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Data Brief. 2018 February; 16: 483–488.
Published online 2017 November 27. doi:  10.1016/j.dib.2017.11.070
PMCID: PMC5725210

Chemical properties and colors of fermenting materials in salmon fish sauce production

Abstract

This data article reports the chemical properties (moisture, pH, salinity, and soluble solid content) and colors of fermenting materials in salmon fish sauce products. The fish sauce was produced by mixing salt with differing proportions of raw salmon materials and fermenting for three months; the salmon materials comprised flesh, viscera, an inedible portion, and soft roe. Chemical properties and colors of the unrefined fish sauce (moromi), and the refined fish sauce, were analyzed at one, two, and three months following the start of fermentation. Data determined for all products are provided in table format.

Keywords: Fish sauce, Chum salmon, Fermentation, Chemical properties, Color

Specifications Table

Table thumbnail

Value of the data

  • • The data would be available as reference for culinary studies on fish sauces and related products.
  • • The data will be useful for nutritional assessments of fish sauce products based on their chemical properties.
  • • The data will be useful for discussions on the metabolism of fish sauce chemical components during fermentation.

1. Data

This article presents data on moisture, pH, salinity, and soluble solid content of unrefined fish sauce, (moromi; Table 1) and filtered fish sauce (Table 2) throughout the fermentation process; we also report colorimetric data (Table 3 for moromi; Table 4 for fish sauce). Japanese terms in this article are explained in Table S1.

Table 1
Chemical properties of moromi products in the fish sauce fermentation process.
Table 2
Chemical properties of fish sauce products in the fish sauce fermentation process.
Table 3
Colors of moromi products in the fish sauce fermentation process.
Table 4
Colors of fish sauce products in the fish sauce fermentation process.

2. Experimental design, materials, and methods

2.1. Design

We used female ‘Bunasake’ and ‘Ginke’ chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) from Hokkaido, Japan. ‘Bunasake’, which is chum salmon after the egg-laying period, has a low market value, because these fish abstain from eating during their pre-spawning run upstream, and the fat in their flesh is depleted. On the other hand, ‘Ginke’, which is chum salmon before the period of migration and spawning, has high market value, because the flesh of these fish is relatively high in fat content. We also used shio-koji, a salt-marinated rice malt, as the fermentation starter. For the color measurement, the L* value that represents brightness, a* value that represents red/green and b* that represents yellow/blue were employed to assess lightness and degree of color shift of the products, respectively.

2.2. Materials

The ‘Bunasake’ salmon and ‘Ginke’ salmon were purchased at a local market in Abashiri, Hokkaido. Shio-koji containing 12.3% salt (Kurashige jozo Co. Ltd., Abashiri Japan) and salt (Shokuen, The Salt Industry Center of Japan, Tokyo, Japan) were used for fish sauce production.

2.3. Fish sauce production

Raw salmon was dissected into flesh, viscera, an inedible portion, and soft roe. Each portion was minced using a food processor. Each minced portion and salt were mixed at various proportions (Table S2), and left for three months in a 37 °C constant temperature incubator (DG-82, Yamato, Japan). The chemical properties and colors of the moromi (unrefined fish sauce) and filtered fish sauce were measured at one, two, and three months following the start of fermentation.

2.4. Physicochemical analyses

Salinity and pH were measured using a salt meter (B-721; HORIBA, Japan) and a pH meter (D-52; HORIBA). Water content was measured according to the methods published by the Association of Official Analytical Chemists [1], [2]. Soluble solid content (%) was defined as content excluding the water content. Unsalted soluble solid content (%) was defined as the soluble solid content excluding the salt content.

2.5. Color analysis

The colors of dried salmon products were measured using a colorimeter (CR-400; Konica Minolta, Tokyo, Japan). The measured data were expressed in Lab color space in which the tree dimensions L* for lightness, and a* and b* for the color opponents green/red and blue/yellow.

Acknowledgements

This research did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.

Footnotes

Transparency documentTransparency data associated with this article can be found in the online version at doi:10.1016/j.dib.2017.11.070.

Appendix ASupplementary data associated with this article can be found in the online version at doi:10.1016/j.dib.2017.11.070.

Transparency document. Supplementary material

Supplementary material

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Appendix A. Supplementary material

Supplementary material

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References

1. Isaac R.A. Chapter 3, Plants. In: Helrich K., editor. Official Methods of Analysis of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists. 15th ed. AOAC; Arlington, VA, USA: 1990. pp. 40–68.
2. Lane R.H. Chapter 32, Cereal foods. In: Helrich K., editor. Official Methods of Analysis of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists. 15th ed. AOAC; Arlington, VA, USA: 1990. pp. 777–801.

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