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Logo of actae2this articlesearchopen accesssubmitActa Crystallographica Section E: Crystallographic CommunicationsActa Crystallographica Section E: Crystallographic Communications
 
Acta Crystallogr E Crystallogr Commun. 2017 October 1; 73(Pt 10): 1421–1425.
Published online 2017 September 8. doi:  10.1107/S2056989017012543
PMCID: PMC5730287

A copper(II) paddle-wheel structure of tranexamic acid: di­chloro-tetra­kis­[μ-4-(ammonio­meth­yl)cyclo­hexane-1-carboxyl­ato-O,O′]dicopper(II) dichloride hexa­hydrate

Abstract

Tranexamic acid [systematic name: trans-4-(amino­meth­yl)cyclo­hexane-1-carb­oxy­lic acid], is an anti­fibrinolytic amino acid that exists as a zwitterion [trans-4-(ammonio­meth­yl)cyclo­hexane-1-carboxyl­ate] in the solid state. Its reaction with copper chloride leads to the formation of a compound with a copper(II) paddle-wheel structure that crystallizes as a hexa­hydrate, [Cu2Cl2(C8H15NO2)4]2+·2Cl·6H2O. The asymmetric unit is composed of a copper(II) cation, two zwitterionic tranexamic acid units, a coordinating Cl anion and a free Cl anion, together with three water mol­ecules of crystallization. The whole structure is generated by inversion symmetry, with the Cu(...)Cu axle of the paddle-wheel dication being located about a center of symmetry. The cyclo­hexane rings of the zwitterionic tranexamic acid units have chair conformations. The carboxyl­ate groups that bridge the two copper(II) cations are inclined to one another by 88.4 (8)°. The copper(II) cation is ligated by four carboxyl­ate O atoms in the equatorial plane and by a Cl ion in the axial position. Hence, it has a fivefold O4Cl coordination sphere with a perfect square-pyramidal geometry and a τ 5 index of zero. In the crystal, the paddle-wheel dications are linked by a series of N—H(...)Cl hydrogen bonds, involving the coordinating and free Cl ions, forming a three-dimensional network. This network is strengthened by a series of N—H(...)Owater, Owater—H(...)Cl and Owater—H(...)O hydrogen bonds.

Keywords: crystal structure, tranexamic acid, anti­fibrinolytic amino acid, fibrinolytic inhibitor, copper(II), paddle-wheel, hydrogen bonding

Chemical context  

Tranexamic acid (TA) is a derivative of the amino acid lysine. It has important anti­fibrinolytic activity and is used extensively in both trauma and normal surgery to prevent excessive blood loss (Napolitano et al., 2013  ; Melvin et al., 2015  ). It was first synthesized in the early 1960s by the Japanese husband and wife team Shosuke and Utako Okamato (1962  ). They showed amino-methyl-cyclo­hexane-carb­oxy­lic acid (AMCHA) to be a new inhibitor of fibrinolysis. Almost simultaneously with a Swedish group (Melander et al., 1965  ), they were able to show that the anti­fibrinolytic active isomer (Okamoto et al., 1964  ) has a trans-conformation (TA; Fig. 1  ) with the amino­methyl and carb­oxy­lic acid substituents on the cyclo­hexane ring occupying equatorial positions (Fig. 1  ). The cis-isomer (Fig. 1  ), in which the carb­oxy­lic acid moiety is axial, is almost inactive. The latter was shown to exist as the free acid in the solid state (Yamazaki et al., 1981  ), in contrast to the trans-isomer, which exists as a zwitterion in the solid state (Groth, 1968  ; Shahzadi et al., 2007  ). Recently, Tengborn et al. (2015  ) published an excellent review article, entitled ‘Tranexamic acid – an old drug still going strong and making a revival’, in which they recount the history of the development of TA and its mechanism of action, pharmokinetics and other details, including clinical uses. Herein, we report on the first crystal structure of a metal complex of tranexamic acid. The reaction of TA with copper(II) chloride leads to the formation of the title compound with a copper(II) paddle-wheel structure, that crystallizes as a hexa­hydrate. The reaction of TA with copper(II) bromide leads to the formation of an isotypical compound; however, the crystals were twinned and the subsequent X-ray analysis was of insufficient quality to be submitted or deposited.

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Figure 1
The trans- and cis-isomers of 4-(amino­meth­yl)cyclo­hexane-1-carb­oxy­lic acid.

Structural commentary  

The mol­ecular structure of the dication of the title compound is illustrated in Fig. 2  . The asymmetric unit is composed of a copper(II) cation coordinated by the carboxyl­ate O atoms (O1–O4) of two zwitterionic tranexamic acid units and a Cl anion, Cl1, together with a free Cl anion, Cl2, and three water mol­ecules of crystallization. The whole structure is generated by inversion symmetry, with the Cu1(...)Cu1i axle [2.6649 (11) Å; symmetry code (i): −x + 1, −y + 1, −z + 1] of the paddle-wheel being located about a center of symmetry. Selected bond lengths and angles in the paddle-wheel dication are given in Table 1  . Atom Cu1 is coordinated by four carboxyl­ate O atoms (O1–O4) in the equatorial plane and a Cl ion, Cl1, in the axial position. The Cu—O distances vary from 1.950 (4) to 1.991 (3) Å, with a longer Cu1—Cl1 axial distance of 2.499 (1) Å (Table 1  ). The copper(II) cation, Cu1 (Cu1i), has a perfect square-pyramidal coordination sphere with a τ 5 index of 0.0 (τ 5 = 0 for an ideal square-pyramidal coordination sphere, and = 1 for an ideal trigonal–pyramidal coordination sphere; Addison et al., 1984  ).

Figure 2
A view of the mol­ecular structure of the title dication, with atom labelling. Displacement ellipsoids are drawn at the 50% probability level. Unlabelled atoms are related to the labelled atoms by inversion symmetry (symmetry operation: − ...
Table 1
Selected geometric parameters (Å, °)

The conformations of the two zwitterionic tranexamic acid units differ slightly. The cyclo­hexane rings (C2–C7 and C10–C15) have chair conformations; puckering parameters for ring C2–C7 are Q = 0.569 (7) Å, θ = 176.3 (6)°, [var phi] = 358 (13)°, and for ring C10–C15 are Q = 0.568 (6) Å, θ = 6.0 (6)°, [var phi] = 137 (6)°. The carboxyl­ate groups (C1/O1/O2 and C9/O3/O4) are inclined to the mean planes of the four planar atoms of the respective cyclo­hexane rings (C3/C4/C6/C7 and C11/C12/C14/C15) by 67.5 (6) and 85.8 (7)°, while they are inclined to one another by 88.4 (8)°. The ammonio­methyl units, C5/C8/N1 and C13/C16/N2, are inclined to the mean planes of the four planar atoms of the respective cyclo­hexane rings (C3/C4/C6/C7 and C11/C12/C14/C15) by 34.9 (6) and 47.5 (6)°.

Supra­molecular features  

In the crystal, the NH3 + groups of the zwitterionic tranexamic acid units and the coordinating and free Cl ions are linked by a series of N—H(...)Cl hydrogen bonds forming a three-dimensional framework (Table 2  and Fig. 3  ). This framework is strengthened by a series of N—H(...)Owater, Owater—H(...)Cl and Owater—H(...)O hydrogen bonds (Table 2  and Fig. 4  ). The packing index, or percentage of filled space, is 67.1 (Kitajgorodskij, 1973  ) and the unit cell contains no residual solvent-accessible voids.

Figure 3
A view along the c axis of the crystal structure of the title compound with the water solvent mol­ecules omitted. The N—H(...)Cl hydrogen bonds are shown as dashed lines (see Table 2  ), and the C-bound H atoms have ...
Figure 4
A view along the c axis of the crystal structure of the title compound, with the hydrogen bonds shown as dashed lines (see Table 2  ). The C-bound H atoms have been omitted for clarity.
Table 2
Hydrogen-bond geometry (Å, °)

Database survey  

A search of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD, Version 5.38, update May 2017; Groom et al., 2016  ) for the skeleton of amino-methyl-cyclo­hexane-carb­oxy­lic acid gave 13 hits, of which six structures concern the cis- and trans-isomers. The crystal structures of the hydro­bromide of the trans-isomer (CSD refcode: CHCAHB) and the hydro­chloride of the cis-isomer (CHCAHC) were reported in 1966 (Kadoya et al., 1966  ). The crystal structure of the hydro­bromide of the cis-isomer has also been reported (AMHCAC; Groth & Hassel, 1965  ), and that of the free cis-isomer (AMCHCA; Yamazaki et al., 1981  ), which does not exist as a zwitterion in the solid state. The room temperature analysis of the trans-isomer (TA), viz. tranexamic acid (AMMCHC10; Groth, 1968  ), and a low-temperature analysis at 173 K (AMMCHC11; Shahzadi et al., 2007  ) showed that it crystallizes in the chiral ortho­rhom­bic space group P212121 and exists as a zwitterion in the solid state. Inter­estingly, in the low-temperature structure it can be seen that the carboxyl­ate group (COO) is inclined to the mean plane of the four planar atoms of the cyclo­hexane ring by 48.9 (2)°, compared to 67.5 (6) and 85.8 (7)° in the title compound. The plane of the ammonio­methyl unit (Car—C—N) is inclined to the same mean plane of the four planar atoms of the cyclo­hexane ring by 37.4 (2)°, compared to 34.9 (6) and 47.5 (6)° in the title compound. Hence, on complexation the cyclo­hexane rings are rotated about the Ccarboxyl­ate—Ccyclo­hexa­ne bonds (C1—C2 and C9—C10), most probably to minimize steric hindrance.

In the CSD over 1500 copper(II) paddle-wheel structures have been deposited. There are only 13 compounds in which the axial position is occupied by a Cl anion (see Supporting information). The Cu(...)Cu distances vary from ca 2.63 to 2.84 Å, with the carboxyl­ate groups being inclined to one another by ca 84.65–90°, and the Cu—Cl distances varying from ca 2.41 to 2.49 Å. The values observed for the title compound fall within these limits (see Section 2, Structural commentary). In all 13 compounds the copper atoms have perfect square-pyramidal geometry, with τ 5 = 0.0.

Synthesis and crystallization  

Tranexamic acid (0.785 g, 0.5 mmol) dissolved in 10 ml of deionized water was added dropwise to a transparent blue solution of CuCl2·2H2O (0.426 g, 0.25 mmol) in 20 ml of aceto­nitrile at ambient temperature and the mixture was stirred for 30 min. The green solution obtained was filtered and the filtrate kept undisturbed at room temperature for slow evaporation. After five days green plate-like crystals of the title compound were obtained.

Refinement  

Crystal data, data collection and structure refinement details are summarized in Table 3  . The H atoms of the water mol­ecules were located in difference-Fourier maps and refined with distance restraints: O—H = 0.88 (2) Å with U iso(H) = 1.5U eq(O). The ammonium H atoms and the C-bound H atoms were included in calculated positions and treated as riding: N—H = 0.91 Å, C-H = 0.99–1.00 Å with U iso(H) = 1.5U eq(N-ammonium) and 1.2U eq(C) for other H atoms. In the final difference-Fourier map the residual density peaks [Δρmax, Δρmin 1.80, −0.93 e Å−3] are located at a distance of 1.2 and 0.9 Å, respectively, from the copper atoms.

Table 3
Experimental details

Supplementary Material

Crystal structure: contains datablock(s) I, Global. DOI: 10.1107/S2056989017012543/wm5416sup1.cif

Structure factors: contains datablock(s) I. DOI: 10.1107/S2056989017012543/wm5416Isup2.hkl

CSD search of axially Cl- ligated Cu-Cu paddle-wheel structures. DOI: 10.1107/S2056989017012543/wm5416sup3.pdf

CCDC reference: 1571897

Additional supporting information: crystallographic information; 3D view; checkCIF report

supplementary crystallographic information

Crystal data

[Cu2Cl2(C8H15NO2)4](Cl2)·6H2OF(000) = 1060
Mr = 1005.81Dx = 1.420 Mg m3
Monoclinic, P21/nMo Kα radiation, λ = 0.71073 Å
a = 14.7100 (11) ÅCell parameters from 8000 reflections
b = 10.7163 (6) Åθ = 2.3–25.9°
c = 14.9312 (12) ŵ = 1.19 mm1
β = 91.828 (10)°T = 153 K
V = 2352.5 (3) Å3Plate, green
Z = 20.34 × 0.30 × 0.20 mm

Data collection

STOE IPDS 1 diffractometer4545 independent reflections
Radiation source: fine-focus sealed tube3172 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Plane graphite monochromatorRint = 0.091
[var phi] rotation scansθmax = 25.9°, θmin = 2.3°
Absorption correction: multi-scan (MULABS; Spek, 2009)h = −18→18
Tmin = 0.712, Tmax = 1.000k = −13→13
18018 measured reflectionsl = −18→18

Refinement

Refinement on F2Primary atom site location: structure-invariant direct methods
Least-squares matrix: fullSecondary atom site location: difference Fourier map
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.067Hydrogen site location: mixed
wR(F2) = 0.196H atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
S = 1.02w = 1/[σ2(Fo2) + (0.1331P)2] where P = (Fo2 + 2Fc2)/3
4545 reflections(Δ/σ)max < 0.001
273 parametersΔρmax = 1.80 e Å3
9 restraintsΔρmin = −0.93 e Å3

Special details

Geometry. All esds (except the esd in the dihedral angle between two l.s. planes) are estimated using the full covariance matrix. The cell esds are taken into account individually in the estimation of esds in distances, angles and torsion angles; correlations between esds in cell parameters are only used when they are defined by crystal symmetry. An approximate (isotropic) treatment of cell esds is used for estimating esds involving l.s. planes.

Fractional atomic coordinates and isotropic or equivalent isotropic displacement parameters (Å2)

xyzUiso*/Ueq
Cu10.57200 (3)0.53341 (6)0.55087 (4)0.0195 (2)
Cl10.69386 (7)0.59126 (13)0.66374 (7)0.0253 (3)
O10.5727 (3)0.3572 (4)0.5833 (3)0.0384 (10)
O20.4505 (3)0.3014 (4)0.5009 (3)0.0369 (10)
O30.6477 (2)0.4905 (4)0.4471 (2)0.0297 (9)
O40.5250 (2)0.4381 (5)0.3640 (3)0.0445 (12)
N10.6876 (3)−0.1791 (5)0.8123 (3)0.0339 (11)
H1A0.715646−0.2074680.7627840.051*
H1B0.688742−0.2395450.8550690.051*
H1C0.717108−0.1101160.8336900.051*
N20.6727 (3)0.1961 (6)−0.0237 (3)0.0451 (14)
H2A0.6746680.1300930.0146730.068*
H2B0.7021330.175997−0.0743990.068*
H2C0.6136840.215079−0.0380250.068*
C10.5154 (3)0.2771 (5)0.5551 (3)0.0244 (11)
C20.5225 (4)0.1471 (5)0.5916 (4)0.0299 (12)
H20.4901460.0892830.5487410.036*
C30.6224 (4)0.1033 (6)0.6034 (4)0.0377 (14)
H3A0.6501870.0988710.5439740.045*
H3B0.6570160.1652550.6400080.045*
C40.6295 (4)−0.0230 (6)0.6482 (4)0.0388 (14)
H4A0.694444−0.0456810.6571970.047*
H4B0.600371−0.0867430.6088490.047*
C50.5841 (3)−0.0227 (5)0.7379 (4)0.0288 (12)
H50.6149420.0422950.7761580.035*
C60.4837 (4)0.0149 (6)0.7258 (6)0.0472 (18)
H6A0.451049−0.0482670.6886210.057*
H6B0.4553110.0177460.7849950.057*
C70.4754 (3)0.1418 (6)0.6811 (4)0.0372 (14)
H7A0.5024040.2057960.7216660.045*
H7B0.4102390.1621090.6712030.045*
C80.5915 (4)−0.1465 (6)0.7881 (4)0.0397 (14)
H8A0.556328−0.1412310.8434060.048*
H8B0.564509−0.2135270.7501870.048*
C90.6099 (3)0.4514 (5)0.3760 (3)0.0244 (11)
C100.6679 (3)0.4182 (5)0.2966 (3)0.0244 (11)
H100.7335150.4276040.3150030.029*
C110.6461 (4)0.5081 (6)0.2187 (4)0.0288 (12)
H11A0.5798380.5072450.2048440.035*
H11B0.6635450.5939650.2365600.035*
C120.6970 (4)0.4710 (6)0.1351 (3)0.0299 (12)
H12A0.6816110.5300320.0859300.036*
H12B0.7633380.4759850.1479850.036*
C130.6722 (3)0.3405 (5)0.1063 (3)0.0262 (12)
H130.6048220.3374270.0952280.031*
C140.6965 (4)0.2495 (6)0.1830 (4)0.0332 (13)
H14A0.6778710.1641120.1649650.040*
H14B0.7632810.2492870.1937200.040*
C150.6507 (4)0.2838 (6)0.2693 (4)0.0319 (12)
H15A0.5844010.2701200.2615010.038*
H15B0.6735270.2279900.3178680.038*
C160.7174 (4)0.3051 (6)0.0196 (4)0.0347 (14)
H16A0.7146180.376924−0.0220830.042*
H16B0.7822390.2854870.0326010.042*
Cl20.53120 (11)0.73439 (19)0.07190 (12)0.0537 (5)
O1W0.3515 (3)0.3850 (6)0.0849 (3)0.0600 (14)
H1WA0.385 (4)0.405 (9)0.038 (3)0.090*
H1WB0.393 (4)0.383 (9)0.130 (3)0.090*
O2W0.1694 (4)0.5612 (6)0.5040 (4)0.0651 (15)
H2WA0.134 (5)0.589 (9)0.548 (5)0.098*
H2WB0.222 (3)0.602 (8)0.514 (6)0.098*
O3W0.1194 (3)0.1039 (6)0.3118 (3)0.0619 (15)
H3WA0.104 (5)0.075 (8)0.259 (3)0.093*
H3WB0.073 (4)0.148 (8)0.329 (5)0.093*

Atomic displacement parameters (Å2)

U11U22U33U12U13U23
Cu10.0152 (3)0.0291 (4)0.0144 (3)0.0005 (2)0.0036 (2)0.0010 (2)
Cl10.0213 (6)0.0352 (8)0.0193 (6)−0.0045 (5)0.0001 (4)0.0005 (5)
O10.035 (2)0.039 (3)0.041 (2)−0.0092 (18)−0.0129 (17)0.0117 (19)
O20.035 (2)0.033 (2)0.041 (2)0.0018 (17)−0.0158 (17)−0.0035 (19)
O30.0195 (16)0.050 (3)0.0195 (17)−0.0029 (16)0.0022 (13)−0.0049 (17)
O40.0187 (18)0.088 (4)0.027 (2)−0.0061 (19)0.0057 (14)−0.018 (2)
N10.031 (2)0.032 (3)0.038 (3)0.007 (2)−0.0064 (19)0.001 (2)
N20.041 (3)0.056 (4)0.039 (3)0.001 (3)0.018 (2)−0.019 (3)
C10.024 (2)0.031 (3)0.018 (2)0.004 (2)0.0067 (19)0.004 (2)
C20.032 (3)0.025 (3)0.032 (3)0.001 (2)−0.008 (2)−0.003 (2)
C30.032 (3)0.048 (4)0.034 (3)0.015 (3)0.016 (2)0.011 (3)
C40.039 (3)0.040 (4)0.038 (3)0.015 (3)−0.001 (2)0.003 (3)
C50.020 (2)0.029 (3)0.037 (3)0.001 (2)−0.002 (2)0.004 (2)
C60.022 (3)0.036 (4)0.084 (5)0.002 (2)0.010 (3)0.022 (4)
C70.019 (2)0.037 (4)0.056 (4)0.007 (2)0.010 (2)0.019 (3)
C80.028 (3)0.040 (4)0.051 (4)0.005 (3)0.004 (2)0.009 (3)
C90.022 (2)0.030 (3)0.022 (2)0.001 (2)0.0045 (19)0.004 (2)
C100.014 (2)0.039 (3)0.021 (2)0.001 (2)0.0046 (17)0.000 (2)
C110.034 (3)0.029 (3)0.024 (3)0.002 (2)0.008 (2)−0.001 (2)
C120.032 (3)0.037 (4)0.021 (3)0.004 (2)0.010 (2)0.004 (2)
C130.020 (2)0.035 (3)0.024 (2)0.004 (2)0.0101 (18)−0.006 (2)
C140.031 (3)0.030 (3)0.039 (3)0.002 (2)0.011 (2)0.000 (3)
C150.036 (3)0.031 (3)0.030 (3)0.003 (2)0.011 (2)0.002 (2)
C160.029 (3)0.047 (4)0.028 (3)0.003 (2)0.013 (2)−0.012 (3)
Cl20.0453 (9)0.0647 (13)0.0518 (10)−0.0012 (8)0.0122 (7)0.0128 (9)
O1W0.062 (3)0.068 (4)0.051 (3)0.008 (3)0.014 (2)0.021 (3)
O2W0.048 (3)0.075 (4)0.071 (4)0.012 (3)−0.008 (3)−0.019 (3)
O3W0.052 (3)0.081 (4)0.053 (3)0.018 (3)0.000 (2)−0.034 (3)

Geometric parameters (Å, º)

Cu1—Cu1i2.6649 (11)C6—H6A0.9900
Cu1—O11.950 (4)C6—H6B0.9900
Cu1—O2i1.955 (4)C7—H7A0.9900
Cu1—O4i1.965 (4)C7—H7B0.9900
Cu1—O31.991 (3)C8—H8A0.9900
Cu1—Cl12.4990 (12)C8—H8B0.9900
O1—C11.265 (7)C9—C101.526 (6)
O2—C11.258 (6)C10—C151.516 (8)
O3—C91.255 (6)C10—C111.536 (7)
O4—C91.264 (6)C10—H101.0000
N1—C81.489 (7)C11—C121.527 (7)
N1—H1A0.9100C11—H11A0.9900
N1—H1B0.9100C11—H11B0.9900
N1—H1C0.9100C12—C131.505 (8)
N2—C161.479 (8)C12—H12A0.9900
N2—H2A0.9100C12—H12B0.9900
N2—H2B0.9100C13—C161.522 (7)
N2—H2C0.9100C13—C141.538 (8)
C1—C21.499 (8)C13—H131.0000
C2—C71.526 (8)C14—C151.518 (7)
C2—C31.547 (7)C14—H14A0.9900
C2—H21.0000C14—H14B0.9900
C3—C41.512 (9)C15—H15A0.9900
C3—H3A0.9900C15—H15B0.9900
C3—H3B0.9900C16—H16A0.9900
C4—C51.515 (8)C16—H16B0.9900
C4—H4A0.9900O1W—H1WA0.89 (2)
C4—H4B0.9900O1W—H1WB0.90 (2)
C5—C81.526 (8)O2W—H2WA0.90 (2)
C5—C61.536 (7)O2W—H2WB0.90 (2)
C5—H51.0000O3W—H3WA0.88 (2)
C6—C71.518 (9)O3W—H3WB0.88 (2)
O1—Cu1—O2i167.02 (15)C5—C6—H6B109.6
O1—Cu1—O4i89.3 (2)H6A—C6—H6B108.1
O2i—Cu1—O4i89.9 (2)C6—C7—C2112.7 (5)
O1—Cu1—O388.33 (18)C6—C7—H7A109.0
O2i—Cu1—O389.60 (18)C2—C7—H7A109.0
O4i—Cu1—O3167.27 (15)C6—C7—H7B109.0
O1—Cu1—Cl194.31 (11)C2—C7—H7B109.0
O2i—Cu1—Cl198.68 (11)H7A—C7—H7B107.8
O4i—Cu1—Cl192.57 (11)N1—C8—C5112.0 (5)
O3—Cu1—Cl1100.08 (10)N1—C8—H8A109.2
O1—Cu1—Cu1i83.04 (11)C5—C8—H8A109.2
O2i—Cu1—Cu1i84.05 (11)N1—C8—H8B109.2
O4i—Cu1—Cu1i80.24 (11)C5—C8—H8B109.2
O3—Cu1—Cu1i87.06 (10)H8A—C8—H8B107.9
Cl1—Cu1—Cu1i172.34 (4)O3—C9—O4124.6 (5)
C1—O1—Cu1125.2 (3)O3—C9—C10119.4 (4)
C1—O2—Cu1i123.8 (4)O4—C9—C10116.0 (4)
C9—O3—Cu1119.4 (3)C15—C10—C9109.8 (4)
C9—O4—Cu1i128.7 (3)C15—C10—C11111.3 (4)
C8—N1—H1A109.5C9—C10—C11109.5 (4)
C8—N1—H1B109.5C15—C10—H10108.7
H1A—N1—H1B109.5C9—C10—H10108.7
C8—N1—H1C109.5C11—C10—H10108.7
H1A—N1—H1C109.5C12—C11—C10111.1 (4)
H1B—N1—H1C109.5C12—C11—H11A109.4
C16—N2—H2A109.5C10—C11—H11A109.4
C16—N2—H2B109.5C12—C11—H11B109.4
H2A—N2—H2B109.5C10—C11—H11B109.4
C16—N2—H2C109.5H11A—C11—H11B108.0
H2A—N2—H2C109.5C13—C12—C11110.8 (4)
H2B—N2—H2C109.5C13—C12—H12A109.5
O2—C1—O1123.9 (5)C11—C12—H12A109.5
O2—C1—C2118.0 (5)C13—C12—H12B109.5
O1—C1—C2118.1 (4)C11—C12—H12B109.5
C1—C2—C7108.9 (5)H12A—C12—H12B108.1
C1—C2—C3112.2 (5)C12—C13—C16111.5 (5)
C7—C2—C3110.2 (4)C12—C13—C14109.2 (4)
C1—C2—H2108.5C16—C13—C14112.2 (5)
C7—C2—H2108.5C12—C13—H13107.9
C3—C2—H2108.5C16—C13—H13107.9
C4—C3—C2112.0 (5)C14—C13—H13107.9
C4—C3—H3A109.2C15—C14—C13112.3 (5)
C2—C3—H3A109.2C15—C14—H14A109.1
C4—C3—H3B109.2C13—C14—H14A109.1
C2—C3—H3B109.2C15—C14—H14B109.1
H3A—C3—H3B107.9C13—C14—H14B109.1
C3—C4—C5111.3 (5)H14A—C14—H14B107.9
C3—C4—H4A109.4C10—C15—C14112.5 (5)
C5—C4—H4A109.4C10—C15—H15A109.1
C3—C4—H4B109.4C14—C15—H15A109.1
C5—C4—H4B109.4C10—C15—H15B109.1
H4A—C4—H4B108.0C14—C15—H15B109.1
C4—C5—C8113.9 (5)H15A—C15—H15B107.8
C4—C5—C6110.2 (5)N2—C16—C13111.6 (5)
C8—C5—C6109.8 (5)N2—C16—H16A109.3
C4—C5—H5107.5C13—C16—H16A109.3
C8—C5—H5107.5N2—C16—H16B109.3
C6—C5—H5107.5C13—C16—H16B109.3
C7—C6—C5110.5 (5)H16A—C16—H16B108.0
C7—C6—H6A109.6H1WA—O1W—H1WB102 (3)
C5—C6—H6A109.6H2WA—O2W—H2WB103 (3)
C7—C6—H6B109.6H3WA—O3W—H3WB106 (3)
Cu1i—O2—C1—O11.1 (7)Cu1—O3—C9—O41.0 (8)
Cu1i—O2—C1—C2178.1 (4)Cu1—O3—C9—C10−179.8 (4)
Cu1—O1—C1—O20.9 (7)Cu1i—O4—C9—O3−2.3 (9)
Cu1—O1—C1—C2−176.1 (4)Cu1i—O4—C9—C10178.5 (4)
O2—C1—C2—C7−94.2 (6)O3—C9—C10—C15122.8 (5)
O1—C1—C2—C782.9 (6)O4—C9—C10—C15−57.9 (6)
O2—C1—C2—C3143.5 (5)O3—C9—C10—C11−114.7 (5)
O1—C1—C2—C3−39.4 (7)O4—C9—C10—C1164.5 (6)
C1—C2—C3—C4174.7 (5)C15—C10—C11—C12−53.7 (6)
C7—C2—C3—C453.1 (7)C9—C10—C11—C12−175.2 (4)
C2—C3—C4—C5−56.3 (7)C10—C11—C12—C1358.9 (6)
C3—C4—C5—C8−178.1 (5)C11—C12—C13—C16176.2 (4)
C3—C4—C5—C657.9 (7)C11—C12—C13—C14−59.3 (5)
C4—C5—C6—C7−57.2 (8)C12—C13—C14—C1556.5 (6)
C8—C5—C6—C7176.5 (6)C16—C13—C14—C15−179.4 (5)
C5—C6—C7—C255.9 (8)C9—C10—C15—C14172.3 (4)
C1—C2—C7—C6−176.8 (5)C11—C10—C15—C1450.9 (6)
C3—C2—C7—C6−53.3 (7)C13—C14—C15—C10−52.9 (6)
C4—C5—C8—N163.3 (7)C12—C13—C16—N2−162.4 (5)
C6—C5—C8—N1−172.5 (5)C14—C13—C16—N274.9 (6)

Symmetry code: (i) −x+1, −y+1, −z+1.

Hydrogen-bond geometry (Å, º)

D—H···AD—HH···AD···AD—H···A
N1—H1A···Cl1ii0.912.633.316 (5)133
N1—H1C···Cl1iii0.912.523.394 (5)160
N2—H2B···Cl1iv0.912.253.123 (5)160
N2—H2C···Cl2v0.912.243.151 (6)179
N1—H1B···O1Wvi0.911.902.760 (7)156
N2—H2A···O2Wvii0.912.062.789 (9)137
O1W—H1WA···Cl2v0.89 (2)2.57 (8)3.218 (6)130 (8)
O2W—H2WA···Cl2viii0.90 (2)2.46 (7)3.176 (6)137 (9)
O2W—H2WB···O3i0.90 (2)2.22 (8)2.820 (6)124 (8)
O3W—H3WA···Cl1ix0.88 (2)2.66 (6)3.258 (5)127 (6)
O3W—H3WB···Cl2x0.88 (2)2.35 (3)3.182 (5)158 (7)

Symmetry codes: (i) −x+1, −y+1, −z+1; (ii) x, y−1, z; (iii) −x+3/2, y−1/2, −z+3/2; (iv) −x+3/2, y−1/2, −z+1/2; (v) −x+1, −y+1, −z; (vi) −x+1, −y, −z+1; (vii) x+1/2, −y+1/2, z−1/2; (viii) x−1/2, −y+3/2, z+1/2; (ix) x−1/2, −y+1/2, z−1/2; (x) −x+1/2, y−1/2, −z+1/2.

Funding Statement

This work was funded by Swiss National Science Foundation grant . the University of Neuchâtel grant .

This paper was supported by the following grant(s):

Swiss National Science Foundation .
the University of Neuchâtel .

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