PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-3 (3)
 

Clipboard (0)
None
Journals
Authors
Year of Publication
Document Types
author:(Robert bossart)
1.  Health Care Utilization and Health Indicators Among a National Sample of U.S. Veterans in Same-Sex Partnerships 
Military medicine  2013;178(2):207-212.
Objectives
To examine health indicators of same-sex partnered veterans as compared with their opposite-sex partnered veteran and nonveteran peers.
Methods
Same-sex partner status was derived by self-reported same-sex partnerships in data from the 2004 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Outcome variables included health risk disparities associated with sexual minority status (e.g., frequent mental distress) and veteran status (e.g., firearm ownership). Stratified multiple logistic regression models were used to examine the association of same-sex partnered veteran status with health indicators.
Results
Same-sex partnered veterans had higher odds of being overweight and keeping firearms in the house compared with same-sex partnered nonveterans. Same-sex partnered veterans were less likely than opposite-sex partnered veterans to be overweight, and they were more than twice as likely to be current smokers when compared with opposite-sex partnered nonveterans.
Conclusions
Findings suggest both that some health disparities patterns identified by same-sex partnership status among the general population also exist among veteran populations, and that some unique distinctions may exist, particularly related to BMI and firearm ownership. Collection of information about sexual minority status within Department of Veterans Affairs data sources is needed to more accurately assess the health of this minority population.
PMCID: PMC3725588  PMID: 23495467
2.  Suicide acceptability among U.S. Veterans with active duty experience: Results from the 2010 General Social Survey 
Objectives
To examine whether U.S. Veterans more frequently indicate suicide acceptability than non-Veterans.
Methods
The 2010 General Social Survey, which employed a probability-based sample of U.S. adults, was analyzed by self-reported Veteran status on suicide acceptability in four, separate hypothetical situations regarding ending one’s life (i.e., incurable illness, bankruptcy, bringing dishonor/shame upon family; tired of living and ready to die).
Results
Veterans were no more likely to endorse suicide as acceptable than their non-Veteran counterparts.
Conclusions
Results suggest that attitudes approving of suicide are not different among Veterans in general and non-Veterans. However, future research may need to examine if subpopulations of Veterans with elevated risk for suicide may report differential attitudes about suicide.
doi:10.1080/13811118.2013.748415
PMCID: PMC3601790  PMID: 23387403
suicide; veterans health
3.  Drivers of Disparity: Differences in Socially-Based Risk Factors of Self-injurious and Suicidal Behaviors Among Sexual Minority College Students 
Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (i.e., sexual minority) populations have increased prevalence of both self-injurious and suicidal behaviors, but reasons for these disparities are poorly understood.
Objective
To test the association between socially-based stressors (e.g., victimization, discrimination) and self-injurious behavior, suicide ideation, and suicide attempt.
Participants
A national sample of college-attending 18- to 24-year-olds.
Methods
Random or census samples from post-secondary educational institutions that administered the National College Health Assessment during the Fall 2008 and Spring 2009 semesters.
Results
Sexual minorities reported more socially-based stressors than heterosexuals. Bisexuals exhibited greatest prevalence of self-injurious and suicidal behaviors. In adjusted models, intimate partner violence was most consistently associated with self-injurious behaviros.
Conclusions
Sexual minorities' elevated risks of self-injurious and suicidal behaviors may stem from higher exposure to socially-based stressors. Within-group differences among sexual minorities offer insight to specific risk factors that may contribute to elevated self-injurious and suicidal behaviors in sexual minority populations.
doi:10.1080/07448481.2011.623332
PMCID: PMC3340564  PMID: 22316411
Community Health; Health Education; Mental Health

Results 1-3 (3)