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PubMed Central Canada to be taken offline in February 2018

On February 23, 2018, PubMed Central Canada (PMC Canada) will be taken offline permanently. No author manuscripts will be deleted, and the approximately 2,900 manuscripts authored by Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)-funded researchers currently in the archive will be copied to the National Research Council’s (NRC) Digital Repository over the coming months. These manuscripts along with all other content will also remain publicly searchable on PubMed Central (US) and Europe PubMed Central, meaning such manuscripts will continue to be compliant with the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications.

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1.  Age- and sex-standardised prevalence rates of fatigue in a large hospital-based sample of cancer patients 
British Journal of Cancer  2011;105(3):445-451.
Background:
The aim of this longitudinal study was to determine age- and sex-standardised prevalence rates of cancer-related fatigue in different groups of patients.
Methods:
This was a prospective study in a cohort of N=1494 cancer patients investigating fatigue at three time points t1–t3 (t1: admission to hospital, t2: discharge, t3: half a year after t1). Fatigue was measured with the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory. Age- and sex-adjusted norms were derived from a representative community sample of N=2037, using a cutoff at the 75th percentile.
Results:
At admission to the hospital, 32% of the patients were classified as fatigued. At discharge, the overall prevalence rate was 40%, and at half a year after t1, prevalence was 34%. Fatigue prevalence rates differed according to tumour stage, site, age, and sex of the patients.
Conclusion:
The prevalence rates provided by this study can be used for the planning of research and clinical routine.
doi:10.1038/bjc.2011.251
PMCID: PMC3172908  PMID: 21750551
fatigue; neoplasms; prevalence studies; prospective studies; mental health

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