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On February 23, 2018, PubMed Central Canada (PMC Canada) will be taken offline permanently. No author manuscripts will be deleted, and the approximately 2,900 manuscripts authored by Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)-funded researchers currently in the archive will be copied to the National Research Council’s (NRC) Digital Repository over the coming months. These manuscripts along with all other content will also remain publicly searchable on PubMed Central (US) and Europe PubMed Central, meaning such manuscripts will continue to be compliant with the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications.

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author:(Liliane J dable)
1.  UNC-108/RAB-2 and its effector RIC-19 are involved in dense core vesicle maturation in Caenorhabditis elegans 
The Journal of Cell Biology  2009;186(6):897-914.
Uncoordinated movement in Rab2 mutants is caused by impaired retention of cargo on dense core vesicles, not by defective synaptic vesicle release. (Also see the companion article by Edwards et al. in this issue.)
Small guanosine triphosphatases of the Rab family regulate intracellular vesicular trafficking. Rab2 is highly expressed in the nervous system, yet its function in neurons is unknown. In Caenorhabditis elegans, unc-108/rab-2 mutants have been isolated based on their locomotory defects. We show that the locomotion defects of rab-2 mutants are not caused by defects in synaptic vesicle release but by defects in dense core vesicle (DCV) signaling. DCVs in rab-2 mutants are often enlarged and heterogeneous in size; however, their number and distribution are not affected. This implicates Rab2 in the biogenesis of DCVs at the Golgi complex. We demonstrate that Rab2 is required to prevent DCV cargo from inappropriately entering late endosomal compartments during DCV maturation. Finally, we show that RIC-19, the C. elegans orthologue of the human diabetes autoantigen ICA69, is also involved in DCV maturation and is recruited to Golgi membranes by activated RAB-2. Thus, we propose that RAB-2 and its effector RIC-19 are required for neuronal DCV maturation.
doi:10.1083/jcb.200902096
PMCID: PMC2753160  PMID: 19797081
2.  Keeping families engaged: the effects of home-based family therapy enhanced with experiential activities 
Social work research  2009;33(2):121-126.
Engagement of high-risk adolescents and their families in treatment is a considerable challenge for service providers and agencies. Despite its importance, little research has been conducted that explores this important treatment process. To address this gap, a test of an innovative method to improve engagement in family therapy was undertaken. Findings of this study of 42 intervention group families and 41 comparison group families (N=83) suggest that augmenting in-home family therapy with short and creative experiential activities can significantly increase engagement and retention in treatment. Further research of engagement as a mechanism of change in family-based treatment is needed.
PMCID: PMC2792997  PMID: 20011133
high-risk youth; family therapy; treatment engagement; treatment retention; experiential treatment methods
3.  Keratometry device for surgical support 
Background
High astigmatisms are usually induced during corneal suturing subsequent to tissue transplantation or any other surgery which involves corneal suturing. One of the reasons is that the procedure is intimately dependent on the surgeon's skill for suturing identical stitches. In order to evaluate the influence of the irregularity on suturing for the residual astigmatism, a prototype for ophthalmic surgical support has been developed. The final intention of this prototype is to be an evaluation tool for guided suture and as an outcome diminish the postoperative astigmatism.
Methods
The system consists of hand held ring with 36 infrared LEDs, that is to be projected onto the lachrymal film of the cornea. The image is reflected back through the optics of the ocular microscope and its distortion from the original circular shape is evaluated by developed software. It provides keratometric and circularity measurements during surgery in order to guide the surgeon for uniformity in suturing.
Results
The system is able to provide up to 23D of astigmatism (32D - 55D range) and is ± 0.25D accurate. It has been tested in 14 volunteer patients intraoperative and has been compared to a commercial keratometer Nidek Oculus Hand-held corneal topographer. The correlation factors are 0.92 for the astigmatism and 0.97 for the associated axis.
Conclusion
The system is potentially efficient for guiding the surgeon on uniformity of suturing, presenting preliminary data indicating an important decrease on the residual astigmatism, from an average of 8D - for patients not submitted to the prototype guidance - to 1.4D - for patients who have actually been submitted to the prototype guidance - after the first 24 hours post-surgery and in the subsequent weeks. It also indicates that the surgeon should achieve circularity greater or equal to 98% in order to avoid postoperative astigmatisms over 1D.
Trial Registration
Trial registration number: CAAE - 0212.0.004.000-09.
doi:10.1186/1475-925X-8-37
PMCID: PMC2795748  PMID: 19995421
4.  The Germ Cell Nuclear Proteins hnRNP G-T and RBMY Activate a Testis-Specific Exon 
PLoS Genetics  2009;5(11):e1000707.
The human testis has almost as high a frequency of alternative splicing events as brain. While not as extensively studied as brain, a few candidate testis-specific splicing regulator proteins have been identified, including the nuclear RNA binding proteins RBMY and hnRNP G-T, which are germ cell-specific versions of the somatically expressed hnRNP G protein and are highly conserved in mammals. The splicing activator protein Tra2β is also highly expressed in the testis and physically interacts with these hnRNP G family proteins. In this study, we identified a novel testis-specific cassette exon TLE4-T within intron 6 of the human transducing-like enhancer of split 4 (TLE4) gene which makes a more transcriptionally repressive TLE4 protein isoform. TLE4-T splicing is normally repressed in somatic cells because of a weak 5′ splice site and surrounding splicing-repressive intronic regions. TLE4-T RNA pulls down Tra2β and hnRNP G proteins which activate its inclusion. The germ cell-specific RBMY and hnRNP G-T proteins were more efficient in stimulating TLE4-T incorporation than somatically expressed hnRNP G protein. Tra2b bound moderately to TLE4-T RNA, but more strongly to upstream sites to potently activate an alternative 3′ splice site normally weakly selected in the testis. Co-expression of Tra2β with either hnRNP G-T or RBMY re-established the normal testis physiological splicing pattern of this exon. Although they can directly bind pre-mRNA sequences around the TLE4-T exon, RBMY and hnRNP G-T function as efficient germ cell-specific splicing co-activators of TLE4-T. Our study indicates a delicate balance between the activity of positive and negative splicing regulators combinatorially controls physiological splicing inclusion of exon TLE4-T and leads to modulation of signalling pathways in the testis. In addition, we identified a high-affinity binding site for hnRNP G-T protein, showing it is also a sequence-specific RNA binding protein.
Author Summary
This study investigates tissue-specific alternative splicing, which plays a key role in generating diversity in animal cells. We found a new testis-specific exon in a human homologue of the important Drosophila developmental regulator Groucho, which is activated by germ cell RNA binding proteins. By analyzing splicing control of this exon, we elucidated how variations in the activity and expression of splicing regulators together counterbalance splicing activation, and achieve more tightly regulated physiological splicing patterns. We find that although this new human testis-specific exon is not conserved in mice, it is functionally important in that it encodes a peptide which increases the activity of this developmental regulator as a transcriptional repressor. This study provides new insights into how signalling pathways are evolving in human germ cells and the possible molecular defects that might be occurring in infertile men who have genetic deletions of germ cell-specific RNA binding proteins.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1000707
PMCID: PMC2762042  PMID: 19893608

Results 1-4 (4)