung cancer, older age, and deprivation.
Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary
Editors' Summary
Background
Death is the only certain event in our lives. Consequently, end-of-life care is an issue that is relevant to everyone, and everyone hopes for a “good death” (a death that is free from avoidable distress and suffering) for themselves and for their loved ones. Many factors contribute to a good death, including the place of death. When asked, most people say they would rather die at home or in a hospice (a care facility that gives supportive care to people in the final phase of a terminal illness and that focuses on comfort and quality of life rather than on cure) than in a hospital. Importantly, patients who die at home or in a hospice often have a better quality of life than those who die in hospital, and caring for terminally ill patients in the community is less expensive than caring for them in hospital.
Why Was This Study Done?
Many countries have introduced end-of-life care policies that are designed to enable more people to die at home or in hospices. England, for example, implemented its National End of Life Care Programme in 2004. However, to improve end-of-life care services and to enable more people to die in their preferred place, we need to understand how the patterns of place of death and the factors that affect the place of death are changing over time. In this population-based study, the researchers examine the changing pattern of place of death of people with cancer and the factors associated with place of death in England between 1993 and 2010. Cancer is a leading cause of death globally and is responsible for 8 million deaths annually. Deaths from cancer still occur most commonly in hospitals, which are the least preferred place of death for people with cancer; home and hospices are the first and second preferred places of death, respectively, for such people.
What Did the Researchers Do and Find?
The researchers used death registration data collected by the Office of National Statistics to identify all the adult cancer deaths in England between 1993 and 2010 (2.28 million deaths) and to determine where these deaths occurred, time trends in place of death, and the factors associated with place of death. Hospital was the commonest place of death throughout the study period—48% of cancer deaths occurred in hospital, 24.5% at home, and 16.4% in hospices. The proportion of home deaths increased after 2005 whereas the proportion of hospital deaths declined. The proportion of deaths in hospices also increased over the study period. The most important factor associated with place of death was cancer site. For example, patients who died from a blood (hematological) cancer were more likely to die in hospital than patients with colorectal cancer throughout the study period although the proportion dying at home or in a hospice increased over time. Being single, widowed, or divorced was associated with a higher likelihood of dying in hospital than being married. Being over 75 was associated with a higher likelihood of dying in hospital than being 25–54 although elderly people were more likely to die at home or in a hospice after 2006 than in earlier periods.
What Do These Findings Mean?
These findings show that the hospital is still the commonest place of death for patients with cancer in England. However, the increase in home and hospice deaths since 2005 suggests that the National End of Life Care Programme has enabled more people to die at their preferred place of death. These findings identify cancer site, marital status, and age as the three most important factors associated with place of death for patients with cancer. Because the study is a large-scale, population-based study, these findings are likely to be generalizable to other high-income settings. However, because the study did not include data on individual patient preferences for place of death, these findings should be applied with care to individual patients. Importantly, these findings indicate that more needs to be done to support people with cancer (and other terminal illnesses) who wish to die at home or in a hospice. Moreover, they identify groups of people—single, widowed or divorced individuals, older people, and people with specific types of cancer—who need extra help to ensure that they are able to choose where they die.
Additional Information
Please access these Web sites via the online version of this summary at http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1001410.
The Cicely Saunders International, a not-for-profit organization, promotes research to improve the care and treatment of all patients with terminal illnesses at home, in hospices and in hospital; its website includes information on end-of-life care and on Cicely Saunders, the founder of the hospice movement in England
This study is part of GUIDE_Care, a project initiated by the Cicely Saunders Institute to investigate patterns in place of death and the factors that affect these patterns
Information on the National End of Life Care Programme is available
The UK National Health Service Choices website provides information (including videos of personal experiences) on end-of-life issues for carers, information on end-of-life care for patients with cancer, and an end-of-life care guide for people approaching the end of their life
The US National Cancer Institute has a fact sheet on end-of-life care for people who have cancer and provides information on hospice care and home care for patients with cancer (in English and Spanish)
The not-for-profit organization HealthTalkOnline provides personal stories about living with dying
The NHS National End of Life Intelligence Network (NEoLCIN) provides information on broad issues about end-of-life care
The South West Public Health Observatory (SWPHO) aims to improve the health of the population through producing evidence to inform decision making on health issues at local, regional, and national levels. SWPHO also produces specific end-of-life care resources (e.g., specialised reports, end-of-life care profiles) and disseminates it via the NEoLCIN website
doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001410
PMCID: PMC3608543  PMID: 23555201
19.  Integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI) strategy for children under five 
Background
More than 7.5 million children younger than age five living in low- and middle-income countries die every year. The World Health Organization (WHO) developed the integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI) strategy to reduce mortality and morbidity and to improve quality of care by improving the delivery of a variety of curative and preventive medical and behavioral interventions at health facilities, at home, and in the community.
Objectives
To evaluate the effects of programs that implement the IMCI strategy in terms of death, nutritional status, quality of care, coverage with IMCI deliverables, and satisfaction of beneficiaries.
Search methods
We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 3), including the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Specialised Register; MEDLINE; EMBASE, Ovid; the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), EbscoHost; the Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS), Virtual Health Library (VHL); the WHO Library & Information Networks for Knowledge Database (WHOLIS); the Science Citation Index and Social Sciences Citation Index, Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science; Population Information Online (POPLINE); the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP); and the Global Health, Ovid and Health Management, ProQuest database. We performed searches until 30 June 2015 and supplemented these by searching revised bibliographies and by contacting experts to identify ongoing and unpublished studies.
Selection criteria
We sought to include randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled before-after (CBA) studies with at least two intervention and two control sites evaluating the generic IMCI strategy or its adaptation in children younger than age five, and including at minimum efforts to improve health care worker skills for case management. We excluded studies in which IMCI was accompanied by other interventions including conditional cash transfers, food supplementation, and employment. The comparison group received usual health services without provision of IMCI.
Data collection and analysis
Two review authors independently screened searches, selected trials, and extracted, analysed and tabulated data. We used inverse variance for cluster trials and an intracluster co-efficient of 0.01 when adjustment had not been made in the primary study. We used the GRADE (Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation Working Group) approach to assess the certainty of evidence.
Main results
Two cluster-randomised trials (India and Bangladesh) and two controlled before-after studies (Tanzania and India) met our inclusion criteria. Strategies included training of health care staff, management strengthening of health care systems (all four studies), and home visiting (two studies). The two studies from India included care packages targeting the neonatal period.
One trial in Bangladesh estimated that child mortality may be 13% lower with IMCI, but the confidence interval (CI) included no effect (risk ratio (RR) 0.87, 95% CI 0.68 to 1.10; 5090 participants; low-certainty evidence). One CBA study in Tanzania gave almost identical estimates (RR 0.87, 95% CI 0.72 to 1.05; 1932 participants).
One trial in India examined infant and neonatal mortality by implementing the integrated management of neonatal and childhood illness (IMNCI) strategy including post-natal home visits. Neonatal and infant mortality may be lower in the IMNCI group compared with the control group (infant mortality hazard ratio (HR) 0.85, 95% CI 0.77 to 0.94; neonatal mortality HR 0.91, 95% CI 0.80 to 1.03; one trial, 60,480 participants; low-certainty evidence).
We estimated the effect of IMCI on any mortality measured by combining infant and child mortality in the one IMCI and the one IMNCI trial. Mortality may be reduced by IMCI (RR 0.85, 95% CI 0.78 to 0.93; two trials, 65,570 participants; low-certainty evidence).
Two trials (India, Bangladesh) evaluated nutritional status and noted that there may be little or no effect on stunting (RR 0.94, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.06; 5242 participants, two trials; low-certainty evidence) and there is probably little or no effect on wasting (RR 1.04, 95% CI 0.87 to 1.25; two trials, 4288 participants; moderate-certainty evidence).The Tanzania CBA study showed similar results.
Investigators measured quality of care by observing prescribing for common illnesses at health facilities (727 observations, two studies; very low-certainty evidence) and by observing prescribing by lay health care workers (1051 observations, three studies; very low-certainty evidence). We could not confirm a consistent effect on prescribing at health facilities or by lay health care workers, as certainty of the evidence was very low.
For coverage of IMCI deliverables, we examined vaccine and vitamin A coverage, appropriate care seeking, and exclusive breast feeding. Two trials (India, Bangladesh) estimated vaccine coverage for measles and reported that there is probably little or no effect on measles vaccine coverage (RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.80 to 1.05; two trials, 4895 participants; moderate-certainty evidence), with similar effects seen in the Tanzania CBA study. Two studies measured the third dose of diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus vaccine; and two measured vitamin A coverage, all providing little or no evidence of increased coverage with IMCI.
Four studies (2 from India, and 1 each from Tanzania and Bangladesh) reported appropriate care seeking and derived information from careful questioning of mothers about recent illness. Some studies on effects of IMCI may report better care seeking behavior, but others do not report this.
All four studies recorded maternal responses on exclusive breast feeding. They provided mixed results and very low-certainty evidence. Therefore, we do not know whether IMCI impacts exclusive breast feeding.
No studies reported on the satisfaction of mothers and service users.
Authors' conclusions
The mix of interventions examined in research studies evaluating the IMCI strategy varies, and some studies include specific inputs to improve neonatal health. Most studies were conducted in South Asia. Implementing the integrated management of childhood illness strategy may reduce child mortality, and packages that include interventions for the neonatal period may reduce infant mortality. IMCI may have little or no effect on nutritional status and probably has little or no effect on vaccine coverage. Maternal care seeking behavior may be more appropriate with IMCI, but study results have been mixed, providing evidence of very low certainty about whether IMCI has effects on adherence to exclusive breast feeding.
PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY
Integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI) strategy for children younger than five years of age
What is the aim of this review?
The aim of this Cochrane review is to assess the effects of programs that use the World Health Organization integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI) strategy. Cochrane researchers searched for all potentially relevant studies and found four studies that met review criteria.
Key messages
This review shows that use of the World Health Organization IMCI strategy may led to fewer deaths among children from birth to five years of age. Effects of IMCI on other issues, such as illness or quality of care, were mixed, and some evidence of this was of very low certainty. In the future, researchers should explore how the IMCI strategy can best be delivered.
What was studied in the review?
More than 7.5 million children globally die each year before reaching the age of five. Most are from poor communities and live in the poorest countries. These children are more likely than others to suffer from malnutrition and from infections such as neonatal sepsis, measles, diarrhoea, malaria, and pneumonia.
Effective strategies to prevent and treat sick children are available but do not reach them. One reason for this is that health care services are often too far away or too expensive. Health facilities in these settings often lack supplies and well-trained health care workers. In addition, ill children may have several health problems at the same time, and this can make diagnosis and treatment difficult for health care workers.
In the 1990s, the World Health Organization (WHO) developed a strategy called integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI) to address these problems. This strategy aims to prevent death and disease while improving the quality of care for ill children up to the age of five. It consists of three parts.
• Improving the skills of health care workers by providing training and guidelines.
• Improving how health care systems are organized and managed, including access to supplies.
• Visiting homes and communities to promote good child rearing practices and good nutrition, while encouraging parents to bring their children to a clinic when the children are ill.
The WHO encourages countries to adapt the IMCI strategy to their own national settings. Types of childhood illnesses prioritised and ways in which services are delivered may vary from country to country.
What are the main results of the review?
This Cochrane review included four studies assessing the effectiveness of the IMCI strategy. These studies were conducted in Tanzania, Bangladesh, and India. The IMCI strategy was used very differently across studies. For instance, the study from Tanzania implemented health care worker training and improved drug supply but did not include home visits or community activities; the study from Bangladesh added new health care workers while training existing health care workers; and the two Indian studies specifically targeted newborns as well as older children.
This review showed that use of IMCI:
• may lead to fewer deaths among children from birth to five years of age (low-certainty evidence);
• may have little or no effect on the number of children suffering from stunting (low-certainty evidence);
• probably has little or no effect on the number of children suffering from wasting (moderate-certainty evidence);
• probably has little or no effect on the number of children who receive measles vaccines; and
• may lead to mixed results on the number of parents seeking care for their child when he or she is ill.
We do not know whether IMCI has any effect on the way health care workers treat common illnesses because certainty of the evidence was assessed as very low.
We do not know whether IMCI has any effect on the number of mothers who exclusively breast feed their child, because certainty of the evidence was assessed as very low.
None of the included studies assessed the satisfaction of mothers and service users by using an IMCI strategy.
How up-to-date is this review?
Review authors searched for studies that had been published up to 30 June 2015.
doi:10.1002/14651858.CD010123.pub2
PMCID: PMC4943011  PMID: 27378094
20.  Hospital at home admission avoidance 
Background
Admission avoidance hospital at home is a service that provides active treatment by health care professionals in the patient’s home for a condition that otherwise would require acute hospital in-patient care, and always for a limited time period. In particular, hospital at home has to offer a specific service to patients in their home requiring health care professionals to take an active part in the patients’ care. If hospital at home were not available then the patient would be admitted to an acute hospital ward. Many countries are adopting this type of care in an attempt to reduce the demand for acute hospital admission.
Objectives
To determine, in the context of a systematic review and meta analysis, the effectiveness and cost of managing patients with admission avoidance hospital at home compared with in-patient hospital care.
Search methods
The following databases were searched through to January 2008: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, EconLit and the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group (EPOC) register. We checked the reference lists of articles identified electronically for evaluations of hospital at home and obtained potentially relevant articles. Unpublished studies were sought by contacting providers and researchers who were known to be involved in this field.
Selection criteria
Randomised controlled trials recruiting patients aged 18 years and over. Studies comparing admission avoidance hospital at home with acute hospital in-patient care. The admission avoidance hospital at home interventions may admit patients directly from the community thereby avoiding physical contact with the hospital, or may admit from the emergency room.
Data collection and analysis
Two authors independently extracted data and assessed study quality. Our statistical analyses sought to include all randomised patients and were done on an intention to treat basis. We requested individual patient data (IPD) from trialists, and relied on published data when we did not receive trial data sets or the IPD did not include the relevant outcomes. When combining outcome data was not possible because of differences in the reporting of outcomes we have presented the data in narrative summary tables.
For the IPD meta-analysis, where at least one event was reported in both study groups in a trial, Cox regression models were used to calculate the log hazard ratio and its standard error for mortality and readmission separately for each data set (where both outcomes were available). We included randomisation group (admission avoidance hospital at home versus control), age (above or below the median), and gender in the models. The calculated log hazard ratios were combined using fixed effects inverse variance meta analysis. If there were no events in one group we used the Peto odds ratio method to calculate a log odds ratio from the sum of the log-rank test ‘O-E’ statistics from a Kaplan Meier survival analysis. Statistical significance throughout was taken at the two-sided 5% level (p<0.05) and data are presented as the estimated effect with 95% confidence intervals. For each comparison using published data for dichotomous outcomes we calculated risk ratios using a fixed effects model to combine data.
Main results
We included 10 RCTs (n=1333), seven of which were eligible for the IPD. Five out of these seven trials contributed to the IPD meta-analysis (n=850/975; 87%). There was a non significant reduction in mortality at three months for the admission avoidance hospital at home group (adjusted HR 0.77, 95% CI 0.54 to 1.09; p=0.15), which reached significance at six months follow-up (adjusted HR 0.62, 95% CI 0.45 to 0.87; p=0.005). A non significant increase in admissions was observed for patients allocated to hospital at home (adjusted HR 1.49, 95% CI 0.96 to 2.33; p=0.08). Few differences were reported for functional ability, quality of life or cognitive ability. Patients reported increased satisfaction with admission avoidance hospital at home. Two trials conducted a full economic analysis, when the costs of informal care were excluded admission avoidance hospital at home was less expensive than admission to an acute hospital ward.
Authors’ conclusions
We performed meta-analyses where there was sufficient similarity among the trials and where common outcomes had been measured. There is no evidence from the analysis to suggest that admission avoidance hospital at home leads to outcomes that differ from inpatient hospital care.
doi:10.1002/14651858.CD007491
PMCID: PMC4033791  PMID: 18843751
Home Care Services [economics; *organization & administration]; Home Care Services, Hospital-Based [economics; *organization & administration]; Hospitalization; Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care); Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Humans
21.  Strategy for care for the elderly persons in Slovenia 
Introduction
The size and age-structure of Europe’s population is undergoing dramatic changes due to low fertility rates, continuous increases in life expectancy and the retirement of the baby-boom generation. ‘The Strategy for care for the elderly till 2010—Solidarity, good intergenerational relations and quality ageing of the population’, prepared by Ministry of Labour, Family and Social Affairs, is the response of the Republic of Slovenia to the ageing society and to the European demands for new solidarity between the generations. The main purpose of the strategy is to create good conditions for preserving and strengthening solidarity, for good intergenerational relations and to ensure quality ageing and care for the fast growing third generation. Special attention is given to the long-term care and the implementation of the new insurance for it.
Description of care
Slovenia was 40 years ago one of the first countries with an efficient gerontological institute. The social welfare system in Slovenia today is based on the welfare system of public social insurance implemented in former Yugoslavia, which for elderly primarily developed nursing homes. Nursing homes in Slovenia are fully occupied at the moment. There are approximately 3.8% of people older than 65 live in nursing homes. The number of applications has been growing and waiting list for a bed to become available has been prolonging.
Discussion
Like in other European countries, there are also in Slovenia trends toward developing specific services for the elderly, adjusted to their needs and preferences. However, to a large share of the elderly population these services are not accessible—partly due to their small number and partly due to their high price. Furthermore, the majority of the elderly people wish to live in their current dwelling and familiar environment.
Conclusion
In developed societies the quality of life of the elderly population is coming to the forefront of research, as well as political agendas. This strategy is the only Slovenian document of this kind, in which different ministries took part in setting goals regarding ageing population. The strategy covers work of the governmental departments of work, employment, social care, health care, education, economy, traffic, science and other relevant areas and the civil society of the Third sector.
PMCID: PMC2707533
elderly; services; ageing; strategy for long-term care
22.  Seniors managing multiple medications: using mixed methods to view the home care safety lens 
Background
Patient safety is a national and international priority with medication safety earmarked as both a prevalent and high-risk area of concern. To date, medication safety research has focused overwhelmingly on institutional based care provided by paid healthcare professionals, which often has little applicability to the home care setting. This critical gap in our current understanding of medication safety in the home care sector is particularly evident with the elderly who often manage more than one chronic illness and a complex palette of medications, along with other care needs. This study addresses the medication management issues faced by seniors with chronic illnesses, their family, caregivers, and paid providers within Canadian publicly funded home care programs in Alberta (AB), Ontario (ON), Quebec (QC) and Nova Scotia (NS).
Methods
Informed by a socio-ecological perspective, this study utilized Interpretive Description (ID) methodology and participatory photographic methods to capture and analyze a range of visual and textual data. Three successive phases of data collection and analysis were conducted in a concurrent, iterative fashion in eight urban and/or rural households in each province. A total of 94 participants (i.e., seniors receiving home care services, their family/caregivers, and paid providers) were interviewed individually. In addition, 69 providers took part in focus groups. Analysis was iterative and concurrent with data collection in that each interview was compared with subsequent interviews for converging as well as diverging patterns.
Results
Six patterns were identified that provide a rich portrayal of the complexity of medication management safety in home care: vulnerabilities that impact the safe management and storage of medication, sustaining adequate supports, degrees of shared accountability for care, systems of variable effectiveness, poly-literacy required to navigate the system, and systemic challenges to maintaining medication safety in the home.
Conclusions
There is a need for policy makers, health system leaders, care providers, researchers, and educators to work with home care clients and caregivers on three key messages for improvement: adapt care delivery models to the home care landscape; develop a palette of user-centered tools to support medication safety in the home; and strengthen health systems integration.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12913-015-1193-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/s12913-015-1193-5
PMCID: PMC4677040  PMID: 26651331
Medication management; Mixed methods; Human factors; Home care safety; Patient safety; Seniors; Caregivers; Family; Paid providers; Poly-pharmacy; Chronic illness; Complex care
23.  Exploring access to care among older people in the last phase of life using the behavioural model of health services use: a qualitative study from the perspective of the next of kin of older persons who had died in a nursing home 
BMC Geriatrics  2015;15:138.
Background
There is little investigation into what care older people access during the last phase of their life and what factors enable access to care in this group. Illuminating this from the perspective of the next of kin may provide valuable insights into how the health and social care system operates with reference to providing care for this vulnerable group. The behavioural model of health services use has a wide field of application but has not been tested conceptually regarding access to care from the perspective of the next of kin. The aim of this study was to explore the care accessed by older people during the last phase of their life from the perspective of the next of kin and to conceptually test the behavioural model of health services use.
Methods
The data collection took place in 2011 by means of qualitative interviews with 14 next of kin of older people who had died in a nursing home. The interviews were analysed using directed content analysis. The behavioural model of health services use was used in deriving the initial coding scheme, including the categories: utilization of health services, consumer satisfaction and characteristics of the population at risk.
Results
Utilization of health services in the last phase of life was described in five subcategories named after the type of care accessed i.e. admission to a nursing home, primary healthcare, hospital care, dental care and informal care. The needs were illuminated in the subcategories: general deterioration, medical conditions and acute illness and deterioration when death approaches. Factors that enabled access to care were described in three subcategories: the organisation of care, next of kin and the older person. These factors could also constitute barriers to accessing care. Next of kin’s satisfaction with care was illuminated in the subcategories: satisfaction, dissatisfaction and factors influencing satisfaction. One new category was constructed inductively: the situation of the next of kin.
Conclusions
A bed in a nursing home was often accessed during what the next of kin regarded as the last phase of life. The needs among older people in the last phase of life can be regarded as complex and worsening over time. Most enabling factors lied within the organisation of care but the next of kin enabled access to care and contributed significantly to care quality. More research is needed regarding ageism and stigmatic attitudes among professionals and informal caregivers acting as a barrier to accessing care for older people in the last phase of their life. The behavioural model of health services use was extended with a new category showing that the situation of the next of kin must be taken into consideration when investigating access to care from their perspective. It may also be appropriate to include informal care as part of the concept of access when investigating access to care among older people in the last phase of their life. The results may not be transferable to older people who have not gained access to a bed in a nursing home or to countries where the healthcare system differs largely from the Swedish.
doi:10.1186/s12877-015-0126-9
PMCID: PMC4624384  PMID: 26502955
Health services accessibility; Aged/80 and over; Next of kin; Nursing homes; Qualitative Research
24.  The Effectiveness of Emergency Obstetric Referral Interventions in Developing Country Settings: A Systematic Review 
PLoS Medicine  2012;9(7):e1001264.
In a systematic review of the literature, Julia Hussein and colleagues seek to determine the effect of referral interventions that enable emergency access to health facilities for pregnant women living in developing countries.
Background
Pregnancy complications can be unpredictable and many women in developing countries cannot access health facilities where life-saving care is available. This study assesses the effects of referral interventions that enable pregnant women to reach health facilities during an emergency, after the decision to seek care is made.
Methods and findings
Selected bibliographic databases were searched with no date or language restrictions. Randomised controlled trials and quasi experimental study designs with a comparison group were included. Outcomes of interest included maternal and neonatal mortality and other intermediate measures such as service utilisation. Two reviewers independently selected, appraised, and extracted articles using predefined fields. Forest plots, tables, and qualitative summaries of study quality, size, and direction of effect were used for analysis.
Nineteen studies were included. In South Asian settings, four studies of organisational interventions in communities that generated funds for transport reduced neonatal deaths, with the largest effect seen in India (odds ratio 0·48 95% CI 0·34–0·68). Three quasi experimental studies from sub-Saharan Africa reported reductions in stillbirths with maternity waiting home interventions, with one statistically significant result (OR 0.56 95% CI 0.32–0.96). Effects of interventions on maternal mortality were unclear. Referral interventions usually improved utilisation of health services but the opposite effect was also documented. The effects of multiple interventions in the studies could not be disentangled. Explanatory mechanisms through which the interventions worked could not be ascertained.
Conclusions
Community mobilisation interventions may reduce neonatal mortality but the contribution of referral components cannot be ascertained. The reduction in stillbirth rates resulting from maternity waiting homes needs further study. Referral interventions can have unexpected adverse effects. To inform the implementation of effective referral interventions, improved monitoring and evaluation practices are necessary, along with studies that develop better understanding of how interventions work.
Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary
Editors' Summary
Background
Every year, about 350,000 women die from pregnancy- or childbirth-related complications. Almost all of these “maternal” deaths occur in developing countries. In sub-Saharan Africa, for example, the maternal mortality ratio (MMR, the number of maternal deaths per 100,000 live births) is 500 and a woman's life-time risk of dying from complications of pregnancy or childbirth is 1 in 39. By contrast, the MMR in industrialized countries is 12 and women have a life-time risk of maternal death of 1 in 4,700. Most maternal deaths are caused by hemorrhage (severe bleeding after childbirth), post-delivery infections, obstructed (difficult) labor, and blood pressure disorders during pregnancy, all of which are preventable or treatable conditions. Unfortunately, it is hard to predict which women will develop pregnancy complications, many complications rapidly become life-threatening and, in developing countries, women often deliver at home, far from emergency obstetric services; obstetrics deals with the care of women and their children during pregnancy, childbirth, and the postnatal period.
Why Was This Study Done?
It should be possible to reduce maternal deaths (and the deaths of babies during pregnancy, childbirth, and early life) in developing countries by ensuring that pregnant women are referred to emergency obstetric services quickly when the need arises. Unfortunately, in such countries referral to emergency obstetric care is beset with problems such as difficult geographical terrain, transport costs, lack of vehicles, and suboptimal location and distribution of health care facilities. In this systematic review (a study that uses predefined criteria to identify all the research on a given topic), the researchers assess the effectiveness of interventions designed to reduce the “phase II delay” in referral to emergency obstetric care in developing countries—the time it takes a woman to reach an appropriate health care facility once a problem has been recognized and the decision has been taken to seek care. Delays in diagnosis and the decision to seek care are phase I delays in referral, whereas delays in receiving care once a women reaches a health care facility are phase III delays.
What Did the Researchers Do and Find?
The researchers identified 19 published studies that described 14 interventions designed to overcome phase II delays in emergency obstetric referral and that met their criteria for inclusion in their systematic review. About half of the interventions were organizational. That is, they were designed to overcome barriers to referral such as costs. Most of the remaining interventions were structural. That is, they involved the provision of, for example, ambulances and maternity waiting homes—placed close to a health care facility where women can stay during late pregnancy. Although seven studies provided data on maternal mortality, none showed a sustained, statistically significant reduction (a reduction unlikely to have occurred by chance) in maternal deaths. Four studies in South Asia in which communities generated funds for transport reduced neonatal deaths (deaths of babies soon after birth), but the only statistically significant effect of this community mobilization intervention was seen in India where neonatal deaths were halved. Three studies from sub-Saharan Africa reported that the introduction of maternity waiting homes reduced stillbirths but this reduction was only significant in one study. Finally, although referral interventions generally improved the utilization of health services, in one study the provision of bicycle ambulances to take women to the hospital reduced the proportion of women delivering in health facilities, probably because women felt that bicycle ambulances drew unwanted attention to them during labor and so preferred to stay at home.
What Do These Findings Mean?
These findings suggest that community mobilization interventions may reduce neonatal mortality and that maternity waiting rooms may reduce stillbirths. Importantly, they also highlight how referral interventions can have unexpected adverse effects. However, because the studies included in this systematic review included multiple interventions designed to reduce delays at several stages of the referral process, it is not possible to disentangle the contribution of each component of the intervention. Moreover, it is impossible at present to determine why (or even if) any of the interventions reduced maternal mortality. Thus, the researchers conclude, improved monitoring of interventions and better evaluation of outcomes is essential to inform the implementation of effective referral interventions, and more studies are needed to improve understanding of how referral interventions work.
Additional Information
Please access these Web sites via the online version of this summary at http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1001264.
The United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) provides information on maternal mortality, including the WHO/UNICEF./UNFPA/World Bank 2008 country estimates of maternal mortality
The World Health Organization provides information on maternal health, including information about Millennium Development Goal 5, which aims to reduce maternal mortality (in several languages); the Millennium Development Goals, which were agreed by world leaders in 2000, are designed to eradicate extreme poverty worldwide by 2015
Immpact is a global research initiative for the evaluation of safe motherhood intervention strategies
Veil of Tears contains personal stories from Afghanistan about loss in childbirth; the non-governmental health development organization AMREF provides personal stories about maternal health in Africa
Maternal Death: The Avoidable Crisis is a briefing paper published by Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in March 2012
doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001264
PMCID: PMC3393680  PMID: 22807658
25.  In-service training for health professionals to improve care of seriously ill newborns and children in low-income countries 
Background
A variety of in-service emergency care training courses are currently being promoted as a strategy to improve the quality of care provided to seriously ill newborns and children in low-income countries. Most courses have been developed in high-income countries. However, whether these courses improve the ability of health professionals to provide appropriate care in low-income countries remains unclear. This is the first update of the original review.
Objectives
To assess the effects of in-service emergency care training on health professionals' treatment of seriously ill newborns and children in low-income countries.
Search methods
For this update, we searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, part of The Cochrane Library (http://www.cochranelibrary.com); MEDLINE, Ovid SP; EMBASE, Ovid SP; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), part of The Cochrane Library (http://www.cochranelibrary.com) (including the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Specialised Register); Science Citation Index and Social Sciences Citation Index, Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Knowledge/Science and eight other databases. We performed database searches in February 2015. We also searched clinical trial registries, websites of relevant organisations and reference lists of related reviews. We applied no date, language or publication status restrictions when conducting the searches.
Selection criteria
Randomised trials, non-randomised trials, controlled before and after studies and interrupted-time-series studies that compared the effects of in-service emergency care training versus usual care were eligible for inclusion. We included only hospital-based studies and excluded community-based studies. Two review authors independently screened and selected studies for inclusion.
Data collection and analysis
Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed study risk of bias and confidence in effect estimates (certainty of evidence) for each outcome using GRADE (Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation). We described results and presented them in GRADE tables.
Main results
We identified no new studies in this update. Two randomised trials (which were included in the original review) met the review eligibility criteria. In the first trial, newborn resuscitation training compared with usual care improved provider performance of appropriate resuscitation (trained 66% vs usual care 27%, risk ratio 2.45, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.75 to 3.42; moderate certainty evidence) and reduced inappropriate resuscitation (trained mean 0.53 vs usual care 0.92, mean difference 0.40, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.66; moderate certainty evidence). Effect on neonatal mortality was inconclusive (trained 28% vs usual care 25%, risk ratio 0.77, 95% CI 0.40 to 1.48; N = 27 deaths; low certainty evidence). Findings from the second trial suggest that essential newborn care training compared with usual care probably slightly improves delivery room newborn care practices (assessment of breathing, preparedness for resuscitation) (moderate certainty evidence).
Authors' conclusions
In-service neonatal emergency care courses probably improve health professionals' treatment of seriously ill babies in the short term. Further multi-centre randomised trials evaluating the effects of in-service emergency care training on long-term outcomes (health professional practice and patient outcomes) are needed.
PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY
In-service training for health professionals to improve care of seriously ill newborns and children in low-income countries
What question was the review asking?
This is the first update of the original Cochrane review, whose objective was to find out whether additional emergency care training programmes can improve the ability of health workers in poor countries to care for seriously ill newborns and children admitted to hospitals. Researchers at The Cochrane Collaboration searched for all studies that could answer this question and found two relevant studies.
What are the key messages?
The review authors suggest that giving health professionals in poor countries additional training in emergency care probably improves their ability to care for seriously ill newborns. We need additional high-quality studies, including studies in which health professionals are trained to care for seriously ill older children.
Background: training health professionals to care for seriously ill babies and children
In poor countries, many babies and children with serious illnesses die even though they have been cared for in hospitals. One reason for this may be that health workers in these countries often are not properly trained to offer the care that these children need.
In poor countries, children often become seriously ill because of conditions such as pneumonia, meningitis and diarrhoea, and may need emergency care. For newborn babies, the most common reason for emergency care is too little oxygen to the baby during birth. If this goes on for too long, the person delivering the baby has to help the baby breathe, and sometimes has to get the baby's heart rate back to normal. This is called neonatal resuscitation.
Neonatal resuscitation is a skilled task, and the health worker needs proper training. As babies need to be resuscitated quickly, the health worker needs to know how to prepare for this before the baby is born. For instance, he or she needs to know how to prepare the room and proper equipment. Health workers in poor countries often do not have these skills, and these babies are likely to die. Babies can also be harmed if the health worker does not resuscitate the baby correctly.
Several training programmes have been developed to teach health workers how to give emergency care to seriously ill babies and children. But most of these have been developed and tested in wealthy countries, and we don't know whether they would work in poor countries.
What happens when health professionals in poor countries are given extra training?
The review authors found two relevant studies. These studies compared the practices of health professionals who had been given extra training in the care of newborns with the practices of health professionals who did not receive extra training.
In the first study, nurses at a maternity hospital in Kenya completed a one-day training course on how to resuscitate newborn babies. This course was adapted from the UK Resuscitation Council, and it included lectures and practical training. The study suggests that after these training courses:
health professionals are probably more likely to resuscitate newborn babies correctly (moderate certainty of the evidence); and
newborn babies may be less likely to die while being resuscitated (low certainty of the evidence).
In the second study, doctors, nurses and midwives in five Sri Lankan hospitals were given a four-day training course on how to prepare for and provide care for newborns. This course was adapted from the World Health Organization (WHO) Training Modules on Essential Newborn Care and Breastfeeding, and included lectures, demonstrations, hands-on training and small group discussions. This study suggests that after these training courses:
health professionals probably are more likely to be well prepared to resuscitate newborn babies (moderate certainty of the evidence).
Unfortunately, the two studies followed up with health professionals for only two to three months after they received training. We therefore don't know if the benefits of the training courses lasted over time.
The review authors found no studies that looked at the effects of training programmes on the care of older children.
How up-to-date is this review?
Review authors searched for studies that had been published up to February 2015.
doi:10.1002/14651858.CD007071.pub3
PMCID: PMC4463987  PMID: 25968066

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