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author:(Robert bossart)
1.  Prevalence, Correlates, and Symptom Profiles of Depression among Men with a History of Military Service 
Purpose
The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence, correlates, and symptom profiles of depressive disorders in men with a history of military service.
Methods
Data was obtained from the 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey. Multivariable logistic regressions were used to identify correlates of lifetime and current depression. Regularly occurring symptom profiles were identified via cluster analysis.
Results
Prevalence of lifetime and current depression was similar in men with and without a history of military service. Lifetime diagnosis was positively associated with younger age and negatively associated with black minority status, married or cohabitation, and self-reported good health. Current depression was positively associated with other minority status (non-Hispanic non-black) and negatively associated with older age, some college, being in a relationship, and self-reported good health. A cluster of younger men who experience significant depressive symptoms but may not report depressed mood or anhedonia was identified.
Conclusions
Depression is as prevalent in men with a history of military service as it is in men without a history. Research should examine subpopulations of men with a history of military service in which depression may be more prevalent or burdensome. Younger men with significant depressive symptoms may be missed by standard depression screens and still be at elevated risk for negative outcomes associated with depressive disorders.
doi:10.1007/s00127-010-0226-y
PMCID: PMC5064430  PMID: 20652680
Depression; Prevalence; Military Personnel; Veterans
2.  Associations Between the Department of Veterans Affairs' Suicide Prevention Campaign and Calls to Related Crisis Lines 
Public Health Reports  2014;129(6):516-525.
Objective
The Transit Authority Suicide Prevention (TASP) campaign was launched by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) in a limited number of U.S. cities to promote the use of crisis lines among veterans of military service.
Methods
We obtained the daily number of calls to the VCL and National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (NSPL) for six implementation cities (where the campaign was active) and four control cities (where there was no TASP campaign messaging) for a 14-month period. To identify changes in call volume associated with campaign implementation, VCL and NSPL daily call counts for three time periods of equal length (pre-campaign, during campaign, and post-campaign) were modeled using a Poisson log-linear regression with inference based on the generalized estimating equations.
Results
Statistically significant increases in calls to both the VCL and the NSPL were reported during the TASP campaign in implementation cities, but were not reported in control cities during or following the campaign. Secondary outcome measures were also reported for the VCL and included the percentage of callers who are veterans, and calls resulting in a rescue during the study period.
Conclusions
Results from this study reveal some promise for suicide prevention messaging to promote the use of telephone crisis services and contribute to an emerging area of research examining the effects of campaigns on help seeking.
PMCID: PMC4187294  PMID: 25364053
3.  Parent and Child Psychopathology and Suicide Attempts among Children of Parents with Alcohol Use Disorder 
Parents with psychopathology such as alcohol use disorder (AUD) that confers risk for suicide attempt (SA) may have children who are more likely to develop such psychopathology and to attempt suicide, suggesting that risk may be “transmitted” from parents to children. We examined this phenomenon during the transition from childhood to adolescence, when risk for SA increases dramatically. A cohort of 418 children were examined at average age 9.4 (range 7–14) years at enrollment (Time 1, childhood) and approximately five years later, prior to reaching age 18 (Time 2, adolescence). One or both biological parents, oversampled for AUD, were also interviewed. Structural equation models (SEM) examined father-child, mother-child, and either/both parent-child associations. The primary outcome was SA over follow-up among offspring, assessed at Time 2. As hypothesized, parental antisocial personality disorder predicted conduct disorder symptoms in offspring both during childhood and adolescence (parent-child model, father-child model) and maternal AUD predicted conduct disorder symptoms during childhood (mother-child model). However, we did not find evidence to support transmission of depression from parents to offspring either during childhood or adolescence, and parent psychopathology did not show statistically significant associations with SA during adolescence. In conclusion, we conducted a rare study of parent-to-child “transmission” of risk for SA that used a prospective research design, included diagnostic interviews with both parents and offspring, and examined the transition from childhood to adolescence, and the first such study in children of parents with AUD. Results provided mixed support for hypothesized parent-child associations.
doi:10.1080/13811118.2013.826154
PMCID: PMC4059391  PMID: 24716789
adolescent; parent; suicide attempt; alcohol use disorder; risk factor

Results 1-3 (3)