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author:(Robert bossart)
1.  Influences on call outcomes among Veteran callers to the National Veterans Crisis Line 
This evaluation examined the association of caller and call characteristics with proximal outcomes of Veterans Crisis Line calls. From October 1-7, 2010, 665 Veterans with recent suicidal ideation or a history of attempted suicide called the Veterans Crisis Line, 646 had complete data and were included in the analyses. A multivariable multinomial logistic regression was conducted to identify correlates of a favorable outcome, either a resolution or a referral, when compared to an unfavorable outcome, no resolution or referral. A multivariable logistic regression was used to identify correlates of responder-rated caller risk in a subset of calls. Approximately 84% of calls ended with a favorable outcome, 25% with a resolution and 59% with a referral to a local health care provider. Calls from high-risk callers had greater odds of ending with a referral than without a resolution or referral, as did weekday calls (6:00 am to 5:59 pm EST, Monday through Friday). Responders used caller intent to die and the absence of future plans to determine caller risk. Findings suggest that the Veterans Crisis Line is a useful mechanism for generating referrals for high-risk Veteran callers. Responders appeared to use known risk and protective factors to determine caller risk.
doi:10.1111/sltb.12033
PMCID: PMC5064431  PMID: 23611446
2.  Health Care Utilization and Health Indicators Among a National Sample of U.S. Veterans in Same-Sex Partnerships 
Military medicine  2013;178(2):207-212.
Objectives
To examine health indicators of same-sex partnered veterans as compared with their opposite-sex partnered veteran and nonveteran peers.
Methods
Same-sex partner status was derived by self-reported same-sex partnerships in data from the 2004 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Outcome variables included health risk disparities associated with sexual minority status (e.g., frequent mental distress) and veteran status (e.g., firearm ownership). Stratified multiple logistic regression models were used to examine the association of same-sex partnered veteran status with health indicators.
Results
Same-sex partnered veterans had higher odds of being overweight and keeping firearms in the house compared with same-sex partnered nonveterans. Same-sex partnered veterans were less likely than opposite-sex partnered veterans to be overweight, and they were more than twice as likely to be current smokers when compared with opposite-sex partnered nonveterans.
Conclusions
Findings suggest both that some health disparities patterns identified by same-sex partnership status among the general population also exist among veteran populations, and that some unique distinctions may exist, particularly related to BMI and firearm ownership. Collection of information about sexual minority status within Department of Veterans Affairs data sources is needed to more accurately assess the health of this minority population.
PMCID: PMC3725588  PMID: 23495467
3.  Suicide acceptability among U.S. Veterans with active duty experience: Results from the 2010 General Social Survey 
Objectives
To examine whether U.S. Veterans more frequently indicate suicide acceptability than non-Veterans.
Methods
The 2010 General Social Survey, which employed a probability-based sample of U.S. adults, was analyzed by self-reported Veteran status on suicide acceptability in four, separate hypothetical situations regarding ending one’s life (i.e., incurable illness, bankruptcy, bringing dishonor/shame upon family; tired of living and ready to die).
Results
Veterans were no more likely to endorse suicide as acceptable than their non-Veteran counterparts.
Conclusions
Results suggest that attitudes approving of suicide are not different among Veterans in general and non-Veterans. However, future research may need to examine if subpopulations of Veterans with elevated risk for suicide may report differential attitudes about suicide.
doi:10.1080/13811118.2013.748415
PMCID: PMC3601790  PMID: 23387403
suicide; veterans health
4.  Co-Occurring Physical Fighting and Suicide Attempts among U.S. High School Students: Examining Patterns of Early Alcohol Use Initiation and Current Binge Drinking 
Introduction: A growing body of empirical research documents a significant co-occurrence of suicide attempts and interpersonal violence among youth. However, the potential role of early alcohol use initiation and current heavy alcohol use as correlates of this comorbidity has not been examined in a nationally representative sample of high school students.
Methods: We based our analyses on cross-sectional data from the 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Survey, which includes a nationally representative sample (n=16,410) of high school students in grades 9 through 12 in the United States. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted to test the associations between measures of alcohol use (early alcohol use initiation and heavy drinking) and comorbid suicidal and violent behavior while controlling for potential confounders.
Results: Among high school students, 3.6% reported comorbid physical fighting and suicide attempt in the past year. Early alcohol use (prior to age 13) and heavy drinking (5 or more drinks in a row) were strongly associated with comorbid reports of physical fighting and suicide attempts (Adj. odds ratio [OR]=3.12; 95% confidence interval [CI]:2.49–3.89) and (Adj. OR=3.45; 95%CI:2.63–4.52).
Conclusion: These findings underscore the importance of both early alcohol use initiation and heavy drinking as statistically significant correlates of comorbid fighting and suicide attempts among youth. While future research is needed to determine the temporal ordering between problem drinking and violent or suicidal behaviors, existing prevention programs may benefit from including components aimed at reducing and delaying alcohol use.
doi:10.5811/westjem.2013.3.15705
PMCID: PMC3735381  PMID: 23930147

Results 1-4 (4)