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1.  Promoting healthy transition to college through mindfulness training with first-year college students: Pilot randomized controlled trial 
Objective
Given the importance of developmental transitions on young adults’ lives and the high rates of mental health issues among U.S. college students, first-year college students can be particularly vulnerable to stress and adversity. This pilot study evaluated the effectiveness and feasibility of mindfulness training aiming to promote first-year college students’ health and wellbeing.
Participants
109 freshmen were recruited from residential halls (50% Caucasian, 66% female). Data collection was completed in November 2014.
Methods
A randomized control trial was conducted utilizing the Learning to BREATHE (L2B) program, a universal mindfulness program adapted to match the developmental tasks of college transition.
Results
Participation in the pilot intervention was associated with significant increase in students’ life satisfaction, and significant decrease in depression and anxiety. Marginally significant decrease was found for sleep issues and alcohol consequences.
Conclusions
Mindfulness-based programs may be an effective strategy to enhance a healthy transition into college.
doi:10.1080/07448481.2017.1278605
PMCID: PMC5810370  PMID: 28076182
Alcohol; mental health; mindfulness interventions; sleep; stress; transition to college
2.  College students’ perceptions of risk and addictiveness of e-cigarettes and cigarettes 
Background
As conventional cigarette use is declining, electronic cigarette (“e-cigarette”) use is rising and is especially high among college students. Few studies examine dual use of e-cigarettes and cigarettes among this population. This study explores the relationship between dual and exclusive e-cigarette / cigarette use and perceptions of harm and addictiveness of both products.
Methods
This is a cross-sectional analysis of data from students attending 24 colleges in Texas (n=5,482). Multinomial logistic regression was employed to test the association between current e-cigarette / cigarette use and perceived harm and addictiveness of both products. Three tobacco groups were included: cigarette only users, e-cigarette only users, and dual users.
Results
Dual users reported lower perceived harm of e-cigarettes most consistently (p<0.001, all comparisons). Perceived harm of cigarettes was significantly lower among cigarette only and dual users only, compared to non-users (p<0.001, all comparisons). Compared to non-users, all three groups reported significantly lower perceived addictiveness of e-cigarettes (p<0.001, all comparisons). The same finding was observed for perceived addictiveness of cigarettes, though findings were less consistent for the e-cigarette only group (p<0.02, all comparisons except one).
Conclusion
Findings demonstrate that among college students, perceptions of harm and addictiveness of e-cigarettes are lower than those for conventional cigarettes. For both products, perceptions of harm and addictiveness were lower among exclusive and dual users, compared to non-users.
doi:10.1080/07448481.2016.1254638
PMCID: PMC5278646  PMID: 27805472
Alternative tobacco use; electronic cigarettes; tobacco use; young adults
3.  The carrot and the stick? Strategies to improve compliance with college campus tobacco policies 
Objective
Tobacco-free policies are being rapidly adopted nationwide, yet compliance with these policies remains a challenge. This study explored college campus key informants’ experiences with tobacco policies, and their perceived benefits, drawbacks, and outcomes.
Participants
The sample for this study was 68 key informants representing 16 different California universities with varying tobacco policies (no smoking indoors and within 20 feet of entrances, designated smoking areas, 100% smoke-free, and 100% tobacco-free).
Methods
Qualitative, descriptive study. Semistructured interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis.
Results
Strategies to improve compliance ranged from a social approach to a heavy focus on punitive enforcement. Key informants from campuses using a social approach alone reported barriers to improving compliance, including a perceived lack of efficacy of the approach. However, these campuses found it challenging to incorporate enforcement through campus police or security.
Conclusions
College campus decision makers should explore using a combined approach (social approach as well as formal enforcement), with enforcement primarily the responsibility of nonpolice university channels (eg, Student Affairs, employee supervisors).
doi:10.1080/07448481.2016.1262380
PMCID: PMC5296947  PMID: 27869568
College policy; policy compliance; tobacco use; young adults
4.  Alcohol use and strenuous physical activity in college students: A longitudinal test of 2 explanatory models of health behavior 
Objective
To help clarify the effect of gender on the bidirectional relationship between alcohol use and strenuous physical activity in college students.
Participants
Five hundred twenty-four (52% female) college students recruited in August 2008 and 2009 and followed up in April 2009 and April 2011, respectively.
Methods
Participants reported their alcohol use and strenuous physical activity on 2 occasions (baseline and follow-up) spaced approximately 1 or 2 years apart.
Results
For females, alcohol use quantity at baseline was associated with increased strenuous physical activity at 1- and 2-year follow-ups, and alcohol use frequency at baseline was associated with decreased strenuous physical activity at 2-year follow-up. For males, alcohol use frequency at baseline predicted decreased strenuous physical activity at 1-year follow-up.
Conclusions
Gender differences may be explained from an eating disorders perspective such that women use physical activity as a compensatory strategy to combat potential weight gain from calories consumed during alcohol use.
doi:10.1080/07448481.2016.1260571
PMCID: PMC5510535  PMID: 27858530
Alcohol; college; students; drinking; gender; physical; activity
5.  The Role of Age and Setting in Adolescents’ First Drinking Experience for Predicting College Problem Drinking 
Purpose
The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of longitudinally reporting age at first drink (AFD), and to test AFD and setting of first drink (SFD) as predictors of collegiate problem drinking.
Participants
338 first-year college students were interviewed multiple times during their first academic year, from May 2011 through August 2012.
Methods
AFD, SFD, and problem drinking were measured using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) during the first year of college. Bivariate analysis and parsimonious multivariate linear regression model were conducted.
Results
62% of respondents were inconsistent in reporting AFD over time. Social SFD was the strongest independent predictor for higher AUDIT scores (b=4.74, 95% CI; 1.91, 7.57; p=.002).
Conclusions
Findings suggest caution should be used in relying upon using AFD as a sole predictor of problem drinking. SFD may be a complementary measure to identify students at high-risk for collegiate problem drinking.
doi:10.1080/07448481.2017.1341767
PMCID: PMC5771674  PMID: 28622114
Alcohol; Clinical Medicine; Health Education; Community Health
6.  Varicella Immunization Requirements for US Colleges: 2014–2015 academic year 
Objective
To obtain information on varicella pre-matriculation requirements in US colleges for undergraduate students during the 2014–2015 academic year.
Participants
Healthcare professionals and member-schools of the American College Health Association (ACHA).
Methods
An electronic survey was sent to ACHA members regarding school characteristics and whether schools had policies in place requiring that students show proof of 2-doses of varicella vaccination for school attendance.
Results
Only 27% (101/370) of schools had a varicella pre-matriculation requirement for undergraduate students. Only 68% of schools always enforced this requirement. Private schools, 4-year schools, Northeastern schools, those with <5,000 students, and schools located in a state with a 2-dose varicella vaccine mandate were significantly more likely to have a varicella pre-matriculation requirement.
Conclusions
A small proportion of US colleges have a varicella pre-matriculation requirement for varicella immunity. College vaccination requirements are an important tool for controlling varicella in these settings.
doi:10.1080/07448481.2016.1138481
PMCID: PMC5757374  PMID: 26829449
varicella; chickenpox; immunization; vaccination; college
7.  Socio-cognitive Factors and Perceived Consequences Associated with Alternative Forms of Alcohol Use 
Objective
Popular media have highly publicized alternative forms of alcohol use (e.g., eyeballing, inhaling alcohol vapor) among college students as a growing concern, possibly associated with severe health risks. Formative research indicates rarity of use.
Participants and Methods
College students (Study 1: n = 411; Study 2: n = 687) completed an online survey.
Results
Findings confirmed infrequent use of alternative methods of alcohol use and low likelihood of trying them in the future (Study 1). Participants indicated varied reasons for possibly trying each alternative form of alcohol use, but consistently perceived consequences for all forms (i.e., health concerns), as well as very low perceived approval from close friends (Study 2). Social and environmental contextual factors associated with possible use were also explored.
Conclusions
College students in the current sample have low prevalence and future likelihood of alternative forms of alcohol use. This information can be used by campus health practitioners to promote accurate normative data for alternative forms of alcohol use. However, with increased perceptions of approval and media presence, future trends could change. Findings revealed important risk factors for these potentially hazardous forms of alcohol use.
doi:10.1080/07448481.2016.1233558
PMCID: PMC5481848  PMID: 27610942
Alternative alcohol use; nontraditional alcohol administration; college drinking; alcohol motives; injunctive norms
8.  Perceived norms and alcohol use among first-year college student-athletes’ different types of friends 
Objective
To describe first-year college student-athletes’ friendship contexts and test whether their perceptions of alcohol use and approval by different types of friends are associated with their own alcohol use.
Participants
First-year student-athletes (N=2,622) from 47 colleges and universities participating in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) sports during February–March 2013.
Methods
Student-athletes completed online surveys during the baseline assessment of an alcohol and other drug prevention program evaluation. Analyses tested whether perceptions of friends’ alcohol use (descriptive norms) and perceptions of friends’ approval of alcohol use (injunctive norms) predicted their alcohol use.
Results
Both use and approval perceptions by upperclassmen, same-team, and most influential friends significantly predicted alcohol use. By contrast, only perceived use by first-year, non-team, and less influential friends significantly predicted alcohol use.
Conclusions
Athletics departments’ alcohol policies and prevention programming for first-year student-athletes should address the potential influence of different types of friends on alcohol use.
doi:10.1080/07448481.2016.1233557
PMCID: PMC5540135  PMID: 27610821
social norms; alcohol; student-athletes; friendships
9.  Variability in Measures of Health and Health Behavior Among Emerging Adults One Year After High School According to College Status 
Objective
To examine changes in health behaviors among U.S. emerging adults one year after high school.
Participants
The national sample of participants (n=1927), including those attending 4-year college/university (n=884), 2-year colleges/technical schools (n=588), and no college (n=455), participated in annual spring surveys 2013–2014.
Methods
Health behaviors were assessed the last year of high school and first year of college; differences by college status controlling for previous-year values were estimated using regression analyses.
Results
Relative to 4-year college attendees, those attending technical school/community college were less likely to binge drink (OR=.57, CI=/38-.86), but more likely to speed (OR=1.26; CI=1.0–2.84), consume sodas (OR=1.57, CI=1.0–2.47), and report lower family satisfaction (p<0.01), with marginally more physical and depressive symptoms. College non-attendees reported more DWI (OR= 1.60, CI=1.05–2.47), soda drinking (OR=2.51, CI=1.76–3.59), over-sleeping (OR= 4.78, CI=3.65–8.63), and less family satisfaction (p<0.04).
Conclusions
Health risk behaviors among emerging adults varied by college status.
doi:10.1080/07448481.2016.1238384
PMCID: PMC5549460  PMID: 27661849
college students; diet; exercise; substance use; driving; mental health; physical health; college health
10.  Negative Affect as a Moderator of the Relationship between Hookup Motives and Hookup Consequences 
Objective
The current study examined the extent to which negative affect moderates the relationships between distinct hookup motives and hookup consequences.
Participants
Data were collected from 271 heavy drinking undergraduate college students.
Methods
Students from three U.S. universities completed online surveys assessing hooking up related motives, behaviors, and consequences.
Results
The results showed that conformity motives to hookup and negative affect predicted hookup consequences. Furthermore, negative affect moderated the relationship between hooking up for relationship reasons and hookup consequences. Specifically, heightened motivation to hookup to secure a long-term relationship was associated with increased hookup consequences among students with high negative affect but decreased hookup consequences among students with low negative affect.
Conclusions
These findings highlight the role that motives and negative affect play in the prediction of negative hookup consequences. Moreover, the findings from the current study have the potential to inform prevention efforts designed to reduce hookup consequences.
doi:10.1080/07448481.2016.1213732
PMCID: PMC5102059  PMID: 27455409
11.  The Theory of Planned Behavior as It Predicts Potential Intention to Seek Mental Health Services for Depression among College Students 
Between 9.5% and 31.3% of College students suffer from depression1, 2. Universities need to understand the factors that relate to care-seeking behavior.
Objective
Across 3 studies, to relate attitude, social norms, and perceived behavioral control to intention to seek mental health services, and to investigate barriers to care-seeking.
Participants
University college students (N = 845, 64% female, 26% male, and 10% unspecified).
Method
New measures were created in studies 1 and 2, and were examined using structural equation modeling in study 3.
Results
Partially consistent with the Theory of Planned Behavior3, a model with an excellent fit revealed that more positive attitudes about care and higher perceived behavioral control directly predicted higher intention to seek mental health services.
Conclusions
Educating college students about mental health disorders and treatments, enhancing knowledge about available services, and addressing limited access to long-term care might improve treatment rates for students suffering from depression.
doi:10.1080/07448481.2016.1207646
PMCID: PMC5181847  PMID: 27386898
College Students; Mental Health; Community Health; Counseling
12.  Different pathways explain alcohol related problems in female and male college students 
Objectives
Comprehensive models elucidating the intricate associations of depressive symptoms, coping motives, alcohol use, alcohol-related problems (ARP) and gender among young adults have been scarcely examined. This study investigated relationships among these variables and the effect of gender on these pathways.
Methods
College students (N = 163; 49.7% female) completed self-report measures on alcohol consumption, depressive symptoms, coping motives, and ARPs.
Results
Structural equation modeling showed that the association between depressive symptoms and ARPs was mediated by coping motives in both females and males. However, frequency of heavy alcohol use mediated the association between depressive symptoms and ARPs in females but not in males.
Conclusions
Different models explain the association between depressive symptoms and ARPs in male and female college students. Prevention programs aimed at reducing ARPs should focus on increasing alcohol screening among students with depressive symptoms, teaching coping skills, and emphasizing moderation in alcohol consumption.
doi:10.1080/07448481.2016.1191016
PMCID: PMC5021447  PMID: 27219280
Gender; depression; alcohol problems
13.  Personalized Boosters for a Computerized Intervention Targeting College Drinking: The Influence of Protective Behavioral Strategies 
Objective
Computerized interventions are cost-effective and can quickly deliver individual feedback to many students. However, in-person interventions are more efficacious. The current study sought to improve the efficacy of a popular online intervention via emailed boosters with personalized feedback.
Participants
Participants were 213 student drinkers at a southeastern public university, ages 18–24.
Methods
Students were randomized into: 1) intervention only, or 2) intervention plus booster. Alcohol consumption and related problems were assessed at baseline, 2 weeks post, and 4 weeks post.
Results
Boosters yielded reductions in drinking, but not alcohol-related problems. Boosters were associated with significant reductions for drinking frequency, heavy drinking days, peak drinks, and associated BAC. Protective behavioral strategies (PBS) moderated this effect, with significant reductions for students low in PBS, but not students already highly engaged in PBS use.
Conclusions
Easy dissemination and low cost make emailed boosters a very efficient way to promote student health.
doi:10.1080/07448481.2016.1185725
PMCID: PMC5022288  PMID: 27148633
alcohol; college student drinking; brief intervention; booster; protective behavioral strategies
14.  [No title available] 
PMCID: PMC4992551  PMID: 27149662
15.  Secondhand tobacco smoke exposure and susceptibility to smoking, perceived addiction, and psychobehavioral symptoms among college students 
Objective
To examine the association of second hand smoke (SHS) exposure with susceptibility to smoking, perceived addiction and psychobehavioral effects of exposure among never- and ever- smoking college students.
Participants
Participants were 665 college students at a large, southeastern university in the United States.
Methods
This study is a secondary analysis of online cross-sectional survey data from randomly selected students in April 2013.
Results
Thirty-eight percent of the sample had moderate to high SHS exposure. Among never-smokers, SHS exposure was associated with increased susceptibility to initiating smoking. Among ever- smokers, SHS exposure was not associated with their perceived addiction to tobacco. In the total sample, SHS exposure was associated with greater psychobehavioral symptoms of exposure.
Conclusions
SHS exposure may the increase risk of smoking, especially among never-smoking college students. This study strengthens the need for prevention strategies that limit SHS exposure in college environments.
doi:10.1080/07448481.2015.1074240
PMCID: PMC5523056  PMID: 26503903
Second hand smoke; cigarette addiction; smoking susceptibility; behavioral symptoms; college students
16.  Formative research to identify perceptions of e-cigarettes in college students: Implications for future health communication campaigns 
Objective
This formative study examined perceptions of e-cigarettes in college students with the goal of informing future health communication campaigns. Differences between e-cigarette users and nonusers were also examined. Participants: Thirty undergraduate students were recruited from a large southwestern public university (15 users, 15 nonusers).
Methods
Structured interviews were conducted and transcripts were coded for themes.
Results
Although users had more favorable attitudes toward e-cigarettes, both users and nonusers believed that e-cigarettes produce water vapor and reported that e-cigarettes were less harmful than conventional cigarettes. Potential health consequences and addiction concerns were the most common perceived threats for both users and nonusers. Both nonusers and users cited social stigma as a perceived disadvantage of e-cigarette use.
Conclusions
Ultimately, themes with particular relevance to future health communication campaigns included negative perceptions of e-cigarette users and social stigma, as well as harm perceptions and potential health consequences associated with e-cigarette use.
doi:10.1080/07448481.2016.1158180
PMCID: PMC4929619  PMID: 26979833
E-cigarettes; Health Belief Model; nicotine; Theory of Planned Behavior; young adults
17.  The Relationship Between Financial Strain, Perceived Stress, Psychological Symptoms, and Academic and Social Integration in Undergraduate Students 
Objective
Financial strain may directly or indirectly (i.e., through perceived stress) impact students’ psychological symptoms and academic and social integration, yet few studies have tested these relationships. We explored the mediating effect of perceived stress on the relationship between financial strain and two important outcomes: psychological symptomology and academic and social integration.
Participants
Participants were 157 undergraduate students. Data were collected from December 2013 to March 2014.
Methods
Cross-sectional data collection conducted using online survey software.
Results
We found that perceived stress mediated the relationship between financial strain and (a) psychological symptomology and (b) academic and social integration. Both models included first-generation status as a covariate.
Conclusions
Results suggest that perceived stress is an important intervention target for reducing psychological symptoms and improving academic and social integration for undergraduate students. Implications for university health centers and mental health professionals include incorporating a public health model to minimize stress risk.
doi:10.1080/07448481.2016.1154559
PMCID: PMC5086162  PMID: 26943354
Perceived Stress; Social Integration; Academic Integration; Mental Health; Financial Strain; First-generation Student; Low-Income Student
18.  The Association between Sensation Seeking and E-cigarette Use in Texas Young Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study 
Objective
To examine the associations between sensation seeking and ever and current e-cigarette use in Texas young adults (18–29 years old). Current cigarette use was examined as a potential effect modifier of the associations.
Participants
Participants included college students enrolled in four-year and two-year colleges in four metropolitan areas in Texas (n=5,418) who completed the survey between November 2014 and February 2015.
Methods
This cross-sectional study utilized mixed effects logistic regression to determine the associations between mean sensation seeking scores and ever and current e-cigarette use after controlling for covariates.
Results
After controlling for covariates, significant associations between sensation seeking and both ever and current e-cigarette use were observed, however, these associations were significant for non-current smokers only (AOR=1.55, 95% CI=1.39, 1.73; AOR=1.82, 95% CI=1.54, 2.15, respectively).
Conclusions
Sensation seeking is an important factor in identifying college students who may be at increased risk for e-cigarette use behaviors. Keywords: Electronic cigarettes, sensation seeking, current cigarette use
doi:10.1080/07448481.2017.1282487
PMCID: PMC5422121  PMID: 28095126
19.  ADHD-specific stimulant misuse, mood, anxiety, and stress in college-age women at high risk for or with eating disorders 
Objective
To examine the misuse of ADHD-specific stimulants in a college population at high risk for or with clinical or subclinical eating disorders.
Participants
448 college-age women ages 18–25 at high risk for or with a clinical or subclinical eating disorder.
Methods
Participants completed assessments of stimulant misuse and psychopathology from September 2009 - June 2010.
Results
Greater eating disorder pathology, objective binge eating, purging, eating disorder-related clinical impairment, depressive symptoms, perceived stress, and trait anxiety were associated with an increased likelihood of stimulant misuse. Subjective binge eating, excessive exercise, and dietary restraint were not associated with stimulant misuse.
Conclusions
ADHD-specific stimulant misuse is associated with eating disorder and comorbid pathology among individuals at high risk for or with clinical or subclinical eating disorders. Screening for stimulant misuse and eating disorder pathology may improve identification of college-age women who may be engaging in maladaptive behaviors and inform prevention efforts.
doi:10.1080/07448481.2016.1138477
PMCID: PMC4904716  PMID: 26822019
eating disorders; ADHD-specific stimulants; eating disorder risk; substance use; college students
20.  Social Influences on Use of Cigarettes, E-Cigarettes, and Hookah by College Students 
Objectives
(1) Compare social norms and perceived peer use between college student cigarette, e-cigarette and/or hookah users and nonusers; and (2) Determine variables associated with social influences.
Participants
Undergraduate students attending a large university in the Southeast U.S. (N=511).
Methods
An April 2013 online survey assessed use of three types of tobacco, social norms, perception of peer use, number of smokers in life, exposure to secondhand smoke, and demographic characteristics.
Results
Participants indicated greater acceptance of emerging tobacco products than for cigarettes and consistently overestimated the percent of peers who use various tobacco products. Males and current users had higher social norm scores for all three forms of tobacco.
Conclusion
To counter marketing of alternative tobacco products, education about the dangers of their use needs to be implemented across college campuses as part of a comprehensive tobacco control strategy that also includes tobacco-free campus policies.
doi:10.1080/07448481.2016.1138478
PMCID: PMC4913463  PMID: 26822236
social influences; college students; tobacco prevention
21.  Hookah and Cigarette Smoking Among African American College Students: Implications for Campus Risk Reduction and Health Promotion Efforts 
Objective
To identify individual and institutional risks and protections for hookah and cigarette smoking among African American (AA) college students.
Participants
AA college students (n=1,402; mean age=20, range=18–24 years; 75% female) who completed the Fall 2012 American College Health Association–National College Health Assessment II.
Methods
Respondents were stratified into four mutually exclusive groups by last 30-day smoking status: cigarette-only use (5.1%), hookah-only use (5.9%), dual use (2.4%), and non-use (86.6%). Multinomial logistic regression models identified the relative odds of exclusive and dual hookah and cigarette smoking.
Results
Current hookah and cigarette smoking rates were comparably low. Age, gender identity, current substance use, interest in tobacco use information, and student population prevailed as risks and protections for hookah and cigarette smoking.
Conclusions
Campus health promotion campaigns may need to tailor messages to AA students, particularly those who use substances, to underscore the health risks of hookah and cigarette smoking.
doi:10.1080/07448481.2016.1138479
PMCID: PMC4960822  PMID: 26829515
Smoking; Tobacco use; Health promotion; African American; College students
22.  In college and in recovery: Reasons for joining a Collegiate Recovery Program 
Objective
Collegiate Recovery Programs (CRPs), a campus-based peer support model for students recovering from substance abuse problems, grew exponentially in the past decade, yet remain unexplored.
Methods
This mixed methods study examines students’ reasons for CRP enrollment to guide academic institutions and referral sources. Students (N = 486) from the 29 CRPs nationwide operating in 2012 completed an online survey in 2013.
Results
Students were somewhat older than traditional age (mean age = 26). Now sober for three years (mean), they had experienced severe dependence on multiple substances. One third reported they would not be in college were it not for a CRP, and 20% would not be at their current institution. Top reasons for joining a CRP was the need for same age peer recovery support, and wanting to ‘do college sober’ recognizing that college life challenges sobriety.
Conclusions
CRPs appear to meet their mission of allowing recovering students to pursue educational goals in ‘an abstinence hostile environment’ and emphasize the need for more institutions to address the support needs of students in recovery.
doi:10.1080/07448481.2015.1117464
PMCID: PMC4852860  PMID: 26731130
Recovery; college students; recovery support services; substance use disorder; addiction
23.  Reaching a representative sample of college students: A comparative analysis 
Objective
To explore the feasibility of a random-digit dial (RDD) cellular phone survey in order to study college health.
Methods
Demographic distributions from the 2011 National Young Adult Health Survey (NYAHS) were benchmarked against enrollment numbers from the Integrated Postsecondary Education System (IPEDS). The sample quality was compared to the Harvard School of Public Health College Alcohol Study (1993), National College Health Risk Behavior Survey (1995), and National College Health Assessment (2011).
Results
Overall, the NYAHS performed as well, if not better, than previous college health surveys at reaching important demographic sub-groups.
Conclusions
Cellular phone RDD is a feasible approach for reaching college students and offers a simpler alternative to traditional complex sampling designs.
doi:10.1080/07448481.2015.1088018
PMCID: PMC4853024  PMID: 26629600
24.  Multilevel analysis exploring the links between stress, depression, and sleep problems among two-year college students 
Objective
This study explored the association of stress and depression with a multidimensional sleep problems construct in a sample of 2-year college students.
Participants
The sample consisted of 440 students enrolled in 2-year study from Fall 2011 to Fall 2013.
Methods
Participants in an obesity prevention study completed surveys assessing sleep, stress, and depression at baseline, 4, 12, and 24 months. Multilevel models predicting sleep problems were conducted to distinguish episodic from chronic reports of stress and depression.
Results
Participants were primarily women (68%), white (73%), young adults (M age = 22.8), with an average of 8.4 hours of sleep per night. Neither stress nor depression was predictive of sleep quantity; however, they were predictive of sleep quality.
Conclusions
Results show that sleep quality rather than sleep quantity may be the greater health concern for young adults, suggesting that intervention programs targeting depression, stress management, and healthy sleep patterns are warranted.
doi:10.1080/07448481.2016.1269111
PMCID: PMC5373919  PMID: 27937737
Depression; mental health; sleep problems; stress; young adults
25.  Changes in Type 1 Diabetes Health Indicators from High School to College 
Objective
Evaluate trajectories of type 1 diabetes health indicators from high school through the first year of college.
Participants
Seventy-four students with type 1 diabetes who maintained pediatric endocrinology care during the first year of college.
Methods
HbA1c, blood glucose monitoring frequency, BMI, and clinic attendance data were collected via retrospective medical chart review in spring, 2012. Group-based trajectory models evaluated diabetes-related health indicators over time and identified distinct growth trajectory groups.
Results
BMI increased and clinic attendance decreased in the first year of college. Trajectories for other health indicators were heterogeneous and stable over time; 69% of students were classified as having stable good glycemic control. Racial minority youth and youth on conventional insulin regimens were disproportionally represented in higher-risk groups.
Conclusions
Diabetes health indicators are stable or decline upon college entrance. Results signal the need for targeted support for college students with type 1 diabetes.
doi:10.1080/07448481.2015.1068780
PMCID: PMC4723297  PMID: 26199180

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