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On February 23, 2018, PubMed Central Canada (PMC Canada) will be taken offline permanently. No author manuscripts will be deleted, and the approximately 2,900 manuscripts authored by Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)-funded researchers currently in the archive will be copied to the National Research Council’s (NRC) Digital Repository over the coming months. These manuscripts along with all other content will also remain publicly searchable on PubMed Central (US) and Europe PubMed Central, meaning such manuscripts will continue to be compliant with the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications.

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1.  Does the impact of a plant-based diet during pregnancy on birth weight differ by ethnicity? A dietary pattern analysis from a prospective Canadian birth cohort alliance 
BMJ Open  2017;7(11):e017753.
Objective
Birth weight is an indicator of newborn health and a strong predictor of health outcomes in later life. Significant variation in diet during pregnancy between ethnic groups in high-income countries provides an ideal opportunity to investigate the influence of maternal diet on birth weight.
Setting
Four multiethnic birth cohorts based in Canada (the NutriGen Alliance).
Participants
3997 full-term mother–infant pairs of diverse ethnic groups who had principal component analysis-derived diet pattern scores—plant-based, Western and health-conscious—and birth weight data.
Results
No associations were identified between the Western and health-conscious diet patterns and birth weight; however, the plant-based dietary pattern was inversely associated with birth weight (β=−67.6 g per 1-unit increase; P<0.001), and an interaction with non-white ethnicity and birth weight was observed. Ethnically stratified analyses demonstrated that among white Europeans, maternal consumption of a plant-based diet associated with lower birth weight (β=−65.9 g per 1-unit increase; P<0.001), increased risk of small-for-gestational age (SGA; OR=1.46; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.54;P=0.005) and reduced risk of large-for-gestational age (LGA; OR=0.71; 95% CI 0.53 to 0.95;P=0.02). Among South Asians, maternal consumption of a plant-based diet associated with a higher birth weight (β=+40.5 g per 1-unit increase; P=0.01), partially explained by cooked vegetable consumption.
Conclusions
Maternal consumption of a plant-based diet during pregnancy is associated with birth weight. Among white Europeans, a plant-based diet is associated with lower birth weight, reduced odds of an infant born LGA and increased odds of SGA, whereas among South Asians living in Canada, a plant-based diet is associated with increased birth weight.
doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017753
PMCID: PMC5695448  PMID: 29138203
nutrition; diet pattern; PCA; birth weight
2.  Cesarean Section, Formula Feeding, and Infant Antibiotic Exposure: Separate and Combined Impacts on Gut Microbial Changes in Later Infancy 
Established during infancy, our complex gut microbial community is shaped by medical interventions and societal preferences, such as cesarean section, formula feeding, and antibiotic use. We undertook this study to apply the significance analysis of microarrays (SAM) method to quantify changes in gut microbial composition during later infancy following the most common birth and postnatal exposures affecting infant gut microbial composition. Gut microbiota of 166 full-term infants in the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development birth cohort were profiled using 16S high-throughput gene sequencing. Infants were placed into groups according to mutually exclusive combinations of birth mode (vaginal/cesarean birth), breastfeeding status (yes/no), and antibiotic use (yes/no) by 3 months of age. Based on repeated permutations of data and adjustment for the false discovery rate, the SAM statistic identified statistically significant changes in gut microbial abundance between 3 months and 1 year of age within each infant group. We observed well-known patterns of microbial phyla succession in later infancy (declining Proteobacteria; increasing Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes) following vaginal birth, breastfeeding, and no antibiotic exposure. Genus Lactobacillus, Roseburia, and Faecalibacterium species appeared in the top 10 increases to microbial abundance in these infants. Deviations from this pattern were evident among infants with other perinatal co-exposures; notably, the largest number of microbial species with unchanged abundance was seen in gut microbiota following early cessation of breastfeeding in infants. With and without antibiotic exposure, the absence of a breast milk diet by 3 months of age following vaginal birth yielded a higher proportion of unchanged abundance of Bacteroidaceae and Enterobacteriaceae in later infancy, and a higher ratio of unchanged Enterobacteriaceae to Alcaligenaceae microbiota. Gut microbiota of infants born vaginally and exclusively formula fed became less enriched with family Veillonellaceae and Clostridiaceae, showed unchanging levels of Ruminococcaceae, and exhibited a greater decline in the Rikenellaceae/Bacteroidaceae ratio compared to their breastfed, vaginally delivered counterparts. These changes were also evident in cesarean-delivered infants to a lesser extent. The clinical relevance of these trajectories of microbial change is that they culminate in taxon-specific abundances in the gut microbiota of later infancy, which we and others have observed to be associated with food sensitization.
doi:10.3389/fped.2017.00200
PMCID: PMC5622971
infant gut microbiota; significance analysis of microarrays; cesarean birth; breastfeeding; antibiotic use; food sensitization
3.  In vivo immune signatures of healthy human pregnancy: Inherently inflammatory or anti-inflammatory? 
PLoS ONE  2017;12(6):e0177813.
Changes in maternal innate immunity during healthy human pregnancy are not well understood. Whether basal immune status in vivo is largely unaffected by pregnancy, is constitutively biased towards an inflammatory phenotype (transiently enhancing host defense) or exhibits anti-inflammatory bias (reducing potential responsiveness to the fetus) is unclear. Here, in a longitudinal study of healthy women who gave birth to healthy infants following uncomplicated pregnancies within the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) cohort, we test the hypothesis that a progressively altered bias in resting innate immune status develops. Women were examined during pregnancy and again, one and/or three years postpartum. Most pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, including CCL2, CXCL10, IL-18 and TNFα, was reduced in vivo during pregnancy (20–57%, p<0.0001). Anti-inflammatory biomarkers (sTNF-RI, sTNF-RII, and IL-1Ra) were elevated by ~50–100% (p<0.0001). Systemic IL-10 levels were unaltered during vs. post-pregnancy. Kinetic studies demonstrate that while decreased pro-inflammatory biomarker expression (CCL2, CXCL10, IL-18, and TNFα) was constant, anti-inflammatory expression increased progressively with increasing gestational age (p<0.0001). We conclude that healthy resting maternal immune status is characterized by an increasingly pronounced bias towards a systemic anti-inflammatory innate phenotype during the last two trimesters of pregnancy. This is resolved by one year postpartum in the absence of repeat pregnancy. The findings provide enhanced understanding of immunological changes that occur in vivo during healthy human pregnancy.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0177813
PMCID: PMC5479559  PMID: 28636613
4.  Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology annual scientific meeting 2016 
Alsayegh, Mohammad A. | Alshamali, Hanan | Khadada, Mousa | Ciccolini, Amanda | Ellis, Anne K. | Quint, Diana | Powley, William | Lee, Laurie | Fiteih, Yahya | Baksh, Shairaz | Vliagoftis, Harissios | Gerega, Sebastien K. | Millson, Brad | Charland, Katia | Barakat, Stephane | Sun, Xichun | Jimenez, Ricardo | Waserman, Susan | FitzGerald, Mark J. | Hébert, Jacques | Cognet-Sicé, Josiane | Renahan, Kevin E. | Huq, Saiful | Chooniedass, Rishma | Sawyer, Scott | Pasterkamp, Hans | Becker, Allan | Smith, Steven G. | Zhang, Shiyuan | Jayasundara, Kavisha | Tacon, Claire | Simidchiev, Alex | Nadeau, Gilbert | Gunsoy, Necdet | Mullerova, Hana | Albers, Frank | Kim, Young Woong | Shannon, Casey P. | Singh, Amrit | Neighbour, Helen | Larché, Mark | Tebbutt, Scott J. | Klopp, Annika | Vehling, Lorena | Becker, Allan B. | Subbarao, Padmaja | Mandhane, Piushkumar J. | Turvey, Stuart E. | Sears, Malcolm R. | Azad, Meghan B. | Loewen, Keely | Monchka, Barret | Mahmud, Salaheddin M. | Jong, Geert ‘t | Longo, Cristina | Bartlett, Gillian | Ducharme, Francine M. | Schuster, Tibor | MacGibbon, Brenda | Barnett, Tracie | North, Michelle L. | Brook, Jeff | Lee, Elizabeth | Omana, Vanessa | Thiele, Jenny | Steacy, Lisa M. | Evans, Greg | Diamond, Miriam | Sussman, Gordon L. | Amistani, Yann | Abiteboul, Kathy | Tenn, Mark W. | Yang, ChenXi | Carlsten, Christopher | Conway, Edward M. | Mack, Douglas | Othman, Yasmin | Barber, Colin M. | Kalicinsky, Chrystyna | Burke, Andrea E. | Messieh, Mary | Nair, Parameswaran | Che, Chun T. | Douglas, Lindsay | Liem, Joel | Duan, Lucy | Miller, Charlotte | Dupuis, Pascale | Connors, Lori A. | Fein, Michael N. | Shuster, Joseph | Hadi, Hani | Polk, Brooke | Raje, Nikita | Labrosse, Roxane | Bégin, Philippe | Paradis, Louis | Roches, Anne Des | Lacombe-Barrios, Jonathan | Mishra, Sanju | Lacuesta, Gina | Chiasson, Meredith | Haroon, Babar | Robertson, Kara | Issekutz, Thomas | Leddin, Desmond | Couban, Stephen | Connors, Lori | Roos, Adrienne | Kanani, Amin | Chan, Edmond S. | Schellenberg, Robert | Rosenfield, Lana | Cvetkovic, Anna | Woodward, Kevin | Quirt, Jaclyn | Watson, Wade T. A. | Castilho, Edson | Sullivan, Jennifer A. | Temple, Beverley | Martin, Donna | Cook, Victoria E. | Mills, Christopher | Portales-Casamar, Elodie | Fu, Lisa W. | Ho, Alexander | Zaltzman, Jeffrey | Chen, Lucy | Vadas, Peter | Gabrielli, Sofianne | Clarke, Ann | Eisman, Harley | Morris, Judy | Joseph, Lawrence | LaVieille, Sebastien | Ben-Shoshan, Moshe | Graham, François | Barnes, Charles | Portnoy, Jay | Stagg, Vincent | Simons, Elinor | Lefebvre, Diana | Dai, David | Mandhane, Piushkumar | Sears, Malcolm | Tam, Herman | Simons, F. Estelle R. | Alotaibi, Dhaifallah | Dawod, Bassel | Tunis, Matthew C. | Marshall, Jean | Desjardins, Marylin | Béland, Marianne | Lejtenyi, Duncan | Drolet, Jean-Phillipe | Lemire, Martine | Tsoukas, Christos | Noya, Francisco J.D. | Alizadehfar, Reza | McCusker, Christine T. | Mazer, Bruce D. | Maestre-Batlle, Danay | Gunawan, Evelyn | Rider, Christopher F. | Bølling, Anette K. | Pena, Olga M. | Suez, Daniel | Melamed, Isaac | Hussain, Iftikhar | Stein, Mark | Gupta, Sudhir | Paris, Kenneth | Fritsch, Sandor | Bourgeois, Christelle | Leibl, Heinz | McCoy, Barbara | Noel, Martin | Yel, Leman | Scott, Ori | Reid, Brenda | Atkinson, Adelle | Kim, Vy Hong-Diep | Roifman, Chaim M. | Grunebaum, Eyal | AlSelahi, Eiman | Aleman, Fernando | Oberle, Amber | Trus, Mike | Sussman, Gordon | Kanani, Amin S. | Chambenoi, Olivier | Chiva-Razavi, Sima | Grodecki, Savannah | Joshi, Nikhil | Menikefs, Peter | Holt, David | Pun, Teresa | Tworek, Damian | Hanna, Raphael | Heroux, Delia | Rosenberg, Elli | Stiemsma, Leah | Turvey, Stuart | Denburg, Judah | Mill, Christopher | Teoh, Timothy | Zimmer, Preeti | Avinashi, Vishal | Paina, Mihaela | Darwish Hassan, Ahmed A. | Oliveria, John Paul | Olesovsky, Chris | Gauvreau, Gail | Pedder, Linda | Keith, Paul K. | Plunkett, Greg | Bolner, Michelle | Pourshahnazari, Persia | Stark, Donald | Vostretsova, Kateryna | Moses, Andrew | Wakeman, Andrew | Singer, Alexander | Gerstner, Thomas | Abrams, Elissa | Johnson, Sara F. | Woodgate, Roberta L.
doi:10.1186/s13223-017-0192-y
PMCID: PMC5390240
5.  Exposure to household furry pets influences the gut microbiota of infant at 3–4 months following various birth scenarios 
Microbiome  2017;5:40.
Background
Early-life exposure to household pets has the capacity to reduce risk for overweight and allergic disease, especially following caesarean delivery. Since there is some evidence that pets also alter the gut microbial composition of infants, changes to the gut microbiome are putative pathways by which pet exposure can reduce these risks to health. To investigate the impact of pre- and postnatal pet exposure on infant gut microbiota following various birth scenarios, this study employed a large subsample of 746 infants from the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development Study (CHILD) cohort, whose mothers were enrolled during pregnancy between 2009 and 2012. Participating mothers were asked to report on household pet ownership at recruitment during the second or third trimester and 3 months postpartum. Infant gut microbiota were profiled with 16S rRNA sequencing from faecal samples collected at the mean age of 3.3 months. Two categories of pet exposure (i) only during pregnancy and (ii) pre- and postnatally were compared to no pet exposure under different birth scenarios.
Results
Over half of studied infants were exposed to at least one furry pet in the prenatal and/or postnatal periods, of which 8% were exposed in pregnancy alone and 46.8% had exposure during both time periods. As a common effect in all birth scenarios, pre- and postnatal pet exposure enriched the abundance of Oscillospira and/or Ruminococcus (P < 0.05) with more than a twofold greater likelihood of high abundance. Among vaginally born infants with maternal intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis exposure, Streptococcaceae were substantially and significantly reduced by pet exposure (P < 0.001, FDRp = 0.03), reflecting an 80% decreased likelihood of high abundance (OR 0.20, 95%CI, 0.06–0.70) for pet exposure during pregnancy alone and a 69% reduced likelihood (OR 0.31, 95%CI, 0.16–0.58) for exposure in the pre- and postnatal time periods. All of these associations were independent of maternal asthma/allergy status, siblingship, breastfeeding exclusivity and other home characteristics.
Conclusions
The impact of pet ownership varies under different birth scenarios; however, in common, exposure to pets increased the abundance of two bacteria, Ruminococcus and Oscillospira, which have been negatively associated with childhood atopy and obesity.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s40168-017-0254-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/s40168-017-0254-x
PMCID: PMC5382463  PMID: 28381231
Pets; Infant gut microbiota; Birth; Prenatal; Postnatal
6.  Ethnic and diet-related differences in the healthy infant microbiome 
Genome Medicine  2017;9:32.
Background
The infant gut is rapidly colonized by microorganisms soon after birth, and the composition of the microbiota is dynamic in the first year of life. Although a stable microbiome may not be established until 1 to 3 years after birth, the infant gut microbiota appears to be an important predictor of health outcomes in later life.
Methods
We obtained stool at one year of age from 173 white Caucasian and 182 South Asian infants from two Canadian birth cohorts to gain insight into how maternal and early infancy exposures influence the development of the gut microbiota. We investigated whether the infant gut microbiota differed by ethnicity (referring to groups of people who have certain racial, cultural, religious, or other traits in common) and by breastfeeding status, while accounting for variations in maternal and infant exposures (such as maternal antibiotic use, gestational diabetes, vegetarianism, infant milk diet, time of introduction of solid food, infant birth weight, and weight gain in the first year).
Results
We demonstrate that ethnicity and infant feeding practices independently influence the infant gut microbiome at 1 year, and that ethnic differences can be mapped to alpha diversity as well as a higher abundance of lactic acid bacteria in South Asians and a higher abundance of genera within the order Clostridiales in white Caucasians.
Conclusions
The infant gut microbiome is influenced by ethnicity and breastfeeding in the first year of life. Ethnic differences in the gut microbiome may reflect maternal/infant dietary differences and whether these differences are associated with future cardiometabolic outcomes can only be determined after prospective follow-up.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13073-017-0421-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/s13073-017-0421-5
PMCID: PMC5372248  PMID: 28356137
Infant gut microbiome; Ethnicity; Breastfeeding; Diet
7.  Fecal Short-Chain Fatty Acid Variations by Breastfeeding Status in Infants at 4 Months: Differences in Relative versus Absolute Concentrations 
Our gut microbiota provide a number of important functions, one of which is the metabolism of dietary fiber and other macronutrients that are undigested by the host. The main products of this fermentation process are short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and other intermediate metabolites including lactate and succinate. Production of these metabolites is dependent on diet and gut microbiota composition. There is increasing evidence for the role of SCFAs in host physiology and metabolic processes as well as chronic inflammatory conditions such as allergic disease and obesity. We aimed to investigate differences in fecal SCFAs and intermediate metabolites in 163 infants at 3–5 months of age according to breastfeeding status. Compared to no exposure to human milk at time of fecal sample collection, exclusive breastfeeding was associated with lower absolute concentrations of total SCFAs, acetate, butyrate, propionate, valerate, isobutyrate, and isovalerate, yet higher concentrations of lactate. Further, the relative proportion of acetate was higher with exclusive breastfeeding. Compared to non-breastfed infants, those exclusively breastfed were four times more likely (aOR 4.50, 95% CI 1.58–12.82) to have a higher proportion of acetate relative to other SCFAs in their gut. This association was independent of birth mode, intrapartum antibiotics, infant sex, age, recruitment site, and maternal BMI or socioeconomic status. Our study confirms that breastfeeding strongly influences the composition of fecal microbial metabolites in infancy.
doi:10.3389/fnut.2017.00011
PMCID: PMC5385454
short-chain fatty acids; lactate; succinate; breastfeeding; infants; gut microbiota
8.  AllerGen’s 8th research conference 
Arrieta, Marie-Claire | Arevalos, Andrea | Stiemsma, Leah | Chico, Marta E. | Sandoval, Carlos | Jin, Minglian | Walter, Jens | Cooper, Phil | Finlay, Brett | Bernatchez, Emilie | Gold, Matthew J. | Langlois, Anick | Blais-Lecours, Pascale | Duchaine, Caroline | Marsolais, David | McNagny, Kelly M. | Blanchet, Marie-Renée | Brubacher, Jordan | Chhetri, Bimal | Sabaliauskas, Kelly | Bassil, Kate | Kwong, Jeff | Coates, Frances | Takaro, Tim K. | Chow, Angela | Miller, Gregory E. | Chen, Edith | Mandhane, Piushkumar J. | Turvey, Stuart E. | Elliott, Susan J. | Becker, Allan B. | Subbarao, Padmaja | Sears, Malcolm R. | Kozyrskyj, Anita L. | Dubeau, Aimée | Lu, Zihang | Balkovec, Susan | Kowalik, Krzysztof | Gustafsson, Per | Ratjen, Felix | Edgar, Rachel D. | Bush, Nicole R. | MacIssac, Julie L. | McEwen, Lisa M. | Boyce, Thomas W. | Kobor, Michael S. | Emmerson, Melanie | Dubeau, Aimée | Lu, Zihang | Shen, Bingqing | Kowalik, Krzysztof | Ratjen, Felix | Moraes, Theo J. | Gabrielli, Sofianne | Clarke, Ann | Eisman, Harley | Morris, Judy | Joseph, Lawrence | LaVieille, Sebastien | Ben-Shoshan, Moshe | Islam, Sumaiya A. | Brückmann, Christof | Nieratschker, Vanessa | Jamieson, Kyla C. | Proud, David | Kanagaratham, Cynthia | Camateros, Pierre | Kopriva, Frantisek | Henri, Jennifer | Hajduch, Marian | Radzioch, Danuta | Kang, Liane J. | Koleva, Petya T. | Field, Catherine J. | Konya, Tedd | Scott, James A. | Konya, Theodore | Azad, Meghan B. | Brook, Jeff | Guttman, David | Kumari, Manjeet | Bridgman, Sarah L. | Tun, Mon H. | Mandal, Rupasri | Wishart, David S. | Lee, Amy H. Y. | Xia, Jeff | Gill, Erin | Hancock, Bob | Maestre, Danay | Sutherland, Darren | Hirota, Jeremy | Pena, Olga | Carlsten, Christopher | McEwen, Lisa M. | Jones, Meaghan J. | MacIsaac, Julia L. | Dow, William H. | Rosero-Bixby, Luis | Rehkopf, David H. | Morimoto, Takeshi | Smith, Steven G. | Oliveria, John-Paul | Beaudin, Suzanne | Schlatman, Abbey | Howie, Karen | Obminski, Caitlin | Nusca, Graeme | Sehmi, Roma | Gauvreau, Gail M. | O’Byrne, Paul M. | North, Michelle | Peng, Cheng | Sanchez-Guerra, Marco | Byun, Hyang-Min | Ellis, Anne K. | Baccarelli, Andrea A. | Okeme, Joseph O. | Dhal, Suman | Saini, Aman | Diamond, Miriam L. | Olesovsky, Christopher J. | Salter, Brittany M. | Wang, Michael | Lacy, Paige | O’Sullivan, Michael J. | Park, Chan Y. | Fredberg, Jeffrey J. | Lauzon, Anne-Marie | Martin, James G. | Ryu, Min Hyung | Mookherjee, Neeloffer | Carlsten, Christopher | Simons, Elinor | Lefebvre, Diana | Dai, David | Singh, Amrit | Shannon, Casey P. | Kim, Young Woong | Yang, Chen Xi | Mark FitzGerald, J. | Boulet, Louis-Philippe | Tebbutt, Scott J. | Singhera, Gurpreet K. | JasemineYang, S. | Dorscheid, Delbert R. | Sinnock, Hasantha | Goruk, Susan | Tavakoli, Hamid | Lynd, Larry D. | Sadatsafavi, Mohsen | Tenn, Mark W. | Thiele, Jenny | Adams, Daniel E. | Steacy, Lisa M. | Ellis, Anne K. | Torabi, Bahar | De Schryver, Sarah | Lejtenyi, Duncan | Baerg, Ingrid | Chan, Edmond S. | Mazer, Bruce D. | Tran, Maxwell M. | Dai, Wei Hao | Lou, Wendy | Chari, Radha S. | Conway, Edward M. | Neighbour, Helen | Larché, Mark | Tebbutt, Scott J
doi:10.1186/s13223-016-0164-7
PMCID: PMC5260783
9.  Proceedings of the Canadian society of allergy and clinical immunology annual scientific meeting 2015 
Côté, Marie-Ève | Boulay, Marie-Ève | Plante, Sophie | Chakir, Jamila | Boulet, Louis-Philippe | Ahmed, Hanan | Ospina, Maria-Beatriz | Sideri, Kyriaki | Vliagoftis, Harissios | Johnson, Sara F. | Woodgate, Roberta L. | Cros, Guilhem | Teira, Pierre | Cellot, Sonia | Bittencourt, Henrique | Decaluwe, Helene | Vachon, Marie France | Duval, Michel | Haddad, Elie | Kim, Vy H. D. | Pham-Huy, Anne | Grunebaum, Eyal | Oliveria, John-Paul | Phan, Stephanie | Tenn, Mark W. | Tworek, Damian | Smith, Steven G. | Baatjes, Adrian J. | Obminski, Caitlin D. | Munoz, Caroline E. | Scime, Tara X. | Sehmi, Roma | Gauvreau, Gail M. | Salter, Brittany M. | Smith, Steven G. | Obminski, Caitlin D. | Munoz, Caroline E. | Schlatman, Abbey | Scime, Tara X. | Watson, Rick | Sherkat, Roya | Khoshnevisan, Razieh | Sheikhbahaei, Saba | Betschel, Stephen | Warrington, Richard | Schellenberg, Robert | Fein, Michael N. | Pelletier, Jean-Philippe | Kan, Manstein | Labrosse, Roxane | Mak, Raymond | Loh, James | Kanani, Amin | Nowak, Dominik A. | Keith, Paul K. | Pannozzo, Daniel | Lima, Hermenio C. | Pham, Diana | Pham, Hoang | Alvarez, Gonzalo G. | Bencze, Istvan T. | Sharma, Krishna B. | Smith, Mark | Aaron, Shawn | Block, Jennifer | Keays, Tara | Leech, Judith | Schneidermen, David | Cameron, Jodi | Forgie, Jennifer | Ring, Alicia | O’Quinn, John W. | Santucci, Stephanie | Yang, William H. | Gaudet, Ena | Aaron, Shawn | Voisin, Mathew R. | Borici-Mazi, Rozita | Vostretsova, Kateryna | Stark, Donald F. | Yeboah, Elizabeth | Martin-Rhee, Michelle | Gula, Cheryl | Cheng, Clare | Paltser, Geoff | Dery, Alizée | Clarke, Ann | Nadeau, Kari | Harada, Laurie | Weatherall, Kimberley | Greenwood, Celia | Daley, Denise | Asai, Yuka | Ben-Shoshan, Moshe | Ling, Ling | Ospina, Maria B. | Protudjer, Jennifer L. P. | Vetander, Mirja | van Hage, Marianne | Olén, Ola | Wickman, Magnus | Bergström, Anna | Teoh, Timothy | Mill, Christopher | Wong, Tiffany | Baerg, Ingrid | Alexander, Angela | Hildebrand, Kyla J. | Dean, John | Kuzeljevic, Boris | Chan, Edmond S. | Argeny, Jonathan | Gona-Hoepler, Mia | Fucik, Petra | Nachbaur, Edith | Gruber, Saskia | Crameri, Reto | Glaser, Andreas | Szépfalusi, Zsolt | Rhyner, Claudio | Eiwegger, Thomas | Plunkett, Greg | Mire, Brad | Yazicioglu, Mehtap | Can, Ceren | Ciplak, Gokce | Cook, Victoria E. | Portales-Casamar, Elodie | Nashi, Emil P. | Gabrielli, Sofianne | Primeau, Marie-Noel | Lejtenyi, Christine | Netchiporouk, Elena | Dery, Alizee | Shand, Greg | Hoe, Erica | Liem, Joel | Ko, Jason K. | Huang, David J. T. | Mazza, Jorge A. | McHenry, Mary | Otley, Anthony | Watson, Wade | Kraft, John N. | Paina, Mihaela | Darwish Hassan, Ahmed A. | Heroux, Delia | Crawford, Lynn | Gauvreau, Gail | Denburg, Judah | Pedder, Linda | Chad, Zave | Sussman, Gordon | Hébert, Jacques | Frankish, Charles | Olynych, Timothy | Cheema, Amarjit | Del Carpio, Jaime | Harrison, Rachel | Torabi, Bahar | Medoff, Elaine | Mill, Jennifer | Quirt, Jaclyn A. | Wen, Xia | Kim, Jonathan | Herrero, Angel Jimenez | Kim, Harold L. | Grzyb, Magdalena J. | Primeau, Marie-Noël | Azad, Meghan B. | Lu, Zihang | Becker, Allan B. | Subbarao, Padmaja | Mandhane, Piushkumar J. | Turvey, Stuart E. | Sears, Malcolm R. | Boucher-Lafleur, Anne-Marie | Gagné-Ouellet, Valérie | Jacques, Éric | Laprise, Catherine | Chen, Michael | McGovern, Toby | Adner, Mikael | Martin, James G. | Cosic, Nela | Ntanda, Henry | Giesbrecht, Gerald | Kozyrskyj, Anita | Letourneau, Nicole | Dawod, Bassel | Marshall, Jean | De Schryver, Sarah | Halbrich, Michelle | La Vieille, Sebastian | Eisman, Harley | Alizadehfar, Reza | Joseph, Lawrence | Morris, Judy | Feldman, Laura Y. | Thacher, Jesse D. | Kull, Inger | Melén, Erik | Pershagen, Göran | Protudjer, Jennifer L. P. | Hosseini, Ali | Hackett, Tillie L. | Hirota, Jeremy | McNagny, Kelly | Wilson, Susan | Carlsten, Chris | Huq, Saiful | Chooniedass, Rishma | Gerwing, Brenda | Huang, Henry | Lefebvre, Diana | Becker, Allan | Khamis, Mona M. | Awad, Hanan | Allen, Kevin | Adamko, Darryl J. | El-Aneed, Anas | Kim, Young Woong | Gliddon, Daniel R. | Shannon, Casey P. | Singh, Amrit | Hickey, Pascal L. C. | Ellis, Anne K. | Neighbour, Helen | Larche, Mark | Tebbutt, Scott J. | Ladouceur, Erika | Stewart, Miriam | Evans, Josh | Masuda, Jeff | To, Teresa | King, Malcolm | Larouche, Miriam | Liang, Liming | Legere, Stephanie A. | Haidl, Ian D. | Legaré, Jean-Francois | Marshall, Jean S. | Sears, Malcolm | Moraes, Theo J. | Ratjen, Felix | Gustafsson, Per | Lou, Wendy | North, Michelle L. | Lee, Elizabeth | Omana, Vanessa | Thiele, Jenny | Brook, Jeff | Rahman, Tanvir | Lejtenyi, Duncan | Fiter, Ryan | Piccirillo, Ciriaco | Mazer, Bruce | Simons, Elinor | Hildebrand, Kyla | Turvey, Stuart | DeMarco, Mari | Le Cao, Kim-Anh | Gauvreau, Gail M. | Mark FitzGerald, J. | O’Byrne, Paul M. | Stiemsma, Leah T. | Arrieta, Marie-Claire | Cheng, Jasmine | Dimitriu, Pedro A. | Thorson, Lisa | Yurist, Sophie | Lefebvre, Diana L. | Mandhane, Piush | McNagny, Kelly M. | Kollmann, Tobias | Mohn, William W. | Brett Finlay, B. | Tran, Maxwell M. | Lefebvre, Diana L. | Ramasundarahettige, Chinthanie F. | Dai, Wei Hao | Mandhane, Piush J. | Tworek, Damian | O’Byrne, Seamus N. | O’Byrne, Paul M. | Denburg, Judah A. | Walsh, Laura | Soliman, Mena | Steacy, Lisa M. | Adams, Daniel E. | Warner, Linda | Mauro, Mary Ann | Mamonluk, Robby | Yang, ChenXi | Conway, Ed M.
Table of contents
A1 Role of fibrocytes in allergic rhinitis
Marie-Ève Côté, Marie-Ève Boulay, Sophie Plante, Jamila Chakir, Louis-Philippe Boulet
A2 Patterns of aeroallergens sensitization in Northern Alberta
Hanan Ahmed, Maria-Beatriz Ospina, Kyriaki Sideri, Harissios Vliagoftis
A3 Addressing acceptable risk for adolescents with Food-Induced Anaphylaxis (FIA)
Sara F. Johnson, Roberta L. Woodgate
A4 Outcomes of matched related and unrelated bone marrow transplantation after reduced-toxicity conditioning for children suffering from Chronic Granulomatous Disease
Guilhem Cros, Pierre Teira, Sonia Cellot, Henrique Bittencourt, Helene Decaluwe, Marie France Vachon, Michel Duval, Elie Haddad
A5 Outcomes of patients with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) prior to and after initiation of newborn screening for SCID in Ontario
Vy H.D. Kim, Anne Pham-Huy, Eyal Grunebaum
A6 Detection of regulatory B cells in the airways of subjects with asthma
John-Paul Oliveria, Stephanie Phan, Mark W. Tenn, Damian Tworek, Steven G. Smith, Adrian J. Baatjes, Caitlin D. Obminski, Caroline E. Munoz, Tara X. Scime, Roma Sehmi, Gail M Gauvreau
A7 Characterization of IgE-expressing B cells in the airways and peripheral blood of allergic asthmatic subjects
John-Paul Oliveria, Stephanie Phan, Mark W. Tenn, Brittany M Salter, Steven G Smith, Caitlin D Obminski, Caroline E Munoz, Abbey Schlatman, Tara X Scime, Rick Watson, Roma Sehmi, Gail M Gauvreau
A8 Pregnancy: could it be a risk factor for primary immunodeficient patients
Roya Sherkat, Razieh Khoshnevisan, Saba Sheikhbahaei
A9 Clinical experience with Octagam: a Canadian retrospective chart review
Stephen Betschel, Richard Warrington, Robert Schellenberg
A10 Kounis syndrome secondary to contrast media with inferior ST elevations and bilateral ischemic stroke
Michael N Fein, Jean-Philippe Pelletier
A11 Honey bee venom immunotherapy ineffective in bumble bee-induced anaphylaxis: case report and review of literature
Manstein Kan, Robert Schellenberg
A12 Delayed immune reconstitution occurring after multiple immune complications of hematological stem cell transplantation for a leaky SCID
Roxane Labrosse, Guilhem Cros, Pierre Teira, Henrique Bittencourt, Helene Decaluwe, Michel Duval, Elie Haddad
A13 Comparison of Three Case Reports of Acquired Angioedema: presentation, management and outcome
Raymond Mak, James Loh, Amin Kanani
A14 Sitagliptin-associated angioedema not related to concurrent use of ARB or ACE inhibitor
Dominik A. Nowak, Paul K. Keith
A15 Sneddon-Wilkinson subcorneal pustular dermatosis associated with an IgA monoclonal gammopathy
Daniel Pannozzo, Dominik A. Nowak, Hermenio C. Lima
A16 Omalizumab can be effective in patients with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis
Diana Pham, Hoang Pham, Gonzalo G. Alvarez, Istvan T. Bencze, Krishna B. Sharma, Mark Smith, Shawn Aaron, Jennifer Block, Tara Keays, Judith Leech, David Schneidermen, Jodi Cameron, Jennifer Forgie, Alicia Ring, John W. O’Quinn, Stephanie Santucci, William H. Yang
A17 Efficacious use of omalizumab in the treatment of cystic fibrosis
Diana Pham, Hoang Pham, Ena Gaudet, Shawn Aaron, Stephanie Santucci, William H. Yang
A18 HAE with normal C1-INH with inconsistent response to C1 esterase inhibitor infusion but reliably responsive to icatibant
Hoang Pham, Stephanie Santucci, William H. Yang
A19 Anaphylaxis reaction to lactase enzyme
Mathew R. Voisin, Rozita Borici-Mazi
A20 Risk of solid tumor malignancies in patients with primary immune deficiency
Kateryna Vostretsova, Donald F. Stark
A21 Is it time to adopt the chromogenic assay for measuring C1 esterase inhibitor function in patients with HAE Type 2?
Elizabeth Yeboah, Paul K. Keith
A22 Emergency department visits for anaphylaxis and allergic reactions
Michelle Martin-Rhee, Cheryl Gula, Clare Cheng, Geoff Paltser
A23 START: Susceptibility To food Allergies in a Registry of Twins
Alizée Dery, Ann Clarke, Kari Nadeau, Laurie Harada, Kimberley Weatherall, Celia Greenwood, Denise Daley, Yuka Asai, Moshe Ben-Shoshan
A24 Qualifying the diagnostic approach employed by allergists when managing patients with self-diagnosed non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS)
Lee Horgan, Teresa Pun
A25 Retrospective analysis on the agreement between skin prick test and serum food specific IgE antibody in adults with suspected food allergy
Ling Ling, Maria B. Ospina, Kyriaki Sideri, Harissios Vliagoftis
A26 Staple food hypersensitivity from infancy to adolescence: a report from the BAMSE cohort
Jennifer L.P. Protudjer, Mirja Vetander, Marianne van Hage, Ola Olén, Magnus Wickman, Anna Bergström
A27 Evaluating the impact of supervised epinephrine autoinjector administration during food challenges on perceived parent confidence
Timothy Teoh, Christopher Mill, Tiffany Wong, Ingrid Baerg, Angela Alexander, Kyla J. Hildebrand, John Dean, Boris Kuzeljevic, Edmond S. Chan
A28 Local immunoglobulin production to Aspergillus fumigatus cystic fibrosis
Jonathan Argeny, Mia Gona-Hoepler, Petra Fucik, Edith Nachbaur, Saskia Gruber, Reto Crameri, Andreas Glaser, Zsolt Szépfalusi, Claudio Rhyner, Thomas Eiwegger
A29 Extract consumption with skin prick test (SPT) devices
Greg. Plunkett, Brad Mire
A30 Evaluation of our cases with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug reactions
Mehtap Yazicioglu, Ceren Can, Gokce Ciplak
A31 Reasons for referral and final diagnoses in a tertiary care pediatric allergy clinic
Victoria E. Cook, Kyla J. Hildebrand, Elodie Portales-Casamar, Christopher Mill, Edmond S. Chan
A32 Internist referral practices for inpatients with self-reported penicillin allergies at a tertiary care teaching hospital
Michael N Fein, Emil P Nashi
A33 Assessing the risk of reactions in children with a negative oral challenge after a subsequent use of amoxicillin
Sofianne Gabrielli, Christopher Mill, Marie-Noel Primeau, Christine Lejtenyi, Elena Netchiporouk, Alizee Dery, Greg Shand, Moshe Ben-Shoshan
A34 Validity of self-reported penicillin allergies
Erica Hoe, Joel Liem
A35 Effectiveness of allergy-test directed elimination diets in eosinophilic esophagitis
Jason K. Ko, David J.T. Huang, Jorge A. Mazza
A36 Allergy testing and dietary management in pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE): A retrospective review of a tertiary Canadian centre’s experience
Mary McHenry, Anthony Otley,Wade Watson
A37 Visualizing the impact of atopic and allergic skin disease
Dominik A. Nowak, John N. Kraft
A38 Cystic fibrosis with and without nasal polyposis in pediatric patients: a cross-sectional comparative study
Mihaela Paina, Ahmed A. Darwish Hassan, Delia Heroux, Lynn Crawford, Gail Gauvreau, Judah Denburg, Linda Pedder, Paul K. Keith
A39 Evaluation of macrolide antibiotic hypersensitivity: the role of oral challenges in children
Bahar Torabi, Marie-Noel Primeau, Christine Lejtenyi, Elaine Medoff, Jennifer Mill, Moshe Ben-Shoshan
A40 Venom allergy testing: is a graded approach necessary?
Jaclyn A. Quirt, Xia Wen, Jonathan Kim, Angel Jimenez Herrero, Harold L. Kim
A41 The role of oral challenges in evaluating cephalosporin hypersensitivity reactions in children
Magdalena J. Grzyb, Marie-Noël Primeau, Christine Lejtenyi, Elaine Medoff, Jennifer Mill, Moshe Ben-Shoshan
A42 Breastfeeding and infant wheeze, atopy and atopic dermatitis: findings from the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development Study
Meghan B. Azad, Zihang Lu, Allan B. Becker, Padmaja Subbarao, Piushkumar J. Mandhane, Stuart E. Turvey, Malcolm R. Sears, the CHILD Study Investigators
A43 IL33 DNA methylation in bronchial epithelial cells is associated to asthma
Anne-Marie Boucher-Lafleur, Valérie Gagné-Ouellet, Éric Jacques, Sophie Plante, Jamila Chakir, Catherine Laprise
A44 NRF2 mediates the antioxidant response to organic dust-induced oxidative stress in bronchial epithelial cells
Michael Chen, Toby McGovern, Mikael Adner, James G. Martin
A45 The effects of perinatal distress, immune biomarkers and mother-infant interaction quality on childhood atopic dermatitis (rash) at 18 months
Nela Cosic, Henry Ntanda, Gerald Giesbrecht, Anita Kozyrskyj, Nicole Letourneau
A46 Examining the immunological mechanisms associated with cow’s milk allergy
Bassel Dawod, Jean Marshall
A47 Tryptase levels in children presenting with anaphylaxis to the Montréal Children’s Hospital
Sarah De Schryver, Michelle Halbrich, Ann Clarke, Sebastian La Vieille, Harley Eisman, Reza Alizadehfar, Lawrence Joseph, Judy Morris, Moshe Ben-Shoshan
A48 Secondhand tobacco smoke exposure in infancy and the development of food hypersensitivity from childhood to adolescence
Laura Y. Feldman, Jesse D. Thacher, Inger Kull, Erik Melén, Göran Pershagen, Magnus Wickman, Jennifer L. P. Protudjer, Anna Bergström
A49 Combined exposure to diesel exhaust and allergen enhances allergic inflammation in the bronchial submucosa of atopic subjects
Ali Hosseini, Tillie L. Hackett, Jeremy Hirota, Kelly McNagny, Susan Wilson, Chris Carlsten
A50 Comparison of skin-prick test measurements by an automated system against the manual method
Saiful Huq, Rishma Chooniedass, Brenda Gerwing, Henry Huang, Diana Lefebvre, Allan Becker
A51 The accurate identification and quantification of urinary biomarkers of asthma and COPD through the use of novel DIL- LC-MS/MS methods
Mona M. Khamis, Hanan Awad, Kevin Allen, Darryl J. Adamko, Anas El-Aneed
A52 Systemic immune pathways associated with the mechanism of Cat-Synthetic Peptide Immuno-Regulatory Epitopes, a novel immunotherapy, in whole blood of cat-allergic people
Young Woong Kim, Daniel R. Gliddon, Casey P. Shannon, Amrit Singh, Pascal L. C. Hickey, Anne K. Ellis, Helen Neighbour, Mark Larche, Scott J. Tebbutt
A53 Reducing the health disparities: online support for children with asthma and allergies from low-income families
Erika Ladouceur, Miriam Stewart, Josh Evans, Jeff Masuda, Nicole Letourneau, Teresa To, Malcolm King
A54 Epigenetic association of PSORS1C1 and asthma in the Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean asthma study
Miriam Larouche, Liming Liang, Catherine Laprise
A55 IL-33 induces cytokine and chemokine production in human mast cells
Stephanie A. Legere, Ian D. Haidl, Jean-Francois Legaré, Jean S. Marshall
A56 Reference ranges for lung clearance index from infancy to adolescence for Canadian population
Zihang Lu, Malcolm Sears, Theo J. Moraes, Felix Ratjen, Per Gustafsson, Wendy Lou, Padmaja Subbarao
A57 Kingston Allergy Birth Cohort: cohort profile and mother/child characteristics to age 2
Michelle L. North, Elizabeth Lee, Vanessa Omana, Jenny Thiele, Jeff Brook, Anne K. Ellis
A58 Cow’s milk protein specific IgE, IgA and IgG4 as a predictor of outcome in oral immunotherapy
Tanvir Rahman, Duncan Lejtenyi, Sarah De Schryver, Ryan Fiter, Ciriaco Piccirillo, Moshe Ben-Shoshan, Bruce Mazer
A59 Age of peanut introduction and development of reactions and sensitization to peanut
Elinor Simons, Allan B. Becker, Rishma Chooniedass, Kyla Hildebrand, Edmond S. Chan, Stuart Turvey, Padmaja Subbarao, Malcolm Sears
A60 Multi-omic blood biomarker signatures of the late phase asthmatic response
Amrit Singh, Casey P. Shannon, Young Woong Kim, Mari DeMarco, Kim-Anh Le Cao, Gail M. Gauvreau, J. Mark FitzGerald, Louis-Philippe Boulet, Paul M. O’Byrne, Scott J. Tebbutt
A61 Early life gut microbial alterations in children diagnosed with asthma by three years of age
Leah T. Stiemsma, Marie-Claire Arrieta, Jasmine Cheng, Pedro A. Dimitriu, Lisa Thorson, Sophie Yurist, Boris Kuzeljevic, Diana L. Lefebvre, Padmaja Subbarao, Piush Mandhane, Allan Becker, Malcolm R. Sears, Kelly M. McNagny, Tobias Kollmann, the CHILD Study Investigators, William W. Mohn, B. Brett Finlay, Stuart E. Turvey
A62 The relationship between food sensitization and atopic dermatitis at age 1 year in a Canadian birth cohort
Maxwell M. Tran, Diana L. Lefebvre, Chinthanie F. Ramasundarahettige, Allan B. Becker, Wei Hao Dai, Padmaja Subbarao, Piush J. Mandhane, Stuart E. Turvey, Malcolm R. Sears
A63 Allergen inhalation enhances Toll-like receptor-induced thymic stromal lymphopoietin receptor expression by hematopoietic progenitor cells in mild asthmatics
Damian Tworek, Delia Heroux, Seamus N. O’Byrne, Paul M. O’Byrne, Judah A. Denburg
A64 The Allergic Rhinitis Clinical Investigator Collaborative – replicated eosinophilia on repeated cumulative allergen challenges in nasal lavage samples
Laura Walsh, Mena Soliman, Jenny Thiele, Lisa M. Steacy, Daniel E. Adams, Anne K. Ellis
A65 The CHILD Study: optimizing subject retention in pediatric longitudinal cohort research
Linda Warner, Mary Ann Mauro, Robby Mamonluk, Stuart E. Turvey
A66 Differential expression of C3a and C5a in allergic asthma
ChenXi Yang, Amrit Singh, Casey P. Shannon, Young Woong Kim, Ed M. Conway, Scott J. Tebbutt
doi:10.1186/s13223-016-0118-0
PMCID: PMC5009563
10.  Multiple-Breath Washout as a Lung Function Test in Cystic Fibrosis. A Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Workshop Report 
The lung clearance index (LCI) is a lung function parameter derived from the multiple-breath washout (MBW) test. Although first developed 60 years ago, the technique was not widely used for many years. Recent technological advances in equipment design have produced gains in popularity for this test among cystic fibrosis (CF) researchers and clinicians, particularly for testing preschool-aged children. LCI has been shown to be feasible and sensitive to early CF lung disease in patients of all ages from infancy to adulthood. A workshop was convened in January 2014 by the North American Cystic Fibrosis Foundation to determine the readiness of the LCI for use in multicenter clinical trials as well as clinical care. The workshop concluded that the MBW text is a valuable potential outcome measure for CF clinical trials in preschool-aged patients and in older patients with FEV1 in the normal range. However, gaps in knowledge about the choice of device, gas, and standardization across systems are key issues precluding its use as a clinical trial end point in infants. Based on the current evidence, there are insufficient data to support the use of LCI or MBW parameters in the routine clinical management of patients with CF.
doi:10.1513/AnnalsATS.201501-021FR
PMCID: PMC5466249  PMID: 26075554
multiple-breath washout; lung clearance index; cystic fibrosis; pulmonary function tests
11.  Cognitive Enhancement in Infants Associated with Increased Maternal Fruit Intake During Pregnancy: Results from a Birth Cohort Study with Validation in an Animal Model☆ 
EBioMedicine  2016;8:331-340.
In-utero nutrition is an under-studied aspect of cognitive development. Fruit has been an important dietary constituent for early hominins and humans. Among 808 eligible CHILD-Edmonton sub-cohort subjects, 688 (85%) had 1-year cognitive outcome data. We found that each maternal daily serving of fruit (sum of fruit plus 100% fruit juice) consumed during pregnancy was associated with a 2.38 point increase in 1-year cognitive development (95% CI 0.39, 4.37; p < 0.05). Consistent with this, we found 30% higher learning Performance index (PI) scores in Drosophila offspring from parents who consumed 30% fruit juice supplementation prenatally (PI: 85.7; SE 1.8; p < 0.05) compared to the offspring of standard diet parents (PI: 65.0 SE 3.4). Using the Drosophila model, we also show that the cyclic adenylate monophosphate (cAMP) pathway may be a major regulator of this effect, as prenatal fruit associated cognitive enhancement was blocked in Drosophila rutabaga mutants with reduced Ca2 +-Calmodulin-dependent adenylyl cyclase. Moreover, gestation is a critical time for this effect as postnatal fruit intake did not enhance cognitive performance in either humans or Drosophila. Our study supports increased fruit consumption during pregnancy with significant increases in infant cognitive performance. Validation in Drosophila helps control for potential participant bias or unmeasured confounders.
Graphical Abstract
Image 1
Highlights
•Gestational fruit intake positively correlates with infant cognitive performance.•Similar findings in a birth cohort and in Drosophila learning and memory scores•Cyclic adenylate monophosphate (cAMP) pathway may be a major regulator of this effect.•Postnatal fruit intake did not enhance cognitive outcomes in humans or Drosophila.
Fruits have been an important part of the human diet for thousands of years. We wanted to know if more fruit intake improves our ability to learn. Using data from the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) study, we found that mothers who ate more fruit during pregnancy had children who did better on developmental testing at 1 year of age. Similarly, fruit flies had improved learning and memory if their parents had more fruit juice in their diet. In both humans and in the flies, there was no improvement in learning when only the babies were fed fruit.
doi:10.1016/j.ebiom.2016.04.025
PMCID: PMC4919537  PMID: 27428442
Gestational diet; Fruit; Birth cohort; Drosophila learning
12.  The Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) birth cohort study: assessment of environmental exposures 
The Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development birth cohort was designed to elucidate interactions between environment and genetics underlying development of asthma and allergy. Over 3600 pregnant mothers were recruited from the general population in four provinces with diverse environments. The child is followed to age 5 years, with prospective characterization of diverse exposures during this critical period. Key exposure domains include indoor and outdoor air pollutants, inhalation, ingestion and dermal uptake of chemicals, mold, dampness, biological allergens, pets and pests, housing structure, and living behavior, together with infections, nutrition, psychosocial environment, and medications. Assessments of early life exposures are focused on those linked to inflammatory responses driven by the acquired and innate immune systems. Mothers complete extensive environmental questionnaires including time-activity behavior at recruitment and when the child is 3, 6, 12, 24, 30, 36, 48, and 60 months old. House dust collected during a thorough home assessment at 3–4 months, and biological specimens obtained for multiple exposure-related measurements, are archived for analyses. Geo-locations of homes and daycares and land-use regression for estimating traffic-related air pollution complement time-activity-behavior data to provide comprehensive individual exposure profiles. Several analytical frameworks are proposed to address the many interacting exposure variables and potential issues of co-linearity in this complex data set.
doi:10.1038/jes.2015.7
PMCID: PMC4611361  PMID: 25805254
environmental exposure assessment; longitudinal birth cohort; indoor air quality; etiology of asthma; biomarkers; CHILD study
13.  Perinatal Exposure to Traffic-Related Air Pollution and Atopy at 1 Year of Age in a Multi-Center Canadian Birth Cohort Study 
Environmental Health Perspectives  2015;123(9):902-908.
Background
The role of traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) exposure in the development of allergic sensitization in children is unclear, and few birth cohort studies have incorporated spatiotemporal exposure assessment.
Objectives
We aimed to examine the association between TRAP and atopy in 1-year-old children from an ongoing national birth cohort study in four Canadian cities.
Methods
We identified 2,477 children of approximately 1 year of age with assessment of atopy for inhalant (Alternaria, Der p, Der f, cat, dog, cockroach) and food-related (milk, eggs, peanuts, soy) allergens. Exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) was estimated from city-specific land use regression models accounting for residential mobility and temporal variability in ambient concentrations. We used mixed models to examine associations between atopy and exposure during pregnancy and the first year of life, including adjustment for covariates (maternal atopy, socioeconomic status, pets, mold, nutrition). We also conducted analyses stratified by time-location patterns, daycare attendance, and modeled home ventilation.
Results
Following spatiotemporal adjustment, TRAP exposure after birth increased the risk for development of atopy to any allergens [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) per 10 μg/m3 NO2 = 1.16; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.41], but not during pregnancy (aOR = 1.02; 95% CI: 0.86, 1.22). This association was stronger among children not attending daycare (aOR = 1.61; 95% CI: 1.28, 2.01) compared with daycare attendees (aOR = 1.05; 95% CI: 0.81, 1.28). Trends to increased risk were also found for food (aOR = 1.17; 95% CI: 0.95, 1.47) and inhalant allergens (aOR = 1.28; 95% CI: 0.93, 1.76).
Conclusion
Using refined exposure estimates that incorporated temporal variability and residential mobility, we found that traffic-related air pollution during the first year of life was associated with atopy.
Citation
Sbihi H, Allen RW, Becker A, Brook JR, Mandhane P, Scott JA, Sears MR, Subbarao P, Takaro TK, Turvey SE, Brauer M. 2015. Perinatal exposure to traffic-related air pollution and atopy at 1 year of age in a multi-center Canadian birth cohort study. Environ Health Perspect 123:902–908; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408700
doi:10.1289/ehp.1408700
PMCID: PMC4559953  PMID: 25826816
14.  The burden of asthma among South Asian and Chinese populations residing in Ontario 
Respiratory diseases follow closely behind cardiovascular diseases in terms of global disease burden. Research investigating disparities in respiratory outcomes among specific populations in ethnically diverse countries, such as Canada, has been increasing, with the prevalence of asthma in Canada among the highest in the world. This study examined the prevalence of asthma and health care burden in groups that represent a significant proportion of Ontario’s population.
BACKGROUND:
The South Asian and Chinese populations represent a significant portion of the population of Ontario; however, little is known about the burden of respiratory diseases in these populations.
OBJECTIVE:
To investigate the prevalence of asthma and the associated health care burden among South Asian and Chinese populations living in Ontario.
METHODS:
Using administrative health data for Ontario, the authors identified individuals of South Asian and Chinese descent using a validated surname algorithm and compared the prevalence of asthma in these groups with the general population using an established asthma case definition for the period 2002 to 2010. Also compared were the rates of asthma-specific emergency department visits and hospitalizations among the ethnic groups.
RESULTS:
In 2010, the prevalence of asthma in South Asians residing in Ontario was similar to that of the general population (12.1% versus 12.4%), and was increasing at a faster rate than in the general population (0.51%/year versus 0.34%/year). Compared with the general population, the South Asian population had fewer emergency department visits for asthma, whereas the asthma-related hospitalization rate was greatest among the South Asian population (0.45 per 100 person-years). The Chinese population had the lowest asthma prevalence and associated health care use.
CONCLUSION:
The burden of asthma among South Asians in Ontario is increasing and warrants further investigation to determine the reasons for this rise.
PMCID: PMC4266153  PMID: 25184509
Asthma; Epidemiology; Ethnicity
16.  Lung Clearance Index as an Outcome Measure for Clinical Trials in Young Children with Cystic Fibrosis. A Pilot Study Using Inhaled Hypertonic Saline 
Rationale: Lung clearance index (LCI), measured by multiple breath washout (MBW), is a noninvasive measure of ventilation inhomogeneity that holds promise as an objective physiologic endpoint for clinical trials in infants and preschool children with cystic fibrosis (CF).
Objectives: To study the feasibility of using LCI to assess treatment effect outcomes in CF trials of infants and preschoolers.
Methods: The Infant Study of Inhaled Saline trial was a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial of hypertonic (7%) versus isotonic (0.9%) saline inhaled twice daily for 48 weeks in children with CF under 6 years of age. LCI measurements were performed in a single-center pilot substudy at baseline and 48 weeks using a respiratory mass spectrometer and sulfur hexafluoride as the tracer gas. LCI measurements were standardized using published normative data (zLCI) to account for height-related changes in LCI during early childhood. A generalized estimating equation model with an interaction between treatment group and test occasion was used to estimate a treatment effect.
Measurements and Main Results: A total of 27 participants were randomized; 25 participants, aged (median [range]) 2.6 (0.34–4.95) years, had acceptable baseline and follow-up LCI measures. On average, LCI decreased in the hypertonic saline group (n = 12) by 1.19 z-scores units (95% confidence interval [CI] = −2.46 to 0.06), and remained stable in the isotonic saline group (n = 13) at 0.81 (95% CI = −0.40 to 2.02). A significant treatment effect was observed for zLCI (2.01; 95% CI = 0.26 to 3.76; P = 0.025).
Conclusions: MBW testing is feasible in an interventional study in infants and preschool children with CF. These pilot findings support the development of MBW and LCI as an objective outcome measure in interventional trials in young children with CF, and provide estimates for sample size calculations for future studies.
Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00709280).
doi:10.1164/rccm.201302-0219OC
PMCID: PMC3778738  PMID: 23742699
cystic fibrosis; lung clearance index; infant; hypertonic saline; preschool child
17.  Asymmetric Dimethylarginine in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (ADMA in COPD) 
l-Arginine metabolism including the nitric oxide (NO) synthase and arginase pathways is important in the maintenance of airways function. We have previously reported that accumulation of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) in airways, resulting in changes in l-arginine metabolism, contributes to airways obstruction in asthma and cystic fibrosis. Herein, we assessed l-arginine metabolism in airways of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Lung function testing, measurement of fractional exhaled NO (FeNO) and sputum NO metabolites, as well as quantification of l-arginine metabolites (l-arginine, l-ornithine, l-citrulline, ADMA and symmetric dimethylarginine) using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) were performed. Concentrations of l-ornithine, the product of arginase activity, correlated directly with l-arginine and ADMA sputum concentrations. FeNO correlated directly with pre- and post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). Sputum arginase activity correlated inversely with total NO metabolite (NOx) and nitrite concentrations in sputum, and with pre- and post-bronchodilator FEV1. These findings suggest that ADMA in COPD airways results in a functionally relevant shift of l-arginine breakdown by the NO synthases towards the arginase pathway, which contributes to airway obstruction in these patients.
doi:10.3390/ijms15046062
PMCID: PMC4013615  PMID: 24727374
arginine metabolism; nitric oxide; asymmetric dimethylarginine; arginase; pulmonary function; airway obstruction; l-ornithine
20.  A new exposure metric for traffic-related air pollution? An analysis of determinants of hopanes in settled indoor house dust 
Environmental Health  2013;12:48.
Background
Exposure to traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) can adversely impact health but epidemiologic studies are limited in their abilities to assess long-term exposures and incorporate variability in indoor pollutant infiltration.
Methods
In order to examine settled house dust levels of hopanes, engine lubricating oil byproducts found in vehicle exhaust, as a novel TRAP exposure measure, dust samples were collected from 171 homes in five Canadian cities and analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. To evaluate source contributions, the relative abundance of the highest concentration hopane monomer in house dust was compared to that in outdoor air. Geographic variables related to TRAP emissions and outdoor NO2 concentrations from city-specific TRAP land use regression (LUR) models were calculated at each georeferenced residence location and assessed as predictors of variability in dust hopanes.
Results
Hopanes relative abundance in house dust and ambient air were significantly correlated (Pearson’s r=0.48, p<0.05), suggesting that dust hopanes likely result from traffic emissions. The proportion of variance in dust hopanes concentrations explained by LUR NO2 was less than 10% in Vancouver, Winnipeg and Toronto while the correlations in Edmonton and Windsor explained 20 to 40% of the variance. Modeling with household factors such as air conditioning and shoe removal along with geographic predictors related to TRAP generally increased the proportion of explained variability (10-80%) in measured indoor hopanes dust levels.
Conclusions
Hopanes can consistently be detected in house dust and may be a useful tracer of TRAP exposure if determinants of their spatiotemporal variability are well-characterized, and when home-specific factors are considered.
doi:10.1186/1476-069X-12-48
PMCID: PMC3711892  PMID: 23782977
Air pollution; Dust; Exposure assessment; Hopanes; Land use regression; Traffic
21.  Bronchodilator Responsiveness in Wheezy Infants and Toddlers is Not Associated with Asthma Risk Factors 
Pediatric Pulmonology  2011;47(5):421-428.
Background
There are limited data assessing bronchodilator responsiveness (BDR) in infants and toddlers with recurrent wheezing, and factors associated with a positive response.
Objectives
In a multicenter study of children ≤ 36 months old we assessed the prevalence of and factors associated with BDR among infants/toddlers with recurrent episodes of wheezing.
Methods
Forced expiratory flows and volumes using the raised-volume rapid thoracic compression method were measured in 76 infants/toddlers (mean (sd) age 16.8 (7.6) mos.) with recurrent wheezing before and after administration of albuterol. Prior history of hospitalization or emergency department treatment for wheezing, use of inhaled or systemic corticosteroids, physician treatment of eczema, environmental tobacco smoke exposure, and family history of asthma or allergic rhinitis were ascertained.
Results
Using the published upper limit of normal for post bronchodilator change (FEV0.5 ≥ 13% and/or FEF25–75 ≥ 24%) in healthy infants, 24% (n=18) of children in our study exhibited BDR. The BDR response was not associated with any clinical factor other than body size. Dichotomizing subjects into responders (defined by published limits of normal)or by quartile to identify children with the greatest change from baseline (4th quartile vs. other) did not identify any other factor associated with BDR.
Conclusions
Approximately one quarter of infants/toddlers with recurrent wheezing exhibited BDR at their clinical baseline. However, BDR in wheezy infants/toddlers was not associated with established clinical asthma risk factors.
doi:10.1002/ppul.21567
PMCID: PMC3325342  PMID: 22006677
recurrent wheezing; infants; pulmonary function; raised-volume rapid thoracoabdominal compression; bronchodilator responsiveness; asthma
22.  Multiple Breath Nitrogen Washout: A Feasible Alternative to Mass Spectrometry 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(2):e56868.
Background
The lung clearance index (LCI), measured by multiple breath washout (MBW), reflects global ventilation inhomogeneity and is a sensitive marker of early cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Current evidence is based on a customized mass spectrometry system that uses sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) as a tracer gas, which is not widely available. Nitrogen (N2) washout may be better suited for clinical use and multi-center trials.
Objective
To compare the results obtained from a N2 washout system to those generated by the SF6 based system in healthy children and children with CF.
Methods
Children with CF were recruited from outpatient clinics; healthy children were recruited from the Research4Kids online portal. Participants performed MBWSF6 (Amis 2000, Innovision, Denmark) and MBWN2 (ExhalyzerD, EcoMedics, Switzerland) in triplicate, in random order on the same day. Agreement between systems was assessed by Bland-Altman plot.
Results
Sixty-two healthy and 61 children with CF completed measurements on both systems. In health there was good agreement between systems (limits of agreement −0.7 to 1.9); on average N2 produced higher values of LCI (mean difference 0.58 (95% CI 0.42 to 0.74)). In CF the difference between systems was double that in health with a clear bias towards disproportionately higher LCIN2 compared to LCISF6 at higher mean values of LCI.
Conclusion
LCIN2 and LCISF6 have similar discriminative power and intra-session repeatability but are not interchangeable. MBWN2 offers a valid new tool to investigate early obstructive lung disease in CF, but requires independent normative values.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0056868
PMCID: PMC3574055  PMID: 23457632
23.  A retrospective cross-sectional study of risk factors and clinical spectrum of children admitted to hospital with pandemic H1N1 influenza as compared to influenza A 
BMJ Open  2012;2(2):e000310.
Objective
To compare risk factors for severe disease as measured by admission to hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) and other clinical outcomes in children with pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) versus those with seasonal influenza.
Design
Retrospective analysis of children admitted to hospital with pH1N1 versus seasonal influenza A.
Setting
Canadian tertiary referral children's hospital.
Participants
All laboratory-identified cases of pH1N1 in children younger than 18 years admitted to hospital in 2009 (n=176) and all seasonal influenza A cases admitted to hospital from influenza seasons 2004–2005 to 2008–2009 (n=200). Children with onset of symptoms more than 3 days after admission were excluded.
Primary and secondary outcome measures
Primary outcomes include admission to hospital and ICU and need for mechanical ventilation. Secondary outcomes include length of stay in hospital and duration of supplemental oxygen requirement.
Results
Children admitted with pH1N1 were older than seasonal influenza A admissions (hospital admission: 6.5 vs 3.3 years, p<0.01; ICU admission: 7.3 vs 3.6 years, p=0.02). Children hospitalised with pH1N1 were more likely to have a pre-existing diagnosis of asthma (15% vs 5%, p<0.01); however, there was no difference in the severity of pre-existing asthma between the two groups. After controlling for obesity, asthma (OR 4.59, 95% CI 1.42 to 14.81) and age ≥5 years (OR 2.87, 95% CI 1.60 to 5.16) were more common risk factors in admitted children with pH1N1. Asthma was a significant predictor of the need for intensive care in patients with pH1N1 (OR 4.56, 95% CI 1.16 to 17.89) but not in patients with seasonal influenza A.
Conclusion
While most pH1N1 cases presented with classic influenza-like symptoms, risk factors for severe pH1N1 disease differed from seasonal influenza A. Older age and asthma were associated with increased admission to hospital and ICU for children with pH1N1.
Article summary
Article focus
Young age and underlying medical conditions have traditionally been considered risk factors for severe influenza in children.
Children admitted with pH1N1 influenza are more likely to have asthma; however, the impact of asthma severity is unknown.
Key messages
The presence of asthma and increased age, but not severity of asthma, were more common risk factors for hospitalisation with severe H1N1 influenza than with seasonal influenza A.
These results suggest that in future pandemics, certain high-risk groups may be more adversely affected than expected with seasonal influenza.
Treatment of pH1N1 influenza with oseltamivir did not appear to be associated with differing outcomes or severity of disease.
Strengths and limitations of this study
The strength of this study is that it compares a large number of children admitted with microbiologically confirmed pH1N1 to those admitted over 5 years with seasonal influenza A. For each admitted child with suspected asthma, at least two physicians reviewed the case to confirm a diagnosis of pre-existing asthma and to grade the asthma as mild, moderate or severe.
The main limitations of this study include its retrospective design, single-centre site, the inability to calculate population-based rates and that the number of admitted patients with asthma, particularly to ICU, was small.
doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2011-000310
PMCID: PMC3307038  PMID: 22411932
24.  Asthma: epidemiology, etiology and risk factors 
doi:10.1503/cmaj.080612
PMCID: PMC2764772  PMID: 19752106

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