PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-25 (936361)

Clipboard (0)
None

Related Articles

1.  Analysis Tool Web Services from the EMBL-EBI 
Nucleic Acids Research  2013;41(Web Server issue):W597-W600.
Since 2004 the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) has provided access to a wide range of databases and analysis tools via Web Services interfaces. This comprises services to search across the databases available from the EMBL-EBI and to explore the network of cross-references present in the data (e.g. EB-eye), services to retrieve entry data in various data formats and to access the data in specific fields (e.g. dbfetch), and analysis tool services, for example, sequence similarity search (e.g. FASTA and NCBI BLAST), multiple sequence alignment (e.g. Clustal Omega and MUSCLE), pairwise sequence alignment and protein functional analysis (e.g. InterProScan and Phobius). The REST/SOAP Web Services (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/Tools/webservices/) interfaces to these databases and tools allow their integration into other tools, applications, web sites, pipeline processes and analytical workflows. To get users started using the Web Services, sample clients are provided covering a range of programming languages and popular Web Service tool kits, and a brief guide to Web Services technologies, including a set of tutorials, is available for those wishing to learn more and develop their own clients. Users of the Web Services are informed of improvements and updates via a range of methods.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkt376
PMCID: PMC3692137  PMID: 23671338
2.  A new reference implementation of the PSICQUIC web service 
Nucleic Acids Research  2013;41(Web Server issue):W601-W606.
The Proteomics Standard Initiative Common QUery InterfaCe (PSICQUIC) specification was created by the Human Proteome Organization Proteomics Standards Initiative (HUPO-PSI) to enable computational access to molecular-interaction data resources by means of a standard Web Service and query language. Currently providing >150 million binary interaction evidences from 28 servers globally, the PSICQUIC interface allows the concurrent search of multiple molecular-interaction information resources using a single query. Here, we present an extension of the PSICQUIC specification (version 1.3), which has been released to be compliant with the enhanced standards in molecular interactions. The new release also includes a new reference implementation of the PSICQUIC server available to the data providers. It offers augmented web service capabilities and improves the user experience. PSICQUIC has been running for almost 5 years, with a user base growing from only 4 data providers to 28 (April 2013) allowing access to 151 310 109 binary interactions. The power of this web service is shown in PSICQUIC View web application, an example of how to simultaneously query, browse and download results from the different PSICQUIC servers. This application is free and open to all users with no login requirement (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/Tools/webservices/psicquic/view/main.xhtml).
doi:10.1093/nar/gkt392
PMCID: PMC3977660  PMID: 23671334
3.  The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database 
Nucleic Acids Research  2002;30(1):21-26.
The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database (aka EMBL-Bank; http://www.ebi.ac.uk/embl/) incorporates, organises and distributes nucleotide sequences from all available public sources. EMBL-Bank is located and maintained at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) near Cambridge, UK. In an international collaboration with DDBJ (Japan) and GenBank (USA), data are exchanged amongst the collaborating databases on a daily basis. Major contributors to the EMBL database are individual scientists and genome project groups. Webin is the preferred web-based submission system for individual submitters, whilst automatic procedures allow incorporation of sequence data from large-scale genome sequencing centres and from the European Patent Office (EPO). Database releases are produced quarterly. Network services allow free access to the most up-to-date data collection via FTP, email and World Wide Web interfaces. EBI’s Sequence Retrieval System (SRS), a network browser for databanks in molecular biology, integrates and links the main nucleotide and protein databases plus many other specialized databases. For sequence similarity searching, a variety of tools (e.g. Blitz, Fasta, BLAST) are available which allow external users to compare their own sequences against the latest data in the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database and SWISS-PROT. All resources can be accessed via the EBI home page at http://www.ebi.ac.uk.
PMCID: PMC99098  PMID: 11752244
4.  The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database: major new developments 
Nucleic Acids Research  2003;31(1):17-22.
The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/embl/) incorporates, organizes and distributes nucleotide sequences from all available public sources. The database is located and maintained at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) near Cambridge, UK. In an international collaboration with DDBJ (Japan) and GenBank (USA), data are exchanged amongst the collaborating databases on a daily basis to achieve optimal synchronization. Webin is the preferred web-based submission system for individual submitters, while automatic procedures allow incorporation of sequence data from large-scale genome sequencing centres and from the European Patent Office (EPO). Database releases are produced quarterly. Network services allow free access to the most up-to-date data collection via FTP, Email and World Wide Web interfaces. EBI's Sequence Retrieval System (SRS) integrates and links the main nucleotide and protein databases plus many other specialized molecular biology databases. For sequence similarity searching, a variety of tools (e.g. Fasta, BLAST) are available which allow external users to compare their own sequences against the latest data in the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database and SWISS-PROT. All resources can be accessed via the EBI home page at http://www.ebi.ac.uk.
PMCID: PMC165468  PMID: 12519939
5.  The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database. 
Nucleic Acids Research  1999;27(1):18-24.
The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/embl.html) constitutes Europe's primary nucleotide sequence resource. Main sources for DNA and RNA sequences are direct submissions from individual researchers, genome sequencing projects and patent applications. While automatic procedures allow incorporation of sequence data from large-scale genome sequencing centres and from the European Patent Office (EPO), the preferred submission tool for individual submitters is Webin (WWW). Through all stages, dataflow is monitored by EBI biologists communicating with the sequencing groups. In collaboration with DDBJ and GenBank the database is produced, maintained and distributed at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI). Database releases are produced quarterly and are distributed on CD-ROM. Network services allow access to the most up-to-date data collection via Internet and World Wide Web interface. EBI's Sequence Retrieval System (SRS) is a Network Browser for Databanks in Molecular Biology, integrating and linking the main nucleotide and protein databases, plus many specialised databases. For sequence similarity searching a variety of tools (e.g. Blitz, Fasta, Blast etc) are available for external users to compare their own sequences against the most currently available data in the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database and SWISS-PROT.
PMCID: PMC148088  PMID: 9847133
6.  GeneFisher-P: variations of GeneFisher as processes in Bio-jETI 
BMC Bioinformatics  2008;9(Suppl 4):S13.
Background
PCR primer design is an everyday, but not trivial task requiring state-of-the-art software. We describe the popular tool GeneFisher and explain its recent restructuring using workflow techniques. We apply a service-oriented approach to model and implement GeneFisher-P, a process-based version of the GeneFisher web application, as a part of the Bio-jETI platform for service modeling and execution. We show how to introduce a flexible process layer to meet the growing demand for improved user-friendliness and flexibility.
Results
Within Bio-jETI, we model the process using the jABC framework, a mature model-driven, service-oriented process definition platform. We encapsulate remote legacy tools and integrate web services using jETI, an extension of the jABC for seamless integration of remote resources as basic services, ready to be used in the process. Some of the basic services used by GeneFisher are in fact already provided as individual web services at BiBiServ and can be directly accessed. Others are legacy programs, and are made available to Bio-jETI via the jETI technology.
The full power of service-based process orientation is required when more bioinformatics tools, available as web services or via jETI, lead to easy extensions or variations of the basic process. This concerns for instance variations of data retrieval or alignment tools as provided by the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI).
Conclusions
The resulting service- and process-oriented GeneFisher-P demonstrates how basic services from heterogeneous sources can be easily orchestrated in the Bio-jETI platform and lead to a flexible family of specialized processes tailored to specific tasks.
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-9-S4-S13
PMCID: PMC2367627  PMID: 18460174
7.  KBWS: an EMBOSS associated package for accessing bioinformatics web services 
The availability of bioinformatics web-based services is rapidly proliferating, for their interoperability and ease of use. The next challenge is in the integration of these services in the form of workflows, and several projects are already underway, standardizing the syntax, semantics, and user interfaces. In order to deploy the advantages of web services with locally installed tools, here we describe a collection of proxy client tools for 42 major bioinformatics web services in the form of European Molecular Biology Open Software Suite (EMBOSS) UNIX command-line tools. EMBOSS provides sophisticated means for discoverability and interoperability for hundreds of tools, and our package, named the Keio Bioinformatics Web Service (KBWS), adds functionalities of local and multiple alignment of sequences, phylogenetic analyses, and prediction of cellular localization of proteins and RNA secondary structures. This software implemented in C is available under GPL from http://www.g-language.org/kbws/ and GitHub repository http://github.com/cory-ko/KBWS. Users can utilize the SOAP services implemented in Perl directly via WSDL file at http://soap.g-language.org/kbws.wsdl (RPC Encoded) and http://soap.g-language.org/kbws_dl.wsdl (Document/literal).
doi:10.1186/1751-0473-6-8
PMCID: PMC3101651  PMID: 21529350
8.  The EMBL nucleotide sequence database 
Nucleic Acids Research  2001;29(1):17-21.
The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/embl/) is maintained at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) in an international collaboration with the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) and GenBank at the NCBI (USA). Data is exchanged amongst the collaborating databases on a daily basis. The major contributors to the EMBL database are individual authors and genome project groups. Webin is the preferred web-based submission system for individual submitters, whilst automatic procedures allow incorporation of sequence data from large-scale genome sequencing centres and from the European Patent Office (EPO). Database releases are produced quarterly. Network services allow free access to the most up-to-date data collection via ftp, email and World Wide Web interfaces. EBI’s Sequence Retrieval System (SRS), a network browser for databanks in molecular biology, integrates and links the main nucleotide and protein databases plus many specialized databases. For sequence similarity searching a variety of tools (e.g. Blitz, Fasta, BLAST) are available which allow external users to compare their own sequences against the latest data in the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database and SWISS-PROT.
PMCID: PMC29766  PMID: 11125039
9.  The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database 
Nucleic Acids Research  2004;32(Database issue):D27-D30.
The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/embl/), maintained at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI), incorporates, organizes and distributes nucleotide sequences from public sources. The database is a part of an international collaboration with DDBJ (Japan) and GenBank (USA). Data are exchanged between the collaborating databases on a daily basis to achieve optimal synchrony. The web-based tool, Webin, is the preferred system for individual submission of nucleotide sequences, including Third Party Annotation (TPA) and alignment data. Automatic submission procedures are used for submission of data from large-scale genome sequencing centres and from the European Patent Office. Database releases are produced quarterly. The latest data collection can be accessed via FTP, email and WWW interfaces. The EBI’s Sequence Retrieval System (SRS) integrates and links the main nucleotide and protein databases as well as many other specialist molecular biology databases. For sequence similarity searching, a variety of tools (e.g. FASTA and BLAST) are available that allow external users to compare their own sequences against the data in the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database, the complete genomic component subsection of the database, the WGS data sets and other databases. All available resources can be accessed via the EBI home page at http://www.ebi.ac.uk.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkh120
PMCID: PMC308854  PMID: 14681351
10.  A new bioinformatics analysis tools framework at EMBL–EBI 
Nucleic Acids Research  2010;38(Web Server issue):W695-W699.
The EMBL-EBI provides access to various mainstream sequence analysis applications. These include sequence similarity search services such as BLAST, FASTA, InterProScan and multiple sequence alignment tools such as ClustalW, T-Coffee and MUSCLE. Through the sequence similarity search services, the users can search mainstream sequence databases such as EMBL-Bank and UniProt, and more than 2000 completed genomes and proteomes. We present here a new framework aimed at both novice as well as expert users that exposes novel methods of obtaining annotations and visualizing sequence analysis results through one uniform and consistent interface. These services are available over the web and via Web Services interfaces for users who require systematic access or want to interface with customized pipe-lines and workflows using common programming languages. The framework features novel result visualizations and integration of domain and functional predictions for protein database searches. It is available at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/Tools/sss for sequence similarity searches and at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/Tools/msa for multiple sequence alignments.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkq313
PMCID: PMC2896090  PMID: 20439314
11.  PSI-Search: iterative HOE-reduced profile SSEARCH searching 
Bioinformatics  2012;28(12):1650-1651.
Summary: Iterative similarity searches with PSI-BLAST position-specific score matrices (PSSMs) find many more homologs than single searches, but PSSMs can be contaminated when homologous alignments are extended into unrelated protein domains—homologous over-extension (HOE). PSI-Search combines an optimal Smith–Waterman local alignment sequence search, using SSEARCH, with the PSI-BLAST profile construction strategy. An optional sequence boundary-masking procedure, which prevents alignments from being extended after they are initially included, can reduce HOE errors in the PSSM profile. Preventing HOE improves selectivity for both PSI-BLAST and PSI-Search, but PSI-Search has ~4-fold better selectivity than PSI-BLAST and similar sensitivity at 50% and 60% family coverage. PSI-Search is also produces 2- for 4-fold fewer false-positives than JackHMMER, but is ~5% less sensitive.
Availability and implementation: PSI-Search is available from the authors as a standalone implementation written in Perl for Linux-compatible platforms. It is also available through a web interface (www.ebi.ac.uk/Tools/sss/psisearch) and SOAP and REST Web Services (www.ebi.ac.uk/Tools/webservices).
Contact: pearson@virginia.edu; rodrigo.lopez@ebi.ac.uk
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/bts240
PMCID: PMC3371869  PMID: 22539666
12.  Expression Profiler: next generation—an online platform for analysis of microarray data 
Nucleic Acids Research  2004;32(Web Server issue):W465-W470.
Expression Profiler (EP, http://www.ebi.ac.uk/expressionprofiler) is a web-based platform for microarray gene expression and other functional genomics-related data analysis. The new architecture, Expression Profiler: next generation (EP:NG), modularizes the original design and allows individual analysis-task-related components to be developed by different groups and yet still seamlessly to work together and share the same user interface look and feel. Data analysis components for gene expression data preprocessing, missing value imputation, filtering, clustering methods, visualization, significant gene finding, between group analysis and other statistical components are available from the EBI (European Bioinformatics Institute) web site. The web-based design of Expression Profiler supports data sharing and collaborative analysis in a secure environment. Developed tools are integrated with the microarray gene expression database ArrayExpress and form the exploratory analytical front-end to those data. EP:NG is an open-source project, encouraging broad distribution and further extensions from the scientific community.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkh470
PMCID: PMC441608  PMID: 15215431
13.  The Annotation-enriched non-redundant patent sequence databases 
The EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) offers public access to patent sequence data, providing a valuable service to the intellectual property and scientific communities. The non-redundant (NR) patent sequence databases comprise two-level nucleotide and protein sequence clusters (NRNL1, NRNL2, NRPL1 and NRPL2) based on sequence identity (level-1) and patent family (level-2). Annotation from the source entries in these databases is merged and enhanced with additional information from the patent literature and biological context. Corrections in patent publication numbers, kind-codes and patent equivalents significantly improve the data quality. Data are available through various user interfaces including web browser, downloads via FTP, SRS, Dbfetch and EBI-Search. Sequence similarity/homology searches against the databases are available using BLAST, FASTA and PSI-Search. In this article, we describe the data collection and annotation and also outline major changes and improvements introduced since 2009. Apart from data growth, these changes include additional annotation for singleton clusters, the identifier versioning for tracking entry change and the entry mappings between the two-level databases.
Database URL: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/patentdata/nr/
doi:10.1093/database/bat005
PMCID: PMC3568390  PMID: 23396323
14.  E-MSD: an integrated data resource for bioinformatics 
Nucleic Acids Research  2004;32(Database issue):D211-D216.
The Macromolecular Structure Database (MSD) group (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/msd/) continues to enhance the quality and consistency of macromolecular structure data in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and to work towards the integration of various bioinformatics data resources. We have implemented a simple form-based interface that allows users to query the MSD directly. The MSD ‘atlas pages’ show all of the information in the MSD for a particular PDB entry. The group has designed new search interfaces aimed at specific areas of interest, such as the environment of ligands and the secondary structures of proteins. We have also implemented a novel search interface that begins to integrate separate MSD search services in a single graphical tool. We have worked closely with collaborators to build a new visualization tool that can present both structure and sequence data in a unified interface, and this data viewer is now used throughout the MSD services for the visualization and presentation of search results. Examples showcasing the functionality and power of these tools are available from tutorial webpages (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/msd-srv/docs/roadshow_tutorial/).
doi:10.1093/nar/gkh078
PMCID: PMC308812  PMID: 14681397
15.  Web services at the European Bioinformatics Institute-2009 
Nucleic Acids Research  2009;37(Web Server issue):W6-W10.
The European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) has been providing access to mainstream databases and tools in bioinformatics since 1997. In addition to the traditional web form based interfaces, APIs exist for core data resources such as EMBL-Bank, Ensembl, UniProt, InterPro, PDB and ArrayExpress. These APIs are based on Web Services (SOAP/REST) interfaces that allow users to systematically access databases and analytical tools. From the user's point of view, these Web Services provide the same functionality as the browser-based forms. However, using the APIs frees the user from web page constraints and are ideal for the analysis of large batches of data, performing text-mining tasks and the casual or systematic evaluation of mathematical models in regulatory networks. Furthermore, these services are widespread and easy to use; require no prior knowledge of the technology and no more than basic experience in programming. In the following we wish to inform of new and updated services as well as briefly describe planned developments to be made available during the course of 2009–2010.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkp302
PMCID: PMC2703973  PMID: 19435877
16.  The EBI RDF platform: linked open data for the life sciences 
Bioinformatics  2014;30(9):1338-1339.
Motivation: Resource description framework (RDF) is an emerging technology for describing, publishing and linking life science data. As a major provider of bioinformatics data and services, the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) is committed to making data readily accessible to the community in ways that meet existing demand. The EBI RDF platform has been developed to meet an increasing demand to coordinate RDF activities across the institute and provides a new entry point to querying and exploring integrated resources available at the EBI.
Availability: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/rdf
Contact: jupp@ebi.ac.uk
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btt765
PMCID: PMC3998127  PMID: 24413672
17.  IARC Database of p53 gene mutations in human tumors and cell lines: updated compilation, revised formats and new visualisation tools. 
Nucleic Acids Research  1998;26(1):205-213.
Since 1989, about 570 different p53 mutations have been identified in more than 8000 human cancers. A database of these mutations was initiated by M. Hollstein and C. C. Harris in 1990. This database originally consisted of a list of somatic point mutations in the p 53 gene of human tumors and cell lines, compiled from the published literature and made available in a standard electronic form. The database is maintained at the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and updated versions are released twice a year (January and July). The current version (July 1997) contains records on 6800 published mutations and will surpass the 8000 mark in the January 1998 release. The database now contains information on somatic and germline mutations in a new format to facilitate data retrieval. In addition, new tools are constructed to improve data analysis, such as a Mutation Viewer Java applet developed at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) to visualise the location and impact of mutations on p53 protein structure. The database is available in different electronic formats at IARC (http://www.iarc. fr/p53/homepage.htm ) or from the EBI server (http://www.ebi.ac.uk ). The IARC p53 website also provides reports on database analysis and links with other p53 sites as well as with related databases. In this report, we describe the criteria for inclusion of data, the revised format and the new visualisation tools. We also briefly discuss the relevance of p 53 mutations to clinical and biological questions.
PMCID: PMC147235  PMID: 9399837
18.  Public web-based services from the European Bioinformatics Institute 
Nucleic Acids Research  2004;32(Web Server issue):W3-W9.
The mission of the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI), an outstation of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, is to ensure that the growing body of information from molecular biology and genome research is placed in the public domain and is accessible freely to all parts of the scientific community in ways that promote scientific progress. To fulfil this mission, the EBI provides a wide variety of free, publicly available bioinformatics services. These can be divided into data submissions processing; access to query, analysis and retrieval systems and tools; ftp downloads of software and databases; training and education and user support. All of these services are available at the EBI website: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/services. This paper provides a detailed introduction to the interactive analysis systems that are available from the EBI and a brief introduction to other, related services.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkh405
PMCID: PMC441543  PMID: 15215339
19.  GeneReporter—sequence-based document retrieval and annotation 
Bioinformatics  2011;27(7):1034-1035.
Summary: GeneReporter is a web tool that reports functional information and relevant literature on a protein-coding sequence of interest. Its purpose is to support both manual genome annotation and document retrieval. PubMed references corresponding to a sequence are detected by the extraction of query words from UniProt entries of homologous sequences. Data on protein families, domains, potential cofactors, structure, function, cellular localization, metabolic contribution and corresponding DNA binding sites complement the information on a given gene product of interest.
Availability and implementation: GeneReporter is available at http://www.genereporter.tu-bs.de. The web site integrates databases and analysis tools as SOAP-based web services from the EBI (European Bioinformatics Institute) and NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information).
Contact: i.retter@tu-bs.de; ida.retter@helmholtz-hzi.de
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btr047
PMCID: PMC3065684  PMID: 21310745
20.  maxdLoad2 and maxdBrowse: standards-compliant tools for microarray experimental annotation, data management and dissemination 
BMC Bioinformatics  2005;6:264.
Background
maxdLoad2 is a relational database schema and Java® application for microarray experimental annotation and storage. It is compliant with all standards for microarray meta-data capture; including the specification of what data should be recorded, extensive use of standard ontologies and support for data exchange formats. The output from maxdLoad2 is of a form acceptable for submission to the ArrayExpress microarray repository at the European Bioinformatics Institute. maxdBrowse is a PHP web-application that makes contents of maxdLoad2 databases accessible via web-browser, the command-line and web-service environments. It thus acts as both a dissemination and data-mining tool.
Results
maxdLoad2 presents an easy-to-use interface to an underlying relational database and provides a full complement of facilities for browsing, searching and editing. There is a tree-based visualization of data connectivity and the ability to explore the links between any pair of data elements, irrespective of how many intermediate links lie between them. Its principle novel features are:
• the flexibility of the meta-data that can be captured,
• the tools provided for importing data from spreadsheets and other tabular representations,
• the tools provided for the automatic creation of structured documents,
• the ability to browse and access the data via web and web-services interfaces.
Within maxdLoad2 it is very straightforward to customise the meta-data that is being captured or change the definitions of the meta-data. These meta-data definitions are stored within the database itself allowing client software to connect properly to a modified database without having to be specially configured. The meta-data definitions (configuration file) can also be centralized allowing changes made in response to revisions of standards or terminologies to be propagated to clients without user intervention.
maxdBrowse is hosted on a web-server and presents multiple interfaces to the contents of maxd databases. maxdBrowse emulates many of the browse and search features available in the maxdLoad2 application via a web-browser. This allows users who are not familiar with maxdLoad2 to browse and export microarray data from the database for their own analysis. The same browse and search features are also available via command-line and SOAP server interfaces. This both enables scripting of data export for use embedded in data repositories and analysis environments, and allows access to the maxd databases via web-service architectures.
Conclusion
maxdLoad2 and maxdBrowse are portable and compatible with all common operating systems and major database servers. They provide a powerful, flexible package for annotation of microarray experiments and a convenient dissemination environment. They are available for download and open sourced under the Artistic License.
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-6-264
PMCID: PMC1298287  PMID: 16269077
21.  The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database 
Nucleic Acids Research  2000;28(1):19-23.
The European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) Nucleotide Sequence Database (http://www.ebi.ac. uk/embl/index.html ) is maintained at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) in an international collaboration with the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) and GenBank (USA). Data is exchanged amongst the collaborative databases on a daily basis. The major contributors to the EMBL database are individual authors and genome project groups. WEBIN is the preferred web-based submission system for individual submitters, whilst automatic procedures allow incorporation of sequence data from large-scale genome sequencing centres and from the European Patent Office (EPO). Database releases are produced quarterly. Network services allow free access to the most up-to-date data collection via Internet and WWW interfaces. EBI’s Sequence Retrieval System (SRS) is a network browser for databanks in molecular biology, integrating and linking the main nucleotide and protein databases plus many specialised databases. For sequence similarity searching a variety of tools (e.g., BLITZ, FASTA, BLAST) are available which allow external users to compare their own sequences against the most currently available data in the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database and SWISS-PROT.
PMCID: PMC102461  PMID: 10592171
22.  PDBe: Protein Data Bank in Europe 
Nucleic Acids Research  2009;38(Database issue):D308-D317.
The Protein Data Bank in Europe (PDBe) (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pdbe/) is actively working with its Worldwide Protein Data Bank partners to enhance the quality and consistency of the international archive of bio-macromolecular structure data, the Protein Data Bank (PDB). PDBe also works closely with its collaborators at the European Bioinformatics Institute and the scientific community around the world to enhance its databases and services by adding curated and actively maintained derived data to the existing structural data in the PDB. We have developed a new database infrastructure based on the remediated PDB archive data and a specially designed database for storing information on interactions between proteins and bound molecules. The group has developed new services that allow users to carry out simple textual queries or more complex 3D structure-based queries. The newly designed ‘PDBeView Atlas pages’ provide an overview of an individual PDB entry in a user-friendly layout and serve as a starting point to further explore the information available in the PDBe database. PDBe’s active involvement with the X-ray crystallography, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and cryo-Electron Microscopy communities have resulted in improved tools for structure deposition and analysis.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkp916
PMCID: PMC2808887  PMID: 19858099
23.  The ChEMBL bioactivity database: an update 
Nucleic Acids Research  2013;42(Database issue):D1083-D1090.
ChEMBL is an open large-scale bioactivity database (https://www.ebi.ac.uk/chembl), previously described in the 2012 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue. Since then, a variety of new data sources and improvements in functionality have contributed to the growth and utility of the resource. In particular, more comprehensive tracking of compounds from research stages through clinical development to market is provided through the inclusion of data from United States Adopted Name applications; a new richer data model for representing drug targets has been developed; and a number of methods have been put in place to allow users to more easily identify reliable data. Finally, access to ChEMBL is now available via a new Resource Description Framework format, in addition to the web-based interface, data downloads and web services.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkt1031
PMCID: PMC3965067  PMID: 24214965
24.  The EMBL nucleotide sequence database. 
Nucleic Acids Research  1998;26(1):8-15.
The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/embl. html ) constitutes Europe's primary nucleotide sequence resource. DNA and RNA sequences are directly submitted from researchers and genome sequencing groups and collected from the scientific literature and patent applications (Fig. 1). In collaboration with DDBJ and GenBank the database is produced, maintained and distributed at the European Bioinformatics Institute. Database releases are produced quarterly and are distributed on CD-ROM. EBI's network services allow access to the most up-to-date data collection via Internet and World Wide Web interface, providing database searching and sequence similarity facilities plus access to a large number of additional databases.
PMCID: PMC147241  PMID: 9399791
25.  EDAM: an ontology of bioinformatics operations, types of data and identifiers, topics and formats 
Bioinformatics  2013;29(10):1325-1332.
Motivation: Advancing the search, publication and integration of bioinformatics tools and resources demands consistent machine-understandable descriptions. A comprehensive ontology allowing such descriptions is therefore required.
Results: EDAM is an ontology of bioinformatics operations (tool or workflow functions), types of data and identifiers, application domains and data formats. EDAM supports semantic annotation of diverse entities such as Web services, databases, programmatic libraries, standalone tools, interactive applications, data schemas, datasets and publications within bioinformatics. EDAM applies to organizing and finding suitable tools and data and to automating their integration into complex applications or workflows. It includes over 2200 defined concepts and has successfully been used for annotations and implementations.
Availability: The latest stable version of EDAM is available in OWL format from http://edamontology.org/EDAM.owl and in OBO format from http://edamontology.org/EDAM.obo. It can be viewed online at the NCBO BioPortal and the EBI Ontology Lookup Service. For documentation and license please refer to http://edamontology.org. This article describes version 1.2 available at http://edamontology.org/EDAM_1.2.owl.
Contact: jison@ebi.ac.uk
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btt113
PMCID: PMC3654706  PMID: 23479348

Results 1-25 (936361)