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1.  Cigarette smoking disparities among sexual minority cancer survivors 
Preventive Medicine Reports  2015;2:283-286.
Objective
Sexual minority (i.e., lesbian, gay, and bisexual) adults smoke cigarettes at higher rates than heterosexual adults. Smoking after receiving a cancer diagnosis is a major health concern, yet risk of continued smoking among sexual minority cancer survivors is as yet unknown. The current study examines current smoking among sexual minority vs. heterosexual adult cancer survivors.
Method
Data drawn from the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey in five states (Alaska, California, Massachusetts, New Mexico, and Wisconsin) included items about sexual orientation, cancer diagnosis, and tobacco use. The analytic sample included 124 sexual minority and 248 propensity score matched heterosexual adult cancer survivors.
Results
Bivariate analysis showed that sexual minority cancer survivors had twice the odds of current smoking as their heterosexual counterparts (OR = 2.03, 95%CI:1.09–3.80). In exploratory analyses stratified by sex, sexual minority disparities in prevalence of smoking post-cancer showed a trend toward significance among females, not males.
Conclusion
The current study offers preliminary evidence that sexual minority status is one variable among many that must be taken into account when assessing health behaviors post-cancer diagnosis. Future research should identify mechanisms leading from sexual minority status to increased rates of smoking and develop tailored smoking cessation interventions.
Highlights
•We examine cigarette smoking in sexual minority vs. heterosexual cancer survivors in the BRFSS.•We use propensity score matching to control for confounding demographic variables.•Rates of continued smoking are higher in sexual minority survivors.•Analyses stratified by sex show disparities at a trend level among sexual minority females, not males.
doi:10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.04.004
PMCID: PMC4430723  PMID: 25984441
Smoking; Neoplasms; Sexuality; Homosexuality; Female; Homosexuality; Male; Minority health

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