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J Urban Health. 1998 September; 75(3): 584–599.
Published online 1998 September 1. doi:  10.1007/BF02427705
PMCID: PMC5587435

Active immunization against poliomyelitis

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Selected References

These references are in PubMed. This may not be the complete list of references from this article.
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Articles from Journal of Urban Health : Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine are provided here courtesy of New York Academy of Medicine