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1.  Genome-Wide Diet-Gene Interaction Analyses for Risk of Colorectal Cancer 
PLoS Genetics  2014;10(4):e1004228.
Dietary factors, including meat, fruits, vegetables and fiber, are associated with colorectal cancer; however, there is limited information as to whether these dietary factors interact with genetic variants to modify risk of colorectal cancer. We tested interactions between these dietary factors and approximately 2.7 million genetic variants for colorectal cancer risk among 9,287 cases and 9,117 controls from ten studies. We used logistic regression to investigate multiplicative gene-diet interactions, as well as our recently developed Cocktail method that involves a screening step based on marginal associations and gene-diet correlations and a testing step for multiplicative interactions, while correcting for multiple testing using weighted hypothesis testing. Per quartile increment in the intake of red and processed meat were associated with statistically significant increased risks of colorectal cancer and vegetable, fruit and fiber intake with lower risks. From the case-control analysis, we detected a significant interaction between rs4143094 (10p14/near GATA3) and processed meat consumption (OR = 1.17; p = 8.7E-09), which was consistently observed across studies (p heterogeneity = 0.78). The risk of colorectal cancer associated with processed meat was increased among individuals with the rs4143094-TG and -TT genotypes (OR = 1.20 and OR = 1.39, respectively) and null among those with the GG genotype (OR = 1.03). Our results identify a novel gene-diet interaction with processed meat for colorectal cancer, highlighting that diet may modify the effect of genetic variants on disease risk, which may have important implications for prevention.
Author Summary
High intake of red and processed meat and low intake of fruits, vegetables and fiber are associated with a higher risk of colorectal cancer. We investigate if the effect of these dietary factors on colorectal cancer risk is modified by common genetic variants across the genome (total of about 2.7 million genetic variants), also known as gene-diet interactions. We included over 9,000 colorectal cancer cases and 9,000 controls that were not diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Our results provide strong evidence for a gene-diet interaction and colorectal cancer risk between a genetic variant (rs4143094) on chromosome 10p14 near the gene GATA3 and processed meat consumption (p = 8.7E-09). This genetic locus may have interesting biological significance given its location in the genome. Our results suggest that genetic variants may interact with diet and in combination affect colorectal cancer risk, which may have important implications for personalized cancer care and provide novel insights into prevention strategies.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1004228
PMCID: PMC3990510  PMID: 24743840
2.  Ribavirin treatment effects on breast cancers overexpressing eIF4E, a biomarker with prognostic specificity for luminal B-type breast cancer 
Purpose
We have evaluated the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target in breast cancer. eIF4E facilitates nuclear export and translation of specific, growth-stimulatory mRNAs and is frequently overexpressed in cancer.
Experimental design
Breast cancer cells were treated with ribavirin, an inhibitor of eIF4E, and effects on cell proliferation and on known mRNA targets of eIF4E were determined. eIF4E expression was assessed, at the mRNA and protein level, in breast cancer cell lines and in skin biopsies from patients with metastatic disease. Additionally, pooled microarray data from 621 adjuvant untreated, node negative breast cancers were analyzed for eIF4E expression levels and correlation with Distant Metastasis Free Survival (DMFS), overall and within each intrinsic breast cancer subtype.
Results
At clinically relevant concentrations, ribavirin reduced cell proliferation and suppressed clonogenic potential, correlating with reduced mRNA export and protein expression of important eIF4E targets. This effect was suppressed by knockdown of eIF4E. Although eIF4E expression is elevated in all breast cancer cell lines, variability in ribavirin responsiveness was observed, indicating that other factors contribute to an eIF4E-dependent phenotype. Assessment of the prognostic value of high eIF4E mRNA in patient tumors found that significant discrimination between good and poor outcome groups was observed only in luminal B cases, suggesting that a specific molecular profile may predict response to eIF4E-targeted therapy.
Conclusions
Inhibition of eIF4E is a potential breast cancer therapeutic strategy that may be especially promising against specific molecular subtypes and in metastatic as well as primary tumors.
doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-10-2334
PMCID: PMC3086959  PMID: 21415224
eIF4E; protein translation; ribavirin; intrinsic breast cancer subtypes; prognostic markers
3.  The Impact of National Institutes of Health Funding on U.S. Cardiovascular Disease Research 
PLoS ONE  2009;4(7):e6425.
Background
Intense interest surrounds the recent expansion of US National Institutes of Health (NIH) budgets as part of economic stimulus legislation. However, the relationship between NIH funding and cardiovascular disease research is poorly understood, making the likely impact of this policy change unclear.
Methods
The National Library of Medicine's PubMed database was searched for articles published from 1996 to 2006, originating from U.S. institutions, and containing the phrases “cardiolog,” “cardiovascular,” or “cardiac,” in the first author's department. Research methodology, journal of publication, journal impact factor, and receipt of NIH funding were recorded. Differences in means and trends were tested with t-tests and linear regression, respectively, with P≤0.05 for significance.
Results
Of 117,643 world cardiovascular articles, 36,684 (31.2%) originated from the U.S., of which 10,293 (28.1%) received NIH funding. The NIH funded 40.1% of U.S. basic science articles, 20.3% of overall clinical trials, 18.1% of randomized-controlled, and 12.2% of multicenter clinical trials. NIH-funded and total articles grew significantly (65 articles/year, P<0.001 and 218 articles/year, P<0.001, respectively). The proportion of articles receiving NIH funding was stable, but grew significantly for basic science and clinical trials (0.87%/year, P<0.001 and 0.67%/year, P = 0.029, respectively). NIH-funded articles had greater journal impact factors than non NIH-funded articles (5.76 vs. 3.71, P<0.001).
Conclusions
NIH influence on U.S. cardiovascular research expanded in the past decade, during the period of NIH budget doubling. A substantial fraction of research is now directly funded and thus likely sensitive to budget fluctuations, particularly in basic science research. NIH funding predicts greater journal impact.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0006425
PMCID: PMC2713403  PMID: 19641617
4.  An Update: NIH Research Funding for Palliative Medicine 2006 to 2010 
Journal of Palliative Medicine  2013;16(2):125-129.
Abstract
Background
Palliative care clinical and educational programs are expanding to meet the needs of seriously ill patients and their families. Multiple reports call for an enhanced palliative care evidence base.
Objective
To examine current National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding of palliative medicine research and changes since our 2008 report.1
Methods
We sought to identify NIH funding of palliative medicine from 2006 to 2010 in two stages. First, we searched the NIH grants database RePorter2 for grants with key words “palliative care,” “end-of-life care,” “hospice,” and “end of life.” Second, we identified palliative care researchers likely to have secured NIH funding using three strategies: (1) We abstracted the first and last authors' names from original investigations published in major palliative medicine journals from 2008 to 2010; (2) we abstracted these names from a PubMed generated list of all original articles published in major medicine, nursing, and subspecialty journals using the above key words Medical Subject Headings (MESH) terms “palliative care,” “end-of-life care,” “hospice,” and “end of life;” and (3) we identified editorial board members of palliative medicine journals and key members of palliative medicine research initiatives. We crossmatched the pooled names against NIH grants funded from 2006 to 2010.
Results
The NIH RePorter search yielded 653 grants and the author search identified an additional 352 grants. Compared to 2001 to 2005, 589 (240%) more grants were NIH funded. The 391 grants categorized as relevant to palliative medicine represented 294 unique PIs, an increase of 185 (269%) NIH funded palliative medicine researchers. The NIH supported 21% of the 1253 original palliative medicine research articles identified. Compared to 2001 to 2005, the percentage of grants funded by institutes other than the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institute for Nursing Research (NINR), and the National Institute of Aging (NIA) increased from 15% to 20% of all grants.
Conclusions
When compared to 2001–2005, more palliative medicine investigators received NIH funding; and research funding has improved. Nevertheless, additional initiatives to further support palliative care research are needed.
doi:10.1089/jpm.2012.0427
PMCID: PMC3607902  PMID: 23336358
6.  Outcomes of patients with hepatitis B who developed antiviral resistance while on the liver transplant waiting list 
Background/Aims
Lamivudine has been shown to improve liver disease and survival of hepatitis B (HBV) patients on the liver-transplant (OLT) waiting list, but liver failure may worsen in patients with drug resistance. Use of antiviral salvage therapy may decrease this risk.
Methods
We analyzed data from patients enrolled in the NIH HBV OLT cohort to study the effects of pre-transplant antiviral therapy on transplant-free survival and survival without transplant. We also compared the clinical outcomes of those who did or did not develop antiviral failure (virologic breakthrough or genotypic resistance) while awaiting transplant.
Results
One hundred twenty-two eligible patients received antiviral therapy pre-OLT and were followed for a median of 40.5 months (0.4–123.0) after initiation of antiviral therapy. Forty-four (36.1%) patients developed antiviral failure; all had lamivudine monotherapy as initial treatment. Forty-two patients started salvage therapy a median of 5 months after lamivudine failure; the median MELD score was 12. Twenty-one (50%) patients had a full response to salvage therapy. Eleven (26.2%) patients had a suboptimal virologic response but remained clinically compensated. Antiviral failure was not a significant predictor of transplant or death (p=0.09) or death without transplant (p=0.39). Multivariate predictors of transplant or death were high MELD score, HCC, and low albumin. High MELD score and low albumin were predictors of death without transplant.
Conclusion
Antiviral failure in patients with HBV on the OLT waiting list did not impair clinical outcome if recognized early and if salvage therapy is promptly initiated.
doi:10.1016/j.cgh.2007.08.008
PMCID: PMC2645788  PMID: 17977800
survival; lamivudine; adefovir; cirrhosis; liver failure
7.  Sequencing of Candidate Chromosome Instability Genes in Endometrial Cancers Reveals Somatic Mutations in ESCO1, CHTF18, and MRE11A 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(6):e63313.
Most endometrial cancers can be classified histologically as endometrioid, serous, or clear cell. Non-endometrioid endometrial cancers (NEECs; serous and clear cell) are the most clinically aggressive of the three major histotypes and are characterized by aneuploidy, a feature of chromosome instability. The genetic alterations that underlie chromosome instability in endometrial cancer are poorly understood. In the present study, we used Sanger sequencing to search for nucleotide variants in the coding exons and splice junctions of 21 candidate chromosome instability genes, including 19 genes implicated in sister chromatid cohesion, from 24 primary, microsatellite-stable NEECs. Somatic mutations were verified by sequencing matched normal DNAs. We subsequently resequenced mutated genes from 41 additional NEECs as well as 42 endometrioid ECs (EECs). We uncovered nonsynonymous somatic mutations in ESCO1, CHTF18, and MRE11A in, respectively, 3.7% (4 of 107), 1.9% (2 of 107), and 1.9% (2 of 107) of endometrial tumors. Overall, 7.7% (5 of 65) of NEECs and 2.4% (1 of 42) of EECs had somatically mutated one or more of the three genes. A subset of mutations are predicted to impact protein function. The co-occurrence of somatic mutations in ESCO1 and CHTF18 was statistically significant (P = 0.0011, two-tailed Fisher's exact test). This is the first report of somatic mutations within ESCO1 and CHTF18 in endometrial tumors and of MRE11A mutations in microsatellite-stable endometrial tumors. Our findings warrant future studies to determine whether these mutations are driver events that contribute to the pathogenesis of endometrial cancer.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0063313
PMCID: PMC3670891  PMID: 23755103
8.  GM-CSF Signalling Boosts Dramatically IL-1Production 
PLoS ONE  2011;6(7):e23025.
GM-CSF is mostly known for its capacity to promote bone marrow progenitor differentiation, to mobilize and mature myeloid cells as well as to enhance host immune responses. However the molecular actions of GM-CSF are still poorly characterized. Here we describe a new surprising facet of this “old” growth factor as a key regulator involved in IL-1βsecretion. We found that IL-1β release, a pivotal component of the triggered innate system, is heavily dependent on the signaling induced by GM-CSF in such an extent that in its absence IL-1β is only weakly secreted. GM-CSF synergizes with LPS for IL-1β secretion mainly at the level of pro-IL-1β production via strengthening the NF-κB signaling. In addition, we show that expression of Rab39a, a GTPase required for caspase-1 dependent IL-1β secretion is greatly augmented by LPS and GM-CSF co-stimulation suggesting a potential GM-CSF contribution in enhancing IL-1β exocytosis. The role of GM-CSF in regulating IL-1β secretion is extended also in vivo, since GM-CSF R−/− mice are more resistant to LPS-mediated septic shock. These results identify GM-CSF as a key regulator of IL-1β production and indicate GM-CSF as a previously underestimated target for therapeutic intervention.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0023025
PMCID: PMC3145786  PMID: 21829580
9.  Implementation of NIH Inclusion Guidelines: Survey of NIH Study Section Members 
In March of 1994, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) released guidelines mandating the inclusion of women and minorities in clinical research. Four years later, the NIH released similar guidelines mandating the inclusion of children. These “inclusion guidelines” were created to increase the representation of women, minorities and children in clinical research to address potential harms (real and perceived) created by their exclusion or omission. As designated in the guidelines, Institutional Review Board (IRB), NIH Scientific Review Groups (SRG) and NIH program staff all have responsibility for the evaluation of Principal Investigator (PI) adherence to the inclusion guidelines. The purpose of this survey was to assess the experience with and attitudes of NIH Scientific Review Group (SRG) members with the implementation of these justice-based policy recommendations.
The results of the survey identify one clear measure of success regarding the implementation of the NIH guidelines; SRG members indicate the guidelines are in part responsible for their attention to the inclusion of women, minorities and children in clinical research. In addition, SRG members believe that gender and race are important factors when assessing the diversity of study samples and that the current NIH guidelines are adequate for encouraging their inclusion. As a proxy measure of success, SRG members believe that PIs responsible for protocols reviewed by their study group are generally compliant with the inclusion guidelines. Future research ought to explore whether IRB members and NIH program officers find PIs to be compliant as their projects get underway. In addition, more research ought to be conducted to assess the downstream effects of this important social policy.
doi:10.1177/1740774508089457
PMCID: PMC2861770  PMID: 18375652
NIH Inclusion Policy; Study Section Members; Attitudes and Opinions about Implementation
11.  Rescoring the NIH Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI): Nothing New 
The NIH-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) is a commonly used 13-item questionnaire for the assessment of symptom severity in men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). For each item, score ranges are 0–1 (6 items), 0–3 (2 items), 0–5 (3 items), 0–6 (1 item), and 0–10 (1 item). This scoring system is straightforward, but items with wider score ranges are de facto weighted more, which could adversely affect the performance characteristics of the questionnaire. We rescored the NIH-CPSI so that equal weights were assigned to each item, and compared the performance of the standard and rescored questionnaires using the original validation dataset. Both the original and revised versions of the scoring algorithm discriminated similarly among groups of men with chronic prostatitis (n=151), benign prostatic hyperplasia (n=149), and controls (n=134). Internal consistency of the questionnaire was slightly better with the revised scoring, but values with the standard scoring were sufficiently high (Cronbach’s alpha ≥0.80). We conclude that although the rescored NIH-CPSI provides better face validity than the standard scoring algorithm, it requires additional calculation efforts and yields only marginal improvements in performance.
doi:10.1038/pcan.2009.22
PMCID: PMC2736311  PMID: 19488065
chronic pelvic pain syndrome; questionnaire; psychometrics
12.  OVA66, a Tumor Associated Protein, Induces Oncogenic Transformation of NIH3T3 Cells 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(3):e85705.
The tumor associated antigen OVA66 has been demonstrated to be highly expressed in malignant tumors and implicated in various cellular processes. To further elucidate its oncogenic character, we established an OVA66 stably overexpressed NIH3T3 cell line and a vector transfected control, named NIH3T3-flagOVA66 and NIH3T3-mock, respectively. NIH3T3-flagOVA66 cells showed faster cell cycling, proliferation, cell migration and more resistance to 5-fluorouracil-induced apoptosis. When NIH3T3-flagOVA66 and NIH3T3-mock cells were injected into nude mice for xenograft tumorigenicity assays, the NIH3T3-flagOVA66 cells formed tumors whereas no tumors were observed in mice inoculated with NIH3T3-mock cells. Analysis of PI3K/AKT and ERK1/2 MAPK signaling pathways by serum stimulation indicated hyperactivation of AKT and ERK1/2 in NIH3T3-flagOVA66 cells compared with NIH3T3-mock cells, while a decreased level of p-AKT and p-ERK1/2 were observed in OVA66 knocked down HeLa cells. To further validate if the p-AKT or p-ERK1/2 is essential for OVA66 induced oncogenic transformation, we treated the cells with the PI3K/AKT specific inhibitor LY294002 and the ERK1/2 MAPK specific inhibitor PD98059 and found either inhibitor can attenuate the cell colony forming ability in soft agar and the cell viability of NIH3T3-flagOVA66 cells, suggesting aberrantly activated AKT and ERK1/2 signaling be indispensible of the tumorigenic role of OVA66. Our results indicate that OVA66 is important in oncogenic transformation, promoting proliferation, cell migration and reducing apoptosis via hyperactivating PI3K/AKT and ERK1/2 MAPK signaling pathway. Thus, OVA66 might be a novel target for early detection, prevention and treatment of tumors in the future.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0085705
PMCID: PMC3954546  PMID: 24633332
13.  Mutations in Conserved Residues of the C. elegans microRNA Argonaute ALG-1 Identify Separable Functions in ALG-1 miRISC Loading and Target Repression 
PLoS Genetics  2014;10(4):e1004286.
microRNAs function in diverse developmental and physiological processes by regulating target gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. ALG-1 is one of two Caenorhabditis elegans Argonautes (ALG-1 and ALG-2) that together are essential for microRNA biogenesis and function. Here, we report the identification of novel antimorphic (anti) alleles of ALG-1 as suppressors of lin-28(lf) precocious developmental phenotypes. The alg-1(anti) mutations broadly impair the function of many microRNAs and cause dosage-dependent phenotypes that are more severe than the complete loss of ALG-1. ALG-1(anti) mutant proteins are competent for promoting Dicer cleavage of microRNA precursors and for associating with and stabilizing microRNAs. However, our results suggest that ALG-1(anti) proteins may sequester microRNAs in immature and functionally deficient microRNA Induced Silencing Complexes (miRISCs), and hence compete with ALG-2 for access to functional microRNAs. Immunoprecipitation experiments show that ALG-1(anti) proteins display an increased association with Dicer and a decreased association with AIN-1/GW182. These findings suggest that alg-1(anti) mutations impair the ability of ALG-1 miRISC to execute a transition from Dicer-associated microRNA processing to AIN-1/GW182 associated effector function, and indicate an active role for ALG/Argonaute in mediating this transition.
Author Summary
microRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that function in diverse processes by post-transcriptionally regulating gene expression. Argonautes form the core of the microRNA Induced Silencing Complex (miRISC) and are required for microRNA biogenesis and function. Here we describe the identification and characterization of a novel set of mutations in alg-1, a Caenorhabditis elegans microRNA specific Argonaute. This new class of alg-1 mutations causes phenotypes more severe than the complete loss of alg-1. Interestingly, the mutant ALG-1 proteins are able to promote microRNA biogenesis, but are defective in mediating microRNA target gene repression. We found that mutant ALG-1 associates more with Dicer, but less with miRISC effector AIN-1, compared to wild type ALG-1. We propose that these mutant ALG-1 proteins assemble nonfunctional complexes that effectively compete with the paralogous ALG-2 for critical miRISC components, including mature microRNAs. This new class of Argonaute mutants highlights the role of Argonaute in mediating a functional transition for miRISC from microRNA processing phase to target repression phase.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1004286
PMCID: PMC3998888  PMID: 24763381
14.  The Effects of Somatic Hypermutation on Neutralization and Binding in the PGT121 Family of Broadly Neutralizing HIV Antibodies 
PLoS Pathogens  2013;9(11):e1003754.
Broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies (bnAbs) are typically highly somatically mutated, raising doubts as to whether they can be elicited by vaccination. We used 454 sequencing and designed a novel phylogenetic method to model lineage evolution of the bnAbs PGT121–134 and found a positive correlation between the level of somatic hypermutation (SHM) and the development of neutralization breadth and potency. Strikingly, putative intermediates were characterized that show approximately half the mutation level of PGT121–134 but were still capable of neutralizing roughly 40–80% of PGT121–134 sensitive viruses in a 74-virus panel at median titers between 15- and 3-fold higher than PGT121–134. Such antibodies with lower levels of SHM may be more amenable to elicitation through vaccination while still providing noteworthy coverage. Binding characterization indicated a preference of inferred intermediates for native Env binding over monomeric gp120, suggesting that the PGT121–134 lineage may have been selected for binding to native Env at some point during maturation. Analysis of glycan-dependent neutralization for inferred intermediates identified additional adjacent glycans that comprise the epitope and suggests changes in glycan dependency or recognition over the course of affinity maturation for this lineage. Finally, patterns of neutralization of inferred bnAb intermediates suggest hypotheses as to how SHM may lead to potent and broad HIV neutralization and provide important clues for immunogen design.
Author Summary
A majority of the over 30 million HIV-1 infected individuals worldwide live in poorly resourced areas where multiple boost strategies, which are likely needed to generate highly mutated antibodies, present formidable logistical challenges. Accordingly, developing new vaccination strategies that are capable of generating highly mutated antibodies should be an active area of research. Another approach, that is not mutually exclusive, is to identify new bnAbs that are both broad and potent in neutralization, but are much less mutated than the bnAbs that currently exist. Here, we have identified bnAbs that are approximately half the mutation frequency of known bnAbs, but maintain high potency and moderate breadth. These less mutated bnAbs offer an important advantage in that they would likely be easier to induce through vaccination than more mutated antibodies. By characterizing these putative intermediates, we can also better estimate how affinity maturation proceeded to result in an antibody with broad and potent neutralization activity and offer more focused strategies for designing immunogens capable of eliciting these less mutated bnAbs.
doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1003754
PMCID: PMC3836729  PMID: 24278016
15.  Folliculin Regulates Ampk-Dependent Autophagy and Metabolic Stress Survival 
PLoS Genetics  2014;10(4):e1004273.
Dysregulation of AMPK signaling has been implicated in many human diseases, which emphasizes the importance of characterizing AMPK regulators. The tumor suppressor FLCN, responsible for the Birt-Hogg Dubé renal neoplasia syndrome (BHD), is an AMPK-binding partner but the genetic and functional links between FLCN and AMPK have not been established. Strikingly, the majority of naturally occurring FLCN mutations predisposing to BHD are predicted to produce truncated proteins unable to bind AMPK, pointing to the critical role of this interaction in the tumor suppression mechanism. Here, we demonstrate that FLCN is an evolutionarily conserved negative regulator of AMPK. Using Caenorhabditis elegans and mammalian cells, we show that loss of FLCN results in constitutive activation of AMPK which induces autophagy, inhibits apoptosis, improves cellular bioenergetics, and confers resistance to energy-depleting stresses including oxidative stress, heat, anoxia, and serum deprivation. We further show that AMPK activation conferred by FLCN loss is independent of the cellular energy state suggesting that FLCN controls the AMPK energy sensing ability. Together, our data suggest that FLCN is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of AMPK signaling that may act as a tumor suppressor by negatively regulating AMPK function.
Author Summary
The FLCN gene is responsible for the hereditary human tumor disease called Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome (BHD). Patients that inherit an inactivating mutation in the FLCN gene develop lung collapse as well as tumors in the kidney, colon, and skin. It is not clear yet what the exact function of this protein is in the cell or an organism. In this study, we used a simple model organism (the round worm C. elegans) to study the function of FLCN. We found that it is involved in the regulation of energy metabolism in the cell. FLCN normally binds and blocks the action of another protein (AMPK), which is involved in the maintenance of energy levels. When energy levels fall, AMPK is activated and drives a recycling pathway called autophagy, where cellular components are recycled producing energy. In the absence of FLCN in worms and mammalian cells, like in tumors of BHD patients, AMPK and autophagy are chronically activated leading to an increased energy level, which makes the cells/organism very resistant to many stresses that would normally kill them, which in the end could lead to progression of tumorigenesis.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1004273
PMCID: PMC3998892  PMID: 24763318
16.  New Susceptibility Loci Associated with Kidney Disease in Type 1 Diabetes 
Sandholm, Niina | Salem, Rany M. | McKnight, Amy Jayne | Brennan, Eoin P. | Forsblom, Carol | Isakova, Tamara | McKay, Gareth J. | Williams, Winfred W. | Sadlier, Denise M. | Mäkinen, Ville-Petteri | Swan, Elizabeth J. | Palmer, Cameron | Boright, Andrew P. | Ahlqvist, Emma | Deshmukh, Harshal A. | Keller, Benjamin J. | Huang, Huateng | Ahola, Aila J. | Fagerholm, Emma | Gordin, Daniel | Harjutsalo, Valma | He, Bing | Heikkilä, Outi | Hietala, Kustaa | Kytö, Janne | Lahermo, Päivi | Lehto, Markku | Lithovius, Raija | Österholm, Anne-May | Parkkonen, Maija | Pitkäniemi, Janne | Rosengård-Bärlund, Milla | Saraheimo, Markku | Sarti, Cinzia | Söderlund, Jenny | Soro-Paavonen, Aino | Syreeni, Anna | Thorn, Lena M. | Tikkanen, Heikki | Tolonen, Nina | Tryggvason, Karl | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Wadén, Johan | Gill, Geoffrey V. | Prior, Sarah | Guiducci, Candace | Mirel, Daniel B. | Taylor, Andrew | Hosseini, S. Mohsen | Parving, Hans-Henrik | Rossing, Peter | Tarnow, Lise | Ladenvall, Claes | Alhenc-Gelas, François | Lefebvre, Pierre | Rigalleau, Vincent | Roussel, Ronan | Tregouet, David-Alexandre | Maestroni, Anna | Maestroni, Silvia | Falhammar, Henrik | Gu, Tianwei | Möllsten, Anna | Cimponeriu, Danut | Ioana, Mihai | Mota, Maria | Mota, Eugen | Serafinceanu, Cristian | Stavarachi, Monica | Hanson, Robert L. | Nelson, Robert G. | Kretzler, Matthias | Colhoun, Helen M. | Panduru, Nicolae Mircea | Gu, Harvest F. | Brismar, Kerstin | Zerbini, Gianpaolo | Hadjadj, Samy | Marre, Michel | Groop, Leif | Lajer, Maria | Bull, Shelley B. | Waggott, Daryl | Paterson, Andrew D. | Savage, David A. | Bain, Stephen C. | Martin, Finian | Hirschhorn, Joel N. | Godson, Catherine | Florez, Jose C. | Groop, Per-Henrik | Maxwell, Alexander P.
PLoS Genetics  2012;8(9):e1002921.
Diabetic kidney disease, or diabetic nephropathy (DN), is a major complication of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) that requires dialysis treatment or kidney transplantation. In addition to the decrease in the quality of life, DN accounts for a large proportion of the excess mortality associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Whereas the degree of glycemia plays a pivotal role in DN, a subset of individuals with poorly controlled T1D do not develop DN. Furthermore, strong familial aggregation supports genetic susceptibility to DN. However, the genes and the molecular mechanisms behind the disease remain poorly understood, and current therapeutic strategies rarely result in reversal of DN. In the GEnetics of Nephropathy: an International Effort (GENIE) consortium, we have undertaken a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of T1D DN comprising ∼2.4 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) imputed in 6,691 individuals. After additional genotyping of 41 top ranked SNPs representing 24 independent signals in 5,873 individuals, combined meta-analysis revealed association of two SNPs with ESRD: rs7583877 in the AFF3 gene (P = 1.2×10−8) and an intergenic SNP on chromosome 15q26 between the genes RGMA and MCTP2, rs12437854 (P = 2.0×10−9). Functional data suggest that AFF3 influences renal tubule fibrosis via the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1) pathway. The strongest association with DN as a primary phenotype was seen for an intronic SNP in the ERBB4 gene (rs7588550, P = 2.1×10−7), a gene with type 2 diabetes DN differential expression and in the same intron as a variant with cis-eQTL expression of ERBB4. All these detected associations represent new signals in the pathogenesis of DN.
Author Summary
The global prevalence of diabetes has reached epidemic proportions, constituting a major health care problem worldwide. Diabetic kidney disease, or diabetic nephropathy (DN)—the major long term microvascular complication of diabetes—is associated with excess mortality among patients with type 1 diabetes. Even though DN has been shown to cluster in families, the underlying genetic and molecular pathways remain poorly defined. We have undertaken the largest genome-wide association study and meta-analysis to date on DN and on its most severe form of kidney disease, end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We identified new loci significantly associated with diabetic ESRD: AFF3 and an intergenic locus on chromosome 15q26 residing between RGMA and MCTP2. Our functional analyses suggest that AFF3 influences renal tubule fibrosis, a pathological hallmark of severe DN. Another locus in ERBB4 was suggestively associated with DN and resides in the same intronic region as a variant affecting the expression of ERBB4. Subsequent pathway analysis of the genes co-expressed with ERBB4 indicated involvement of fibrosis.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1002921
PMCID: PMC3447939  PMID: 23028342
17.  An Accessory to the ‘Trinity’: SR-As Are Essential Pathogen Sensors of Extracellular dsRNA, Mediating Entry and Leading to Subsequent Type I IFN Responses 
PLoS Pathogens  2010;6(3):e1000829.
Extracellular RNA is becoming increasingly recognized as a signaling molecule. Virally derived double stranded (ds)RNA released into the extracellular space during virus induced cell lysis acts as a powerful inducer of classical type I interferon (IFN) responses; however, the receptor that mediates this response has not been identified. Class A scavenger receptors (SR-As) are likely candidates due to their cell surface expression and ability to bind nucleic acids. In this study, we investigated a possible role for SR-As in mediating type I IFN responses induced by extracellular dsRNA in fibroblasts, a predominant producer of IFNβ. Fibroblasts were found to express functional SR-As, even SR-A species thought to be macrophage specific. SR-A specific competitive ligands significantly blocked extracellular dsRNA binding, entry and subsequent interferon stimulated gene (ISG) induction. Candidate SR-As were systematically investigated using RNAi and the most dramatic inhibition in responses was observed when all candidate SR-As were knocked down in unison. Partial inhibition of dsRNA induced antiviral responses was observed in vivo in SR-AI/II-/- mice compared with WT controls. The role of SR-As in mediating extracellular dsRNA entry and subsequent induced antiviral responses was observed in both murine and human fibroblasts. SR-As appear to function as ‘carriers’, facilitating dsRNA entry and delivery to the established dsRNA sensing receptors, specifically TLR3, RIGI and MDA-5. Identifying SR-As as gatekeepers of the cell, mediating innate antiviral responses, represents a novel function for this receptor family and provides insight into how cells recognize danger signals associated with lytic virus infections. Furthermore, the implications of a cell surface receptor capable of recognizing extracellular RNA may exceed beyond viral immunity to mediating other important innate immune functions.
Author Summary
Nearly all viruses produce dsRNA during their replication cycle. This molecule is not normally found in a healthy host cell and thus functions as a flag, alerting the host to a viral infection. Cells can die by lysis during virus infections, and the intracellular dsRNA is then released into the extracellular space. This dsRNA is stable in the extracellular milieu, and is able to function as a signaling molecule, detected by neighboring cells. This has been observed experimentally, as extracellular dsRNA has been used for years to trigger host antiviral responses. It has also been suggested that extracellular dsRNA plays a role in causing pathological symptoms in virus infected patients. Our data suggests that class A scavenger receptors (SR-As) function as cell surface receptors for dsRNA. SR-As bind extracellular, viral dsRNA and mediate its entry into the cell, where it delivers the dsRNA to other known intracellular dsRNA sensors, activating intracellular antiviral responses. These findings shed new light on how the host detects and responds to virus infection.
doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1000829
PMCID: PMC2847946  PMID: 20360967
18.  The Future of Toxicity Testing: A Focus on In Vitro Methods Using a Quantitative High Throughput Screening Platform 
Drug discovery today  2010;15(23-24):997-1007.
The U.S. Tox21 collaborative program represents a paradigm shift in toxicity testing of chemical compounds from traditional in vivo tests to less expensive and higher throughput in vitro methods to prioritize compounds for further study, identify mechanisms of action, and ultimately develop predictive models for adverse health effects in humans. The NIH Chemical Genomics Center (NCGC) is an integral component of the Tox21 collaboration due to its quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) paradigm, in which titration-based screening is used to profile hundreds of thousands of compounds per week. Here, we describe the Tox21 collaboration, qHTS-based compound testing, and the various Tox21 screening assays that have been validated and tested at the NCGC to date.
doi:10.1016/j.drudis.2010.07.007
PMCID: PMC2994991  PMID: 20708096
Tox21; National Research Council; National Toxicology Program; toxicity testing; in vitro assays; NIH Roadmap; NIH Chemical Genomics Center; quantitative high-throughput screening
19.  MANAGEMENT OF CHRONIC PROSTATITIS/CHRONIC PELVIC PAIN SYNDROME: AN EVIDENCE-BASED APPROACH 
Urology  2006;67(5):881-888.
doi:10.1016/j.urology.2005.12.015
PMCID: PMC1463048  PMID: 16698346
chronic prostatitis; chronic pelvic pain syndrome; prostate; CI – confidence interval; CP/CPPS – chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome; CGI – clinical global improvement; NIH/NIDDK – National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; NIH-CPSI – National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index; NNT – number needed to treat; PPS – pentosan polysulfate; RR – risk ratio; RCT – randomized controlled trial
20.  Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Asymptomatic Inflammatory (NIH-IV) Prostatitis in Chinese Men 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(8):e71298.
Background
While many investigators have studied symptomatic prostatitis, little research has been done with regard to asymptomatic (NIH-IV) prostatitis.
Purpose
To describe the prevalence of and risk factors for NIH-IV prostatitis among a large male population.
Methods
The study population was comprised of 1,868 men at the second phase recruitment of a population-based cohort in China. Asymptomatic and symptomatic men were defined by the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis (CP) Symptom Index. Meanwhile, EPS specimens and their leukocyte count were collected. Lifestyle and demographic characteristics were obtained through a questionnaire.
Results
Prevalence of NIH-IV prostatitis was 21.1% among 1,868 asymptomatic men aged 19–78 years and increased with age. After adjusteing for potential confounding variables (age, smoking habits, alcohol drinking habits, education, physical activity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity and diabetes), age remained a significant factor for NIH-IV prostatitis (OR = 1.35; 95% CI = 1.06–1.71; P = 0.01) and the risk of NIH-IV prostatitis was significantly higher in smokers≧15 pack/years than non-smokers (OR = 1.33; 95% CI = 1.01–1.75; P = 0.03). In addition, compared with non-drinkers, the OR of NIH-IV prostatitis in drinkers ≧1 drinks/week was 1.35 (95% CI = 1.03, 1.77, p = 0.02) after adjusting for the other variables above. In addition, having less than a college education may be a risk factor for NIH-IV prostatitis, although a statistically significant difference did not exist in our data (OR = 1.22; 95% CI = 0.97–1.52; P = 0.08).
Conclusions
Our findings suggest that NIH-IV prostatitis is prevalent in China. Age, smoking, drinking and lower education levels were associated with an increased risk of NIH-IV prostatitis. The prevalence of NIH-IV prostatitis should be taken into account when estimating the total prevalence of CP in future studies.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0071298
PMCID: PMC3742742  PMID: 23967188
21.  National Institutes of Health (NIH) Chronic GVHD Staging in Severely Affected Patients: Organ and Global Scoring Correlate with Established Indicators of Disease Severity and Prognosis 
Between 2004 and 2010, 189 adult patients were enrolled on the National Cancer Institute (NCI) cross-sectional chronic Graft-versus-Host disease (cGVHD) natural history study. Patients were evaluated by multiple disease scales and outcome measures including the 2005 NIH Consensus Project cGVHD severity score. The purpose of this study is to assess the validity of the NIH scoring variables as determinants of disease severity in severely affected patients in order to standardize clinician evaluation and staging of cGVHD. 125 of 189 patients met criteria for severe cGVHD on the NIH global score and 62 had moderate disease, with a median of 4 (range 1–8) involved organs. Clinician average NIH organ score and the corresponding organ scores performed by subspecialists were highly correlated (r=0.64). NIH global severity scores showed significant associations with nearly all functional and quality of life outcome measures including Lee Scale, SF-36 Physical Component Scale (PCS), 2 minutes walk, grip strength, range of motion and Human Activity Profile (HAP). Joints/fascia, skin, and lung involvement impacted function and quality of life most significantly and showed highest number of correlations with outcome measures. The final Cox model showing factors jointly predictive for survival contained the time from cGVHD diagnosis (>49 vs. ≤49 months, HR=0.23; p=0.0011), absolute eosinophil count of (0–0.5 vs. >0.5 cells/µL, HR=3.95; p=0.0006) at the time of NIH evaluation, and NIH lung score (3 vs. 0–2, HR=11.02; p <0.0001). These results demonstrate that NIH organs and global severity scores are reliable measures of cGVHD disease burden. Strong association with subspecialist evaluation suggests that NIH organs and global severity scores are appropriate for clinical and research assessments, and may serve as a surrogate for more complex sub-specialist exams. In this population of severely affected patients, NIH lung score is the strongest predictor of poor overall survival, both alone and after adjustment for other important factors.
doi:10.1016/j.bbmt.2013.01.013
PMCID: PMC3619213  PMID: 23340040
22.  Pancreatic Cancer and Exposure to Dietary Nitrate and Nitrite in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study 
American Journal of Epidemiology  2011;174(3):305-315.
Nitrate and nitrite are precursors of N-nitroso compounds, which induce tumors of the pancreas in animals. The authors evaluated the relation of dietary nitrate and nitrite to pancreatic cancer risk in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Nitrate and nitrite intakes were assessed at baseline using a 124-item food frequency questionnaire. During approximately 10 years of follow-up between 1995 and 2006, 1,728 incident pancreatic cancer cases were identified. There was no association between total nitrate or nitrite intake and pancreatic cancer in men or women. However, men in the highest quintile of summed nitrate/nitrite intake from processed meat had a nonsignificantly elevated risk of pancreatic cancer (hazard ratio = 1.18, 95% confidence interval: 0.95, 1.47; P-trend = 0.11). The authors observed a stronger increase in risk among men for nitrate/nitrite intake from processed meat at ages 12–13 years (highest quintile vs. lowest: hazard ratio = 1.32, 95% confidence interval: 0.99, 1.76; P-trend = 0.11), though the relation did not achieve statistical significance. The authors found no associations between adult or adolescent nitrate or nitrite intake from processed meats and pancreatic cancer among women. These results provide modest evidence that processed meat sources of dietary nitrate and nitrite may be associated with pancreatic cancer among men and provide no support for the hypothesis in women.
doi:10.1093/aje/kwr092
PMCID: PMC3202160  PMID: 21685410
diet; nitrates; nitrites; nitroso compounds; pancreatic neoplasms
23.  Comparisons of the Effects of Stent Eccentricity on the Neointimal Hyperplasia between Sirolimus-Eluting Stent versus Paclitaxel-Eluting Stent 
Yonsei Medical Journal  2010;51(6):823-831.
Purpose
Previous studies suggested that asymmetric stent expansion did not affect suppression of neointimal hyperplasia (NIH) after sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) implantation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of stent eccentricity (SE) on NIH between SES versus paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES) using an intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) analysis from the randomized trial.
Materials and Methods
Serial IVUS data were obtained from Post-stent Optimal Expansion (POET) trial, allocated randomly to SES or PES. Three different SE (minimum stent diameter divided by maximum stent diameter) were evaluated; SE at the lesion site with maximal %NIH area (SE-NIH), SE at the minimal stent CSA [SE-minimal stent area (SE-MSA)], and averaged SE through the entire stent (SE-mean). We classified each drug-eluting stents (DES) into the concentric (≥ mean SE) and eccentric groups (< mean SE) based on the mean value of SE.
Results
Among 301 enrolled patients, 233 patients [SES (n = 108), PES (n = 125)] underwent a follow-up IVUS. There was no significant correlation between %NIH area and SE-NIH (r = - 0.083, p = 0.391) or SE-MSA (r = - 0.109, p = 0.259) of SES. However, SE-NIH of PES showed a weak but significant correlation with %NIH area (r = 0.269, p < 0.01). As to the associations between SE-mean and NIH volume index, SES revealed no significant correlation (r = - 0.001, p = 0.990), but PES showed a weak but significant correlation (r = 0.320, p < 0.01). However, there was no difference in the restenosis rate between the eccentric versus concentric groups of both DES.
Conclusion
This study suggests that lower SE of both SES and PES, which means asymmetric stent expansion, may not be associated with increased NIH.
doi:10.3349/ymj.2010.51.6.823
PMCID: PMC2995963  PMID: 20879046
Drug-eluting stents; intravascular ultrasonography; restenosis
24.  Glut4 Storage Vesicles without Glut4: Transcriptional Regulation of Insulin-Dependent Vesicular Traffic 
Molecular and Cellular Biology  2004;24(16):7151-7162.
Two families of transcription factors that play a major role in the development of adipocytes are the CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), in particular PPARγ. Ectopic expression of either C/EBPα or PPARγ in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts results in the conversion of these cells to adipocyte-like cells replete with fat droplets. NIH 3T3 cells ectopically expressing C/EBPα (NIH-C/EBPα) differentiate into adipocytes and exhibit insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, whereas NIH 3T3 cells ectopically expressing PPARγ (NIH-PPARγ) differentiate but do not exhibit any insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, nor do they express any C/EBPα. The reason for the lack of insulin-responsive glucose uptake in the NIH-PPARγ cells is their virtual lack of the insulin-responsive glucose transporter, Glut4. The NIH-PPARγ cells express functionally active components of the insulin receptor-signaling pathway (the insulin receptor, IRS-1, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and Akt2) at levels comparable to those in responsive cell lines. They also express components of the insulin-sensitive vesicular transport machinery, namely, VAMP2, syntaxin-4, and IRAP, the last of these being the other marker of insulin-regulated vesicular traffic along with Glut4. Interestingly, the NIH-PPARγ cells show normal insulin-dependent translocation of IRAP and form an insulin-responsive vesicular compartment as assessed by cell surface biotinylation and sucrose velocity gradient analysis, respectively. Moreover, expression of a Glut4-myc construct in the NIH-PPARγ cells results in its insulin-dependent translocation to the plasma membrane as assessed by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Based on these data, we conclude that major role of C/EBPα in the context of the NIH-PPARγ cells is to regulate Glut4 expression. The differentiated cells possess a large insulin-sensitive vesicular compartment with negligible Glut4, and Glut4 translocation can be reconstituted on expression of this transporter.
doi:10.1128/MCB.24.16.7151-7162.2004
PMCID: PMC479711  PMID: 15282314
25.  Sex Differences in Application, Success, and Funding Rates for NIH Extramural Programs 
Academic Medicine  2011;86(6):759-767.
Purpose
The authors provide an analysis of sex differences in National Institutes of Health (NIH) award programs to inform potential initiatives for promoting diversity in the research workforce.
Method
In 2010, the authors retrieved data for NIH extramural grants in the electronic Research Administration Information for Management, Planning, and Coordination II database, and used statistical analysis to determine any sex differences in securing NIH funding, as well as subsequent success of researchers who had already received independent NIH support.
Results
Success and funding rates for men and women were not significantly different in most award programs. Furthermore, in programs where participation was lower for women than men, the disparity was primarily related to a lower percentage of women applicants compared to men, rather than decreased success rates or funding rates. However, for subsequent grants, both application and funding rates were generally higher for men than for women.
Conclusions
Cross-sectional analysis showed that women and men were generally equally successful at all career stages, but longitudinal analysis showed that men with previous experience as NIH grantees had higher application and funding rates than women at similar career points. On average, although women received larger R01 awards than men, men had more R01 awards than women at all points in their careers. Therefore, while greater participation of women in NIH programs is underway, further action will be required to eradicate remaining sex differences.
doi:10.1097/ACM.0b013e31821836ff
PMCID: PMC3379556  PMID: 21512358

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